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fHE CARPENTER: 






* 

*V 



Volume XII. — No. i 



LEND A HELPIN' HAND. 

When a man is down, an’ tryin’ hard to git upon 
his feet, 

An’ fate seems dead agin’ him, an’ he’s party 
nearly beat, 

Don’t pass him by an’ leave him when you see 
he cannot stand — 

Stay by him for a moment, an’ lend a helpin’ 
hand 

Speak a word o’ kindness, an’ let him know ycr 
near; 

(’Tis better than to pass him with, perhaps, a 
nasty sneer :) 

It’ll make him glad he’s livin’, tho’ lie’s worn 
out an* weak. 

An’ his heart’ll swell with fervor, an’ his eyes’ll 
spring a leak. 

His voice’ll tremble as he tries to find some 
words to say, 

To te'I you of his gratitude for the good an’ 
kindly way 

You stopped an’ took him by the hand an’ spoke 
those words o’ cheer 

That seemed to break away the clouds an’ let the 
sun shine clear. 

There’s a heap o’ trouble in this world— a mighty 
sight o’ woe 

Jes’ caused by too much nonsense ’bout “ hoein’ 
ycr own row,” 

An’ bein’ so confounded mean you wouldn’t give 
u cent 

To keep a man from starvin’, or to help him pay 
his rent. 

Come, brace up, fellers, an’ jes’ git up an’ git; 

Don’t matter if yer wealthy, or you haven’t got 
a whit ; 

You can do a heap ’o good, if you'll only take a 
stand 

Beside some fallen brother, an’ lend a helpin 
hand. 

— W. Hubert Royers. 



PHILADELPHIA, JANUARY, 1892. 



I 



ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE AMERI- 
CAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 

The Eleventh Annual Convention as- 
sembled at Birmingham, Ala., Dee. 14, 
1891, and remained in session six days. 
There were 71 delegates present, four of 
them colored men, and two ladies, repre- 
senting 27 National and International 
Unions, 12 Central bodies or Trades As- 
semblies, 16 State Federations and Feder- 
al LaDo. Unions. 

The United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
was represented by General President W. 
H. Kliver, of Chicago; W. J. Shields, 
Boston, Mass. ; F. Fildew, Detroit, Mich. ; 
H. Blaekmore, St. Louis, Mo., und P. .1. 
McGuire, Philadelphia, Pa. General Sec- 
retary McGuire was appointed by the G. 
P. and G. E. B. to fill the vacancy caused 
by the resignation of T. J. Flemming, of 
Camden. N. J. Harry Lloyd, of Union 
33, Boston, Mass., was the delegate ot the 
Central Labor Union of that city. 

After the usual formalities and ameni- 
ties on the part of the representatives of 
the Trades Council of Birmingham and 
city authorities, Governor .lones delivered 
an extended address of welcome 011 be- 
half of the State of Alabama. 

The report of the committee on creden- 
tials showed that while during the past 
year the growth of the federation was all 
that could be expected, there were not as 
many delegates present as at the Detroit 
convention one year ago, there having 
been 103 at the latter meeting, while 
there were onlv 7 1 at Birmingham. This 
was accounted for by the inconvenience 
of the location and its distance from the 
great industrial centers. 

The Daily Age of Birmingham, Ala., in 
speaking of the personnel of the Conven- 
tion, says : “Taken as a whole, it is a 
body of unusually able men, the delegates 
as a rule being much abler men than the 
average members ot the House of Repre- 
sentatives at Washington. And as a rule 
the convention is much more orderly and 
decorous than Congress,” 

President Gompers read his address, 
which was frequently interrupted by loud 
applause. Secretary Evans’ and Treasur- 
er Lennon's reports show a balance in 
hand of $8,156.36. The total receipts 
for the year were $21,346.43; expenses 
*33,190.07.. Of these expenses $2,390 were 
donated to unions on strike, and $1,135. 95 
was spent for lecturing and organizing,/ 
Besolutions concerning the following 
Were adopted : Condemning the decision 
of the Secretary of the Treasury in allow- 
ln g foreign musicians to «tunic into the 
country as musicians ; to Congress, pe 
ti tinning to put trade union labels on a 
j footing with trade marks ; urging the pas- 
I sa 3c of laws prohibiting barber shops 
opening on Sundays, and asking the 
friends of lalior not to patronize shops 
that op en Sundays or keep open later than 
f o’clock evenings ; authorizing the Na- 
ional Harness makers’ Union to use a 
label, especially in Tennessee, Missouri 
end Illinois, where harness is being 
made by convict labor ; condemning the 
sweating ri y 8 tem of making clothing, and 
providingi a uniorf label for Union-made 
clothing ; ordering a boycott 



Ehret’s New York beer, and lifting or 
raising the boycott on Milwaukee beer ; 
favoring the re-establishment of a repub- 
lican form of government in the District of 
Columbia, the governmental control of 
telegraphs, and protesting against the 
action of the Chicago police in breaking 
up public meetings ; recommending the 
passage of a labor law by Congress recog- 
nizing the first Monday in September as a 
legal holiday in the District of Columbia 
and Territories. 

/ The Committee on Grievances reported 
exonerating President Gompers from the 
aspersion of corruption as circulated by 
the New York City Central Labor Feder- 
ation The report was unanimously 
adopted. The Federation of Labor of the 
Pacific Coast was reinstated to member- 
ship and its delegate seated. 

All organizations affiliating with the 
American Federation of Labor were ad - 
vised by resolution to connect themselves 
with the central body in their own re- 
spective localities. Where there were two 
or more such central bodies the organiza- 
tions should connect themselves with that 
one affiliating with the Federation. 

It was resolved that no further subsidy 
be paid the Pacific Mail Steamship Com- 
pany unless the company discharge all 
the Mongolians in its service; also a reso- 
lution to amend the Shipping Aet of 1890 
so as to make vessels liable to damage 
for cruelty to sailors at the hands of 
officers. 

Resolutions were adopted favoring a 
Woman’s Suffrage amendment to the 
Constitution and that the proper sphere 
of trade unions was on the outside of 
political party movnments and favorable 
to compulsory education laws, requiring 
children between the ages of 6 and 14 
years to attend school at least nine months 
in the year. 

A protest was adopted against the em- 
ployment of non-union men on public 
buildings, and the Government censured 
for failing to enforce the Eight Hour 
law. A resolution condemned the con- 
spiracy laws of Pennsylvania and the re- 
cent injunctions of the Allegheny Court in 
connection with the present strike of 
Pittsburgh printers, and empowers the 
Executive Council to expend $3,000 in 
prosecuting the injunction cases should 
they be taken to the highest court, or to 
make a tect of any other auch injunction 
or conspiracy case as they may deem ad- 
visable. General officers were re-elected 
as follows: President, Samuel Gompers; 
First Vice-President, P. J. McGuire; Sec- 
ond Vice-President, W. A. Carney; Secre- 
tary, Chris Evans, and Treasurer, John 
B. Lennon. The next convention will be 
held in Philadelphia, Pa., December 15, 
1892. 



PERSONAL NOTICES. 



OFFICIAL. 



'P 



ROPOSITI0NS 



TO THE 
LABOR. 



KNIGHTS OF 



Charles A. Rockwood, of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, is in very bad health, and is no 
longer District Organizer on that account. 

Ex- President Jacob Goldberg, of Union 
200, New York' city, in remembrance of 
his services, was presented with a gold 
medal by the members of that union on 
his retiring from the presidency. 

Thomas Gorevin and John J. Man- 
ning, of Union 471, are the business 
agents of the Brooklyn (N. Y.) Carpen- 
ters’ Unions. Bro. Bob Beatty has re- 
tired after many years of faithful service. 

General President Kliver had to hasten 
home from the Birmingham Convention, 
and is a very sick man. He is suffering 
from sciatic rheumatism and nervous 
prostration, the result of his active work 
in the movement. 

A. Watt, Jr., for three and a half 

S ears Financial Secretary of Union 340, 
few York city, was pre^nted with a 
handsome gold watch as a testimonial 
from his frllow-members. Bro. G. N. 
Halkett made the presentation speech. 

Jim McDermott, union bricklaver, of 
Cincinnati, Ohio died December 12. 
He was one of the carpenters’ staunchest 
friends, and always stood by us faith- 
fully. We sincerely wish the brick- 
layers of every city had such a broad 
gauge worker as our departed friend 
McDermott. 



FLOATING GOSSIP. 

Our Scranton, Pa., carpenter’s unions 
are booming in membership. 

The Harness Makers’ National Union 
meets in Louisville, Ky., next June. 

A strong movement is on foot in Chi- 
cago to thoroughly organize all the mill 
bench carpenters of that city. 

Central Labor Unions have been 
formed last month in Altoona, Pa., Aus- 
tin, Texas, and Sioux City, Iowa. 

During the mill carpenters’ strike in 
New Orleans, La , last spring, the Cotton 
Screwmcn’s Union donated $2500, and 
the Cotton Yard Men’s Union gave $500. 
This is practical fraternity. 

The December report of the Amalga- 
mated Carpenters shows they have 543 
branches and 35,429 members. The 
award of the arbitrator in the carpenters’ 
strike in London has conceded a reduction 
in the working hours from 521 down to 
50 hours per week. 



Trustees’ Reports should be sent only 
once every six months — in January and 
July. 



eports 

to the G- S. They should be kept on file 
in the Local Union. 

Our Little badges or pins are neat and 
durable. Every member should wear one. 
Cost only 25 cents. 

Membership Cards 'for 1892-1893 are 
now ready. Price one cent each. Send 
orders for the same to the G. S. 

Be Sure and see that the accounts of 
your local union are audited monthly as 
required by Sec. 159 of the Constitution. 

Is Your Treasurer under bonds? If 
not, he should be put under bonds with- 
out any delay. See Sec. 155 of the con- 
stitution requires it. 

Password for this quarter and blanks 
for use of locals were sent out December 
16th to all the Locals. If not received 
then notify the G. S. 

Send in the list of your new officers. It 
should be on file in the office of the G. S. 
It is the duty of the R. S. to send it in. 
Those not doing so will be published next 
month. 

Boycott Mertz & Sons’ turned mould- 
ing. The firm has a factory in Port- 
chester, N. Y., and has violated its agree 
ment with Union 404 to live up to the 
nine-hour day. 

Have you any suggestions as to changes 
in the Constitution of the U. E. ? If you 
have, then send them in without further 
delay to the G. S- for classification and 
preparation for the next convention. 

The G. E. B. will hold its next meeting 
January 11, 1892, at the office of the G. S. 
Any member or local having any griev- 
ance or complaint should at once forward 
the same to the G. S. for action of the 
G. E- B. 

Password for this quarter and neces- 
sary blanks for officers of local unions 
were sent out December 16th, to all unions 
in good standing Any unions not re- 
ceiving the same should notify the G. S. 
at once. 

The Quarterly Circular of December 16, 
sent out by the G. S. to the locals, called 
for a general vote on four questions, viz.: 
Higher dues, reserve fund at headquar- 
ters, increase of reserve fund to 10 cents 
per month, and the advantage of sick 
benefits. Be sure and send in the vote of 
your local by February 1st. 



Published Monthly. 



GRIST FROM THE INDUSTRIAL MILL. 

Knoxville, Tenn.— Trade dull. Union 
225 is booming in membership ever since 
General Secretary McGuire lectured here. 

Union 584, Jersey City, N. J., turned 
out in good numbers at” the funeral of 
Brother Albert Wiege, who was suddenly 
killed by falling oil a scaffold, November 
18th. 

All the Engineers, machinists, etc., 
on the North East Coast of England are 
out on the question of overtime, 30,000 
men are involved. The employers at first 
locked out 25 per cent.ot the men, and the 
powerful Amalgamated Society of En- 
gineers called out the rest. 

The Semi-Annual report of the Flint 
Glass Workers’ National Union shows a 
membership of 7,108, with 442 members 
unemployed, and 228 locked out. There 
is $96,397 in the National Treasury at 
headquarters which is nearly $14 per head 
for each member. This is accumulated by 
high dues and a large tax to headquarters. 

The Carpenters of London, England, 
have settled their strike by arbitration 
which concedes them a small advance in ' 
wages, but they did not succeed in getting 
the eight hour day. Fully 2500 of the 
men, however, have secured the eight 
hour day and the advance in wages. And 
there are good prospects of the change 
becoming general next Spring. The men 
were out seven months and spent over 
three quarters of a million dollars in their 
strike. 

Elmhurst, 111. — Union 244 has wan a 
notable victory against the contractors 
here who had formed a bogus union, dis- 
charged members of Union 244^ and hired 
non-union men. After a strike of short 
duration the bosses surrendered and 
agreed to union rules. Union No. 1, 
Chicago, donated $5U, and Union No. 28, 
Chicago, gave $25 to help Union 244. 
And though Union 244 is a new union 
only a few months organized — yet its 
members have acted like old veterans. 



II 

W' s 



against 



The following: is the text of the agreement 
unanimously adopted by the convention of the 
A. F. of X.. at Birmingham, Ala., in reference to 
tlie Knights of I-nhor : 

Address to the Working People of America — 
Greeting: The record shows that much time 

and money iiave been spent in efforts to secure 
a peaceful settlement of difficulties between the 
American Federation of Labor and the Knights 
of ! -abor since 108 ( 1 . Conferences iiave been held 
at intervals, and the American Federation of 
Labor has used every effort to end a useless and 
wasteful struggle It has submitted propositions 
for settling all real or alleged differences, but 
these are at all times rejected by the Knights of 
Labor. The trade-union movement of America 
lias neither time nor inclination to deviate from 
its mission by seeking quarrels with other organ- 
izations. Experience proves that the wage-earner 
is the natural and proper guardian of his in- 
herent rights. Hence the trade union becomes 
the necessary outgrowth of existing conditions 
in the industrial world. History justifies the 
trade. union movement in its present form, and 
teaches that permanent industrial progress can 
only bcaehieved by organization on cruft lines. 
It thus becomes imperative that the autonomy of 
the trade union be carefully guarded and de- 
fended. 

' The American Federation of i ubor is organ- 
ized to maintain and strengthen ihe prestige, au- 
thority and autonomy of its affiiliated bodies. 
Any proposition from an organization conducted 
upon an entirely different plan mustbe carefully 
considered as to its bearing upon the component 
parts of tile American Federation of Labor. Each 
organization attached to the American Federa- 
tion of Labor is guaranteed freedom from dicta- 
tion or interference in niaungiiig its own afiairs. 
Hence any agreement with another organiza- 
tion, even if satisfactory to the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, can only come as a recom- 
mendation to its affiliated bodies. They arc en- 
tirely clear to accept or reject it. 

*• As a proof of the independence and freedom 
of notion obtaining among its affiliated bodies, 
the American Feneration of Labor .has never 
denied their right to recognize such cards and 
labels as they may deem proper. Nor can it, 
under any circumstances, deviate from the policy 
of allowing self-government to its federated 
bodies. The platform of the Knights of Labor 
shows olparly that it was never intended to be 
other than an educational organization. Thus 
it can have no legitimate place in the field occu- 
pied l>y trnde unions. Wishing, however, to 
bring to an end any cause for diversion or dis 
cord in the ranks of organized labor, we submit 
the following basis for an ..micable adjustment 
of differences between the American Federation 
of labor and tile Knights of Labor : 

“ First. That tlie Knights of Labor snail re- 
voke and issue no more charters to the local 
trade assembles or national trade assemblies. 

“ Second. In return the American Federation of 
Tabor shall revoke and issue no more chart -rs to 
mixed federation unions. 

" Third. The American Federation of Labor 
will recommend to affiliated unions that they 
urge their members to become members of mixed 
assemblies ol Knights oflabur. 



Lynn, Mass , Union 108, had the mis- 
fortune to be burned out of its quarters 
last month. Now the union has an ele- 
gantly fitted hall of its own, with solid oak 
furniture, fine upholstering, and all this 
has been paid for by private subscription 
from tlie members, without taking a cent 
out of the union’s treasury. 

Aurora, III., Union 697, has been 
holding monthly open meetings with 
gratifying success. The meetings are 
well attended by the wives, families and 
friends of the members and by many non- 
union men. The programme is uniquely 
printed on a thin wooden card, and con- 
sists of fine musical and literary exercises, 
interspersed with three minute talks by 
picked members. At the last public 
meeting an address in our favor was de- 
livered by the wife of a contractor. 



A NON-UNION SHEEP’S HEAD. 

A good story is none the worse of being 
twice told, and the following one is 
worthy of repetition. 

The boss butchers of one of the large 
cities resolved to hire only Union butch- 
ers, and placed a sign in their meat stores 
which read “none hut union meat sold 
here.” 

A non-union man who lived near one 
of these stores sent his wife to buy 
sheep’s head. The butcher wrapped up a 
sheep’s head and handed it to her. Seeiin 
the Union sign, she said : 

“I don’t want that one. I want a non- 
union sheep’s head.” 

The butcher took the sheep’s head, un- 
wrapped it, took his cleaver, chopped it 
in two, scooped out the brains, and hand- 
ing it bad: to her, said : “Here, madam 
is a non-union sheep's head.” 



Great Falls, Mont. — One year ago 
Union 286 started with 20 charter mem- 
bers. Now it has 163 members in a city of 
««,000 population, with only one scab job in 
the town. R D. Giliis, the scab contractor 
has left here and gone to Butte City, Mont, 
lie defrauded his men of their wages. 



PICKINGS FROM ALL POINTS. 

The Union Carpenters of Columbus, 0., 
have an exoellent brass band of their own. 

Du Quoin, 111. — W. R. Lipe has been 
appointed District Organizer on recom- 
mendation of Union 556. 

Anaconda, Mont. — Union 88 charges 
one dollar a month dues. There is no 
danger of such a union dying out. 

Olympia, Wash. — Trade dull Open 
meetings are well attended. Our Federa- 
tion of Trades is doing splendid work. 

Muncik, Ind. — Union 592 was visited 
last month by a large delegation from tlie 
carpenters’ unions of Indianapolis, headed 
by a uniformed drum corps of union car- 
penters. 

Indianapolis, Ind. — Union 60 has a 
splendid flag made by Mrs. Lino Fiddlier, 
Box D, South Side P O., Milwaukee, Wis. 
The Union recommends the work of Mrs. 
Fuklner very highly. 

Bu ffalo, N . Y • — We have several strictly 
union jobs, and on February 1st our initia- 
tion fee will be raised to three dollars, and 
we will soon advance our dues. Union 374 
has ^handsome new banner. Trade is slack. 

Los Angeles, Cal. — We have a splendid 
Labor Council of all trades. The painters 
gained the eight-hour day anil an advance 
of 50 cenTs per day The bricklayers are 
now striving to get ~'.e eight hours. Trade 
is quite dull in this city, but improving 
slowly. 

The Trades and Labor Unions of In- 
dianapolis, Ind., are arranging to build a 
large Labor Temple, to cost $lu0 000. The 
money is to be raised by issuing 10,00u 
shares of stock at $10 per share, payable 
in instalments. The caipenters’ unions of 
that city are active in the project. 

The Strike of the printers of Berlin, 
Germany, should be supported by the 
organized workingmen of America. The 
union uten of England and other countries 
are sending in their financial help. The 
struggle is for the nine-hour day and has 
extended all over Germany. The German 
Government has confiscated the funds of 
the printers Send donations to Chris. 
Evans, 21 Clinton Place, New York city. 
Mr. Evans is Secretary of the American 
Federation of I -abor. 



JOHN BURNS ON THE EIGHT-HOUR DAY. 

A meeting of trade unionists in fa > m <>.' 
the legal eight-hour labor day was held 
recently at Clapham Common. England, 
some 2000 persons being present. Mr. 
John Burns was the chief speaker. He 
said that the demand for an eight-hour 
working day, by strike or act of Parlia- 
ment, was the voice* of labor clamoring 
for more leisure- About this time last 
year he warned an immense gathering of 
unionists not to look upon the strike 
weapon with so much confidence as they 
had done since the termination of the 
great dock strike. It was not to be bo 
strongly relied upon, and builders, car- 
penters and joiners, and in fact every 
trade, had to admit that the employers, 
with their far superior organization and 
the capital behind their backs, could beat 
them. During the past twelve months 
they had had the Scotch railway servants 
beaten in an attempt to shorten their 
hours, the omnibus men’s strike for a 
twelve-hour day won in eight days, hut 
lost in fourteen days ; the Scotch blast- 
furnace men, with not a single English 
non-unionist to fight againBt, were hope- 
letsly beaten, and the carpenters and join- 
ers failed after a gallant fight They had 
in one year seen four of the biggest strikes, 
all strikes for shorter hours, lost. After 
that he would like to know how any one 
could defend any attempt on the part of 
the workers to obtain an eight-hour 
working day by trade union efiort alone. 
The men were not strong enough, anti 
under the present conditions they bad 
thousands and thousands ready to take 
their places. The only way that the 
workers could get shorter hours without 
chance of the employers breaking an 
agreement was by legal enactment, and 
he had no hesitation in saying so. 









ids 






TO WHICH CLASS DO YOU BELONG ? 

What kind of a uiemlter are you? Are 
you one ot Class A, known as the ab- 
sentees — the men who shirk all duties — 
who seldom, if ever, attend their own 
unions? Are you in Class F, desig- ’ 
nated as the fault-finders, the ones who 
never see any good in this or that feature, 
in this motion or that motion ; who vote 
against one motion anil object to the re- 
verse ; or do you belong to Class O. B., 
the old reliables, tlie men who steer the 
ship into the open sea, over the breakers 
and over the shoals into calm water ; the 
men who are willing and do sacrifice their 
time and devote their energies to the best 
interest of tlie Order. If you are not in 
this latter class lose no time in getting 
there, and then you will be a benefit to ' 
tlie Union with which you have connected 
yourself, and not lie a drone, spongir '598.fi. 




16 

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cen 



and reaping the result of the hard w <• 



vour brr her members. 



*.’9 




tn, 

.ewiills, be A- <*.«,. 



i ord, “charjjenlier." 
c d French niea n ” 



This word, with its 
- passed into the 
Mer date was 



of a horseshoe and shield, which is the 
general trade mark of the firm, until it 
deals justly by its employes now on strike. 



,0 call on all the .wt, _ 

r-gunizutions affiliated with the A. F of L. 
to consider the advisabil ty of withdraw- 
ing their patronage ‘ tin the coming 
World’s Fair at Chicst. 



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218 



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388 











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387 


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THE CARPENTER. 



i he CARPENTER, 

OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 

Published Monthly, on the Fifteenth of each Month , 
AT 

1!U N. Ninth St.. Phil*., P»* 

P. J. McGuire, Editor and Publisher. 

Entered at the PostrOffice at Philadelphia, Pa., 
as second-class matter. 

Subscription Price:— Fifty cents a year, in 
advance, postpaid. 

Address all letters and moneys to 

P. J. McGuire, 

Box 884, Philadelphia, Pa. 



PHILADELPHIA, JANUARY, 1892. 



ELEVEN CHARTERS GRANTED. 

During the past month Charters have 
been granted to eleven new unions, viz : 
No. 34, Peekskill, N. Y. ; 263, Velaseo, 
Tex.; 281, Wheaton, 111. ; 626, Lexington, 
Ky. ; 631, Wabash, Ind. , 644, Green- 
ville, 0. ; 645, Pasadena, Cal. ; 686, Sen- 
ton Harbor, Mich. ; 695, Yoakum, Tex. ; 
702, Saxonville, Mass. ; 713, Cincinnati, 
O. (Millwrights and Elevator men.) 

WHERE WORK IS SLACK. 

At this time of the year it is usual to 
And work quite dull. But this season it 
is much duller throughout the country 
than it has been any Winter in several 
years. The Carpenters’ Unions in a num- 
ber of places wisli to warn men to keep 
away, owing to the depressed condition 
of trade. In these cities traveling carpen- 
ters can lind very Jiltle to do : Buffalo, 
N. Y. ; Ottawa, Canada; St. Catharines, 
Canada ; Defiance, O. ; Chicago, 111- ; 
Austin, Tex. ; Winnipeg, Manitoba ; Mer- 
idian, Miss. ; Seattle, Wash. ; Muncie, 
Ind. ; Boston and East Boston, Mass. ; 
Williamsport, Pa. Dallas, Tex. ; San An- 
tonio, Tex. ; Asbury Park, N. J. ; New 
Whatcom, Wash. ; Lansing, Mich. : Mt. 
Vernon, Ind. ; Anacortes, Wash. ; Boches- 
ter, N. Y. ; Jacksonville, Fla., and Roan- 
oke, Va. 



TRADE MOVEMENTS OF CARPENTERS 
THIS SEASON, 

Aurora, 111., is pushing for the eight- 
hour system. 

Mt. Vernon, Ind., has secured the 
eight-hour day. 

Muncie. Ind., will ask the nine-hour 
rule, and 30 cents per hour. 

Du (Iuoin, 111. — Union 556, will ask a 
minimum rate of wages April 1st. 

Sharon, Pa. — Union 268, will request 
an advance of 25 cents per day on 
April 1st. 

Punxsutawney, Pa. — Union, 145, will 
have the nine-hour day and eight hours 
Saturdays. 

Union 215, Lafayette, Ind., is striving 
to get an increase in pay or to have eight 
hours on Saturdays. 

Covinuton, Ky.— Union, 712, on May 
1st proposes to establish the nine hour 
system and trade rules. 

Mill Men’s Union 776, Covington and 
Newport, Ky., will move for the nine- 
hour day and trade rules April 1st. 

La Crosse, Wis. — Union, 335, lately 
adopted the nine-hour day quite gener- 
ally, and without any serious opposition. 

Nelsonvillk, O. — Union, 736, gained 
the nine-hour day last month amicably, 
through a conference with the contrac- 
tors. 

St. Johns, New Brunswick — Uqion 397, 
is pushing ahead at a lively rate, so as to 
advance wages, as $10 per week is con- 
sidered extra good pay tor the best car- 
penters. 

The Carpenters’ Unions in Asbury 
Park, N. J. ; Middletown, N. Y. ; Sioux 
City. Ia.'; Grand Rapids, Mich., and 
Scranton, Pa., propose to establish the 
nine-hour clay this Spring. 

The Cincinnati, O., Carpenters’ 
Unions on May 1st deinund the retention 
ot the nine-hour day with eight hours 
Saturdays, and 37 yi cents per hour, as the 
minimum. Union 327, mill men, of Cin- 
cinnati, ask to have the nine-hour day 
and full pay May T 1st, and the Union car- 

nters agree to not put up any non union 
-rk. 



MOVEMENTS OF THE GENERAL SECRE- 
TARY. 

Within the' past few months General 
Secretary P. J. McGuire has delivered 
several public addresses in the interest ol 
the United Brotherhood. He has spoken 
in Bridgeton, N. J., and Washington, 
D. C-, with good effect. In November he 
made public speeches in Newport News, 
Va., Norfolk, Va., Roanoke, Va., Knox- 
ville, Tenn., Asheville, N. C., Spartan- 
burg, S. C., Atlanta, Ga., Macon, Ga., 
Augusta, Ga., Charleston, S. C., and 
Richmond, Va. On that trip he made 
speeches in eleven cities, and was away 
only twelve days. 

Then, after being home ten days, 
he started out again December 1, 
and lectured in Columbus, O., Louisville, 
Ky., Evansville, Ind., Nashville, Tenn., 
Chattanooga, Tenn., Memphis, Tenn., 
Vicksburg, Miss., New Orleans, La , Pen- 
sacola, Fla , and Birmingham, Ala , mak- 
ing twelve speeches in twelve days, besides 
attending the Federation Convention at 
Birmingham, Ala. 

The trips to the Southern Unions were 
in response to the urgent requests of Local 
Unions which for years have been desir- 
ous ol a visit from the G. S. The meet- 
ings were enthusiastic and largely at- 
tended all along the line. In Knoxville, 
Tenn., 47 applications for membership 
and 38 initiations came into Union 225 the 
next meeting after the lecture of the G. S 
In all other cities visited an increase in 
membership has resulted from these agita- 
tion trips of the G. S. 

From time to time this winter the G. S. 
will make short lecture trips wherever 
his presence may be of service to the or- 
ganization. It will be entirely out of the 
question for him to accept every invitation 
sent him. But where he can do so with- 
out too greatly embarrassing the work ot 
the General Office he will be ready to 
serve the commands of the Local Unions 
and to help upbuild the organization. 

While in New Orleans, La., General 
Secretary McGuire became extremely sick 
from au attack of influenza and hoarse- 
ness. which clung to him for several 
weeks. 



Secret Signs and an imposingCeremony 
and Ritual will not bind members to- 
gether or interest them in their Union 
unless they first have the right union 
spirit. A good union man will pay his dues 
regularly and not begrudgingly. He will 
attend the meetings and serve the Union 
wherever he can. He will work for it— 
yes, even fight for it. Wherever he goes 
his whole thought will be for the good of 
his organization. He will bring in new 
members and work on with heart and 
energy to uplift his fellow-man. Proud 
are we that we have hundreds of such 
men among our members. 



A WELL MANAGED DISTRICT COUNCIL. 



One of the best proofs of the value of 
having competent, active walking dele- 
gates is contained in the latest semi- 
annual report of the Auditors of the 
District Council of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

The total receipts of the district for the 
six months were $4,640.49, of which 
$2 212.58 were collected by the two 
walking delegates of the district, whose 
salaries only amounted to $1,404, and 
$498.50 were paid out in local strike 
benefits. * 

This table of figures shows the majority 
of the Carpenters’ Unions in Brooklyn re- 
ceived in return from the District 'Council 
more money than the., paid into it. And 
these moneys came in shape of strike 
benefits due their members, and in collec- 
tions by the walking delegates of fines and 
dues from both new and reinstated mem- 
bers. 



T..IT. 



ivy pa. emu - . m* * 



147 " 
179 - 
2 » “ 
247 “ 
258 “ 
191 “ 
8KI •* 
387 “ 
413 “ 
471 “ 
471 “ 
63# " 



94 09. 
230 00. 
80 26. 
213 04. 
106 91. 
130 63. 
157 49. 
63 48. 
37 72 
173 36. 
302 72. 
12 36. 



279 70 
212 40 
14 50 
184 80 
20 40 
108 50 
232 90 
310 10 
165 60 



Totals . . . . *2,180 94 



*2611 73 



TRYING TIMES FOR THE PRINTERS. 

The book and job printers and press- 
men of Pittsburgh are making a valiant 
fight for the nine-hour day. Fora couple 
of months they have held out on strike to 
gain their point. 

In a peaceable, dignified manner they 
have conducted their struggle. All the 
powers of the associated employers, com- 
bined with the help of partisan judges 
and courts, have been invoked to down 
the men. Injunctions against the rights 
of the union men to even peaceably per- 
suade others have been granted by the 
Courts at the solicitation of the employers. 

Meanwhile the compositors in Phila- 
delphia on two of the morning papers 
have been locked out in their demands 
for an advance in wages, and the places 
of the union men have been quite readily 
filled by “rat” recruits from the Rat 
“Printers’ Protective Fraternity.” This 
“rat” organization of late years is a con- 
stant menace to the success of any strike 
undertaken by the printers. It is com- 
posed largely of men who, at one time or 
another, were members of the Inter- 
national Typographical Union, and for 
some reason were suspended or expelled. 

Had a libe^l policy of amnesty been 
extended to these persons they might to- 
day be in the ranks of the I. T. U., and 
not be in position to do harm. As it is 
they are combined lor purposes of re- 
venge and reprisal against every move- 
ment of the I. T. U. 

The Typographical U nion is one of the 
oldest in the land, and of late years has 
been getting out of its old mossback policy 
of conservatism. It now printB its own 
official journal, and has a staff of able 
general officers not subject as formerly to 
every change in “printers’ politics.” It 
has adopted general benevolent features, 
and made many advanced steps in the 
line of progressive trade unionism. With 
the utmost liberality union printers are 
ever ready to help every trade in trouble, 
but are utterly impecunious when it 
comes to help themselves. They lack a 
good financial system in their organiza- 
tion. so as to have the necessary funds in 
time of trouble. 

At the Birmingham Convention, when 
the printers’ delegates called for an appro- 
priation of $3,000 to test the use of in- 
junction suits by the Pittsburgh em- 
ployers, the opposition manifested to that 
appropriation was not for want of sym- 
pathy with the printers, but more in the 
line of a rebuke to them for not relying 
much more on themselves, and making 
adequate financial provision to carry on 
their judicial fights the same as the cigar- 
makers, tailors and other trades had done 
m similar injunction suite. 



SCABBY WORK AT THE WORLD’S FAIR 
BUILDING. 

There is an immense overflow of idle 
men to Chicago on account of the World’s 
Fair buildings. The number of carpenters 
and other mechanics thronging into 
Chicago is actually astounding. And the 
most of them are mossbacks and dirt- 
eaters willing to work at any price. 
Resident workmen are at a discount, 
especially at the World’s Fair buildings. 
When they go there and say they are 
residents of Chicago they are told they 
are not wanted. The grounds are filled 
up with about 160 policemen taken from 
the cheap lodging-houses of Clark street, 
and who had to pay $5 or $10 for their job. 
When a man applies fora job as police- 
man if it is ascertained he is a union man 
he is not wanted. A rousing sensation 
has been made by a statement recently 
published that more money is paid the 
officers and clerks, sixty-five in nunibei^ 
at these World Fair buildings than is paid 
to all the ordinary laborers and teamsters 
with teams, numbering 1600 men and 100 
teams. 



San Angelo, Tex. — W R. Jackson, the 
scab contractor, is in a bad fix here, and is 
going to Velasco, Tex We warn the public 
against him. lie is a genuine dead beat 
and has swindled workmen of wages due 
and has defrauded all his creditors. 

Bricklayers meet at Indianapolis this 
month, when it will be decided whether 
or not m affiliate with the American Fed- 
eration of Labor. 



A SUCCESSFUL STRIKE IN CHICAGO. 

The strike of union carpenters, Decem- 
ber 17th to 20th, on the big Leiter building 
in Chicago against one of Chicago’s mil- 
lionaire speculators was a grand victory. 
Mr. Leiter, the Superintendent, discovered 
that one of his employes was a union 
Steward, whose efforts were directed 
toward bringing non-union carpenters 
into the union. The Steward was dis. 
charged, and the carpenters, eighty- 
seven in number, thereupon quit, after 
consulting with the Superintendent, who 
said that he would not have a union gang 
controlling him if it cost him all his im- 
mense fortune. Furthermore, he paid 
only time and a half instead of double 
time for Sunday work. But after a lively 
scrimmage between the scabs, police, 
Pinkertons and the union men who were 
placed on picket duty, Mr. Leiter finally 
concluded, after three days, that it was 
best for him to take back the strikers. 
Our union men were attacked by the 
police and ■ Pinkertons, and next day, 
with good stout walking canes, they made 
it lively for the police and Pinkerton 
thugs. In the final settlement Mr. Leiter 
agreed that he would send to union head- 
quarters for any carpenters he may need. 
Instead of discharging one Steward Mr. 
Leiter now permits eight Stewards to go 
about the building, one upon each floor. 



TROUBLE IN GALVESTON, TEXAS. 

James Stewart & Co , elevator contract- 
ors from St. Louis, Mo., are building an 
elevator for the Galveston Wharf Com- 
pany, Galveston, Tex., and are working 
their carpenters ten hours a day. The 
nine-hour rule is general among the car- 
penters of Galveston, and Unions 526 and 
611 are giving Stewart & Co. a vigorous 
fight on their scabby ten-hour job. There 
are a large number of union and non-union 
carpenters idle in Galveston, but so far not 
one of them has been dastardly enough to 
work for this firm. The non-union men 
are just as solid as the union men in up- 
holdingthe nine-hour day. The City Coun- 
cil, Builders’ Exchange and Chamber of 
Commerce are with the union men in 
their struggle, and have rendered effective 
aid. The City Council refused to allow the 
firm any w T ater privileges as long as it is 
hostile to organized labor, notwithstand- 
ing the city has a one-third interest in the 
g tock of the company. We have tried 
every fair means to bring this firm to 
terms, and we will keep up the fight until 
they surrender. We hope carpenters will 
not come to Galveston during this trouble. 



OUR PRINCIPLES. 

Resolved, That we, as a body, thoroughly ap- 
prove of the objects of the American Federation 
j of Labor, and pledge ourselves to give it our 
earnest and hearty support. 

UNION-MADE GOODS. 

Resolved , That members of this organization 
should make it a rule, when purchasing goods, 
to call for those which bear the trade-marks of 
organized labor, und when any individual, firm 
or corporation shall strike a blow at labor organi- 
zation, they are earnestly requested to give 
that individual, llrrn or corporation their careful 
consideration. No good union man can kiss the 
rod that whips hi in. 

KNIGHTS OF LABOR. 

Resolved , That we most emphatically dis- 
courage carpenters and joiners from organizing 
as carpenters under the Knights of Labor, as we 
believe each trade should be organized under its 
own trade head in a trade union. This does not 
debar our members from joining mixed assem- 
blies. 

LABOR LEGISLATION. 

Resolved, That it is of the greatest importance 
that members should vote intelligently; hence, 
the members of this Brotherhood shali strive to 
secure legislation in favor of those who produce 
the wealth of the country, and all discussions and 
resolutions in that direction shall be in order at 
any regular meeting, but party politics must be 
excluded. 

IMMIGRATION. 

Resolved , That while we welcome to our shores 
all who come with the honest intention of be- 
coming lawful citizens, we at the same time con- 
demn the present syr-tem which allows the 
importation of destitute laborers, and we urge 
organized labor everywhere to endeavor to se- 
cure the enactment of more stringent immigra- 
tion laws. 

FAITHFUL WORK. 

Resolved, That we hold it as a sacred principle 
that Trade Union men, above all others, should 
set a good example as good and faithful work- 
men, performing their duties to their employers 
with honor to themselves and their organization. 

SHORTER HOUJttS OF LABOR. 

We hold a reduction of hours for a day’s work 
increases the intelligence and happiness of the 
laborer, and also increases the demand for labor 
and the price of a day’s work, 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

We recognize that the interests of all classes of 
labor are identical, regardless of occupation, 
nationality, religion or color, for a wrong done 
to one is a wrong done to all. 

We object to prison contract labor, because it 
puts the criminal in competition with honorable 
labor lor the purpose of cutting down wages, 
and also because it helps to overstock the labor 
market. 



NINE-HOUR CITIES. 



Below is a list of the cities and towns where 
Carpenters make it a rule to work only nine 
hours a day: 



Albina, Oreg. 

Allston, Mass. 
Amesbury, Mass. 
Atlantic City, N. J. 
Arlington, Mass. 
Anacostes, Wash. 
Astoria, Oreg. 
Asheville, N. C. 
Auburn, N. Y. 

Auburn, Me. 

Altoona, Pa. 

Apollo, Pa. 

Anderson, Ind. 
Allegheny City, Pa. 
Albany, N. Y. 

Austin, Tex. 
Bakersfield, Cal. 

Bay City, Mich. 

Belle Vernon, Pa. 

Bath Beach, N. Y. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Butler, Pa. 

Bayonne, N. J. 

Boise City, Idaho 
Bridgeton, N. J. 
Burlington, Iowa. 
Blaine, Wash. 
Bridgeport, Ohio. 
Bradford, Mass. 
Bellaire. Ohio. 
Belleville, 111. 
Belleville, Can. 
Baltimore, Md. 

Boston, Mass. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
Brockton, Mass. 
Beaver Falls, Pa. 
Brookline, Mass. 

Butte, Mont. 
Carrollton, Ga. 
Chelsea, Mass. 
Charleston, W. Va. 
Covington, Ky. 
Chester, Pa. 

Columbus, Ga. 
ColumbuBj Ind. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Camden, N J. 
Concordia, Kan. 
Columbia. S C. 
Collinsville, 111. 
Cohoes, N. Y, 
Corsicana, Tex. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Charlestown, Mass. 
Coraopolis, Pa. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Colorado City L ,Col. 
Colorado Springs, Col. 
Corsicana, Tex. 
Corryville, Ohio. 

Des Moines, Ia. 
Davenport. Iowa. 
Dover, N H. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Denison, Tex. 

Dedham, Mass. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
Duquesne, Pa 
Dubuque, Iowa. 

Dallas, Tex- 
East Liverpool, Ohio. 
East Saginaw, Mich. 
East Orange, N. J. 

East Portland, Oreg. 

El wood, Pa. 

Erie, Pa. 

Englewood, N. J. 
Evansville, Ind. 
Eureka, Cal. 

Fair Haven, Wash. 
Fall Kiver, Mass. 
Findlay, Ohio. 

Fresno, Cal, 

Frank ford, Pa. 
Franklin, Pa. 
Frankfort, Ind. 

Fort Worth, Tex. 

Fort Wayne Ind. 
Franklin, Mass. 
Galveston, Texas. 
Greensburg, Pa. 
Greenfield, Ind. 
Gloucester, Mass. 
Greenville, Pa. 
Germantown, Pa. 
Greenwich, Conn. 
Grove City, Pa. 

Glen Cove, N. Y. 

Hot Springs, Ark. 
Homestead, Pa. 
Hamilton, Can. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Halifax, N. S. 
Hampton, Va. 
Hanford, Cal. 
Haverhill, Mass- 
Hackensack N. J. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Hudson, Mass. 
Herkimer, N. Y. 
Hoosick Falls, N. Y. 
Hyde Park. Mass 
Hoboken, N. J. 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Houston, Tex. 
Hingham, Mass. 
Irvington, N. Y. 
Jacksonville, 111. 
Jackson, Mich, 

Jersey City, N. J. 
Kearney, Neb. 
Knoxville. Tenn. 
Kittaning, Pa. 
Kingston. N. Y. 
Lansingburg, N. Y, 
Lawrence, Mass. 
Lowell. Mass, 

Lynn, Mass. 
Leominster. Mass. 
Lafayette, Ind. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Lewiston, Me. 

Lincoln, Neb. 

London, Canada. 

Long Branch, N. J. 
Marlboro, Mass, 
Morristown, N. J. 
Manayunk, Pa 
Malden, Mass. 
Millville, N. J. 

Media, Pa. 

Medford, Mass. 
Marblehead, Mass. 
Mayfield, Ky 
Monongahela, Pa. 
Memphis, Tenn 
\It. Vernon, N Y 
Martin’s Ferry. Ohio, 
Mamaroneck, N, Y. 
Mercer, Pa. 
Middlesborough, Ky. 
Meriden, Conn. 
Moline, III. 

Mobile, Ala, 

VI usk egon , Mich. 
McKeesport, Pa. 

Total ......... 



ADDITIONS TO 

Armnsns Harbor, Tex- 
Jeannette. Pa 
Hutherford, N J . 



Mt. Pleasant, Pa, 

New Britain, Conn. 
Norfolk, Va. 

New Orleans, La. 
Newport, R. I. 

Newport, Ky. 
Newburyport, Mass. 
Nanaimo, Brit. Col. 
Nyaek, N. Y. 

Norwood, Mass. 
Natchez, Miss. 

N’w Cumberl’d, W. Va. 
New Castle, Pa. 

New Haven, Conn. 

New Haven, Pa. 
Norristown, Pa. 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 
New Westminster, B. O. 
Nyaek, N. Y. 

Newark, N. J. 

Natick, Mass. 

Newton, Mass. 
Newburgh, N. Y 
New Bedford, Mass. 
New Albany, Ind. 

New Brighton, N. Y. 
Norwich, Conn. 

Oswego, N. Y, 

Ogden, Utah. 

Olean, N. Y. 

Ottawa, Can. 

Ontario, Cal. 

Omaha, Neb. 

Orange, N. J. 

Olympia. Wash. 

Port Chester, N. Y. 
Punxsutawney, Pa. 
Peterborough, Can. 
Portland, Oreg. 

Port Townsend, Wash. 
Passaic, N. J. 

Plymouth, Mass. 
Portland, Me. 

Port Angeles. Wash. 
Portsmouth N. H. 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Paterson, N J 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Plainfield, N. J. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pierre, 8. Dak. 
Pasadena, Cal 
Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Porterville, Cal. 

Peoria, 111. 

Quincy, Mass. 
Rochester, Pa. 
Richmond, Va. 
Richmond Ky. 

Rock Island, 111. 
Rondout, N Y 
Roxbury, Mass. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Rosedale, Ind. 

Revere, Mass. 

Riverside, Cal 
Red Bank, N. J. 
Redlands, Cal. 

Rockford, 111. 

S. Framingham, Mass. 
Springfield, Mass. 

St. Augustine, Fla. 

South Omaha, Neb. 
Salem, Mass. 

Stoneham, Mass. 
Somerville, Mass. 
Saltsburg, Pa 
San Angelo Tex. 
Shreveport La. 
Stamford, Conn. 

Sea Cliff, N Y. 
Springfieid, O. 

San Leandro, Cal. 

Santa Anna, Cal. 

Santa Rosa, Cal. 

St. John’s, N. B. 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Schenectady, N. Y, 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Scottdale, Pa. 

Spokane, Wash. 

Sharon, Pa. 

Sheffield, Ala. 

Staten Island, JL Y. 
Stoughton, Moss. 

S. Abingdon, Mass. 

St. Catharine, Out. 

San Antonio. Tex. 

San Bernardino, Cal. 
Sharpsville, Pa. 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Santa Cruz ; Cal. 
Saginaw City, Mich. 
Stockton, Cal. 
Sacramento. Cal, 
Sheepshead Bay, N. Y^ 
Seymour, Tex. 

Seymour, Ind. 

Summit, N. J. 

Superior, Wis. 

Tampa, Fla. 

Tawas C ity, Mieh. 
Tarrytown, N. Y. 

Terre Haute, Ind. 
Toronto, O. 

Toledo, O. 

Toronto, Ont., 50 hra. 
Trenton, N. J. 

Trinidad, Col. 

Troy, N. Y. 

Tacoma, Wash. 
Tarentum, Pa. 

Turtle Creek, Pa. 

Union Hill, N. J. 

Utica, N. Y, 

Uniontown, Pa. 
Vancouver, B. C. 
Vicksburg, Miss. 
Victoria, B C. * 
Vincennes, Ind. 

Visalia, Cal 
Waxahatchie, Tex. 
Wellshurg, W. Va. 

West Hoboken, N. J. 
West Duluth, Minu, 
Warren, Ohio. 
Wtlkesbarre, Pa. 

Winthrop, Mass. 
Windsor, Can. (Ont.) 
Weymouth, Mass. 
Waltham, Mass. 

Waco, Tex. • 

W. Newton, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Washington, Pa. 
Wilmington, Dei. 
Whitman, Mass, 
Whatcom, Wash. 
Woburn, Mass. 
Winchester, Mass. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Washington, I> O. 
Wilkinsburg, Pa. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Yoakum, Tex. 

Yonkers, N* Y. 
Youngstown, Ohio. 
Zanesville, Ohio. 

..... 32 > eitle«. 



KINK-HOUR LIST. 

Charleroi, P*. 
Leech burg, Ptt. 



TJttiJE CÄ RPK N TEE. 



T, 
Pul 
I «h, 



General Officers. 

OF THE 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 

Office of the General Secretary, 

124 N. Ninth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Alameda. Cal. 
Austin, 111. 
Bellevue, Pa. 
Berkeley, Cal. 
Bessemer. Colo. 
Braddock, Pa. 
Brighton Park, 111. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Carondelet, Mo. 
Chicago, 111 
Denver. Colo. 

East Boston. Mass. 
East St Louis, 111. 
Englewood, 111. 
Grand Crossing. Til. 
Highland Park, 111 
Hyde Park, 111 
Indianapolis, Ind. , 
Jeannette, Pa. 
Kensington, 111. 



Los Angeles, Cal. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Manor Station, Pa. 
Milwaukee, Wls. 
New York, N. Y. 
Oakland, Cal. 
Pensacola, Fla. 
Pueblo, Col. 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Santa Barbara, Cal, 
San Francisco, Cal. 
San Jose, Cal. 

San Rafael, Cal. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Sheboygan, Wis! 
South Chicago, 111. 
South Denver, Col. 
Town of Lake, 111 
Verona, Pa. 
Whatcom, Wash. 



Long Island City, N. Y. West Troy, N. Y. 



Total 



Moneys Received. 

DURING THE MONTH ENDING NOVEMBER 30 18»1. 
heiterer any error» appear notify the G. 8, without delay. 

All money received in DEC., will be pnbliahed In next 
month’« (FEBRUARY) paper. Thi» report include« all mony« 
rtoeived by the O. 8. from the Local Union« for tax and «opplie« 
for the month of NOVEMBER only. 



General-President — W. H. Kliver, Box 156, 
Grand Crossing, Cook Co., 111. 

General-Secretary— P. J. McGuire, Box 884, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

General-Treasurer— James Troy, 2026 Christian 
St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

General Vice-President». 

First Vice-President — P. M. Wellin, 26 Twelfth 
St., near Market St.. San Francisco, Cal. 

Second Vice-President— P. W. Birck, 798 Nos- 
trand Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

General Executive Board. 

(All correspondence for the G. E. B. must be 
mailed to the General Secretary.) 

Hugh McKay, 302 Paris St., E. Boston. Mass. 

T. E, Deegati, 111 E. 89th St., New York. 

E. A. Stevens, 150 Pearl St., Jeffersonville, Ind. 
W. F. Abrams, 451 Monroe Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

S. J. Kent, 2046 S St., Lincoln, Neb. 



OBITUARY RESOLUTIONS. 

(Insertions under this head cost ten cents per line.) 

Victoria, B. C., Union No. 354 

November 20, 1891. 

Whereas, it has pleased the Great Master 
Workman of (Tie universe to remove from among 
us a well-known and respected Brother. Davi 
Gill, be it 

Resolved, That we, the officers and members of 
Local Union 354, do express our heartfelt sympa- 
thy with the bereaved family. 

Resolved , That we also regret the loss of an ac- 
tive and efficient member and a respected friend, 
and be it further 

Resolved, That these resolutions now adopted 
by this Union he published in The Carpenter, 
spread upon the minutes of the Union and a copy 
sent to the family of our deceased Brother. 

G. Maltby, Ree. Sec. 



Expulsions. 



J. F. Lloyd, from Union 1 82, Richmond, Va. 
for violation of Constitution. 

A. C. Burt, from Union 496, Vicksburg, Miss., 
for slandering officers and members of the Union. 

Fred Kuhlenschmidt, from Union 470, Evans- 
ville, Ind., for defrauding Union men of their 
wages . 

\ F. Williams, from Union 628 Cincinnati/)., 
or not paying $15 fine. Uc is a chronic dis- 
turber. 

Henry Salgory, from Union 153, Fort Wayne. 
Ind., for selling l>all tickets and not returning 
money. 

W. OsTERHAUs, from Union T, Chicago III 
for working for C. Wehrbahn, who was expelled 
for defrauding the Union. 

Fred Baumbach, from Union 793, Grand Raj>- 
ids.Mich., for refusing to pay over to the Treas- 
urer money in his possession due the Union. 



DEAD BEAT CONTRACTORS. 

Union G96, Tampa, Fla., wishes it known that 
Chab. C. Maynard left that city in October last 
owing several Union men their wages and owes 
bills for material. When last heard from he was 
in Birmingham, Ala. 



EIGHT-HOUR CITIES. 



Below is a list of the cities and towns where 
Carpenters make it a rule to work only eight 
hours a day: 



138 SO | .66— 
51 00 167- 
19 0 >|l08 — 

2 oo! 169 — 
19 40 170— 

3 90 171 — 
14 00 172— 
27 30:173— 

8 90 1 174 — 
10 20, 175— 
46 30 1 17ti — 

• 1 00. 177 — 

■ . 178— 

■ 1 90 179— 

• 6 30 180— 

2 40 181— 

• 6 40 182— 

■ 3 80183— 

- 3 50 184— 

■ 16 80,185— 
21 56 186— 



65 60 
23 40 
50 
29 DO 
17 40 
12 80 
71 70 



. 41 cities. 



THINGS TO BE REMEMBERED. 

Three Months in arrears subjects a member 
to loss of benefits. 

Steady Attendance at the meetings gives life 
and interest to the Union. 

Members Going Off to another city should 
be provided with a clearance card. 

All Local Treasurers should be under bonds 
and the bonds tiled with the President uf the L. U. 

Trustees Reports should be prepared semi- 
annually and forwarded to the G. 8. Blanks arc 
furnished free for that purpose. 

All Change» in Secretaries should be promptly 
reported to the G. H., and name and address of 
' the new Secretary should be forwarded. 

Organize the Carpenter» in the unorganized 
town» in your vicinity, or wherever you may go ! 
Hold public meetings or social festivals at stated 
occasions; they will add to the strength of your 
' u don. 

Letters for the General Office should be 
' written on official note paper and bear the seal 
r* of the Local Union. Don’t write letters to the 
G. S. on monthly report blanks, us such commu- 
anf ideations are not in proper shape. 

OY 

All 'Moneys received by the G. S. one month 
, ^are published in the next month’s journal, 
lap Money« received can not be published in this 
journal the same month they are received. It 
M takes some time to make up the report and put 



187- 

188— 

189— 

190— 

191 — 

192 — 
493 — 



86 30 194- 



26 50 
3 10 



195- 

196— 



11 70|331 — 
8 20 1 332— 

7 30] 331 — 
29 101334 — 

3 90 335— 
15 80(336 - 

6 70 337— 
1 50 338 - 
1 801339— 

60,340— 
40 00 341 — 
18 20(342— 
■343 — 
. . . 344— 

8 40,345 — 
31 50(346— 

1 70 347— 
10 95 348- 

1 40 ! 349— 
. . . 350 — 

7 10 351— 

2 00 352— 

7 60 353 — 

3 80 354 — 
80 355 — 

12 9i|356 — 

8 20 357— 
1 20 ! 358— 
6 091359— 

360- 
1 361— 



32— 


2 


50 


197— 


15 


20 


362— 


34— 


63 


HI 


198 — 


7 


eo 


363- 


34— 






199 — 


13 


30 


364— 


av- 


* 4 


50 


200— 


6 


10 


365 * 


36- 


56 


90 


201— 


5 


90 


366— 


37- 


4 


10 


202— 


4 


20 


367— 


38— 


b 


40 


204— 


9 


10 


368— 


39— 


9 


to 


204— 


4 


00 


309— 


40— 


11 


00 


205- 


3 


40 


370— 


41— 


10 


80 


206— 


13 


45 


371— 


42— 


4 


30 


207— 


1 


00 


372— 


43— 


23 


90 


208- 


4 


30 


373— 


44— 


7 


00 


209— 


16 


20 


374- 


45- 


2 


20 


210— 


9 


30 


375— 


46— 


3 


00 


211— 


64 


60 


376— 


47— 


5 


80 


212— 


6 


10 


377- 


48— 


17 


40 


213— 


4 


40 


378— 


49— 


11 


80 


214— 


5 


40 


379— 


50— 


13 


70 


215- 


9 


10 


380 — 


51 — 


22 


00 


216 - 


7 


.50 


381— 


52- 


14 


00 


217- 


9 


75 


382 - 


53- 


3 


00 


218- 






383— 


54— 


68 


20 


219— 


* 6 


50 38i— 


55— 


16 


20 


220— 


6 


30 


385— 


56— 


3 


00 


221 — 


5 


36 


386- 


57— 


1 


60 


222 — 


9 


90 


387— 


58— 


X 


201 22 J— 


5 


20 


388— 



5 10*224- 
13 00 225— 
28 30 226— 
27 271227— 
• . . '228 - 
17 70 229— 
4 30 j 230— 
211 - 



67- 






232— 


1 


30 


68— 


10 


30 


233— 


1 


40 


69— 


2 


00 


234— 


14 


50 


70— 


2 


80 


235— 


7 


10 


71— 


2 


60 


236— 


2 


10 


72 — 


26 


60 


237— 






73 — 


11 


20 


238— 


7 


50 


74 — 


8 


50 


239- 




75 


75— 


, , 




240— 


12 


56 


76 — 






2l1 — 


1 


00 


77— 


1 


*0 


242 — 






78- 


5 


60 


243 — 


*4 


50 


79 — 


1 


70 


241— 


1 


80 


80 — 


1 


90 


245- 


2 


90 


81 — 


4 


40 


246— 


13 


20 


82— 


16 


60 


247— 


19 


20 


83— 


24 


90 


»48— 


5 


80 


84- 


7 


90 


249— 


7 


50 



3 20 
1£0 
10 35 

6 50 

7 70 
3 66 



19 90 

13 60 
13 00 
2 00 
5 65 
10 00 



1 90 

6 90 
9 60 
4 50 

29 10 

7 10 

’ 2 60 
16 10 



11 00 ; 



lit into type. 

i ^ g the only safe way to send money is by Post 
» iloffice Money Order or by Bank ('heck or Draft 
required by the Constitution. The G. S. is not 
fitreiesponsible for money sent in any other way. . 
Don't send loose cash or postage stump» in puy- 
inent of tax or for any bill due the G. S. 



2 40 j 



1 20 1 
2 00 1 



7 00 496— 

3 35 497— 
. . . 1 498 — 

4 30 1 499— 
35 00 500— 

7 10 501— 
6 30 ! 502— 
503— 



2 CO 

5 00 

6 90 
1 80 
4 90 
8 20 



8 10 

’ S 30 
7 80 
1 40 
11 00 



504— 

505— 

506— 

507— 

508— 

509— 

510— 

511— 

512— 

513— 

514 — 

515 — 
616 — 

517— 

518— 

519 — 
7 60 1 520— 

6 00(521— 
. . . *522 — 

3 20(623— 

7 90 524— 



6 70 

3 10 
1 60 

* 7 10 

6 70 
18 30 

7 30 
6 90 

3 30 
2 91) 
1 30 

1 70 
6 20 

14 10 

2 10 
10 60 

6 30 

4 90 

22 75 
37 00 
1 40 

7 90 
10 80 



1 50 

2 90 
1 40 
7 20 

5 00 

3 10 

6 40 

7 60 



2 60 
2 20 



3 50 '666— 

4 80 1 566— 
7 40 567 — 
9 70 568 — 
4 50 569 — 

. . . 1 570 — 

7 20,571 — 
75 572— 

. . 573— 

4 CO 
26 80 

8 10 

5 60 



7 00 
21 10 



9 00' 463— 



10 30 I 



4 15 ( 



19 25 f 
6 60 t 



a 



525— 

526— 

527 — * 

528— 

529— 

530— 

531— 

532— 

533— 

534— 

535— 

536— 

537— 

538— 

539— 

540— 

541— 
512— 

543— 

544— 

545— 

546— 
647 — 
548 — 
649 — 
560— 

551— 

552— 
563— 
554— 
556— 
556— 
567— 
658— 

559— 

560— 

561— 

562— 
603—. 
504— 



10 00 

11 10 
2 20 

1 50 
9 70 
3 40 

12 85 

2 90 

*2 00 

3 70 



7 05 
6 40 
1 00 
10 00 
11 80 
70 

2 00 
3 60 
1 70 

’ 3 20 

3 20 

4 90 



4 60,595— 

5 20 596— 
. . . 597- 
JO 70 598— 

0 60 599— 

1 10 600 — 
. . . 601— 



1 90 
6 90 



11 i5 
19 20 
8 80 

1 90 
4 60 

2 00 

’ 3 55 
1 10 
2 40 



31 90 
65 
12 25 
4 40 



20 10 

2 9) 

20 CH> 
7 80 

3 80 

3 30 

* 3 60 

’ l’ 50 
9 40 

* 1 15 
1 60 

4 30 
3 95 
2 20 

’ 1 80 

' 3 00 
1 90 

1 HO 
1 80 

3 40 

’ 7 80 

2 10 

io oio 

4 10 



5*2 


Amount. 


Local 

Union 


Amount. 


Local 

Union. 


Amount. 


Local 

Union. 


| Amount 


661— 


10 101696— 


15 10 


731— 


2 30 


766— 




662— 




697— 


3 60 


732— 


28 70 


767— 




6'3— 




698— 


16 40 


733 — 




768 — 


7 40 


664— 


17 40 


699— 


5 7u 


734— 


3 00 


769— 




665— 


3 20 


700— 




7:35— 




770— 


6 .35 


66<>— 


1 90 


701- 


3 80 


736— 


2 50 


771— 


7 00 


667— 


14 00 


702— 




737— 


2 80 


772— 


2 00 


668— 


10 10 


703- 


12 30 


738- 


3 7n 


773- 




669- 


8 10 


704— 


10 00 


7:39— 


5 20 


774— 




670— 


2 60 


706— 




740— 


4 00 


775- 


3 40 


67 J — 




706— 


6 40 


741— 


1 60 


,776- 


7 50 


672— 


5 00 707— 


4 70 


742— 




777— 


2 90 


673 — 




708— 


6 20 


743— 


6 00 


778— 




674— 


1 55 709- 


2 50 


744— 


4 50 


779— 




675— 


1 70 710- 


8 40 


745— 




780— 


3 70 


676— 


10 46 711— 


4 70 


746— 


3 30 


781— 


8 35 


677— 


3 10 


712- 


18 50 


747— 


1 O'l 


782— 


3 00 


678— 


20 40 713— 




748— 


1 90 


783— 


1 40 


679- 


9 05 


714 — 


1 00 749— 


3 30 


784— 


2 85 


680— 


1. 40 71.5— 


12 95 750— 


7 20 


786 — 


2 70 


681— 


16 40 716— 


15 90(751— 
4 00(7.52— 


1 90 


786 — 




682— 


3 70 1 717— 


1 80 


787— 




683— 


Hi 65:718— 


13 70 


753— 


2 80 


788— 




684— 


10 -0 


719— 


3 00 


754— 


80 


789— 




685— 


3 001720— 


1 00 


755- 


5 10 


790— 


1 30 


686— 


... 


721— 


14 00 


756— 


3 85 


791— 




687— 




722 


2 10 


757— 


50 


792 - 


3 20 


688 — 




723 — 


90 


758— 


4 20 793— 


3 80 


689— 


2 00 724— 


. . . 


759- 


7 55 


794— 




690 — 


7 50 725 — 




760— 


2 90 795— 


1 00 


691— 


2 7(! 


726— 


4 80 


761— 


1 10 796— 




692— 


9 90,727— 


2 00 


762— 


4 60 797— 
2 80 798— 




693— 




728— 


2 40 


763— 


3 30 


694— 1 70 729— 

695— . . >730— 

Total! .... 


10 70 


764— 

765— 







Financial Report. 

By inadvertanee the Financial Report for 
October did not appear in last month's Journal. 
This month we print both the October and 
November reports. 

RECEIPTS— October, 1891. 

Balance, Oct. 1, 1891 $3,393 30 

From the Unions (Tax, etc.) 6,182 11 

“ Rent 10 00 

“ Clearances, etc . 5 28 

Total . $9,530 69 

EXPENSES- October, 1891 

For Printing $343 32 

“ Office, etc 550 88 

“ Tax A. F. of L 90 00 

“ Meeting of G. E. B 425 60 

“ Traveling and Organizing . .... 56 24 

“ Watch Charms 27 87 

“ Benefits Nos. 1431«to 1483, inclu- 
sive . . . 6,675 00 

Balauce on hand Nov. 1, 1891 1,521 88 

Total 49,590 69 

DETAILED EXPENSES-October, i891. 

Printing 1,000 Ode Cards $2 50 

“ 1,500 Clearances 3 76 

“ 6.109 Constitutions 51 09 

“ 1,000 Postals 3 00 

“ 1,000 Stamped Envelopes ... 1 26 

“ 6,000 Noteheads 12 60 

“ 6,000 Membership Cards . . . r 12 50 

“ 46,000 Copies Nov. Journal .. . 228 23 

“ J,6:X) German Constitutions . . 22 60 

“ 2,000 Bill Heads 6 00 

Wrapping and Mailing Nov. Journal . 19 82 

Postage on Nov. Journal ........ 15 66 

Postage on Supplies, etc. Ü5 76 

Expressage on Supplies, etc 22 60 

Six Telegrams ... 2 82 

,000 Stamped Envelopes and 5C0 Postals 27 00 

500 Postals . 5 00 

Salary and Clerk Hire ... 382 60 

Office Rent for October 25 00 

E. Grosseurth, org. Moundsvil!e,W.Va. 4 24 
11. McCormack, org. Elmhurst, 111 . . 7 00 

T. E. Deegan, visit to Pittsburgh, Pa.. . 43 60 

J.J. Maguire and Hugh McKay, visit 

to Norri«town, Pa 1 50 

20 Watch Charms 27 87 

Tax to A. F. of L 90 00 

Gas bill for three month» . 1110 

S. J. Kent. Meeting G. E. B 141 0<> 

Hugh McKay. Meeting G. E. B . . . . 62 50 

E. A. Stevens, Meeting G. E B 96 50 

T. E. Deegan, Meeting G. E B 44 76 

W. F, Abrams, Meeting G. E B . . . , 81 75 

Ice and Incidentals .... ..... 

Rubber Seals for New Unions 4 76 

Janitor for cleaning office 5 00 

Benefits Nos. 1434 to 1483, as published 

in December Journal 6,675 00 

Total $8,068 81 



Rubber Seal« for New Union» 




1 50 


Ice and Incidentals . 








2 50 


Stationery and Twine 








2 90 


Janitor for Cleaning Office 






5 03 


BENEFITS PAID IN 


NOVEMBER, 




No. 






Union. 


Amt. 


1484 Mrs. B. Sweeney 






. 204 


$60 00 


J485 Mrs. Leta Stewart 








26 00 


I486 Ernest Simson. Sr 






15 


200 00 


1487 J. V. Plotts .... 








200 00 


1488 Mrs. Jennie Teed 








50 00 


1489 Mrs. 1>. Bedard . 








50 00 


1490 A. J. Hall .... 








200 00 


1491 S. T. Bowler . . . 








200 00 


1492 J. C. Weiler . . . 








200 00 


J 493 W. 1. Parkinson . 








200 00 


1494 Mrs. A. Summer« 






. . 253 


. 50 00 


1495 Mrs. M. A. Stephenson 




. .735 


25 00 


1190 J. O, Keuth . . . 






601 


200 00 


1497 Mrs. E. Türke . . 








60 00 


1498 A. J. Perrigo . . 








200 00 


1499 (4. W. Arbogast . 






. . 28 4 


20.) 00 


1590 Mrs. M. J. Henderson 




. . 260 


60 10 


1501 Mrs. A. Baine 






. 446 


60 00 


1502 Mrs. Marie Kuchne . 






50 00 


1503 Mrs. Maggie Evtli 








50 00 


1504 W. H. Dunn 








200 00 


1505 Mrs. M. E. Winston . 




. . 262 


25 00 


1506 Mrs. M. Kittinger 






. . 11 


60 W 


1507 J. B Forrest 








108 25 


1508 Joseph Da/.a . . . 








200 00 


1-509 Mrs. A. Sheehv . 






. 163 


50 00 


1510 Jas. Moran .... 






. . 675 


2 C 0 00 










200 00 


1512 Mrs. R. O’Brien . 






. . 03 


50 00 


1513 M K. Berry . . . 






7 


200 00 


1514 Mrs M. A. Patton 






. . 205 


50 00 


1615 Mrs. A E. Houk . 








60 00 


15L6 Mrs. C. M. Fagan 








50 U0 


1517 Mrs. 1>. Tredeau . 








50 00 


1518 C. J. Brcnton . . 








200 00 


1519 Mrs. E. Kluemper 






. 712 


50 (0 


1520 Mrs. G. Peterson . 






. . 199 


50 00 


1621 Mrs. J. Wandless 






. . 142 


50 00 


162 i John D. Hughes . 








200 00 


1523 Mrs. Mary Jearger . . 




. . 107 


25 0« 


1524 Mrs. M. Foster 






. . 142 


50 00 


1625 Mrs. M. McCarthy 






. . 489 


60 00 


1526 Mrs. 1.: Peters . . 






. . .377 


50 00 


1527 Mrs. E. Felske 






. . 179 


50 00 


1528 Owen Hiller 






. . 0 


200 00 


1529 Mrs. Barbara Thu] 






] 


50 00 


1530 Mrs. Annie Smith 






. . 109 


50 00 


1531 W. K. Ku-hards . 






. . 29 


200 00 


1512 Wm. Bnrriek 








2(0 00 


1533 Mrs. S. V. Donaldson 




. . 190 


50 00 


1634 Mrs. Minnie Bechtel . 




104 


50 00 


1535 Mrs. J. Mueller 






. . 172 


50 00 


1536 Mrs. A. F Tillie . 






. 493 


50 00 


1637 Mrs. A . Hampton 








26 00 


1538 W. W. Crumley 






. 225 


200 00 


1539 Mrs. < ’. Kappler . 








.50 00 


1510 J. O Dietrich . 






. . 165 


lot) 00 


Total 










SPECIAL ASSESSMENT. 




Below Is a report of all moneys for the Special 


Assessment, levied June 11th, 1891, and 


received 


from Nov. 1st, to Nov. 


30th 


1891 (inclusive). 


All moneys received since Nov. 30tl 


will be 


reported in the JANUARY 


Carpenter. 




i 












d 


CJ 


fl 






P — 


S 3 


O © 1 5! O © 

I« sis s 

Jts ^ 1 gb < 


| 


a 

P 


41 J 


.5 o 

£ 1 


142— $14 50 211— 174 00 


402- 




28 00(475- 


- 2 50 


100- 75 270— 14 75 


416— 


22 75 682- 


- 4 25 












Total 








. $311 02 



RECEIPTS— November, 1891. 



10 50 



Balance Nov. 1, 1891 

From the Unions ( Tax, etc.) 

“ Rent and Gas 

“ Clearances 


$1,521 88 
5,425 31 
17 00 
5 10 


Total 




EXPENSES— November, 1891. 




For Printing ... 

4 * Office, etc .... 

“ 1X58 Badge« 

** Tax A. F. of L. . . 

“ Traveling and Organizing . . . . 

** Benefits Nos. 1484 to 1540. in- 
clusive . . 


$440 18 
549 01 
231 60 
90 00 
78 00 

5,833 25 


Total ... » 

Deficit Dec. 1, 1891 


$7,222 04 
152 75 




$<3.969 29 



DETAILED EXPENSES— November, 1891. 



8 00 
1 20 
5 90 

8 70 
16 80 



2 80 
2 40 



4 70 

7 00 

8 10 
8 75 



15 30 

5 00 

6 10 

H 30 
4 60 

1 90 



Printing 6,000 F. S. Blanks 

5,«J00 Labels 

2.000 Bonds 

5,'jOO Agitation Cards 

10.000 Appeals 

1,500 Postals 

8.000 Notice« of Arrears .... 

1 ,o(K> Death Benefit Slips 

1.000 Lists of Officers 

2.000 Trustees’ Blank» 

3.000 Remittance Blanks . 

1.000 Letter Heads for Claims . 

3,« 0*0 Auditors’ Blanks 

100 Secretaries’ Order Book» 
1,000 G. S. Annual Reports . . 
1,000 Inquiries of Physicians . 

1 .000 Stamped Envelopes. . . 

5, IKK) Noteheads 

Ream Wrapping Paper . . . 

5.000 Applications 

Three Electro« 

6.000 Membership Cards , 

46.000 copies December Journal 

Wrapping and Mailing Dee. Journal . 
Postage on December Journal ..... 
Postage on Supplies, • • • • 

Expressage on Supplies, etc - , . 

1 .000 Stamped Envelopes 

1.000 Postal« . 

Eight Telegrams • • • 

Salary and Clerk Hire ......... 

Oflice Kent for November . 



II. K. Herbert, organizing 
p. J. McGuire, expenses to Washing- 
ton. D. C. (m^sa meeting) 

L. G. Newman, orga* iziug 

1,168 Badge«. 

Tax to A. F. of L 

One Ton of Coal and carrying it in . , 



$17 75 

6 25 
10 00 

12 50 
16 00 

4 25 
19 25 

3 2-3 

2 75 

13 50 

7 50 

5 25 

7 80 

25 00 

4 76 

8 76 
1 25 

12 60 
4 87 
7 50 

3 58 

15 00 
232 23 

19 62 

16 01 

26 80 
25 89 
23 1.0 
10 00 

4 13 
382 66 



RESERVE FUND. 



Her (fcatpeittgr. 






$§ilabelpi)ia, Januar 1892. 



Report of moneys received for Reserve Fund 
from NOVEMBER 1st, 1891, to NOVEMBER 
30th, 189J, (Inclusive). 

All moneys received since NOVEMBER 30th 
will be reported in the FEBRUARY Carpkn- 



Aufruf au alle Zimmerleute und 
Ba uschreiner. 

SB e 1 1 f) e r (S o U e g e ! 

SBir fe[;en uns genötigt, ein eenfteß SBort 
an Sie ju rieten. @ß ift nun außgefpcotljene 
2Ijatjacl)e, je weniger bie Arbeitet organic 
firrt jtnb, befto niefjr werben fte butef) bie l)eu» 
tige SSrobultionßweife uon ben Slrbeitgebern 
unb ©apitaliften außgebeutet. Sie ©nun» 
genfcljaft ber Qimmerleute unb SJauföreiner 
wirb wieber »erloren getjen, bie Hrbeitßjeit 
wirb eine längere unb ber Sofjn ein niebriget 
werben, wenn wir unß nidjt fo f$nell wie 
ntäglid) jufammenraffen unb unfere Unionß 
Beiftärfen Ijelfen. 3e ftärfer bie Drganifa» 
tian, befto gewaltiger lannfie einem Slnfturm 
unferer capitaliftifc^en Slibeitgeber entgegen» 
treten, beßfjatb, ©ollege, ttyue ein jeher feilte 
Siflidj)t, oerbinbe fiel) mit feinen ©oUegen unb 
trete ber bereits beftebenben Union bei, um 
gemeinfebaftheb unfere Siebte oertbeibigen ju 
tonnen, benn oetemjelt ftnb wir nid)tß, oer» 
einigt finb.wir SUteß. 

Seit 25 3>abten wirb uon organifirten Sir» 
beitem für ©infübtung türjerec Slrbeitßjeit 
agitirtunb getämpft. ®ie ©riinbe, auf roel» 
cbe fte ficb ftiiben, ftnb beute noch biefelben 
tute oon Slnbeginn, nämlicb bie SUbeitßloftg> 
teit, worunter wir beute uiet ju leiben haben, 
ju beieitigen, um einem 3eben bureb SJerliir» 
jung ber Slibeitßjeit Slrbeit oerfebaffen u"b 
fomit ein menftbenwürbigeß ®aieitt friften tu 
tonnen, benn ein Seber bat baß iRetbt, bte 
grüebte biefec ©rbe ju genießen, wir Sitte ftnb 
gleich geboren unb besbalb juSiem berechtigt, 
waß beute oon ber capitaliftifcben treffe unb 
bereu Mnhängern uns ftreitig ju machen gef 
fucht wirb: nämlich ©leicbberccbtigung ailer 
SJlenfchen. 

®est)rtlb, wertberSIlitarbeiter, erfuchen wir 
Sie, ^[Jflici>t nidbt tu oerfäumen, ftcb un» 
ferer Union anjufcbiiefen, um mit unß ge» 
meinfcöaftlteh &aß jnerringen ju fudien, waß 
unß gebührt, unb an bete Drganifationen fdjon 
tängft errungen haben. Sie ©apitaliften unb 
Silonopoliften organifiren fich, um unß arme 
gebriicfteStrbeiter nod) mehr Inebeln jufön 
nen, beehalb miiffen wir beßgleichen tbun. 
SBir finb eß uns unferen grauen unb Hin 
bern fcbulßig, ihnen eine beffere (Stiften , ju 
oerfdjaffen, ato wie fie bisher gehabt haben. 
®ie ’Arbeiter hätten .in uiet beffereß Yooß, 
wenn fie brüberlich jufammengingen unb ficb 
gemeinfdjaftlicb beffer uerftehen würben. Sieh 
m^r. Sie ftch ein SJeifpiel an unferen 3Ubeu- 
gebent ; warum füllen wir nicht baffelbe ttjun ? 

SBertber ©ottege ! SBir bitten Sie bcehalb 
nodimatß btingsnb, ftd) unferer Union anju* 
fcbltefieii unb SÄitgt.eb unferer Slrüberfdiaft 
ju werben, um gemein cbaftlich baß Dbenfte 
heube beffer jur ®urd)ttil)rung bringen ju 
Ibnnen. ®ie Sebingungen, ber Union bei 
jutreten. finb fo genug geftettt, bah eß Sebent 
möglich ift, SJIitglieb berfelben ju werben, um 
bet uotfowmenben Sranlljeitß. unb Uugliicfß= 
fällen genügcitbe Unterftühung ju belommeit. 









■had 



_ s 



19— 


$1 75 256— 


3 35 467— 


1 


30 6*7— 


1 65 


37— 


2 05 258— 


5 60 482— 


5 


50 679— 


1 10 


44- 


2 95 262- 


55 484— 


2 


SO 684— 


5 05 


46 — 


1 50 268— 


4 60 488— 


6 


05 694 — 


85 


48— 


8 70 276— 


14 55 489 — 


77 


00 697— 


1 80 


54— 


11 60 287— 


4 25 496— 


2 


65 710— 


4 20 


56— 


1 80 295— 


1 00 500— 


o 


30 717— 


2 00 


68— 


5 56 314— 


2 30 503- 


1 


15 728— 


1 20 


70— 


l 40 341— 


3 45 515— 


10 


05 740— 


2 00 


91— 


3 60 346— 


1 35(519 — 


3 


901743— 


3 05 


102— 


4 55:378— 


2 90 523— 


1 


80)751— 


95 


1 17— 


4 90 383— 


70 537— 




96 752— 


90 


151 — 


6 75 391— 


3 <»0 539— 


i 


851753— 


40 


163— 


1 30 392— 


7 80 656— 


1 


45(754— 


2 86 


166— 


1 60 3 »8— 


1 301657— 


1 


45 1 759— 


3 15 


170— 


1 95 406— 


3 60(570— 


1 


SO 760— 


1 45 


186— 


4 40 416— 


5 05 571— 




85 ! 762 — 


2 30 


iwO— 


90 1 425— 


70 579— 


1 


65,703 — 


1 40 


206 — 


6 60 429— 


2 36 580- 


7 


30(777— 


1 45 


213- 


2 20(439— 


95 691— 




90 781— 


1 95 


220— 


3 16)452— 


1 4ok;oo— 




50(790— 


65 


232 — 


65 456 — 


2 25 637— 


4 


35( 




238— 


70 466— 


3 75 657— 


5 


65 — 




249— 


3 00 1 


1 









Total 8350 05 



The Job of making over worlds is one 
easy to tackle by platform and by resolu- 
tion, but the trades union walks into the 
region of accomplishment and gets more 
bread and butter, and elothes and other 
things worth having. Hence its stability 
and assured perpetuity as a factor in social 
progress. — Labor Leader. 



The Ifrcn men meet in the bank, the 
elub-houseor parlor ; workmen, when they 
combine, gather in the street. Ail the or- 
ganized forces of society are against them. 
Capital has the army and the navy, the 
legislative, judicial and executive depart- 
ments. When the rich combine, it is for 
“exchanging ideas.” When the poor 
combine, it is “conspiracy.” If they act 
in concert, if they really do something, it 
is a “ mob.” If they defend themselves, 
it is “treason.” In this country the 

omce wnuur 25 oo I political power w equally divided among 

p, J. McGuire, Southern trip 52 oo men. \\ by should the nch control . there 

W oo ilre certainly more poor than there are rich. 
u qq Why should the laborers not combine for 
6 oo j the purpose of controling the executive, 
^“ legislative and judicial departments?— 
6 od I Col. Hubert O. Ingortoll. 



Tn« («rflarfcit bc3 WemrrffiliaftjyirinrifiS 

(Slito ,,:Higl)to of Babor.") 

Tic ©eroerlfdjaftß » Strömung unter ben 
arbeitenden ©laffeit war ttiemals ftärfer alß 
jur gegenwärtigen ,-jeit. Sie bat ficb nicht 
nur in permanente Organifatianeit uerför= 
pert, fonbern bereu Utitgtieber entwicfeln fid) 
aueb febr febnett ju einer pottftättbi'a bißctplU 
Hirten Slrmee, entfcbloffen unb bereit, für ihre 
91ed)te ju fämpfen, wenn bie 'Kotbwcnbigteit 
bieo »erlangt, ©o ift imbloo für bie ©egner, 
gegen bie Mewerffcbaften ju proteftiren unb 
biefelben ju unterbrüefen uerfueben. Tie 
(Slewerffcbaften finb ba unb werben weiter 
befteben. x \al)r um 'miIic, lUlotiat um Wonat 
unb lag um Jag nehmen fie an Di acht ju, 
SBao ihnen nicht biefes 'saf)v ju erreichen 
gelingt, errcidien fie nädiftes v \abr. ©ß mag 
hier gleich mit betont werben, bag bie ßeit 
ber Unterbrücfung ber 3lrbeiter fdiwinbet, tint 
nie mehr wicbet jufebren. Tie ©rjeuger aller 
'Berthe finb entfcbloffen, fid) beit gerechten 
3lntbeil ihrer Slrbeit ju fiebern. 

Sängftenß innerhalb weniger fahren wer- 
ben bie 3lrbeiter im ganjeit Vaitbe — unb wir 
wollen hoffen in ber ganjenBelt — ben Sicht» 
ftunbentag errungen haben. 3Öirb bte ütgi» 
tatiou bamit aufhören? Unter feinen lim- 
ftänben. ©inß aber ift fid>cr, weint auch 
feine Stbficht ober felbft fein 'Verlangen fei» 
teno ber aufrichtigen Jreunbe ber Arbeiter 
»orliegt, bic perjönlidie Freiheit beß ©injel» t 
neu tu befchränfeit ober ftd) in feine 'brituu 
»erhättniffe tu mifdieit, fo wirb bod) ber ®e= 
banfe immer mächtiger, baß eo bie 'hfl id) t 
j c b c ß Slrbeitero ift, bem (hewerfoereiu feiner 
'Branche antugehöreit. Tiefer (hebanfe ift fo 
ftart, bah mitunter ein Trucf außgeiibt wirb, 
utn bie 'Ärbeiter juitt ©intritt in bie Union ju 
bewegen, uon ber 3lnficht aitogchenb, ,,ber 
3wed beiligt bie Dlittel," Unb eß ift eine 
Xhatfache, bie faft überall beobachtet wirb, 
baft foldje Dlitgtieber, bie man erft jum ©in» 
tritt in bie Union tmingen iituf), fchliejjlich 
ihre wärmften 'Befürworter werben. 

©ß ift nuttloö für bie Arbeitgeber, über bie 
Tprannci ber Wewevtfchaften ju jammern. 

©o mag ja fein, baft mitunter auch Unionß 
turanuiid) haitbeln, aber fo lange bic I mau ; 
nei ber 'Boffeo anbauert, haben bie i'clitereit.jj 

598 

60 ' 



fein Siecht, fich ju beflogen, wenn Ift» 
ter gelegentlich einm«' 
ahmen. 



“ — i U> " SWitDii'efS i* isrtJÄ'iii :■< 1 1 iflt tn imr® 

- void, “ charpentier 




. by . 

trrTifnll ittluö, mCb rnag 

This word, with its I of a horseshoe and shield, which is the 
mean'"- i’a-rd into the | general trade mark of the firm, until it 
' r date was | deals justly by its employes now on strike. 



-gan...- — «-u witlf the A. 1* o» 
to consider the advisabil ty of withdraw- 
ing their patronage ' an the coming 
World’s F*ur at Clues) ” 



304 

31« 

318 



386 

388 

not' 



63« 

643 



i'8 

195 
I 304 

784 316 

785 242 
t*' • | ojsn 



350 ' 

372 

378 

380 

38« 

387 

390 

399 



, 



I«, 



. ,,, .mi uve. 



är 



THE CARPENTER, 



WHY IS THIS? 



When the land is full of workers, 

Busy hands and active brains, 

When the craftsmen and the thinkers 
If eel about them binding; chains ; 

When the laborer is cheated 
Of the work his hands have wrought, 
And the thinker, vain of logic, 

8ees that reason comes to naught ; 

When the forces men have harnessed 
And have trained to their will. 

Ought to leave no homeless people 
And no hungry mouths to fill, 

Have but proved themselves the servants 
Of the shrewd and selfish few. 

Ami the many have hut little 
For tin* work they lind to do; 

When the labor of a million i 

Goes to swell the gains of one, 

As the serfs of ancient Egypt 
Starved beneath the burning sun ; 

When the schemer and the sharper 
Hold the wealth and rule the land, 
losing up the thinker’s brain force, 
Mortgaging the craftsman’s hand ; 

When the many shear the sheep 
And the few secure the wool, 

And the gallows claims its victims, 

And your costly jails are full — 

Then the men who dreamed of progress 
And the hopes of peace and bliss. 

While they weep and wonder vainly, 

Ask euch other * 4 Why is this ?” 

— Light of Persia. 



THE STATISTICAL WORK OF LABOR 
ORGANIZATIONS. 

By request of Mon. Carroll D. Wright, 
Chief of the Department of Labor. Wash- 
ington, D. C., General Secretary P. J. Mc- 
Guire addressed the Eighth National Con- 
vention of the Officers of Bureaus of 1-abor 
Statistics. The convention was held May 
19-23, 1891, at the Aldine Hotel, Philadel- 
phia. On the evening of May 32, Gen- 
eral Secretary McGuire delivered an im- 
promptu address on the subject of “ Statis- 
tical Work of Labor Organizations.” By 
urgent req nest from various unions we here 
give some extracts from the address, and 
copies in full can be had by writing to any 
State Bureau of Labor Statistics, or by ad- 
dressing Hon. Carroll D. Wright, Depart- 
ment of Labor, Washington, D. C. 

Extracts prom the Address. 

it is & very difficult thing in your field 
of work, as Chiefs and Commissioners of 
Labor Bureaus, to get access to labor or- 
ganizations and get their ear, their atten- 
tion, and their confidence. 

There is that innate feeling that the 
facts you desire to ascertain may be used 
to their detriment , or that deductions may 
be made from the statistics they may fur- 
nish, or could furnish, that would be used 
to their disadvantage, and hence it is, I 
believe, that you have found more or less 
trouble in your attempts to obtain the 
statistics of labor organizations. Now, 
this fact of Hostility, as it appears to some 
of you, to me is only a want of confidence, 
and this fact that there is an apparent 
hostility in some States to Labor Bureaus 
is due very largely to the influence that 
has surrounded organized labor in certain 
States and certain localities. Laboring 
men have been filled with a feeling of 
secrecy and mystery by an organisation 
that lias made them believe the more 
secret and mysterious their actions were, 
the more powerful they would become and 
the more awe they would inspire in the 
puolie mind ; while I believe that if you 
have a truth to tell, and have the facts 
behind it, you should not hide that truth, 
nor should you hide the facts which sup- 
port that truth. 

The statistics of labor organizations can 
be reached by a little patience, and they 
can be perfected much more in time. The 
older an organization grows the more con- 
servative it becomes. It is a fact also, 
that as an organization becomes older and 
more conservative, its records are better 
taken care of and its statistics are more 
watchfully recorded. They introduce sys- 
tems of benefits, through which they iiave 
to ascertain statistics as to mortality in 
their organizations, and the general sec- 
retary of the national body lias to have 
reports monthly. In time these reports 
will extend over a larger field, as the or- 
ganizations become stronger and more 
widespread. They will not only cover the 
field of mortality, as they do now, and to 
some extent the matter of wages and earn- 
ings, but the statistical work of labor or- 
ganizations will then go into the whole 
field of productive industry and the un- 
employed, giving the number of men em 
ployed and the number unemployed. I 
believe that even to-day it is possible, 
within one week, to ascertain the actual 
number of the employed and unem- 
ployed window-glass workers in this coun- 
try; so perfect is their organization. 

"The Amalgamated Association of Iron 
and Steel Workers controls probably from 
75 to 80 per cent, of the men employed in 
the iron and steel trade. They have a 
complete census of the wages in every de- 
partment of the iron and steel trade in 
this country, and while they could not 
reach a census within a week, the same as 
the glass w orkers, they could take a cen- 
sus of their trade within two or three 
weeks. These two trades are splendidly 
organized, and are reaching more and 
more what might be termed a scientific 
basis. 

While in the boards of trade and cham- 
bers of commerce they have access to the 

elm. — ••»'tof product in each respective 

and full pa., May itAwtics obtained are 
nters agree to not pi as some might 
rk. 



think; still to-day in the hands of the 
capitalists, their methods of business are 
becoming arranged so scientifically that 
they are able to reach very nearly the 
total amount of product in a large number 
of the trades in which they are engaged. 
That has taken time, for the organization 
of capital was prior to the organization of 
labor in this country — not the militant 
form of organized capital, but the in- 
dustrial form of capital, organized to con- 
duct business in its own interest. The 
militant form, the fighting form of organ- 
ized capital, came only when labor com- 
menced to organize, and labor is now in 
the militant condition ; that is, it is fight- 
ing organized capital. In time labor will 
look to do more than simply fight capital. 
When capital ceases to fight labor and 
recognizes that there is a necessity for 
organization on both sides labor will settle 
down to organize itself on a scientific basis 
for the purpose of acquiring statistics and 
perfecting them, and of controlling itsow'n 
forces. 

The movement connected with labor 
organizations in this country is compara- 
tively new, and our country is new, and 
the questions raised in regard to labor and 
capital are of quite recent birth. 

Most people have looked upon Labor 
Bureaus as mere caves in which to bury 
some ancient archives furnished by various 
so called ‘ cranks” in the labor move- 
ment ; but I believe the bulk of the Labor 
Bureaus, so far as I have had time to look 
at their reports, even cursorily, are in 
clined to do their best to reach the facts 
as they can get them. One of the great 
mistakes, in my opinion, with all due re- 
spect, is to put the Labor Bureau of any 
State, or even that of the National Gov- 
ernment, entirely in the hands of the 
laboring people ; and I say that in the 
interest of the laboring people themselves. 
I believe that- the Bureaus should be 
managed with an eye to the welfare of 
the laboring people — not to shut out any 
facts in their favor, or even to their detri- 
ment — but 1 believe that Labor Bureaus 
should have at their head everywhere 
men who can command the ear of the 
public and be regarded as unbiased and 
fair to all sides — capitalists, laborers and 
all. I feel that the laboring men who are 
so extremely radical as at times to demand 
that somebody’s head shall be chopped off 
because he does not furnish all the statis- 
tics they want are harming the very insti- 
tutions which are making the labor move- 
ment stronger in the eyes of people who 
have no ears for sentiment, but are de- 
sirous of having facts. 

I know from experience, as some of you 
are already aware, that the reception of 
blanks from your Bureaus has had the 
effect of inducing men to keep an account 
of their household expenses who never 
thought of doing such a thing before — 
your blanks suggested the necessity for it ; 
so that, in a remote way, if not in a direct 
manner, your Bureaus have the effect of 
educating men who are now' simply wage- 
workers to some idea of business habits in 
their daily fives. The trouble with the 
working classes is not, as some think, want 
of heart or want of brains ; it is simply the 
want of business methods. Most of them 
have intelligence, brains, and all the nec- 
essary qualifications except culture, and 
that they will get when they secure eight 
hours as a day’s work, and also secure 
some other things they are after. 

Just in proportion äs our labor organ- 
izations get larger and older and more 
disciplined, you will find the statistics 
from labor organizations will become more 
reliable. The labor movement in many 
industries is getting out of the froth of 
sentiment down to the solidity of bed- 
rock, and workingmen are beginning to 
feel that before they move they must 
know 7 the reason why they should move. 
Before they can reach that condition, how- 
ever, they will have to go through a sys- 
tem of education similar to that which 
each trade now having a successful organ- 
ization has passed through, such as the 
glass workers, the iron and steel workers, 
and a number of others. The desire to 
strike whenever they see a large number 
together in a room will be more and more 
checked by the inquiries How many 
union men have you in town ?” "How 
many non-union men are there in tow r n?” 
“How is trade— good or bad?” "How 
much money have you in your treasury?” 
“ IIow T many bosses are willing to concede 
your demands?” "How 7 many are op- 
posed to your demands?” All this re- 
quires statistical inquiry. It requires per- 
sonal investigation, and personal investi- 
gation, after all, is the basis of every good 
statistical report. If you have not the 
money necessary to make personal inquiry 
in securing statistics, your reports are at 
best whatever you can make them under 
the law granting your appropriation. 

We find that rigid discipline in our trade 
organization and in a number of other 
organizations during the past few years 
has had the effect of checking strikes, tor 
men read the blanks we send them and 
say to themselves, " Well, we never 
thought we ought to inquire how many 
bosses were opposed to us.” The old 
system of labor organization was the 
“ hurrah ”, system. Where there was an 
improvement in trade and the men felt 
that the bosses were making too much 
money, they would gather together, prob- 
ably in a hall over some beer saloon or in 
a beer garden, and pass a resolution, 
“ Down with the bosses — the capitalists; 



they are making too much money ; now is 
the time to give them a whack in the 
back of the neck.” A motion to strike 
was then made, seconded, and carried, 
and the extent of that labor move- 
ment was determined sometimes by the 
quantity of beer downstairs or the amount 
of money chipped into the hat that night. 
On the following day the men would be 
called out, and at the end of a w r eek, if 
they held out that long, they found they 
were minus a week’s wages without any- 
thing to fall back on. But ofttimes they 
did not hold out a week. Perhaps they 
would hold out for twenty-four hours, and 
then begin to watch each other to see who 
would go back first. That was the 
“ hurrah ” system of labor organization — 
no statistics, no savings, no responsibility, 
but hit a capitalist’s head whenever it ap- 
peared. Tlie new form of labor organiza- 
tion which has come into existence of later 
years requires that workmen shall not go 
into a strike without due deliberation, and 
requires a two- thirds vote instead of the 
old majority, and a secret ballot at that. 
It requires afterward, that the local organ- 
ization shall appeal to the national head 
for permission. You have no idea of the 
amount of labor saved to you, gentlemen, 
in making inquiries as to strikes by reason 
of this method ot careful preparation in 
inaugurating and conducting strikes. You 
would have had far more to deal with if it 
had not been for this system. During this 
very year applications have come to my 
office from 309 local organizations for per- 
mission to strike. They all thought, 
“ Hurrah ! we have a crowd in the room ! 
We are bigger than the bosses!” But 
they were told to act cautiously, or to wait. 
We have sanctioned Btrikes in 147 cases, 
and I am pleased to say. and I think you 
will be glad to hear, that we have won all 
of these strikes, except in some fourteen 
cases where the men are now out. The 
check placed on strikes by requiring the 
local organizations to appeal to a higher 
power, has a restraining influence which 
has proved ot great benefit. I only wish 
there was a corresponding restraint on the 
bosses in regard to lockouts. 

I believe that the safety of the Labor 
Bureaus, as well as that of labor organiza- 
tions themselves, is in the conservatism of 
their management, witli a radical idea to 
the future wants of the people — not to 
give them all that every alarmist asks, but 
the next and nearest thing they can prop- 
erly investigate upon which it is possible 
to secure information, or on which to base 
legislation. In the work of the Bureaus 
represented here, including the National 
Bureau, I believe that plan of taking one 
subject at a time is correct and safe. 

The real statistics of labor organizations 
will be gathered by them, immediately in 
some cases, remotely as time goes on. But 
there are matters you can reach, and 
which you are reaching, relating to the 
hours of labor, wages of labor, cost of 
living, cost of production and profits, the 
conditions of various industries in their 
sanitary rules, and in States where you 
have mines, look after the condition of 
the miners ; investigate convict labor, 
women’s and children’s labor and such 
practical subjects. Your zealous interest 
in those questions and your activity in 
those respects will cause the laboring peo- 
ple to repose in you the confidence you 
deserve >and aid you materially in the 
work in' which you are engaged. 



MOULDERS LOCKED OUT. 

The Trades Assembly of Rochester, N. 
Y., appeals to all wage workers and 
friends of honest labor. For the past 18 
months all members of the Iron Moulders’ 
Union have been locked out of the Roch- 
ester Co-Operative Foundry for refusing 
to submit to the unjust demands of said 
firm, and as yet no settlement whatever 
has been reached. The places of the 
Union Moulders have been taken by boys 
and some of the rankest scabs of America. 
With these the Rochester Co-Operative 
Foundry Co. are manufacturing their 
stoves and ranges. Now we ask all to 
have non-intercourse with all dealers who 
handle then - stoves and ranges, and by so 
doing you will aid honest labor in a just 
cause. The list of stoves of Co Operative 
Foundry Co : 

Red Cross Stoves and Ranges; New 
Idea Range, Kremlin, Maple Leaf, Gen- 
esee. 

Monroe Range, Fox Hall Range, New- 
port Range, The Fire Fly, The Hornet 
Furnace. 



THE SELFISHNESS OF UNIONS. 

In an address to the Miners’ Union in 
Hanley, Staffordshire. England, Mr. John 
Morley. M. I’., made the following re- 
marks : " 

‘ ' People sometimes talk of selfishness 
of Trade Unions. But there is all the 
difference in the world between the selfish- 
ness ot a capitalist and the selfishness of a 
great labor organization. The one means 
an increase of selfish luxury for one man 
or a single family. The other means not 
luxury, but increase of decency, increase 
of comfort, increase of self respect, more 
ease for the aged, more schooling for the 
young, not of one but of ten thousand 
families. Others may call this selfishness 
if they please ; I call it humanity and 
civilization and the birtberanee of the 
common weal." — Leader. 
j-abor. 



The United Garment Workers’ Na- 
tional Union is making a good fight for 
recognition of their label on all ready made 
clothing. Knights of Labor, D. A. 231, is 
opposing this National Union. Todd, 
Sullivan & Co. of New 7 York, are being 
taught that as a clothing firm they must 
recognize this sturdy new 7 Union of Gar- 
ment Workers. 



RULES REGARDING APPRENTICES. 

At the Detroit Convention of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of Amer- 
ica, held Aug. 6-11, 1888, the following rules in 
relation to apprentices were approved and the 
Local Unions are urged to secure their enforce- 
ment : 

Whereas, The rapid influx of unskilled and in- 
competent men in the carpenter trade has had, 
of late years, a very depressing and injurious 
effect upon the mechanics in the business, an» 
has a tendency to degrade the standard of skill 
and to give no encouragement to young men to 
become apprentices and 10 master the trade 
thoroughly; therefore, in the best interests of the 
erait, we declare ourselves in favor of the follow- 
ing rules: 

Section 1. The indenturing of apprentices is 
the best means calculated to give that efficiency 
which it is desirable a carpenter should possess, 
and also to give the necessary guarantee to the 
employers that some return will be made to them 
for a proper effort to turn out competent work- 
men ; therefore, we direct that all Local Unions 
under our jurisdiction shall use every possible 
means, wherever practical, to introduce the sys- 
tem of indenturing apprentices. 

Sec. 2. Any boy or person hereafter engaging 
himself to learn the trade of carpentry, shall be 
required to serve a regular apprenticeship of four 
consecutive years, and shall not be considered a 
journeyman unless he has complied with this 
rule, and is twenty-one years of age at the com- 
pletion of his apprenticeship. 

Sec. 8 . All bo>s entering the carpenter trade 
with the intention of learning the business shad 
be held by agreement, indenture or written con- 
tract for a term of four years. 

Sec. 4. When a boy shall have contracted with 
an employer to serve a certain term of years, he 
shall on no pretence whatever, leave said em- 
ployer and contract with another, without the 
full and free consent of said flrst employer, un- 
less there is just cause or that such change is 
made in consequence of the death or relinquish- 
ment of business by the first employer : any ap- 
prentice so leaving shall not be permitted to 
work under the jurisdiction of any Local Union 
in our Brotherhood, but shall be required tore- 
turn to his employer and serve out his appren- 
ticeship. 

Sec. 6. It is enjoined upon each Local Union to 
make regulations limiting the number of ap- 
prentices to be employed in each shop or mill to 
one for such number of journeymen as may 
seem to them just; and all Unions are recom- 
mended to admit to membership apprentices in 
the last year of their apprenticeship, to the end 
that, upon the expiration of their terms of ap- 
prenticeship, they may become acquainted with 
the workings of the Unions, and be better fitted 
to appreciate its privileges and obligations upon 
assuming full membership. 



SOMETHING FOR CARPENTERS TO READ. 

The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America was founded in Convention 
at Chicago, August 12, 1881. 

At first it had only 12 Local Unions and 2042 
members. Now, in eight years, it has grown to 
number over 798 Local Unions in over 689 cities, 
and 81,000 enrolled members. It is organized to 
protect the carpenter trade from the evils of low 

rices and botch-work; its aim is to encourage a 

igher standard of bkill and better wages, to re- 
establish an apprentice system, and to aid and 
assist the members by mutual protection and be- 
nevolent means. It pays a Wife Funeral Benefit 
of $26 to $60; Members’ Funeral Benefit, $100 to 
$200, and Disability Benefit, $100 to $400. In these 
General Benefits, $44,732 have been expended the 
past year, and $166,250 the past eight years, while 
$310,000 more were spent for Sick Benefits by the 
Local Unions. Such an organization is worth 
the attention of every carpenter. The Brother- 
hood is a Protective Trade Union as well as a 
Benevolent Society. It has raised wages in 482 
cities, and placed five and a half million dollars 
more wages annually in the pockets of the car- 
penters in those cities It reduced the hours of 
labor to 8 hours a day in 41 cities, and 9 hours a 
day in 331 cities not to speak of 352 cities which 
have established the 8 or 9 hour system on Satur- 
days. By this means 9,200 more carpenters have 
gained employment. This is the result of thor- 
ough organization. It is not a secret oath-bound 
organization. All competent carpenters are eli- 
gible to join. 



GENERAL LAWS. 

Weekly Pay — Weekly payments are the most 
convenient for members of this Brotherhood, 
and where practicable should be adopted. 

Convict Labor. — W e will not use any mill or 
other work manufactured in a penal institution, 
or brought from any town or city where cheap 
labor prevails. 

Labor’s Holiday.— W e favor the adoption of 
the first Monday in September as Labor’s Holi- 
day, and we recommend that our L. U. ’s shall 
endeavor to observe the same. 

Eight Hours.— Our L. U.’s shall do all in their 
power to make the Eight hour rule universal, 
and to sustain those unions that have now estab- 
lished the Eight hour system. 

Am k able U nderstanding — TlieG. E.B should 
do sill in its jx) wer to discourage strikes, and 
adopt such means as will tend to bring about an 
amicable understanding between Local Unions 
and employers. 

Lien Laws.— W e desire uniform lien laws 
throughout the United States and Canadas, mak- 
ing a mechanic’s lien the first mortgage on real 
estate to secure the wages of labor first, and 
material second. Such liens Hhould be granted 
without long stays of execution or other un- 
necessary delays. 

Building Trades Leagues.— E ach L. U. shall 
strive to form a League composed of delegates 
from the various unions of the building trades in 
its respective city, and by this means an employ- 
ment bureau for these trades can be created. 

Grading Wages.— We are opposed to any sys- 
tem of grading wages in the Local Unions, as we 
deem the same demoralizing to the trade, and a 
further incentive to reckless competition, having 
the ultimate tendency when work is scarce, to 
allow first-class men to öfter their labor at third- 
class prices. We hold that the plan of fixing a 
minimum price for a day’s work to be the safest 
ami best, ami let the employers grade the wages 
above that minimum. 



Skvekal of our correspondents have 
been perusing President Harrison’s very- 
exhaustive message. They have inquired 
why it is the President makes no refer- 
ence to measures of labor legislation, and 
wherein does he give any special recogni- 
tion to the working people ? To our mind 
it would be otherwise, no matter who is 
President, if the working people were 
only thoroughly organized all over this 
land ; they would get far more social and 
political recognition than is now accorded 
them. 

FIRST-CLASS BOOKS l 



CHEAP, USEFUL AND PRACTICAL. 



Bell’s Carpentry Made Easy $5 00 

The Builder’s Guide and Estimator’s 

Price Book. Hodgson. 2 00 

The S teel Square, and How to Use It. 1 00 
Practical Carpentry. Hodgson. ... I 00 
Stair-Building Made Easy. Hodgson. I 00 
Hand Railing Made Easy .... . I 00 

Illustrated Architectural and Me- 
chanical Drawing-Book. A Self-In- 
structor. with 300 Illustrations ..... 1 00 

The Carpenter’s and Builder’s Com- 
plete Companion ... . . 2 50 



Address P. J. McGUIRE, 




This is a Facsimile of the LABEL of the 



UNITED HATTERS 

OF NORTH AMERICA. m 

The Labelling received the indorsement of the 
General Executive Board of the K. of L. and of 
the American Federation of Labor. 

4Gy*The Label is placed on every union-mr 
hat before it leaves the workman’s hands. c 
dealer hikes a label from one hat and places iti. 
another, or has any detached labels in his store, 
do not buy from him, as his Jaliels may be coun- 
terfeit and his hats may be the product of scab or 
non-union labor. 

beware of Counterfeits. Sometimes they are 
printed on white paper and sometimes on yellow 
paper. As a general thing they are not perforated 
on the edges. A counterfeit label with perforated 
edges has lately made its appearance. It is larger 
than the genuine one. The genuine label is about 
an inch and a half square and is printed on buff 
colored paper. When purchasing a hat see to it 
that you get the genuine label v r ith the perforated 
edges. 

This is the Only Correct Union Label foi 
Fur-Felt Hats. 

BUY NO FUR-FELT HAT WITHOUT IT! 

Wm. Leonard, President, 

Hat Makers’ International Association; 
James II. Penrose, Secretary, 

523 Snyder Ave., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
•Thos. F. O’Rourke, President, 

Hat Finishers’ International Ass’n; 
John Phillips, Secretary, 

417 Park Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



THE UNION LABEL. 

THE CIGAR MAKERS» BLUE LABEL. 




At the Four- 
teenth Annual 
Session of the 
Cigar Makers’ 
International 
Union, held at 
Chicago, in the 
month ofSeptem- 
ber, 1 886, the ac- 
companying label 
I was adopted as a 
trade mark to be 
pasted on every 
box of cigars 
made by Union 
men. 



roil are opposed to the servile labor of Cool- 

moko union-made cigars. . 

you ore opposed to contracts for eonvlo 
; i„ deadly competition with free labor 
o union-made cigars. , 

•ou favor higher wages, smoke union-mad 
. ** 
iron are opposed to filthy tenemeut-hoiis 
■ies smoke none hut uinon-mado cigah 
,'OU favor SHOBTKB HOURS OP PA BOB, SBlok 

■ou favor of permanent organization of labo 
ly union shops, do not purchase the pr 
of scabs, rats and blacklegs. t 

. Dl..n Ta hol k »n tlifi Roi 




I 






'Volume XII. — No. 2. 



PHILADELPHIA, FEBRUARY, 1892. 



Published Montht.’ 



t J ul 

a n, 



*r 

If 



t Vi 



THE WORKINGMAN THE TRUE RULER 
1 OF THE EARTH. 

Idler, stand back, and leave to us 
The fruits of our hard toil ; 

Ttjo long thou' st been a bane, a curse, 

-A serpent’s treacherous coil. 

Tljiou’st wrapt us round about with wrongs, 
'{That ground us to the earth ; 

A^id smote us with hell-woven thongs. 

Until we cursed our birth. y 

I«dler, stand back, leave us our own,— 

»Aye, ‘ ours,” by every righteous law. 

The seed we sowed for you was mown, 

To till your greedy, glutton maw. 

Fjor you we toiled, and never yet 
* One kindly word thou’st given ; 

■ Xnd still we poured our honest sweat, 

3 And still like beasts were driven. 

l*dler, stand back, no longer we 
Do tremble at thy frown ; 

' t ) ie turn is ours , but watch and see, 

How boldly we cast the gauntlet down. 

/Aye, take it up, we care not now, 

We know our strength to light; 
vVe’ve learned the way to shun eaeh slough, 
j And our watchword is 4i Unite.” 

I*dler, stand back, you block the way, 

1 A nobler being comes; 
ifleneeforth all men shall own his sway ; 

N See ! Nature for him blooms. 

TU'he ruler of the earth behold, 

a Crn 1 } His well-knit form now scan : 

KesQ 

hearth bosom bared, his sleeve uprolled : 
their' Behold the Workingman ! 

them T ‘ C - 

Rci h 'Cal Union, No. 03, New York, 
sent 

PEN' ' ’ ‘ 

fHE ORIGIN OF THE WORD “CARPEN- 
TER.’’ 



Brother J. K. Whiteside, of Union 046, 
Pittsburgh, Kan., asked what was the 
meaning uf the word “ Carpenter,” ako 
Tits origin. 

N No member being prepared to answer, 
"'a committee was appointed to ascertain, 

’ if possible, the origin of the word. 

1 In the report of that committee was the 
following, obtained from Brother Crews 
V Jewell, of Ohanute, Kan. L. U. No. 64« 
admired the communication so much that 
,\a motion was made and carried that a 
copy be furnished The Ca nr enter for 
■ ’' publication, believing that many brothers 
would read it with interest. 

By permission of Brother Jewell wesend 
the following : 

Strictly speaking, a carpenter is one 
who construct# tilt framework of a house, 

J ship or bridge, made of wood. The car- 
8 penter completes whatever is necessary 
t to make the structure substantial. The 
house-carpenter completes the framework 
of the outside wall and of the partitions; 

' he also completes the roof and the floor, 
j Whatever is joined on to the frame of 
the house by way of finishing or orna- 
, ment, made of wood, belongs to the 
Joiner. The Joiner also makes the doors, 
sash, stairs, mantels, stationary cupboards, 
closets, and puts in place the facings, 
washboard or baseboard, and whatever 
else is necessary to coinplete the wood- 
work of the house. Some men are good 
framers or carpenters, and are also good 
joiners. This class have two trades, and 
wecall them “ Carpenters and Joiners.” 
Your second question: “ How did the 
name Carpenter originate?” 

In order to tell "how” the term origi- 
nated, I find it necessary to tell when 
and where it originated. Our word “ Car- 
penter”' is from the old French word 
“ Charpentitr.” This term or name was 
used by the Franks, a warlike and un 
cultured race, out of which the French 
nation in part was formed, and from 
which France was named. The old 
French derived the word from the low 
or later Latin word, Carpentaria#, a wagon 
or chariot maker. In time of war the 
Roman armies took with them wagons 
or chariots, also wagon-makers to repair 
the chariots. These men were skilled 
woodworkers, and were employed to 
build houses for the armies wherever 
they spent the winter or established a 
post. When the Romans were among 
the Franks, the Franks would see them 
framing bridges and at work on houses 
more frequently than on anything else, 
t and -would hear the Romans call them 
“ carpentarius,” and would thus learn to 
use the term in a different way from what 
the Latins did. 

The Latins saw their wagon-makers at 
work on a house, bridge, or boat, and 
they would call them wagon-makers ; 
that is. they would call them ’‘carpen- 
tarius. ” While the Franks, hearing the 
men called by this name, and seeing them 
at work on houses and other frame 
structures, would learn to call a man who 
constructed any heavy frame work out of 
wood a “carpentarius.” The old French 
dropped the Latin ending of the word, 

' i-u s,” and changed the long “ a ” into 
■ ie,” and thus was formed the old French 
vk»'d. “ charpentier.'l This word, with its 
o’-d French mea»'"- passed into the 
iLyiffio-! 4 a> r0 - •'' U1 ^ 1 ” '-»ter date was 
ance- This is the kind of m3fc .1 
pn nine hours and an advance of $?.50‘ 
r day fo- the carpenters in Bridgeton, 
J., las' .'prb 



Rt 

an 

ov< 

eas; 

face 

le 

'dr 

be p< 
Addr 
etree: 



anglicized by dropping out the “ i ” of the 
last syllable, and so we have the English 
word “carpenter,” which, in its strictest 
Eense, means, as shown above, a framer, 
one who makes heavy frame structures 
out of wood. 

Thus far we have traced the word down 
the ages to the time when it received the 
present English meaning, and beyond 
that time into the Latin, and have shown 
that it came out of the Latin, through the 
old French into the English. It remains 
still to remark that the word originated 
outside of the Latin tongue. The Latin 
derived it from the Celtic word,“ carruca,” 
a word used by the Celts as the name of a 
two-wheeled cart. With the Celts the 
word appears to have been originated 
The Celtic race in ancient times occupied 
central and western Europe. Their de- 
scendants now occupy Ireland, Wales, 
Highland, Scotland, and the north of 
France. 

Your next question, “What did the 
word mean’in the time of Christ ?” 

The word was not known to the civil- 
ized world in the time of Christ, if, in- 
deed, it had any existence in His day. 
The word for carpenter in Mark vi- 3, is 
“ tekrar ” (teknon). It is better rendered 
by our word, “ mechanic.” since the term 
is applied to a skillful workman. It is 
known that the foster father of Jesus was 
a worker in wood such as we in this west- 
ern country would call a carpenter. This 
information is gathered from writings out- 
side of the New Testament. Joseph, be- 
ing a carpenter, would, under the ordinary 
rules in his day, be obliged to teach Jesus 
the same trade. In Christ’s time it was a 
dishonor to a Jew to be without a trade. 
It had been said for centuries, and was 
believed among the Jens that “ He, who 
brings up a son without a trade, brings up 
a son to become a thief.” After the boy 
came to manhood he was free to follow 
what he pleased. 

The Hebrew word forearpenter. is, ty"i ri , 
(charash). It is applied to several classes 
of skilled workmen. It means, a me- 
chanic. When the word is used some 
other word is used with it to show what 
the person spoken of works in, whether 
of gold, silver, wood, or iron. The same 
is true of the Latin They say, “faber 
tignanius,” a mechanic in wood; “faber 
ferrarius,” a mechanic in iron; “faber 
aurrarius,” a mechanic in gold, etc. 
“ Faber” means a fabricator, or maker of 
anything. 

V 

PERSONAL MENTION. 

General Secretary J. T. Elliott, of the 
Brotherhood of Painters and Decorators, 
has been quite seriously ill of late- 

J. Franklin. President, Union 017, 
Vancouver, B. C., has been elected aider- 
man as a labor representative in that city. 

A. Bailey, of E. St. Louis, 111. , and L. R, 
Carl, Auburn, N. Y., on recommendation 
of their respective Local Unions, have been 
duly commissioned as District Organizers 
of the U. B. 

Joseph Kerr, formerly of Union 10, 
Detroit, Mich. , now a member of Union 
203, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., has been elected 
First Vice-President of the New York 
State Branch of the American Federation 
of Labor. 

D. P. Rowland, Ex-General President 
and now Business Agent of the Cincin- 
nati Carpenters, has been elected 
First Vice-President of the Ohio State 
Trades and Labor Assembly, S. P. Ewing, 
of Union 61, Columbus, O., was elected 
the Treasurer of the body. 



•L, 



FLOATING ITEMS. 

The Nebraska eight-hour law has again 
been decided constitutional. 

Boston machinists will make a stand 
for the nine-hour day May 1st next. 

The eight- hour system is to receive a 
trial of one year in the municipal depart- 
ments of London, England, and if satis- 
factory will be continued. 

The eight-hour day is being pushed 
very vigorously by the bricklayers of Bal- 
timore. Md., and it is likely to be adopted 
with little opposition from the bosses. 

A State Labor Congress is to be held in 
Nashville, Tenn., Monday, Feb. 29th. It 
promises to be well attended, and will 
have good effect in securing needful labor 
legislation in Tennessee. 

The Granite Cutters’ National Union, 
the Marble Cutters’ National Union, the 
Journeymen Freestone Cutters’ National 
Union and the Journeymen Stoue Cutters’ 
Associations of North America have de- 
cided to work in harmony with each other 
in the future. 

There was one custom of the colonial 
days which had in it somewhat of merit, 
i. sousing in the water the shrews who 
were always speaking ill of their neigh- 
bors. There is room for some such insti- 
tution in the labor movement for the 
benefit of the clique who have nothing but 
ill to say of others. It may safely be pat 
down that this disposition to abuse every- 
body and everything is an evidence of 
surplus spleen rather than of extra vir- 
tue. —Labor leader. 

The Tanners and Curriers have formed 
a go-ahead national organization, known 
as the “ United Brotherhood of Tanners 
and Curriers of America. ’ ’ J ohn E . Cough- 
lin, 649 Island avenue, Milwaukee, Wia., 
is the General Secretary. The organiza- 
tion is somewhat similar in style and work 
to that of our own. It was formed last 
June with ten Local Unions, and its next 
convention will be held at Glean, N. Y. 
Do all you can to help these people to 
perfect the unity of their trade. 



CROOKED WORK ON THE WORLD’S FAIR 
GROUNDS. 

The Construction Department at the 
World’s Fair Grounds, Chicago, has an 
employment office and agent on the 
grounds, and they insist that no man can 
get a job unless he is employed by this 
agent. The grounds arc fenced in, and no 
man can get in to look for employment. 
Carpenters’ wages are 35 cents per hour 
as paid by Chicago contractors, but we 
have often heard the policemen at the 
Employment Agent’s gate crying out for 
carpenters for 30 cents per hour, pre- 
sumably to go to work for outside con 
tractors who have contracts on the 
grounds. 



INDUSTRIAL NOTES 0F ALL KINDS. 

Ik ai t, does not go to your satisfaction, 
do not blame your officers. The pilot of a 
ship cannot mitigate the billows or calm 
the winds . — The Laster. 

Look out for ash-barrel hats! These 
hats are picked out of ash barrels and ofi 
the streets by street scavengers and made 
over again at little cost by non-union hat- 
ters. To be sure you have a union hat 
look under the sweatband of your hat and 
see it has the union label. See advertise- 
ment on page 4 of this journal for design 
of the label. 



For over three months the collar 
starchers of Troy N. Y., fully 700 girls 
and women have been out on strike against 
the firm of Miller, Hall & Hartwell, of by W. H. KUver, Gen. Pres, of the U. B. 



They will not issue a pass to any repre- 
sentative of any labor union admitting 
him on the buildings and if a labor dele- 
gate should go on the buildings he is at 
once put ofi by the police, as they have 
a number on each building, and one case 
has happened where our representative 
has been abused by a drunken policeman. 

We have an agreement that all work 
shall be done on the eight-hour plan. 
This has been also violated in a great many 
instances. 

There are about 200 policemen ou the 
grounds, and a representative cannot go 
on the grounds without his every step is 
dogged by those police, who, as has been 
proven, have to put up $5 or $10 a month 
to hold their job. A notorious character 
by the name of Nordrum, who has been 
discharged in disgrace by Chicago’s Mayor 
from the detective iorce, is then - Chief of 
Police. 

They maintain a hotel on the grounds, 
with over 400 bunks on one floor, and 
charge men $4 a week for board, and keep 
the same out of their wages. McArthur 
Brothers compel their men to sleep in 
canvas tents in all sorts of weather. 

No man can get a job on the grounds as 
inspector of the buildings under the Chief 
of Construction, D. H. Burnhamif, if he 
is a member of any trade union. No man 
can get a job on the grounds or buildings 
as gate-keeper or watchman if he is a 
member of any labor union. 

On the above complaint the Executive 
Council of the American Federation of 
Labor, at then - meeting, Feb. I, 1892, de- 
cided as follows : 

“ Resolved, The President of the A. F. 
of L. is instructed to write to the Chief of 
the Department of Construction of the 
World’s Fair Buildings. Chicago, and call 
on biro to abate the evils complained of 



of Carpenters and Joiners of Ame ick, in 
The strikers are resisting a re- j the foregoing letter. 

Resolved, That in the event that 



•fly, 

aud cuffs. 

duction of 56 X per cent, in wages. Wei 
appeal to workingmen everywhere to help 
them. Don’t buy the “ Monarch ” shirts, 
which are made by this firm, and avoid all 
shirts, collars and cuffs, liearingthe brauds 
of a horseshoe and shield, which is the 
general trade mark of the firm, until it 
deals justly by its employes now on strike. 




251t»,/— 
11 S0|«58— 
1 30 65»— 
6 60 660.- 



m tue event 

these grievances are not redressed at an 
early date, President. Gompers is empow- 
ered to call on all the workingmen’s or- 
ganizations affiliated with the A. F of L. 
to consider the advisability of withdraw- 
ing their patronage ' im the coming 
World’s Fair at Chicac 11 ” 

if' . ... 

ZU j abouflW?leet eleven Indies, tall, dark eomplex- 
j ion, slim build, brown «3 es, Und right eye cross- 
8 30 ' eyed. Treat him as a scab wherever he goe«. 



GOSSIP FROM EVERYWHERE. 

The Cigarmakebs’ International Union 
has spent $25,000 to advertise the blue 
label. 

Patronize the shoes and boots bearing 
shoe-workers’ label as published in this 
issue. 

Union 602 has changed its headquarters 
from Red Bank, N. J., and now meets in 
Oceanic, N. J. 

Job Lot Unionism.— Some union men 
hold union meetings on the curbstones 
and in saloons, while others transact their 
business in their union halls. Which are 
the best union men ? — Cleveland CUizen. 

Fleishman, the boycotted yeast manu- 
facturer, is at the bottom of the bakers’ 
strikes at Duluth, Toledo and Findlay, O. 
He is making strenuous efforts to break 
up the International Bakers’ Union, but 
it is a greater task than he can accom- 
plish. 

The boycott placed on the Clark O.N.T. 
thread has had and is still having such an 
effect that, in order to prevent a com- 
plete shut-down in over one-half of their 
departments the company has been com- 
pelled to discharge the scab spinners in 
batches of twenty and thirty each alter- 
nate week. Those who remain in the 
employ of the firm are working only three 
or four days in the week. Keep up the 
boycott. 

UNIONS TWO MONTHS IN ARREARS. 

Under sections 57 and 111 it is the duty 
of the G. S. to notify Local Unions when 
two months in arrears. The G. S. takes 
this method of notifying the following 
list of Locals that they are two months in 
arrears to the G. S,: Unions 69, 85, 130, 
139, 144, 161, 174, 178, 179, 187, 210, 239, 
241, 254 294, 296, 303, 30«, 318, 342, 350, 
358, 381, 386, 387, 390, 399, 432, 476 , 498, 
502, 514, 524, 528, 582, 536, 548, 551, 562, 
565, 568 569, 570, 573, 574, 582 583, 586, 
603, 604, «15, 620, 624, 636, «40, 048, 651, 
653, 662, «71, 674, «83, 688, 090, 700, 710, 
717, 724, 732, 737, 738, 740, 754, 769, 781, 
785, 789, 796, 797. 

NO LIST OF OFFICERS. 

In accordance with lines 6 aud 7. of 
Section 152. of the Constitution, it is the 
duty of the Recording Secretaiy of the 
Local Union “to send a list of all new 
officers to the G. S., also, all changes of 
officers.” Blanks to report the names 
and addresses of the new officers were 
sent out on December 16th last by the 
G. S. to all the Locals. 

Here it is now the 1st of February, and 
a number of the Recording Secretaries 
have not attended to this duty. Such 
negligence merits very severe censure. 
There is no excuse for such carelessness. 
We must have a complete list of all the local 
officers, to be kept on file in the general 
office. 

Hence, we most urgently call on the 
Recording Secretaries of the below named 
unions to send in their lists of officers for 
the ensuing term beginning January 1, 
1892. They have not done so up to date ; 
and the other officers and members should 
arouse and stir up the Recording Secreta- 
ries to do their duty in this respect. 

Here is the list of locals whose record- 
ing secretaries have failed to attend to 
this matter. Please poke them up : 



25 


220 


404 


529 


646 


30 


221 


408 


530 


651 


36 


220 


409 


531 


657 


48 


228 


410 


532 


600 


62 


230 


413 


537 


601 


63 


239 


415 


538 


662 


56 


245 


417 


540 


064 


57 


247 


419 


554 


668 


66 


254 


421 


555 


671 


69 


255 


424 


556 


674 


71 


261 


425 


560 


680 


80 


264 


426 


561 


683 


81 


273 


427 


562 


688 


85 


279 


432 


565 


690 


88 


292 


437 


568 


695 


93 


294 


438 


569 


696 


95 


298 


441 


571 


697 


97 


303 


443 


572 


708 


98 


307 


444 


573 


709 


103 


312 


415 


574 


710 


106 


313 


447 


581 


717 


115 


317 


450 


583 


718 


119 


318 


458 


586 


720 


120 


319 


459 


588 


721 


124 


322 


460 


589 


727 


127 


324 


407 


592 


733 


137 


325 


472 


593 


735 


139 


331 


474 


596 


740 


142 


337 


476 


599 


741 


147 


339 


478 


601 


745 


152 


344 


479 


603 


748 


157 


345 


480 


609 


754 


160 


350 


484 


613 


755 


170 


353 


494 


615 


762 


177 


354 


498 


619 


767 


178 


358 


501 


620 


769 


184 


369 


504 


623 


772 


188 


371 


506 


624 


779 


190 


372 


510 


632 


780 


203 


379 


519 


634 


784 


204 


386 


521 


636 


785 


216 


388 


524 


642 


iye 




tHVX, ..4. 


^‘lh. 




too 


«in 

nod) 


10 ©tunben gearbeitet imrb, loll un 



OFFICIAL NOTES. 

Union 230, Pittsburah, Pa., has been sus- 
pended for violation of the Constitution. 

On December 8th, Union 177, McKees- 
port, Pa, sent in $60.25, for old debt of 
special assessment. 

Don’t send auditor’s reports or treas- 
urer's bonds to this office They should 
remain on file in the Local. 

Auditors of local Unions should audit 
the accounts regularly once a month, aud 
go over the same carefully. 

Where a Union is weak aud struggling 
it is folly to keep up a higher initiation 
fee, this winter, than two dollars. 

The next convention of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters will lie held 
in St Louis, Mo., on Monday, August 1st, 
next. 

Send in your Union’s vote on the four 
propositions. Up to January 50th, only 
234 Unions had voted so the time for 
vote is now extended until March 1st, 
next. 

Have you or your Union any sugges- 
tions lor action at the next convention, 
or any changes to suggest as to the con- 
stitution? If you have, then send them 
in at once. 

Appeals or circulars from Local Unions, 
asking the Union or members to purchase 
ball tickets or raffle checks should not be 
considered at all, as such appeals are en- 
tirely irregular. 

Polish Constitutions. — Union 598, 
Polish Carpenters, Milwaukee, Wifi., has 
had our U. B. Constitution printed in the 
Polish language. Copies can lie had 
cheap. Write to Theo. Deinbinski, 821 
Eleventh avenue, Milwaukee, Wis. , for 
copies. 

The severity of la grippe has told 
heavily the past six months on the funds 
of all our Local Unions wherever they had 
sick benefits. And it has also told on the 
lives and energy and business activity of 
the whole people, it is even a wonder we 
have paid all claims for death benefits 
legally due, and did not have to levy an 
assessment on our numbers. The last 
benefit assessment was levied in Octohet 
1886. 

General Secretary P. J. McGuire is 
now out on the road in the interest of the 
organization delivering public lectures. He 
is notin best of health, owing to the attack 
of influenza he had in December last. On 
January 18th he spoke in the centre of the 
coal regions, at Sbamokin,Pa., and on Feb- 
ruary 1st he attended the meeting of ihe 
Executive Council of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor in session at New York. 
There he secured favorable action on the 
complaint of the carpenters as to the 
World’s Fair building, and on the car- 
penters’ petition for appropriation ol 
money to prosecute violations of the semi- 
monthly pay law in Pennsylvania, and of 
the eight-hour law in Nebraska. On 
February 3d, he spoke in Troy, N.Y., and 
since then has spoken daily in New York 
State, to large audiences in Utica Syra- 
cuse, Rochester. Auburn, Lockport, Buf- 
falo, Elmira and Bridgeton, also in Erie. 
Pa., and Toronto, Canada. 



FINE THESE FINANCIAL SECRETARIES 

The provisions of lines 8, 9 and 10 c 
Section 153 of the Constitution requirt 
that the F. S. of each Local Union shal 
make a monthly report to the G. S. under 
penalty of $2 fine for failing to do so. Then 
is no reason why this should not be at 
tended to by each Financial Secretary 
Blanks in sufficient quantities are fur 
nished to the F. S. from the gen 
oral office. Month after month warn 
ing has been given that the negli 
gent Financial Secretaries would b 
published. The publication of such a lis 
for August and September last had a verr 
healthy effect, and for a time the repoirt 
came in more promptly; but now we ftflp 
that several Financial Secretaries huv 
made no report at ail for the months c 
November and December. The Lot" 
l) irons interested should fine these Seer 
taries. Here is a list of them: 






13 

24 

54 

58 

«1 

«0 

130 

189 

146 

147 
178 
195 
204 
216 
242 

•150 



303 

31« 

318 

324 

381 

338 

345 

350 

372 

378 

380 

38« 

387 

390 

399 



427 

432 

435 

437 

438 
443 
465 
476 
479 
492 

1 508 
524 



562 

508 

569 

574 

586 

593 

598 

60 

r. 



WHO, 



fommenben Tvrüh iat)c bei' uttb Slem: 
ftunbentag cingefüfirt mevben. X-ab neun' 
man 2l«itaticn. (St- Souiö Sageblatt.) 



..Sycamore >L . . 

1 Seventh tt. 

528 10 w * 616 Howitt ist, 
rcks.Hth ami H.-tup. 
hnjBtm, Box 100. 
öS'f.Tohnson. coz S ltb. 

, W1T , «. Wiuzel, 413 South Court. 

166. Rock Island— J, F. New field, 2.0S Sixth ave. 
74s! Savanna — \V. T. Cottral. 

199 Son’ll Chicago— J. C. Grantham, Box 149, 
Cheltenham, Cook Oo. 

75 ». s Ehulkwood— J. P. Kimiuol, Calumet P.O. 
Hi’ SPRiNurtw-D— John Dick, 615 Eaatinau uve 












4>V 

1 



THE CARPENTER. 



1 



Tue pürpfmtfr I moc?eo,n8s of the eeneral EX - sr * 

1 nt Orirvi L-1M I L-iV, ECUTIVE B0*RD. I mend it to the consideration of the next con- Appli 



members of the suspended Union Xo. 



ECUTIVE BOiRD. I mend it to the consideration of the next con- Application. I nion A>2. An«h r*on, I nd.. for 

venUon. sanction of trade demands t;. h. B feel it is 

Mr. Ilenrvot, representative of the Furni- now ton early in the season to sanction the en- 

Pn I la Delphi A Pa Ja .11,1892. ture Workers’ International Union, again forcemeat of trade rules w hi« h ma> ’ 11 ' < * 1 
Philadelphia, . ll, appeared tieforc theG. E. B to arrange for better onr members in strikes, therefore no further ae- 

FIRST DAY’S SESSION — JAN. 11th. relations between the U. B. and the Cabinet- tion will he taken on trade demands until tin- 

makers working at house building. G. K. B next meeting of G. h. B., March 2«. 181*2. 

| The G. K. B. met at 8 A. M. of above date, at rpeoninit>n(le(I t|iut Mr . Henrvot ami the Exce.i- Applications for sanc tion of trade demands 
oilicv oft;. S. Chairman Hugh McKay pro- tive Committee of the Cabinetmakers draw up were then submitted from the D. C of Sc ranton. 



A LABEL ADOPTED. 

Knows as thk Union Laukl of t „ 
Boot and Shoemakers ok Amku, 



OFFICIAL JOCRSAL OK THK 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Philadelphia, pa , ja . 11 . 1892. 

Joiners of America. 

| FIRST DAY’S SESSION'— JAN. 11th. 

.•W.’wAa? Monthly, on ihe Fifteenth oj each Month, 

AT The G. E. B. met at 8 A. M. of above date, at 

1** N. Math St.. Phil*., Pa. .«A»« »** (i s - Chairman Hugh McKay pre- 

, , .... sided. Minutes of previous sessions in October 

P. J. McGhee. Editor and 1 ubh.her, ^ ^ ^ publi9 , K . <I in the Novem- 

lu-r Journal. 

Watered at the Post-Ofl.ee at Philadelphia, Pa.. . f ^ ^ ft|ul , li!a lina!icial 

as second-« a., mat. ae»« nuts for October, November and Deeeudier 

.... . ; were taken up for examination and audit. All 

Sn»- T.-mos Pkice:— F ifty eeuts a year in ■ ., - , 

day. Jan. 11th. was spent in this work. 

a; ?anct . |M.»;|iai>l. 

Address all li iters and moneys to f»E(.OND I>A\ S SESSION JAN. 12m. 

1". J- MoG; iei . Audit of aeeounts of General Office eontiniied. 

Box -"l. 1 hil.ni» i;..nA. l*i and report as to the same appears in the ininiites 

— — 1 of Jan. .6th. 

PHILADELPHIA, FEBRUARY, 1892. Appeal Union «1 Chicago, in matter of lialiiuce 

— dm- f.r tinaneial expenses on death claim of J. B. 

NIN£ CHARTERS GRA* ,Tr D. Forrest. The deceased had left no heirs, and 

Since our last issue, t hat 8 . .ve been r,lion 21 1,11,1 upended more tl.an -AW for the 

. . iuiieral, and had incurred excessive expenses 

granted to nine new umoi . viz.. No. «•>, , „ . - . ... , ,, . ,,,,, ..... 

^ for carriages, committees, u band ol music, eu*. 

Calgarv. Alberta, Canada ; ko!. College g. e. B. instruct the g. s. to pay the funeral ex- 
Hill, O.; 31? Neiliart. Mont.; 321 Ottawa, ponses, not u> exceed the sum of saw, as 
Canada i FrenclP: 82*2. Alexandria, I nd.; ! !, - v tl,e UonstitutU.u. on presen- 

.. ... ... tain li of proper vouelu-rs for the expense*- 

.»96, l>ay ton,« i. (Car builders : 230. Pitts- Tht K H . mi.,,, ji. «»t' Chicago, f»>.- 

burjzh, 441, HoUmikI, Midi., UTl'l it> rtckksMies» ill t*utiiiliiiK many mrcillt»» e*- 






MTAX. Sf TMC 



A|»i>«*al riiion -1 (Tiicago, in matter ofbaliinee : mit a boy under 18 years. See Sec. 61. 



tive Com nut lee or toe uiDineuniKen« um» «I» ~ , , _ 

Written proposals to t»e acted on at the next Pa , and Union 153, Fort Wayne, 1ml. Tin- At a Krciit .<.iilerw.iv of n-j.^erda- 

meeting of the G.E.B. and send a representative aame course was ordered as in the easeof An- tives from tin? Hoot and Slim -makers ] n . 

to meet the O. E. B. demon. Ind., and applications laiii over until ternational Union, Knights of Labor ai.il 

Union 578, St. Ix»uis, Mo., (Stair Builders! n|>- March 28, 1892 the New I'.nglaild Cutters l nion, a 

plied fora dispensation to be relieved in certain Communication, Union 341. Sacramento, Cal. l U l»el WUS adoptC<l and rille.« ROV.-rnii,.» t |, e 
resjKM ts from the trade rules of the St. Louis as to legality of assessment levied lust June by same <ll’afte<l. A fa«* Rmile of tile laltfl i« 

district. TheG. E. B. recommended that the I>. the 1>. C. of California for the mill men’s stritte, gjyen above, and unionists will .*«•«• t : at i[ 

C. of St Louis grant the request. G. K- B. sustain letter of G. S that if assessment j« j n the shoes before purchasing 

Union 74, Pensacola, applies! for a dispensation was levied by consent of a two-thirds vote of the The fairtrr, the Oliifial organ «.f tl, e 
to admit an apprentice boy of 15 years of age. members of the unions in said district then the craft, Under the heading of ”A Lately 
The G. E B. decided that the L. U. ran not a<l- assessment is legal. In answer to a <piery from Last,” speaks HS follows oil the si >, •; : 
mit a bov under 18 years. See See. Cl. Union 211 tin- G. E. B. further decide it is he- “After tWO months of hard work nntii( 



due for tinaneial expenses on death c-laitn of J. B. Communication of D. C., Pittsburgh, Pa , in vond the jsiwc-r o( the (4. I-.. B. togi.i t .t »li.-*- part of t!iP Teprpseutati *8 of all tin* «hug. 

NINE CHARTERS GRA*' ,Tr D. Forrest. The deceased had left no heirs, and j reference to «1, 170 claimed by Union No. 177, I peiisation *" extend Hmit of time a inetnln-r «au making organizations, < .‘‘epting Ji A., 

>irre Olir last issue ch-u s vel-eeu * nion 21 halt ex landed more than —AW for the McKeesport. Pa., for money said to lie due on run into arrears without hoing suspend» <1 «»•<’• 2115, K- of L., a label has lieen Hgrei ■! I1 ]»uq, 

. . ’ „ funeral, and had incurred excessive expenses account of the lute strike. TheG. E. B. decide 84 is plain on that point. lilt? rule? of the label are Ptieh that ai»v 

ranted to lime new tmioi .VIZ.: No. f„ r . wmmittc-es. a band of music-, etc. that as the Pittsburgh strike was not officially Appeal from the D C. of Milwaukee for manufacturer employing union li«- j, uiil 

,'algarv. Alberta, Canada; go!. College G. E. B. instruct the t;. S. to i»ay the funeral ex- sanctioned hy the G E. B. they cannot rec-og- funds claimed to he due them from strike last he entitled to its Use, ami, ft OH! tile appli- 

-fill, O.; 91? Neihart. Mont.; o01 Ottawa, pc-nsc-s. not to exceed the sum «>f &aw, as nfze any hills on account of saidstrike. season. I-ormer dcc-ision reatlirmed. Ihe?.»il- catioilH already reeeive<l from KOUn* itthe 



presc-n- 



Freniont. Colo. 

THE VALLE OF A GOOD SECRETARY. 

In large organizations of working men. 
where the general unions are made tip of 
local associations, it is ditiicult, says the 



pc-ii'cs which might have bee n spared 

Appeals of James D.mlin und lkirl Padgett, 
formerly of 1" nion 270, St. Louis, M>>., from dc- 
» isioii of <». s ;»:i<l G. T.. in st staining Union 



. wanke«- «trike was not sanctioned with tinan- lirgest manufacturers in the COUlitrv. the 

l-OI l.TH AX S SESSION— JAN. Ntii. rial aid, but donations wen- sent -ol«-ly to help demand for this label w ill he large. 

Appeal Union 176. Ncwnort. R. I., to arrange tilt* men on strike. “The pitfalls which We fell into !| Mir 

for financial aid for their trade' movement. In Appeal. Smith W . IVrigo, l nion tin. India former attempt have been ear-fu'lv 

this ca«e the G. E. B. r< affirm their former de- "<M»»Iis. Ind , aguinst de« i.-ion of G. S.and (». avoided, and tllifl label Oil U pair of 1 - uts 
eisiou, and leave the matter of flnanciul aid ov»-r I • -^Ttc-r due c-onsidcration ap|« al not su.-lained. o|- shoes will he Bll absolute gUaraiitee ai.d 
until next meeting of O. E. B. in March. letter from District t’oiinc-11 of Chicago HI., evidence that they Were made hy Union 

Application. Union 132. Richmond. Vn., for asking an appropriation of 'l.< 00 as a donation niei) and W omen limler fair COIlditi« »II- ai;d 



270 in il . expulsion of said appe’lants. After a | r maiu .js»| M id t« enforce the card system. For tu -aid D. U. for organixing pur|x»scs. E. B. at fail’ wages. All that remains formelle 



liireful i vii-.v of all the voluminous evidence 
submitted nv XK-ssrs. Dooliu and Padgett and 



Blliladelphia /.< I‘J> to secure the right the facts as shown Oil the other «de, on theles- 
kind ot men to carry on the exec utive and ot I'ooiinan.iPacigettaon.it- 

..... * -ii ting tueir guilt as charged, t In* <». K. 11 concur 

clerical business at the respective head- ... . . w ... 

quarters so that harmony shall prevail lion ..i Union -7n. 

throughout. The secretary is generally | <>n peiition of Union H9. Newark. N. J.. the | 

the most important man, and if he is not *’ 1 l: *b . i«:» dthat in m»-w ot the present eon- 
. , , ,, , * , , dition of the'o: Lianization in Newark, N. J.. it is 

fitted to handle the correspondence and ... . ... 

1 expedient n»r inet». E. B. to comply with the 

other clerical business of his union in an r» M .u»tofi ..ion iw. and will accept theuUcof 
intelligent ami speedy manner, all kin» Is -aid union, withe at interest forth»- am. un.t due. 



want of complete information the matter is rc- decide that iu view of tin- increase»! «lc-ntli rate hers is to create a demand fur the !..! *-l. 
ferrodb-ick to the Local for further details. of late in our organisation, and the large amount Hn ,| we feel SUl’e that the Iliemheis rtf 

Coinmniiic-Mtioii, Union 15 1 ». Mi»l<lletown, N. ,( T death Im-hc-iIis pai»l out tiirougli that can-»- lalmr organizations all over the cuuiJry 
Y., applying for sanction of tra<le demands. Rc- the past year, the present condition of our Gene- will give US that kindly support it» this 
fcrr»-il back for further details. ral Treasure will not warrant any such appro- venture that they have given other i ihr-, 



A|/p!it*«t ion. T’nion 116. Vunx^iitawney, IM.» I prifttion. 



and its success is assurtd Manufacturers 



for saiic-»ion of tr.-nledci iamb. Sanction granted 
and fiiiaueial ai l. should it he m-i-ded, will he 



VoliiRiinou« cviilcnce am! complaints from ue i uf; the label will receive the beijclit <>t 
members of the Chicago unions were then p.v- the advertising which will be giv. r. t 



tint man, ami if he is not 4tsit.tiilli.il in \iew Ol ihe preiH» 1 »! «»n- cor si«h*rf*4! Mt tin* next mi-ftinjr «M* K H., pro- niiMUMn iircmci.! of nltuirs of\ lie lahnl, as it is J»rojK).-* ’4 to lli:ik~ tlli? trj'le 

the correspondeil- e and ' tlll ‘ «-• .sanitation ill Newark. N. J.. it is vide. I details a- to amount need. I nr.- furnish« »I. ' t'hh-ago. au. I of rep. at. -.1 and evorbitant mark of Otir craft U familiar Si_;iit ti eVPt’V 

• . ,r » • w l' fdie,,t, ' ,, r theG. E. B to comply with the Application. Union 721. Sioux C’ity, Iowa, for ass,— ments on the members in that city. u. the member of a labor organization in the 

aur.su nu unit i in dll rc«|ue.-t of l m».n li'J, and will accept the uttc of Ha „ rt j ol , of tra»lc demand. TheG. K. B. do not detriment of the organization. And further. States US it is oil their hid we 



feci they are instilled in granting sanction atnl <hat the 1>. <’. of our l . B. ia Chicago b entirely must depend for success. 



of confusion result. This is particularly !»•*.' '-»■•ie \ng. l. u.*--*. Hut theG E. L | a,| i“’ 1 «idfrom the sh »wing made, but would recoin- -'iboniinati- to a bmiy entirely out-i.ie of our I • The labels will l e printed in sheets of 
the case where instructions t»> -ulmrii- <-•-* -- ' ■ 1 ~ 1 '' *• -“- ll “ 11 i « - - ■ -C « ■> t ’- 1 " — j mend that the union strive to at lea-t organize a jnris«iii lion, and known a- tin- l nited > nira-u- 1 p;() paeft and will he just the size of a 



am: | a » w 1 1 



nates or reports to superior olheers are the Newark Union, 
necessary, and to the blunders of sti»-!i 
men, tts well as to their indillereinv. many 1 1111,11 D ' 
a big internecine tjuurrel can he trad, in Report Mr. T. i 
some instances to the destruction of tin* ‘.ui.vc »>. tu 

whole concern. What is often nt eded in A[liaiktV11 ar,.. 
such cases above intelligence and legil.il- - .u .imnt «.f exist 



■ »-instate for that sum i- granted 



riilRD DAY’S >E>S10X-JAN. ICth. 



Report of Mr. T. E. Dcegan was subu. iltcd as 
rt pres, i.latiu- of tin- (». E. B. to visit Bittshiugh 
io conjunction vvillt the representative ol’ the 
Aniaigaiiiated < ar|/c-nU*rs. tc* endeavor to eile» ta 
-■•tin nu nl of existing troubles between Ihe 



ity is a mutual understanding, not only oi Amalgamated and the l\ B. in piit-hm-gii. The 

the laws that govern all. hut a courteous r *‘ ,,olt " u ' " r > ‘ ^oniph-tenn.l extensive, covering 
. . . . ..... . . , . all d» tails v. im evident*»- and giving necessary 

consideration ot the difficulties attaching u ,onr,nodutn»us. Correspondence from Mr. 

to the proper and etlective administration George Cavanaugh, Secretary of tlu' American 
of them. District of the Amalgamated wasaiso read. Mr. 



repo it was very complete and extensive, covering 
all details w ith evidence and giving necessary 
rec-ommcidatious. Correspondence from Mr. 
tleorge Cavuuaiigh, Seereiarv of the American 
List: nt of the Amalgamate«! va- a.s«» ren»i. Mr. 
Cavac.ungh n. forms the U. B. that c-ertuiu ot>- 
noxi«, n- pt-rsons, » x-nieinla-rs of the U. iJ. and 
a.imiitio to the newly formed branch of the 
Aina gamateil in IMUsbiirgh, are now excluded 
f i cm tin Ama:gaint ti il at recjuc.-t of the l*. B. 

VU« r a h *»g dis. iis-:oi: the G. K. B. fui ther dc- 



CARPENTtR WOnK EXTREMELY DU.L. noxi. i'- persons, « x-mcliil.er.- of the U. 1». and 

-r .1 1 - 1 . _ i- » e li.i, .. . .. admittc-.l to the new ly formed brunch of the 

To publish a list of all the citu-s report- • , . * 

. Amalgamated in flits«. mgh, are now exeimu-d 

mg carpenter work .lull would take a floaithl a„ 1k: . ;1!1u , 1 ,i a! re,,ucst of the u. B. 

whole page of this journal. Never in nine \u. ra n .,g »b-.ur-mn the g. e. b. further de- 
vears hack has trade been so 'lull in Clare«; that for the pur|»o-c of »-«eati: g harmony 
Winter, and it has been remarkably .lull •‘ndg.K*d^-iii»i;U*iwcvMiheiw„or.;aid»ti*.i.- 

. ii n i * the Amalgamated S-a-it tv of Carpciitrisbc asked 

quite generally all over the country » ver . l ulllit .,. or » x,,c-i the following 

since last September. The hniMing la»»i:i - i . rson- no» in tm- Amaig.imated linaa-u at 
have tlattencd out in the West ami Nor:! i- fitt-burgh. m/.: 1.. .M. Caipenu-r. J. M tu.it- 



m.-nd that tin- union strive to at lea-t organize a .iun-«lii tn>ii, and known a- tin- I mted > nirx'ii- pi) p a di and will he just the size of a 
majority of the «wrponters in that city. Should Uts’ C ouncil. All the papers, etc. inthi-ca-.- postage Stamp, anti lire to he placed on the 
they do s< » ill»- <1. E. B. would hi* only too well "ere very carefully c-oiisidi-rei! and lai«l over 1 1 » S i » 1 c * lining of tilt* boot Of slltiC I abf-le 
pleased to «io mi_c thing in it< power to nid the for action next day. will lie ready for the market about .lantl- 

rarpenter* of Sioux City. «vtii mv-aswaa- iav ,»• arv 1892. Manufacturers desiring in- 

App-ication. 1 nion 741. Eogan-port, In«l.. for formation t»n this subject Will please ud- 

-aix-tiou of trade «Iemnnds. I.aid ov»*r to next Bil«s of (».!.. B. f»»r attc-ndaiu-c- at this session I dreSS Label Committee, Room *»(• to 52, 
meeting of G 11 B., ami further information "'’rc presented and allowed to the amount in j C,*>0 Atlantic Avenue, Hofton.” 

eallc*cl f«*r. ami the Union called on to npi»oiiit a 1,11 ? 130 _•>, 

.«•nfcrc-uee committee to meet the contractors. The auditing of the a, count* of the* Gc-m-ra, TRADES UNIOSAND STRIKES. 

Application. Union 3'V>. Galesburg. 111. for 0l1 icc* slmws the lollowing, and w.- prc-c-nt it in When the century began iniquitous laws 
-auction of Ira.h- «h-mands. Tjii.l over for fa- a «mimarixed staU-m.-nt of the receipts and ex- still prohibited tile combination of W’Olk- 
vorabie eonsi.ienitiimt ud to take -am»* course ,or 1 ,e *i ,,ur,or vuding Dc-c-ciuIkt 31. men In US24 the combination law« were 

»sin the ea-e of Union 744. repealed, but next vear fresh acts imposed 

A] Pi-hM o . r.“'" n 7"" 1'»"'' ;*<'•.'*' '■ '»>■ . • *»»!» new rtstriotion»", ali.l for many yeai> the 

r.»r —.ii.tioi. of i-oV ihnaiMl,. wo. S.11H im, ‘Vj’.'.n.nL'p ’ tü ’ r ' * a " 1 _ , „ laws were wrested to put down 

granted, ami if Ibittuc-ial aid he needed that suiw 1 ** 1 '-' 1 1 : or punish trade combinations, while six 

iec-t will he eot-.siili-red at the next meeting. lultOrerS wllO had pletlged each Other t<J 

Application of Mill Men’s Union. No. tgy, a MC i Total -ju -'2 47 | mutual support ill theil’ ctlorts to better 

'tair Buihlers’ Union. No. 4SI. Cineiui nti. O. Expenses for Oc toher, November and their condition Were Sentenced to trailS- 



I carpenters «»f Sioux City. 

* Application. Union 741. E<tg:in-port, In«!., for 
1 «auction of trade demands. Labi over to next 

meeting of G K. B., ami further information 
! * ea)lc*d f«»r. and the Union called on t i app«iint ;» 
e « «iiiferem-e c-ommiltee 1«» meet the contractor»». 

Application. Union 360. Galesburg. 111. for 
' sanction of trail»» demands. T jii»l over for fa- 
’ vorahle oonsideratiouA iid to take same course* 

• a« in the ea-t* of Union 714. 

Application, District f’ouncil. Cinciiinati. O., 
for sanction of tr-.u’c* «1« mauds. Ac. Sanction 
. granted, and if liiutncial aid lx* nc*e«h-d that -nl>- 
ject will be* considered at the next meeting. 

'. Application of Mill Men’s Union. No. and 
Stair Builders* Union. No. 4SI. Cineini ati, O.. 



TRADES UNIO S AND STRIKES. 

When the centurj* began iniquitous laws 
still prohibited the combination uf work- 
men. In ls24 the combination laws were 
repealed, hut next year fresh acts imposed 
new restrictions, and for many veats the 



also of Union 77 » Covington. Kv.. ami Unitm 
» '.>.*». Newport. K v.. for -an» tion t»» strik»- t»> take 
the- «aim* eour«e is the application «»f D C of 
Cincinnati. 



follow .- : 

RE l.I ITS. 



west, an<l in the South and on the l’aciiic A - -' ! - 11 ai,l ‘ *' J 

, .. tlie pail of the G. B. we s 

coast. >peculative building in the : tr-je , ... . , 

r - - l‘»u-hingii DA. live up to ther 

cities has been overdone, and has a!*.:.»-: a! u , Jr ,-. ;1 .,g u c-..nventiou r»-l 

come to a standstill, as there is quite a niimn of Ama’.gam .ted t-anls. 
number of houses untenanted and idle. Ktitionof member» of Union 67, Uoxbury 
bringing in no rent or revenue on these • ** i*attc: me «.ity ot Boston i, rc-questinj; 



that thc-v a, so c-xiäudt or c xpel tlie following Application. I nimi ,12. ( ovingtou. Kv.. f.ir nu-iit shows a.s follow - : 

(•»•rsons" now in the Amalgamated Dra.ic-U at metinn of trade »k maud-«. G. S given social 

lnttahuiKb. viz.: L. M. Carpenter, J. M. Bolt- ii»‘«ru,-t*..ns on this «il.ject. LE. Kills. 

iignt. A. M. Haiti.» I« and Ali»crl f-pttde. uu»l *»u In «-» 1 st of death claim uf E- 1 ward A. Going. Bilan«-«- on harnl October I. l'.'l 

in. pail of tin U. B. we sluul insist thut our Union 3S». New Y««rk c-itv, up,»u further » vi- B‘ -' rvefuu«: October. Not tin»« r am 

lblt-!»uig'i D.G. live uptothiTej-olutionsailopted «lc-nee the * ;»-•* was reopen«-«l, former «lec-i-ion Dcc-i-inher 

at i ’;; Cfi ago Convention relating tc* tilt rccog- rev«-is« »i. ami (.», S. and G. T. instructed u«.» t«> I'lweial a— « —i ■ i.t ■ - 

nitiou of Amalgaui.ted cards. pay th<- claim. 

lVtitioiiof numbers of Union 67. Uoxbury. Ap|«-alsof John F. Day and Thomas Burt« ti- Total r • c-ipt- . . . 

Ma*«. a part of the city of Boston», requitiing uc-ll. on di-eis.on of (J. S. and G. T. in tin* caso.f 

pi ivilige i«» withdraw delegates of Union 67 from 1 nion 111*- Devi- ion of (». S. ami G. T. m-t «•»•ii- )« J.VU S E.\I"i-.NI>EI>. 

the D. C. Ol Boston. TheG. K B decide that while etirre.l in. The « videnoc now sul>mitt<-«l -I. » - 1 October 21, Halifax. N. S 

th»-y r»‘«'"giiize the evils and disa«lvant:»g»s in the <li-f«-ii«lants. Day ami Biirtehaell, have »»«»t 1 Balance- on ham! January |, |\r.’, 



irgiit. A. M. Ilaitm I» and Ainvrl sj.'ttde. avi«l on In «"»»*< «•< »liath claim «»f lvlwar«! A. G«.ing. 
tli. pail of I’m U. B. we shail insist '.iiat our Union :W2. New York c-itv, upon further » Vi- 
1, it-, nigu D.G. live up to the nsolntions adopted «1» n«-i- the «;i*c* was rec»i>ein-«l, former dec-i-jon 
at o*i: f..i ago Convention relating to the leeng- reversi-ii, and G. S. and G. T. instructed n«.» t«» 



1.260 65 



epeculatlie lmcs.mcnu. Ill»*n Uga,n «I! t ; u . J) C | Boston. TheG. E. B decide that while etirre.l in. The « videnec- now siihiuittc*d -I. w* 
tllC Lt* g*-' 1 »tics t . it* >.* man 1 .ot ! 1 re - j 1 r< H ' 1 ^,,. v r ,. r . guize the c \ ils uutl di-a'ivant.igt s in tin* «lefemlant-. Day ami Burtelkaell, ha*.’«- »»«»t 
huihlitPJS has hr», tight more iron and stone ' S I case- «»:' our pre-ent system ot Disliiet had a fair and impart: il trial. The trial < <-m- 
illtO the construction of such buildings 1 ' '-ni’.-. an«; Willie it would apimrc-nUy l*ebv-i- mittee erreil in refusing to allow dc-femlants to 

and leaves less woodwork 1» .r can »enter- 1 1 ’ " 1 07 Uu ‘ ,,ri ' ih * v ili,ke ‘ 1 forsliU ,5K ‘ 11 ' y °'’f ‘ ,io, "‘ 11 “‘ y r wWl ,nattcr of I 

l . the o. E. 1>. are powerless in this respect, us record, rhese c-ase» are therefore reic-rn-d Iwc-k 

To add further to the stagnation in car ^ p:. Rages 7 ami » of Constitution, are very to Union 119 for a new trial. 

pentcr work, there has Ufll a dullness it* J.;aiu and in»i»erative that U nion 67 cannot with- FIFTH 1) V' ’S SESSION’— J IN IVni 

real estate investments and a paniekv feel- <ha" from the 1>. c. of Bust . 1 . 

mg m huancul circles. Still, for all that. Appeal ot Investigating Committee, 1 1 , ion .. • .. , 



ree« 1 r» I . The.-e cases are therefore rc-ferr. «1 back 
to Union Ii9 for a new- trial. 

FIFTH DA' ’S SESSION— JAN. 15th. 

A lengthy pr«it -«t from Union 230. Pittsburgh 



there «U0 pros pec tS of afollly goo 1 season " Former decision reaftiiued ami Union - Jj re- eeecltoC 

,, . . , «.. s and G. f. in the* car«»- ®f A. E. Dixuu, a , . 

this coming Spring and summer I , «.I»,... .I , . mains suspended. General 

^ 1 e ■ un-liber cfsaid local. Alter a thorough review . .... 

Trade at present is extremely «lull Oil 1 of all the evidence the G. E. B. concur in part Com - Union 59. Octroi:, Mich., asking t«. be 

the Pacific Coast and in the large cities, SO j "'itl‘ decision of (.».S. and G. T., but fc-ei that the re Bev»*d from paying part of their special ns- 1 ri{ 

there is little Use for carpenters moving !> u, u*huie.it rec-on, mended by the Trial Com- cessment. G E. B. wmot comply, but giant 

lr . . : rl . inittee was excessive, an.l A. E. Dixon should further time for payment until August 1, t«<C. * ,r ’ E ’ 

around from Clt} O City * ritey are better be puitight . t , by a moderate tine in accordance Applications of Unions 8 and 3 *6. of Phihub-I- i “ s hl * 

ot! to remain just now where they are ac- I wi|ll s, »-. 66«»l the Constitution, for A. E. Dixon, <’ hia - for extensien of tine to pay their special ti,c ,,,nc 

quainled. TllC cities here named are ill his Statement, pleuds guilty to theotreue« assessment also granted until Aug. 1,1897. '''"'«" 

particularly overcrowded, and carpenters* ‘barged agaft.-t him. Com. from the Rochester, N. Y., Carpenters’ J 

are particularlv urged to stav awav from A hearing was then granted A. llenryot. of l «‘»on, risking for financul aid to organize that öflered b 

♦i zxr.» 1 , i »«• !*• • j New York, General Soeretarv ol iIk* Furniture ll *' and surrounding vicinity more tlioroujrlily. , 

them, V1Z l ^t. 1 ullL ^linil.I KivtrSlJt?, ... . . . . ... . ‘ was then ihmatPfl to lie nhnrtn.il it I-otter 

Worker» International l nion. The ohje» l ot ^ tuen ui»nateti, to be charged to the ac*- . . 

Cal.; Memphis, Tenil.; Kirhmond, Ind.: ^J r H tnr yol*s vi.-it was to utVcet a UiUtnal ^>nnt of the District for tie Middle States Din- n^n 

New York city, Philadelphia, Chicago, treat» or agreement to harmonize tlu- interests I K ’ ,,!ia B° n f° r amnesty cf suspended meiubera 11( w 

Ixoston, Mass.; Nashville Teun.; Vancou- Ol the two organizations wherever tueir mein- also granted. let|er ju] 

▼er. B.C.; Plainfield, N. J.; Salem Mass.; lK ‘ r> *'■ engaged in house I.uibling. Application from fomer members of si-.s- should e: 

Toronto, o.; Newport, Kv.; Cleveland, O : 1,1 a,1 " vi ' r 1,1 Uw raised by Union 50, pei,(led Unu ^ 230 PHLslurgh, for new charter they hav 

• v. . i i . k . j • xi i • i . . • und fnr chcpuI i«nnt itionB l luirtor <rw> .i 



Deec-niher 17,176 85 J portftiou for administering unlawful 

oaths. Political economists argued that 

„ , , , , , , as wt ges wore fixed hv " natural laws. " it 

rpl . r# ... »juiti* useless lor workmen to atD'iupt 

The Audit ot 1.» Reserve* Fund ami A-«-.- by t . olu i )Lliat i on to raise their rates of pav- 

men io« - a- 1 <, <»«.-. ment. and self-interest and fear combined 

re El its. to look upon workmen's societies with 

Balance on hand Oeb.ber i. isi»i . . - 59 ; 9 - ! Trade? unions thus under the 

R.-s, rv. fun.; Oc-t«»i>«-r. N,,v ; m’»*. r ami ! 1,1111 1,10 \ ÄW alul . society, got many of 

Deet tniK r 1 1 «» -» 1 1 u,e worst ‘ »‘aracteristicp of secret a.-so- 

S|H-»-ial a— «— -n'.-.-n't ...... I * 61*65 riatlüus - T Ju ‘- v vven ‘ oftt ‘ n headed by ig- 

norant, violent and unreasonable i. t n. 
and the strikes which, under their aus- 

Total 1 - -c-ipt« . . . -2.791 86 pices, ht*c wno more important move- 

L-vm-v.iLi. ments, were sometimes marked by out- 

“ NK '’ A N Ll r;««ge and brutality, and met by unw-nibu- 

Oi-tobc-r 21 , Halifax. N. s ¥i5o uo lous repression, which led to hitter feeiings 

Balance- on hand January 1,1892. . . 2.6 li S 6 j between da?S aild class llllt hit by ! »it 

things go* better. 1 Respite the coldr e.*s of 

. *. - tf , sti j ti»? law, there waa no positive reason to 

.. " ' ’ ’ ‘ , ’! prevent thestronger trades from forming 

ha g. E. . hmi tin h.«.ks met ly kept ami in | strong unions, and in 1851 the Amcl-’a- 

thc- be— t ... order, amievery vouche r ami rc., ipt „,ate<l KllgilieefS* 8 ocietV, eshtblis!. t « M V 
l* prc.perlv iile«l. t j )e ,. onso |i,l a ti on 0 t a ft t |, e ^«-at tc-Ueii 

Iheconsnlera .on of th, •««„».«„, ofatiair* i„ branches of a great trade into one union, 
Chicago was the« resume,, Mr. < F. K.-nt. set a new example of further combination, 

Si*l*r4»1nrv l»F ll»l> (■ I- K u ills' rn r... 1 . ... 1 l • i 



Special a—< — i 



Total i" c-ipt* 



great outcry hut the searching investiga- 



uucicu tn v*. o. ACCPptcd. 1 ' 1 « /. . 

i , .. Hi*n s power, and, also, hv acting as Ben- 

Letter from «ton 189, Salt Lake uty, Utah. e fit societies on a huge scale, they hav, 
receive. 1 regard, ng benefit« and pmilegexof done UtUel, to raise the condition ‘ol ti e 
men adninte.! when over -60 years of age, and more «killed laborers In 187l> Jo«,.pl, 
now elaa*ed as non-benehc-.a! members. The Arch established a Union of the poor an.l 

dependent agrk-ultural laborers. The ex- 



now clas.*eil as nou-nnictuMa! members. 1 
letter advocated no dMimlioi. as to bvuv 



Lima, o.; Wilmington, Pel.; Norwich, j } ‘ or ^ u - 1 ^ w »-,ue u»a. wuen a ös „a^tedpoxver to art respect, am. cunnoi act mt.ie, natter. 

I* i,i i> - . »«-•»,- ^ „ ’ I Local r* granted the privilege of an amnesty to » granted power to act A general and lengthy discussion took place 

Lonn., JMXltDiaie, l a., U Uliamsport, la., ^instate >u«i^nded member» for $2 that does Appeal, Union 162, Hfde Park, 111., against on the welfare of the U. B. and how to promote 
Harrimun, Tenn.; Denison, Tex.; W. I>U- not carry wiih it the right for said lox-al to rein- disapproval of Charles Johnson’s claim. Action its growth and power, and also os to a line of 
luth, Minn.; Kettle Falls, Wash.; Port suspended memliers of Other Locals who of G. 8. and G. T. in disapproving claim is cm- agitation and speakers to go on the road 

Angeles, Wash.; Waxahaehie, Tex.; Vic- sojourning or at work away from their own curredin. Finally, the subject was laid over, to be farther 

tnrin R ('• R-dtimnw» Md • Halif c-r Loi ‘ l,ls - Such suspended member» can be rein- In the matter of the faitlful, law-abiding mem- considered at the next meeting. 
v ’ ,, . ’ „ ' I ’’ *’ stated only by consent of the l nion they belong hers of suspended Union !30, Pittsburgh, Pa , the The G. E. B. then adjourned at 4.30 P. M. to 

-V b.J rair Haven. Wash.; IcOChester, to, and as provided in Sections 65, S7 and 88 o G. E. B. hereby grant a dispensation, reserving meet Monday, March 28, 1892, at 8 A. M. 

N.Y.; Binghamton, N.Y ; Seymour, Ind.; Constitution to all such meiab« re who have joined,’ or will be. * HUGH McKAY Chairman 

Alexandria, La.; Seattle. Wash.; Temple, delegates trom luion 422 Frank ford, Pa., ap- come connected with th« new Union by Feb. 8. J. KENT, Recording Secretarv 

Tex. ; Houston. Tex. ; St. Catharine's, Can. , k " f *”" ° h “ de V‘‘ °, f He . nry 14 ’ J 892 ’ “ ,d newlv cluirU ' K d Union to be known Attest : 

and Helena Mont Jh^k, a non-benefieuü member of said union, as Union No. 230, all th; rights, benefits and P. J. McGcibe, 

ana Helena -Mont. o E . B . rule that UMder the Constitution, and by privileges that may have accrued to these per- General Secretary. 



memoers O, sus- should exist on account of age. G. E. B decide I ““i 

pended Unicffi 230, Pittshrrgh, for new charter lhcy have no power t«» change the lawsi,, this If-VuL l l V Um ® ni9111 t0 the . C0R ^ e : " l ‘~ 
i. E. B. decide that when a »«d for special eondiüons Charter granted a- «I respect, and cunnot act in the matter ^ 1^1 1 ^ ° ‘P" “ 8 ^ had a IV- 

privilege of an amnesty to G * S K ranted l‘°' ver to aot A general an.l lengtliv discussion took - — - “ -® exemplification in the Rhvessltll 



lo A general ana lengthy discussion took place nn<l nr«h,rLr D »l:i. *i f T : i 

it does Appeal, Union 162, Hfde Park, 111., against on the welfare* of the U. B. and how to promote i-.E.xrprs U ^ LoU ' 1 ^! 1 ^ 

orein- disapproval of Charles Jchnson’s claim. Action its growth and power, and also os to a line* of ^ ” 1 r » Bllt . aS fOmhinat..*» 

18 who of G. S. and G. T. in disapproving claim is cun- agitation and speakers to go on the , ad f?™ Pf.^ .* Htnk^s an,! lo,’k°UtS 

r own eurred in. Finally, the subject was laid over, to be further SlX? ^‘“iniflhetl m numbers, an.l 

Locals. Such susj>ended uu mlK-rs can be rein- i n the matter of the faitkful, law-abiding mem- considered at the next meeting. u: V Pen com PaWtlVely Beldom a 11101)2 

‘ L belong bers of suspended Union !30, Pittsburgh, Pa*' the The G. E. B. then adjourned at 4.30 P. M. to & organized trades «V.ar« S o 

ld “ ° « J « ‘r by -- “ 4ispensatior^ reserving ^et Monday, March 28, 1.2, at 8 A. M. ÄÄÄ 

to all such metab« re who hax-e joined, or will be. HUGH MeKAY, Chairman. ham and Belf-aetin«' slidin- M ales of 

anion. «, Dnion No. 23«., “ McOc.E Ä“» «l.mbtahed ü* «*««* 

uid by privileEon tbot may have aot-ruetl t „ tlitoe per* General Seor.Ury, 7o»,r, ^ y TS, gM '' 






TJriü C^JR!Pi£JN r_UK. 






: 



General Officers. 



United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 



M°n eys Received. 

TH* MOUTH ENDING DECEMBER 31, 18M. 



Office of the General Secretary, 

124 N. Ninth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



7,”™» — y wrara app*»r aHfj lb«. O. B. wlü.oot delay. 

U wU1 pr'Jllrted la next 

vi Vw Tt D report loom dei al' money» 

« 1 . ,V **“ *• *“> Oie Looai Jew a» tot tax acd »nap'Jet 

for the month of DECEMBER or-ly ?P 



n - a 

I £•? 

< -S 



jBcr Carp enter* 



FINANCIAL SECRETARIES. 



C X 

e I - 

< ,2; 



General-Presidrntr— \V. II. Kliver, Box 156 
Grand Grossing, C«x»k C’o.. 111. 

General-Secretary— P. J. McGuire, Box 884 
Pniladelphia, Fa. 

«»■in* ral-Trcasurer— James Trov, 2026 t hrifUiaii 
St., Philadelphia, Ha. 



General Vic k- Presidents. 

Fir*! Vie. -I’n si.ir iii— p M. W« iliti, 2D Twelfth 
SL. d <<r Mark« i St. San Frami-.e<, C a 
StMxiitd Viee-Preshhnt— 1\ W. Birck. 798 Xos- 
traiid Ave., Brooklyn. X. V. 



General Exkttivb Boari». 

(All eorres|>ondencc for the G. K. K. must be i 
mail« <1 t«i tlie General Secretary.) 



Hugh MoKav, 302 Paris si., E. Boston. Mass 
T. K. Doegiin, Ill E. 89th St.. New York. 

K. A. Stevens. 150 Pearl St., Jeffersonville, Ind. 
W. F. Al rams, 451 Monroe Ave.. Detroit Mich 
H. J. Kent, 2010 S St.. Lincoln, Xel 



OBITUARY RESOLUTIONS. 

(Insertions u inter this I, etui cos/ ten rents per line.) 



I sion 577 . Marshall Wb. 

Whereas, It has (.based the All-Wise Ruler 
tii«- I Diverse to remove from our midst tin 
s loved wife of our esteemed brother. S M. 



V \s. and 

Whereas. She was not a member of our or- 
- ioi/. itioii, stii, we feel we have lost a true 
riei d of our «Miise, f, > Brother Xi:.\s has lost a 
• rue iriend and worthy hei|imato. the Church 
.1 «« liling and earnest worker, ami the community 
a l hristian worn al.. 

Risi.trrfl. Timt we tender Hi other Xeas our 
le art felt sympathy to himself und family in tliis 
th ir hour of sorrow, and we trust that the hope 
ot a happier reunion in a h:iji|>i«M' world will help 
tie in to bear this gr* -at loss with ivsic* nat ion. 

/.'■ ><i/r« </. That a copy of these n solutions lie 
'•nt Brother Ni:.Vs and In* publish« d in The Car- 
i kmkk journal. 

W. S. l\OWK I 

JAM Ls RIDER. i ommittee. 

v. k vansai ki.i:b. I 



1— 12» So .66- 

2— 5 '» 8’j 167— 

3— 15 6 i 1 .8— 

4— 107 20 1 ,9— 
5 - 15 90 170— 

6— 4 8i 171 — 

7 — 7 80 172— 

8 — . 173— 

y— 9 93 174 — 

10 — 9 40 175— 

11 - “ 47 80 (7o — 

12- 22 70 177 — 

13 — a 00 178— 

11— 4 20 179 — 

15— 5 so 180— 

16— 3 75 181— 

17— 6 0 • 182— 

18— 3 70 183— 

19— . { 8 i 184— 

20 16 30 185 — 

21— i s no |8cr— 
-- 65 30 187- 
23— 27 50 188— 
21— ja 5o |H‘I— 
2-5— so so 1-0— 

26— s 40 191 - 

27— i_. nr. 191— 

28— s6 ‘20 193- 

29 — s7 to 194— 

30 — 4 5 . 195 - 

31 — 3 ’Q 196— 

32— 5 6 |97 

3< — .54 INI 198 — 

34 — jo i 5 199— 

35 — 4 300— 

36— 2-5 20 201 — 

37 — 3 90*203 — 

38 — 5 20 204™“ 

•19 — 22 .50 204 — 

1°— ii on 2o r >— 

«“ 4 3‘. -06 

I™ | 50 207- 
4 » — ]», - rt J08 - 

II — e 10 2 : 9— 
1-5— j g l 210— 
?&- 55*11- 

47- 4 so 212- 

48- 1 i 75 213 — 

19- 111,211- 



l.i 90 215- 



Expulsions. 



‘2,1 01 2 6 — 
•217 - 



Tames Anderson, frmn Fnion 4s2. Jersey City. 
N J . for misappropriating funds la-longing t«i 
the Local. 



7 51 218 — 

5 45 219- 
. re 220— 

«I- 

I » 222- 



I .50 - \ 

I« 221- 



II. M. Farrell, from Fninn 029, M.nith Betid, 
Ind.. for embezzlement of initiation fees 



Pi ter Crooiikn. from Fnion 2!. Chi<ng«j. 111., 
tor disorderly esmduet at an entertainment «.f the 
Fnion. 



c I". Bones from Fnion 3*0, Austin. Tex., for j 
had conduct. 



27 oo xxr~ 

19 sa --6- 

•••» i =, — < — 

1« i v?j_ 

6 

14 70 -’l 



- »T» 

1 1 6 1 -„7 



I has. A. M i i.i. wa» formerly at N«*w Kni'init* 
ton. Pa. Mis wln-retthoiits now is unknown. 
Hi- has misappropriated moneys csillet tcd for a 
disable«! member of Fnion 3 33 



Samuel Stevens, from Fnion 
Pa. for disreputable conduct. 



AltOoi 



• • >,6 

•>6 ° 

■: j; S= 



s GO 311 — 
8 50 332— 
7 20 -ill— 
31 65 314 — 
7 10 333— 

15 Oil 336 - 

7 00 337 - 
1 10 338 - 

319- 
64 30 3ln — 

16 95 311 — 

342— 
. . . .143- 
1 00 344— 

8 111 34.5— 
3. .V)3:r>— 

1 70 347— 
3 7u 348— 
I 40.149— 

8 CO 350 — 
.5 40 351 — 

. . . 3.2— 

7 0, i 353 — 
6 15 35 1 — 
1 70 355 — 

9 9) 356— 
9 05 357— 
1 2" 358— 

359— 

8 :o :kxi - 

3 20 .61 — 

6 50 362— 

7 10 363- 

11 60 36 1 — 

9 10 365 - 

12 TO 366— 
> 2n 367— 

8 40 :168 — 

4 0 I .369— 

3 00 -370- 
11 35 171- 
25 2C 172— 

4 NO CJ — 

16 Oi 374— 

37->— 
59 20 376— 

8 8 377 - 
I 40 378— 
1 50 379 — 

9 10 

381— 
■5 91 ‘ 3s j . 

17 .50 3s. 5 — 

4 9** 3s |_ 
.5 ;8i 3s.-, _ 
s 15 js6_ 

11 1.5.187— 

5 20 .5.88— 

.589 — 
44 SO 59 — 
1 65 391 — 
15 Ini ;<rj — 
39 50 393— 
S 00 391 — 
2! s0 . '35— 
3*.*6— 

I 10 397 — 

1 30 9.8— 

1 1 to 399 — 
9 .5.5 4<4) — 



< 1-22- 

4 30 496— 

497— 
1 70 498— 

5 65 499— 
10 00 500— 

5 10 501— 

9 90 502— 
.5 10 503— 
3 00 504— 

59 95 .Vi.5— 

7 00 506— 
. . . 507— 

5 20 508— 

8 20 509— 

1 50 510— 

2 90 511— 

. . 512— 

25 CO 513— 

7 511 — 
515 — 

8 00 516 — 
. SO 51 7— 

70 51s— 
15 4 r > 519— 

5 NO 520— 

10 00 521 — 
"2 6» 522— 

3 2" 5.3— 
7 0.. 584 — 

6 «41 52V- 
2 50 626— 
1 10 5 n — 

1 oo 52s— 

5 70 529 — 

6 80 530— 

•Ali- 
bi >0 .32— 

7 3. 533— 

7 1" 531— 
5 50 >15— 

2 40 536 — 
1 30 537— 

1 50 5.18— 

5 95 •39— 
12 20 54i 1— 

2 .0 .>11 — 

8 10 512 — 

543 — 

4 90 544 — 
12 20 545— 
. . . 546 — 
40 nO 547— 

1 40 548— 

6 70 549— 
. . . 560— 
. . . 551— 

4 70 552— 

1 40 553— 

2 90 55 1— 

. . . 556— 

9 40 . r >56— 

3 52 557— 
3 20 558— 
0 NO 559— 

7 90 560— 

. . . 561— 

. . . 5‘.2— 

3 .jO 5t>3 — 

. . . 681 — 
3 20 5 5— 



661— 
«3 662— 

= 6«i3— 

5 664— 

a (165— 
< 666 — 

6 00 667— 
22 30 I 668— 



669— 
90 670— 
70 671 — 
56 672— 
50 673— 
40 674— 
80 1 675— 
676— 
. . I 677— 
, . 678— 

00 I 679 - 
70 680 — 
,30 »Wi- 



ll 70 ’ 682- 
> 40 683— 
•23 vO 68 1— 
635 — 
21 65 686 — 
2 so 687— 



5 90 696— 

. . . 1697— 

698— 

. . . 699— 
2 50 700- 
1 801701— 
14 01' 702— 
4 40 703— 
• - 704 — 

1 60 71,5- 

2 40 706— 
. . . 707— 

708— 
1 20 709- 

1 70 710— 

6 80 711— 
4 05 712- 

20 30 713- - 

2 20 714— 

1 40 715— 
14 90 716— 

717— 

12 1» 718— 

2 75 719— 
2 10 720— 

10 Oil 721— 



17 40 731— 
7 35 732 — 
15 00 7: ‘„3 — 
ä 70 7 ;4_ 
2 5o 7 ’5 — 

4 10 7 5— 
10 »»0 7 7— 

9 30 738- 
. - - 7-i9 — 

7 1^’740— 
1 00 741— 

5 95 712— 
9 55 743— 

1744 — 
. . . 745 — 
4 20i7 ,5— 
17 50 7 7- 
1, 00 748— 
. - |«49 — 

8 4o‘7,')0 — 
17 70|751 — 



2 0 »|7ü6 — 

.767 — 



(Oi — 

>768— 

1 2 > 769— 
3 10 770— 

2 70 771— 
50 772— 



9 10,752— 



1 40 724- 

. . 725- 

3 30 726- 
6 40 727— 
. . . 728- 

2 00 729— 

7W— 



23 15 753— 
9 tO 7.' 4 — 

1 00 7' 5— 
12 10 7.56- 

2 10 71 7— 
80! 7-' 8— 

ITE«A 



Total 



8 lo 7» 9— 
. . |7ld — 
. . ,762— 

3 10 763— 
13 50 764— 

4 7t> .61 — 



. . |4#*S 

16 75 774— 
. . . !776- 

1 30 776- 

. . . iii — 

2 3t 778- 
4 40 779— 

2 10 780— 
6 30 781— 
2 00 782— 

783— 

3 00 784— 
11 65 785— 

4 20 786— 
1 «0 787 — 

1 ]o 783— 

789— 

4 60 790— 

2 2" 791— 
8 20 792 - 

5 9 793— 

3 50 79 1- 

2 65 795- 
1 10 796- 

6 51 797— 

3 1»> 798 — 



ALABAMA 

357 . Anniston— W m. Kcrriilce Box 615. 
a. u , ! - v a 1 „ f. • -s ,u„,, 100.. 512 . Bridgeport— J ohn C. Morris. 

ISgilaDelp^ta, ACbruar 1892 . Mobile— 

«9. E Marschsl. 607 S. Elmira st. 

••,„1,. ■« * i * r S « <• 92. (Col ) W. G. Lewis, cor. of Scott and St. Louis. 

5? 0 l) e O P 1 1 1 tl e, g O l) C steuern, 3ö9 Sheffield — W ard Parker, Box 46. 

in liiea’erffdjaften oeiurfadjen oft Unjufrie* ARKANSAS 

bcnheii unb nicht f Itenbie gröfet^emorali* 469 . hot spring®- m. h’ Packar 
fation in ten SReifjen folc^.r Crgantfattontn, 754 . Jone>borocgh— w 11. Crowder, 
bie nicht genügenb nut be:n 0«ift ber 0e* ^ttlkBock— D w uaskiii. Box 371. 

roecffchaftcSrSerocgung burchträn!t ftrb, urn 432 ! Pen* BLurr-J c! gVK: ^ 

KtAtA 1 I A. O L I 



1 25 in Geasrffchaften Deiurfad)en oft Unjufties 
• ,5, benbeit unb mebt ; lien bie gröfet'* T'emoratis 

3 w f .ii L. l . . «1 .‘t r « r — s f . 



570 fation in ten Reiben folcb.r Crganifationen, 
2 Oo bie nicht genügenb nut be:n Qeift ber 0e* 



2 40 biefe sGerpflubtnnqen mit 5 reu i> e n einju= 
750 g?beii- SÜ e & it'd)* bios Strafe, roenn 
2 00 nnr bebaupten, baf> jeb r £baler ir.o ftirt in 
4 oo ber Union jehnfadie 3inien bringt. 



CALIFORNIA 



D. C. of 



y California— S ecretary, W. R. Jack, 
23 Ninth st. Sau Francisco, Cal 



Ja« £>fer Der 'ÄrbeitMofcn. 

Xie Vertut jung ber Krbeitejeit ift eire 
Aorberung, loelche burcb unfere o'onotmfcbe 
fntroicfeiüng fidj non felhft ergibt 

^ » O * I6lt AJ S 1 ! •> F IV. lI f t*IIF /> «1 » Vk t £•*.*+■* '(i.wiiM A 



47. Alameda— Jacob Hoeck, 1510 it K avo 
529 Berkki.ey— E. B. Shaw. 

217. Ki beka- M. B. Fowler. 

660 . Hanford— J. McCaslin, Box 118 
56. Los Angeles— Theo. E. Cross. Box 482 
36 . Oakland- J F. Gallin, 1419 Ninth st. 
722 . Redlands— A. S Backus. 

23i. Riverside— W .1. 1 mbree, 2ts3 E. 10th st 
341. Sacramento- I ; s. Masoa. 1201 .1 >t. 



2)ie tiefige i«erme';rurg unb (inofiterung 3 "5 “ (Cars.) d. i>. Paxton, 1715 e st. 

ber ^robiiftiofiäfte burcb bie tedmrehen H * WeR,,ori ’ Box 797 - 

trnnbungen ur.b il? t rbefierung?n liefern uns 22. 11. Meyer 26osi«- K ei st., 11. h. 
eine Staffenpiobuftion, ber es immer mebr i ^ (Oer.)\vui Keinhoiu, .31 >‘ 2 Birch ave. 
an (Sonfumenten fehlt. ^i-i'uVa n,, Vv W T 1 S^ , V r . h . t '.A.- 

Xie «rbeiterflafie lebet üJlangel, met! ju 707. (Mill.) p. Beium, 013 Twenty tifthst 
»tel 'Jlabiun^omittel nerbanben nub ! Xtefe 316 - »an Jose- l d. smith, Box' 9:« 
Tbat’adie fenn\eid)tut b as lo.'bnfinnige ur.= | 22 s - Fon " 

i..<r 1,0. H»W»tK. Ä ÄSriÄ.“ 

3i!'0f):r fommt bas ? — 133 Santa Ckiz— G W. Reid, 74 Locust st. 

Unpre t«r Jbuftionoaieife ift in ben mober* ^tw^ton— F iE-«i. Reevt*8, 210 Sonora sl 

neu Äulturlanbent an e nem '^unf e ang:: 1 ' 

‘anat, mo ieber techniicte A-ortfdiritt. ietf CANADA 



22. H. Meyer 260 Siegel st., B. H. 

304 (Ger.) Will Reinlmlu, ,31'., Birch ave. 

483. Guy Luthrop, 108 lay lor st. 

616. (Stair Hldrs.) X. J. x'isbett. 1917 Stevenson. 
707. (Mill.) P. Be. ton. 513 Twenty tilth st. 



fr», 832 62 



RESERVE FUND. 



nen Jtmturianbem an e nem e ang-:> 

langt, mo jeber tedinifcJ, e Aortfdiritt, jet« CANADA 

iLrbsfferut g b.r 2)lafch:nene unb Öilfsmerf. Belleville— R. McPherson, Box 547. 

I’uae tin A-iud) für b ; e 'l(rbeitarfI„iiV mirb ,0 ..:. ARY . Alberta- W m . Pittman, Jr , 



Report of moneys received for Reserve Fund 
from DECEMBER 1st, 1891, to DECEMBER 
31st. 1891, (inclusive). 

All moneys received since DECEMBER 31st 
will be reported in the MARCH Carpenter. 



1 - 


•* J «j 


■J 1 


m * S mm 2 *• £ m 

sc O'ao 5 *o o 


X - q 

is < 


q.= 5 5 = 3 5 s S 



j’uge ein Alud) für bie iJlrbeiterflaffe mirb. 
?ie^robuftu) ; riifte haben fid) fofoloffal ntt= 
micfclt, baü alle o«bufirielänber mebrprobu= 
jirer. al4 fonfuoiire \ fiber jeber .siapitalift 
mill feine s J>rt»bufte pevfaufen, er perfud't 
alfo feine (Sonfutrmt n ju untorbi.ttit im 
Greife, alfo feme Ji'aaren biUig>’r ju uer* 
faulen. 

lim aber bie i'robufte billig?r oei laufen 311 
lönneit, muffen fie billiger bergeftelli mrrb*n, 



83. Halifax, X. S— A. Xoi thup. 169 Morris st 
18. Hamilton — D. Barnard, 59 F/orence st. 

19i. London K. J. Aust, 706 Duiuias st. 

Montreal— S ecretary of District Council, 
«•>* /c A , 0 !!'? ry 4,i Bufferin Ter. Dorchester st 
134. (Fr.) J. O. Beausoleil, 1443 Ht. Catherine st. 
311. (riy Isidore Gagnon, 1211 St. James st. 

U Leary,3Dufferii Ter., Dorchester st. 
6t»6 (I r.) Jos. LamontaKiie, 53 Duluth ave 
755 . Xaxaimo. B. C— A W. Heath 
574 . Xew Westminster, B. C— X. Gilchrist, Box 
245. 



3 80 102— 
6 Oil 151 — 
6 20 i 166— 



6 — $63 21 219 — 
19 — 1 90 262- 

37— I 95 268— 
44— I 1)5 28V- 
46 — 1 40 287— 

48— 6 50 291— 

51— 34 00 295— 
56— 1 8»' 314— 

fH — 65 311— 

70— 1 20 314 — 

76 — J 24 346 — 
n 5 — 1 55 363— 

93— 2 40 383— 

102— 4 . 0 .391 — 

151— 7 80 392— 

4 30 3 8- 
3 7" 406— 

•"5 416— 

5 b , 425 — 
2 20 429— 
2 96 139— 

65 412— 

66 452— 



• aoor Sf iter, from Union 13, Batavia, X. Y.. 
for cmhezzlitiK funds as Treasurer. Hi- where- 
abouts is unknown. 



W. 11 . Daii.fv, from Union 3»L Sacramento 
Cah. for obtaining immcv under fals«- pretences' 

John Tai.i.ai ii, from Union 3*5, BnJalo. X. Y. 
for bad eomlucl. 



Wiei.iam S»ff!Ri s. from Fnion 316. s ;l n .lost*. 
Cal., for violtitiu id Fnion pi n.eiples. 



S 50 

1* 9% 213— 

1 90 *, J _ 

2 no 7: ! 

16 00 *, ill 

• 11 >v»_ 

•• G'l * 

“ 0 •«] 

5 00 7- i 



K. J. Knix. from Union 253. Jeumu ite. Pa. for 
v iolutiiiR trade i uh-s, on coiiipiaint of the Latrobe 
Fni«ni. 

!C. H. Alley fmm Unitm ■ '81, Middleshorouith, 
Ky.. for ini-nppropi iatinjj waives of 1 is fellow- 
w«irkiiu"i. Ills wliei eul iii.ts is unknown. 



r'251- 



!° iv_ 



•» 


10 


4U — 


4 


2o 


'■6'i — 


• . 




55 


40 


102— 


9 


Ml 


•567 — 


•1 


50 


i 


40 


4 a- 


8 


90 


568 — 


J I 


20 


. . 




101— 


1 


00 


569— 


• • 


. 


10 


40 


low 


•> 


50 


570— 


• 


00 






IOC, — 


7 


60 


571 — 


3 


. . 




407 — 


16 


10 


572 — 


1 


70 


1 


.'44 


41 18 — 


1 


80 


57.4 — 


4 


50 


1 


>0 


409- 






574— 


• . 




» 


0 


110- 


22 


55 


575— 


3 


00 


13 


O0 


111 — 


6 


80 


b — 


1 


50 


21 


80 


412— 


3 


3 1 


577- 


•» 


60 






lei - 


9 


40 


5TS— 


7 


55 


10 


10 


HI- 






.79— 


3 


30 






415— 


1 


30 


5.80— 


\ 


60 


5 


f4) 


111'»— 


13 


05 


5S1 — 


i 


lu 


1 


'.»0 


417- 




M 


.'►82— 


1 


10 


s 


60 


lls — 




'.•0 


.-.K.3— 


. . 








1 !>— 


1 


0 1 


►81— 


5 


70 






42o — 


" 


.'0 


•V.5- 


7 


S5 



S5 05 156— 
55 466— 
4 65 467— 
6 75 482— 
4 25 484— 
2 20 488— 

1 25 195 — 

2 35 496— 

3 50 500— 
75 503— 

1 45 515— 
45 519— 
70 521— 



1 95 637— 
3 80 6 r 7— 

1 30 6 7- 
6 40 679— 

2 7* 082— 

3 00 69 i— 
:{ (jo 697— 
3 00 705— 
I 85 717- 
1 20 728- 
9 10 741— 
3 90 751— 
1 55 752— 



. , >n to u. I). McNeill, »9 Hamburg ave. 

28 b.4 befummle vlt ja!)l flrbetter uteiflufug, bie PI _ v Dovercourt Branch otiiee. 

j • Ivroite JU ein« vi.figm ami« Jy; viSSKTS wK™«™ 

4 t5 llllD. .. . .... a,3 ‘ " INNIPEG, 3 Ias— G. Ireland, SO Juno st. 

i «*o ^u'lcinbuurielleilleieniearmecml: cSCaffe COLORADO 

.1 Sjj in beit §(intcn fctr Mapitaliften, rocmit fie an), aspen— m c. Haves Box 407 

T sa ben JlrfceiNMolm je nad) beließen herabbriiefen Colorado Citv—g. f. itnndi. 

120 formen. 2 o lang> olio bao veer ler 31 *.* 5l5 - lodohado spbixgb— m. Kk-mmedson, Foi 

! Jo beitslofen tin fold) bebeutenbeo ift, mirb jebe 55 . Denyeh-c. j. liendcn-hott, Box 42" Hi-h 

“ 85 erl)öl)te L'ol)nforberarg ber ^Ubeit^r non ben .... lands p.o. 



J, ancwver 4 C — (Jeo. {In} ren, Box 798. 

X K TV R,a ‘ I *. C— r - C. DourIhsh, 87 Pan. ora. 
313 . W innipeg, Man — G. Ireland, SO Juno st. 

COLORADO 

630. Aspr n — M C. Hayes. Box 407 
560 . Colorado Citv—G. F. Hand! 

515 . Colorado Springs-M. KJcmmedson, Pox 



l 25 790— 



FroDi the Unions (Tax, etc.). 
" Clearances, ete . . 



I 5 

• in - ’* 



W. II Ri.r.vi.'. from Fninn 311. V.'inni|ieir, 
MaiiitiJia. su-jiei.d« d D r six '11011111-, until July 
1. I8l»2. (5>r an oilvnet* lui. xinjt «li*cre«lit on th«* 
Fnion. 



>iö_ 

11 in 7,-jZ 



Rejections. 



Fkank Cru t. fnvn* I ni« u f>o7. (*iu«iiinali 
l«»r iiMDiiijK. li m y. 

i . J. IIu k. from 1‘nioii -.*>». .I» :» 1 1 net 1 1 

infr )»c*en lor ati oll’rmv a 

rnion. 



O ‘ 

.3 80 , f>1 _ 

" «" -65- 
» 00 .8,6- 
' W 267- 

1 5 1 268 

8 • 0 

• 05 — 



421 — 
30 20 122 — 
7-5 424 
. . . .24— 
2 15 12 »— 
2 s0 I 6— 
1 in 427— 
1(1 OO 128— 
50 t^.i — 
•"> 70 130- 



1 so 586 — 

2 90 '87 — 

6 t;o Ass— 

3 O' 1 589— 
1 50 V8i— 
3 1)0 591 — 
1 75 >•.'2- 
3 6» .593— 

3 .'0 091— 

4 85 595 — 



For Printing . . . . 

“ Office, ete 

“ Tax A. F. of T.. 



tion 

“ T ravi-liii" ami OrsariziiiR . 

" D li« it ht irtuisT 1, 1891 . . 
Balance on hand January |. 1892 



• • 


. 5342 76 


PORT. 


1891. 




.* , 


. '5.832 62 


. . . 


li 75 


• 


t'5,si| 37 


1891 




• • • 


f5.«5 73 


• . . 


(5< 77 




90 00 


IVf II 






411 20 


. . . 


K-5 30 


. . . 


lO 

3. ‘.05 6 > 


• • > 


15 81! 37 



arum 10 Ptei eftteo oeruuen gingen. 

Slieiter ttitb nod) btefer *}uftanb Ü. rfdjiil ft 19 - Meriden— G eo. J. Srniiiey ,' 115 Orover^'" ' 
baburi, baf> bie grofje ^alilber ÜHrbeiielofen, v- EW ,;Kn ' A,Jf — 'V» u - Jones, Box 927. 

in bm 3!«. 3l.ia-en fib r eine »liui™, ate ;« 



Gerety, 247 W’etherefleld • 



Pa . hav- 
;ain.-l ihe 



9 9 1 ■ 1 _ 
2 *." *,-3 _ 
61 10 .> 4 _ 
3 till ~-r. 



3 


76 


131- 


5 


ou 


.96— 


li 


1*0 


DETAILED EX PI 


;XSKS- Dec. mber 


.t 


lo 


4 "2 — 


•» 


Ou 


597— 


. . 




Printing - r 0 


109-page 


lA*<lgers 


9 


HO 


433— 


Id 


SI 


.598— 






50 


200-1 Kig«- 


lA’<lgei> 


12 


W 


131— 


5 


00 


399 — 


6 


•t) 


35 


300- ) *age 


l.«-»lgers . . . 


1 • 


00 


ICV- 


3 


7o 


6 0— 




7*» 


•• 50 


1» o-puge 


Day B< <>ks. . . . 


i 


su 


43»j— 


5 


00 


6ol — 


“ 


i" 1 


•• 100 


Tn usf. A 


eet. Bock- .... 


1 


HI, 


137 — 


1 


00 


6 » 12 — 


li 


r>o 


1.1 >00 


i/ohi teri 


v « ireiilars. ... 


s 


lo 


13S — 


t 


70 


••03— 


. . 




•• |,'0’( 


P;t«.>w«»rü Blank.' 



iSoniumentcn at r ein .’ö 1 ng rniuecu l)erabg t s 
, triicf: firb unb bie Mauffraft ber in ülrteit 
• fcljenben Proletarier burcü bie tötfdjneibuiia 
ber V öl) ne e!ir tief gefut fen ift unb ba[ ; e. 
s.42 62 ba® Jlbfabgebict ein immer fie nereo m;rb. 
i » "" Jim' ber cm n ccite innrer gröf; r • Piaffe id 
pro.'mftion, auf ber anbern 3eite mime» 
Heinere 3lbf >t»gebi«te für bie'e pronifte, 
- 3 ein malmfim iger ('iefeüfdjafiöjuftam, b-ffen 
5» 77 'fiber b e ^Irbeiterflaffe gcgenmärtig bio auf 
9<> oo bie Pe g biudjmfojtea hat. 
in oy 'ir-ie ober run e tie (rrlcicbt-rong fdjaffen f 
i-5 'n iii e uollftänbige Peffcrurg für l ie SCrtci- 
' ' 2 7* terfiaffc fann mir burd) tine Peie tigung bic= 
for unfinnig n i’robu ' tion : met fe erjielt m.r- 
►11 37 ben, allein mir finb roch nid)t fo meit. 3o 
rjl lange bie 'ilib iterflaffe biefes nod) nicht 

39 mi e- fannt bat, rnüffen mir unö ; ad) einem Ptil- 
•56 oo fei umfeiicn, bao g?e ; giut ift, fJ)on unt r len 
^ VJ] heutigen Perbiilti.iifen eine trrleidjterung jit 
: ,, oo fcrtmven ur.b ein focdjeö'Üli tel ift eben gerabe 
•5 25 bie p.rlir jung ber 'Jlrbeito eit. 



620 . Stamford— G eorjfe F. Peck, 5 Bedford. 

DELAWARE 

40 . W ilmington— R. Shinn, 120 X. Franklin st, 
DIST. OF COLUMBIA 
190 . Washington— L. Burner. 1741 Seaton X W 

531. »i. ll. Bailey 606 W'bitney uv X W T 

FLORIDA 

221 . Jacksonville— iCoL) F. Crocket, Hansom 
. o ^•J;,; ,0,n ‘ so ' , ’ w - Br ^k>y.,. 



71 . Pensa« ola—R F. KillK«>re, Box 4. 

127. ■' (Col.) A. B. Pettiway. 

396 . Tampa — E. S Cooper, B«ix 232. 

GEORGIA 

5ir2 VTLANTA'-C. T. Printup, 22 Fortress ave 
593. “ II. B. I.owry, 81 llilRixl st. 

136 . Augvsta— (C ol.) T P. Lewis, 448 Broad. 



BOYCCTT SÜH B.E & CO.'S HATS. 



30 2» 



Si-hoMt* «S: Co., hat manufurturen-, l'liil- 
ailelphia, l'a., hav«.* discliarvvd their iiniuii 
hatters, after rediiein^ wanes, and the linn 
is running their hat shop with non-union 
men and hoys The Hat Finishers’ Inter- 
national Union appeals to members of the 
Carpenters’ Locals and to all workingmen 
to not patronize hats from rfclmhle «X: Co. 
The name i/f tiiis iirui can he found in 
most of the hats made by them. V. e also 
urire our members to heed tiiis apj -al. 
and in the eities’ below named our Carpen- 
ters’ Unions, aided by all organized labor, 
hotild make an active, personal canvass 
m the hat stores aud stop the sale of Scho- 
hle’s liats. The eities where these h.ats 
ire sold are : Memphis, St. Louis. Den- 
ver, San Francisco, Louisville. Omaha, 
Kansas City, Mo.; Baltimore, Minneapo- 
lis, Sacramento, Cal.. Chicago, Milwaukee, 
Cincinnati, Trenton, N. J.; Portland, 
Ore.; Vicksburg, Miss.; New Orleans, 
“direveport, La ; Burlington, Iowa ; Keo 
kuk Iowa, and in Pennsylvania, in l'itts- 
liurgh, Allegheny City, Harrisburg, Lan 
aster and Johnstown. 



5 -211 

4 7»* 



!0 3» I 439 — 

5 3U Uii — 
■ • Ill - 

6 50 ||2— 
3 9 ' 1 13— 
•2 io in- 

:0 5. ,|5— 



1 90 604— 

4 6» (lift— 
• - 6 6 — 

5 .8 » cji 7_ 
1 40 »408 — 
3 SO OiO- 



CAN ANY UNION BEAT THIS? 



L. U., No. 121, of Bridgeton, N. J., has 
i member sixty-three years old that walks 
fourteen miles of a night to attend the 
meetings ot the union. Ilis dues are al- 



J., last Bpring. 



11 '.— 


27 el 


10 O' 116 — 


51 '5 si;_ 


5 00 


D 7 - 


2 . 82 — 


• • - Iff- 


• • • M 2 — 




118 - 


85 ly ? — 


li 20 ns— 


• • 613 — 


2 50 


119 — 


23 20 •> 1 _ 


5 20 | lu- 


12 4 " 1 14 — 


5 50 


I 2 (i— 


• • 285 — 


ll 50 ;mi— 


1 8 )«!.'»— 




• 21 — 


12 00 


17 50 ir,|_ 


16 20 r, 16 _ 


4 25 


122 - 


16 20 j -7 


« 5 l 152 — 


2 30 617 - 


8 00 


125 - 


1 90 2 s 8 - 


11 2 o 152 — 


15 4 -* «IS — 


... 


124 - 


2 5 '* 28'3 — 


4 15 IM _ 


5 00 . 619 — 


85 


125 — 


10 90 29 U — 


25 00 | % 5 — 


620 — 


4 00 


126 - 


• ■ IC'l - 


. . 156 - 


3 15 021 — 


4 10 


127 - 


. - - 92 — 


I 50 457 — 


10 20 622 — 


1 50 


128 — 


1 *V . 91 — 


3 4 158 — 


623 — 


3 40 


129 — 


3 50 -Hi- 


1 65 F>«J - 


1 4 5 ° 624 — 


5 76 


lio- 


fi 50 295 — 


2 T 5 ifti— 


6 . 5 — 


• • . 


131 — 


5 00 2 k> — 


. . - I'd — 


.8 7 < ' 626 


... 


132 — 


10 60 •j«» 7 — 


. . 162 — 


50 627 — 


3 00 


131 — 


2 0 1 298 - 


9*0 463 — 


N 30 628 — 


... 


134 — 


2 5 '' 299 - 


35 •« pn— 


9 40|6 9 — 


11 35 


135 — 


2 70 3 fji) — 


. » 10 |.., - 


. . 630 — 


... 


136 - 


14 00 3 m — 


19 9 '! 466 — 


7 10 631 — 


00 20 


137 — 


4 00 302 — 


2 in 467 — 


2 60 1 32 — 


3 40 


138 — 


12 03 3113 — 


7 20 4 * 18 — 


22 00 6 M— 


• • • 


139 - 


2 00 304 — 


9 90 169 — 


. . 634 — 


... 


140 - 


8 50 in— 


3 0 Q 470 — 


8 20 635 — 


... 


141 — 


9 55 


1 25 471 — 


21 15 636 — 


1 40 


142 - 


41 50 :» 7 — 


2 00 172 — 


2 00 637 — 


7 90 


143 — 


4 K 0 31 IN— 


1 TO 473 - 


13 20 638 — 


19 OO 


144 - 


50 * 19 — 


1 90 474 — 


17 90 639 — 


50 


145 — 


3 20 310 — 


7 0 ' 475 — 


640 - 


... 


146 — 


90 311 - 


5 90 476 — 


10 39 641 — 


... 


147 — 


9 45 312 — 


2 00 177 — 


8 60 642 — 


. 


148 - 


. . . 313 — 


478 — 


7 30 6 3 - 


2 40 


149 — 


3 95 314 — 


4 91 479 - 


. . . 644 — 


10 00 


150 — 


10 40 315 — 


50 480 — 


16 25 645 — 


10 00 


151 — 


15 6 P 316 — 


16 45 481 — 


9 95 646 — 


2 30 


152 — 


4 50 317 - 


482 — 


15 :-0 647 — 


10 05 


153 — 


SI 4.5 318 — 


46 75 483 — 


18 (Mi 648 — 


... 


154 — 


19 00 319 — 


3 30 184 — 


4 90 649 — 


9 25 


155 — 


8 90 320 — 


3 90 485 — 


3 40 650 — 


. 


156 - 


321 — 


. . 486 — 


. . 661 — 


... 


157 — 


6 00 322 — 


487 — 


8 00 652 — 


11 05 


158 - 


10 90 323 - 


2 09 488 — 


6 00 « 53 — 


... 


159 — 


7 20 324 — 


2 00 489 — 


4 70 654 — 


• • • 


160 - 


3 20 325 - 


9 10 490 — 


4 10 655 — 


6 00 


161 — 


. . 326 - 


32 70 491 — 


4 70 666 — 


... 


162 — 


34 00 327 — 


30 90 492 — 


25 667 — 


22 20 


163 — 


8 40 328 — 


7 80 493 — 


11 90 658 — 


4 60 


164 — 


31 45 329 - 


3 80 494 — 


1 30 659 - 


1 90 


166 - 


41 60 330 - 


2 80 496 — 


6 60 660 - 


8 30 



“ 1.000 P«i!«L« 1 h 

“ 10,000 MomlK'rship Cards .... 
*' 5,»l» 0 Note! icad.s . . . ... 

“ 1,000 Stamped Envelopes . . . . 

“ 1,004 i learuuecB 

" 5 .*.hj(I XoticeA of .Vir«*«! - » .... 

*• 5,0. 0 Ciiiistitutions 

6,01.0 Apit iti«m (Wils 
" 4r,U00 Copies Jan Journal . . . 
Wrapping and Mailing Jan. Journal . 

Postage oil Jan. Journal 

Postage on Supplier, etc. 

Pu»tam on Pa.'>woid 

KxpieHsage on Supplies, etc. 

I,0c0 St’iii'«! Envelope-sand 1 U00 Postals 

Seven Telejrranis 

Salary and Clerk Hire . . . . 

Office Rent for Deeemlier 

J M. Slieridan, orjianizinjr . . . 

.1. Van Sweringvn, organizini; . ... 

(icorRe W. Wilson, or^aniziiiR 

1.. W. Reiter, organizing 

F. J. Lambert, Attorney's services . . 

Tax to A. F. of L. . . . 

KuliWr Seals for Xew Unions 

Dating Stamps for Unions 

! Janitor for cleaning office 

I Incidentals 



56 UU 
70 On 
33 OO 
: v. 00 

5 25 
3 75 
2 75 
25 00 
12 5 » 

1 25 

2 6 (> 
12 59 
.'(i Oo 
(2 50 

233 23 
19 70 

15 34 
23 36 

16 Hi 
•51 21 
32 00 



Tie 'iJladjt&cr Crganifation. 



136 . Augista— (C ol.) T P. Lewis, 418 Broad. 

5» j . '* 

141 Macon— E. 11 Nowell. 1543 First av. 

727. (Col.) I.. B. Bennett, 157 Green st. 

IDAHO 

331. Boise City— P. J. Lewis, Box 239. 

785 . Wallace— J ohn McLaughlin. 

ILLINOIS 

79 . Alton — S am Springer. 

697. Aurora— F. G Tenney. !76S Lincoln ave. 
133. Beelevilee— Henry Shopp. 804 E. 1st S«.. st. 
726. Bloomington— Daniel Sweeney, llu3 X.i iak! 
70. Brighton Pauk— T. Raymond, 2JU1 38tii >t 



Tic A-Ortfcf)ittt<, lie icfjc bie Craanifation *31 . Uairo— G eo. ll. Yunher, lUiOCouimereial av 

►T 'ilrb iter in Smctifa feit einen: ‘TÄK 
cmacot bat, finb bebeulenb gröfier, als fiel) 1 . r. i.attman, tox. Carpenurst. 



ber Vlrb der ;n Ämctifa feit einer, ^abtteimt 
aciuadn bat, finb bebeulenb gröf.er, alo fiel) 

>2 50 'Jttele trätttven taffer, wie unö u IL bie 'Brü« 2l - (French) A iloreney, 2lu Centre ave. 

Sä »•6<t«f( »«r .|iinnter!ctue im» »™f*KÜut SÄÄSiSSÄ 

,5 34 non 'Janbam.rifa ben beiten ^eareio li feit. 54. (Boh« m.) R. Dusii. -ä» Inulin st. 

23 36 Thier :>iat oralne. bar.b taube qegriiubet « uf " 3 - ' Vni - Kruumann. acai igiehun pi. 

16 Kl ,-pr mit 12 *)(h iilft 1KK1 ti (s bi'i'.V «'» n «4-»*,., IM. (Stand ) A Hansen, d.8 .V Elizabeth st. 
•5121 : tr . nllt ' lu 8«ft «n Lbltago Itcttge* U2 (G er.» Wm. Winkhr, 4t-38 Di-evcr »t. 

32 du runrenen conuention. ifb uuar mit 1? Yof.«D 2.9 ! l. g. Fritz. 10, .sth i.Ihlc. * 

146 llnior o, weldje eine iiiitglietcrjafjl dou J 04 J ti6. Ja». Be 11 i3to Van Homst. 

!“'! .Hopfen aufjuroeifen batten, dr.b wie ftebt cg f*®- ’ J l , s .r lkmu, ,l“ 6 V ' 1 , sth 

“4 75 ' rit dicier C rganifation beute? _ Sem offijicüen ^ \ iL'in! j Jusejr /imuaslb Centre av. 

('. 09 ifeitd)£ bcG 'JfrttionalsSefr'tiirS jufolge be- oVO. (Mill Bench Hands) F. Quitiueyer, 6Co 

r;‘; fteben f) utein«s«»3täbtep.798 iofahltniono Ashhmdave 

3 20 «... <H-.iSos«*.-4i.,t4 . .„v o 295 . Collinsville — M onroe Simmons. 

15 00 9 ^ Ci. ^int!r^r*CUti unb 788 . Dbcatcr— O. W Trum 111er, 330 E. Orcliai 

so oo )d)raner mit emer 'blitgliebfrijait tum h 1 ,(kni ööö. du licoiN— < ieorge Flauans. 

75 Köpfen ! Drrcb r ie riamt bieier Craari fation ,etf - East St Louis— r. j. T<>j«. sii st. Louis .«« 
6 w «wrfcen in m 3täbt*u lie Siöfjne' ber rftm 2 £ engI^^s ll^tt 329 5sti, 8t . 

1 40 mcrleute g-^oren unb ( Pu r um .rn,.J<H),0<)0 117 . Evanst<»n— A. F. Briggs, 7ü6 Duvis st. 

82 10 jpUr'icfi. 11 2täbten gelarg ber'BtÜ- >x0 - Galesburg— E. Chalstran, 629 N. Seminar 

SS tmmtt. M« *«46*6,6.. aller ^immcrlcttlo S 

85 60 ur.b 'Jiamd)r''inn' cuiH sciunben 311 le^uj reit; 162 . uydf. park-s. s. Baker, l'urk siue p. 0 

m 50 in 331 ctiibten befubt berä'Q ber 9ftiinbige , Iü '« Ii<,x 48 - „ , 

— 3trBctW!aß unb in 'dr>> ctäbten wirb am ™ jo^KT-wmNtiu, ^ 

86 00 camGtag r.ur 8 unb 9 3tunben qearteitet. 434. Kensington (Fr.) — K. Lupoliee, Box ISGhik 

Xurcübi fe Üleifürjung ber fHtbatojeit finb CookCo. 

9-iOUbrobfofe S'mnur leute wiener in Arbeit ^ m^rotolui’ Pyles, 

gefommen. Unb bieo würbe ÜUleG erreicljt 762 mouse— j. i. swim. 2420 Filth «v. 



1 46 llrioro, weldje eine itgliebcrjabl oon >(M:J 
43 166 köpfen aufjuweiiett Ratten, ür.b wie ftebt cs 



II. B!ai-kmore. 
IV. H. Kliver, 



Delegate to Birmingh'm 



W. J. Shiehls. ** *• J32 00 

Total $1.886 00 



WARNINGS. 



SO 00 

4 75 
3 90 

5 00 
1 40 

82 10 
46 80 
82 40 
85 50 
94 50 
132 00 



169. East St. Louis— K .1. Tojo. 814 St. Louis ave 
244. Elmhurst— Aug. Lauge 
62. Englewood— A S Hurtt 329 58th et. 

117. Evanston— A. F. Briggs, 7ü6 Davis m, 

:-.CO. Galesburg — E. Chalstran, 629 X. Seminary. 
141. Grand Crossing — A. Mol ine, Box 151. 

298. Highland Park— J. 11 Zimmer. 

162. Hyde Park— 8. S. Baker, Park Siue P. O., 
111., Box 48. 

649. Jacksonville— S. P. Carter, Garter Hotel. 
442. Joeiet — W m. Stitt, 206 Stale st. 

434 . Kensington (Fr.) — E. Lapolice.Box lSGano, 
Cook Co. 

178. Maywood— J. Glover. Box 116. 

91. Metropolis City— John J. Pyles. 

762 Moline — J. I. Swim. 2420 Fifth av. 



Ciias. W. Ca m don is expelled from Union 356 
Marietta, Ohio for leaving his wife and six chil- 
dren destitute and running off with another 
woman He is somewhere in Eastern Ohio, and 
has a paid-up card to Jan. 1st, 1892, and wears a 
carpenter's badge. He is about six feet high an d 
weighs 175 pounds, and is of sandy complexion. 



John Emmons is a notorious scab, and has left 



aller anberen ^nbuftriejweige, tretta nur ber ß 6 L Ottawa— H eim, vieth, 923 . sycamore *t. 
gute JBille, unb e.nflein SBenig SKaimeomuty J»- st . 

Ur.b iSnergienorpanDen t|t. 189 . Quixcy — H erman J. Mareks, 9th and Hemp. 

Xie 'JJrÜberfcbaft benft aber fetneoroegS. auf 636 . Ravenswood— A aron Johnson. Box luo. 
gre Lorbeeren auäjurufjen, fonbernfübrt ben S th ’ 

ÄQIUPT encrfllia) fort. » 3 ^ Stelen ctäbten, mo 166 . Rock Island — J, F.Kewtield, 2 i 08 hixtü ave. 



Ogden, Utah, and is bound for Chicago. He is feilte n0(^ 10 Stunben gearbeitet wirb, foil im 745 . Savanna— W. T. Cottra). 

about five feet eleven inches tall, dark complex- 1 tommenben ^rÜ^ja^t bet '.}lcf)t= unb 'Jteur.-' 199- Sol £ 1 f i^’ham^Cook'Co ^ rantham, Box 149 

! 1 1 1 11 J 1 1 111 I t » I t 4« X« t. 4 A /S u .. A ^ * _ * 



ion, slim build, brown eyes, and right eye cross- ftunbentag eingefüf)rt Werben. Xa§ nennt 738 . S. ExglkwooiAj. P. Kimmel, Calumet P.O. 
eyed. Treat him as a scab wherever he goes. man Slgitation. (0t. Soui§ Xageblatt.) 16 Springfield— John Dick, 615 Eastman ave. 



‘J 



✓ 



THE CARPENTER. 




495 Streator — J ohn Robertson, 201 Bridge »I 
120- VENICE' — Geo Miller. 

444. Waukegan— W alter Strickland. 

281. Wheaton — J ames B. Weldon. 

INDIANA 

362. Anderson — cha* Moore 1.55 First -t. 

883. Aurora— J J Henderson, Cochran. Ind. 
874. Bedford — F. M. Russell. 

439 Bi.ufftox— J ohn X Hatfield. 

79'i. Clinton -W. Woodall. Box W. 

717. Columbus — I« B. MeI.eod. lltli A California 
494 Craw fokusvii.le— S.L« ng,20l Whitlock av. 
852 Elwood — J. J. Gregg. 

Evansville— 

90. F W Klein, 51 3 Edgar st. 

470. M. Halhmbergor. Uw av . Hartmctz add’n. 
Töt». (Mach. hands) I,. Kessler 92n K. Franklin st. 
777. (Mill Joseph Ulsas, 1004 E. Maryland sL 
153 Fort Wayne— II. I.. Mullet, 92 Chicago -*t. 
728 Frankfort — G. K irschhaum.606 X. Jackson 

445. Grek s field — Robert Otl'ntt. 

157. I1au«.hville— 8. T„. McCormick. 

95. Hartford City -C. Huffman. 

810 Huntington— G. A. Mentzer. 

Indi anapolis— S ecretary of District Council, 
ilBrry Kollert*. 189 W. ist si. 

57 (Steirs lie». Wernsing. 74 Ixckcrhie st. 

80 tier Alb. Simons«- 48 Buchanan st. 

9T<9. H K Travis, 156 Bates st. 

44*> W Pranneman. 147 Ludlow lane. 

8*9 (Milli J H. Daugherty, 237 X. Miss. at. 

706. J. Ii- Whisncr. 210 English ave. 

770. Jeffersonville— J. Page. 25 Missouri ave. 
Lafayette— 

215. W. Kottenhtirg. 112 S. Fifths! 

78*. (Ger ) G. W. Davis, S mill Firth -t. 

744. Logan'Pokt — M ilo Gil»s«*ii 
613 Madison — C harles Ilol wager W. Madison 
585 . Marion — J. K B , «"-ser,« , or.3Mh uml Harmon 
796 Mt. Vernon — Preston Loveland. 

592 Munde— J. B. Miller. 133 W. Mich, st' 

19- New Albany— P. G- Kenn, 564 Vincenneaat. 
c»‘. Kichmond— J ohn H. Cohontt 837 S. Sixth at. 
579 Peru — G eo. B. Mitchell. 

7"9 ItosKDALE — J. O. Denman. 

43' Seymour— H. Moritz 

6.9 South Bend — o. A Pattison, 1 16 S. Laurel «t. 

4S. Terre Haute— J. It. Warner. 101 s 15th st 
tile*. VlSUKNNES — Allen < i reen hood. 61s Kills st. 
631. AVaii.v-h— s. Banister. 

INDIAN TERRITORY 

640. South MuAi.i.estlr — J. K. Underwood. 

879. Stillwater. Okla. T«-r. — K. J. Myers. 

IOWA 

534. Buri.ini.ton— A. Bokenoiimp. 1333 Angular. 
156. « 'KisToN— K. strii kland. 

554. Davenport — F W. lloetteher. 1931 Walnut. 
68. I)4 > Moines— D. Bl inking 13(18 K. G rand av 
678 . Dubuque — M. It. llegan. 2®.» 7th st 
503 1 -'mmetsiiurgh K. 11 Frcdern!:. 

»1 . Ft. Madison — C. K. Peoples 614 Park st. 

7<o Km>ki k H. L. Breitenstein. 1524 Bank st 
721. Sioux City— J. Deary, 23d A Court sts. 

KANSAS 

264 At« HisoN — H. Stork. 438 S. Seventh st. 

76'. i'hanute— A. M. Davison. 

66. CON<<<RDIA — W. H. Demds. 

499. Leavenworth— W 1! shon*»«*, Box 25. 

646. Pittsburgh — G ilbert Snyder, 
lös. Topeka— P. K. Conk, Box :» **» 

721. Winfield — B. D. M<Kire, S. Mail! st. 

KENTUCKY 

712. Covington— J. L. Lyons 250 Western ave. 
776. ( jLiill I John Raiirkcmper, X. W. cor. Kim A 
Brighton Ms, Newport. 

618. Grand Rivers— J. .«" . Milstea«!. 

259. Henderson— W in. O. Council, care Ky. 
Pinning Mill. 

626. Lexington— J Henry 

Louisville: — S ecretary of District Council, 
Jos. Heheman, 2315 Portland ave. 

7. D. It. Gash. 628 Eighth st. 

103. T. J. Murphy. 305 Thirtieth st. 

212. H. Ruby. 9, <6 K. Walnut st. 

214. (tier.) A. Berberi«'h,727 K. Broadway. 

258. S. J. Wilhovtc. 14:k) AV. Walnut st. 

729. (Car) Beni J. D.iller, 194.3 W. Jetl'crson st. j 

406. Ludlow — W. Laudon. 

684. Mi um. es borough — C ourtney Long, Box 65. 
698. Newport— J- W. Crupp« r. 7 2d Central ave 
504. Owensboro — J. N. Miller, i;in6 K. 7th st. 

201. Pahupah— C ha» Boon, is Huntington IDw. 

582. lti< hmond— \\ . M. Pearce 

701. W 1 Null ester — J . \V. Crone. B<«x 46. 

LOUISIANA 

622 Alexandria.— A. P. McNeil. Box 164. 

279. Monroe — B. It. Truly, Box htt. 

New Orleans— 

76. J. G. Bloomer, 132 1 ., S. Liberty. 

249. F. I). Kos*. lit) Third st. 

621. Chas. Bartels. 1 >1 C amp. 

704. Hy. llatl'ner. 132 Tolednnu st. 

7.42. (Mill) X. M. Heal> . Baronne A Marengo st-. 
739. Manuel Joaquin, 142 Washington ave. 

45. Shreveport— P eter («arson, Box 339. 

MAINE 

519. Augusta.— E verett Libby. 

31-5. Hath — E. A. Howard, 52 Bowery st. 

566 Gardiner— J. FI. Drake. Box ixj 

407. Lewiston — A. M. Flagg, 9 School st. Auburn 
344. Portland — L. W. Whitcomb, 4 Oxford st. 

772. Westbrook — V. L. Porter, Cumberland Mills. 

MARYLAND 

29. Baltimore— A. Faulhaber, 929 X. Ann st. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

State District Council— Secretary, D Ma- 
loney, 6 Parker st.. Cambridge. Muss. 

584. Amesbuhy — Samuel C. Young, 22 Beacon -t. 
648. Beverly— W in H. Cook. 

Boston — S ecretary of District Council, 

W. T. Brady. 246 ltoxburyst.. lt«»x bury sta 
33. S. J. Chadwick, 44 Ziegler st.. Roxbury. 

545. (Stairs' I W. Spcakman. 75 Rutland st. 

561. Geo. C lark. 7 Medford st.. Chelsea. 

56.5 'Miib W. McWilliams. Ill Church st., Somer- 
ville. 

139. IIroi ktos — F 7. Shattuck, •*9 Howard st. 

13*. Cambridge- D. Maloney, 6 Parker st. 

204. •• W. Boyle, 24 Porter st., Somerville. 

321. Chaki.f>town— W. c. Wheeler, 103 Bartlett. 
135. Chelsea — L. Jonah 145 Chester ave. 

3T3. Dedham— K Itvtwick. 

£09. Dor* Hester — L. K. Tarltcll, Hunt st. At- 
lantic. Mass. 

218. East Boston— H ugh McKay. 302 Paris st. 

106. (Ship Joiners' Kzra 11 nestis, 13« Trenton st. 
403. Fall River —John B. Pasiseanlt. 2 Branch st 
571. Franklin— J. Hussey. Box 387. 

38ii. Gt.nui e>tk.k — J. A. >1« Donald. 13 Cleveland. 
82. Haverhill — D. I -ar«>y Wilson. 9 Sixth ave. 
421. Bingham— 1'olia Camphcll, B«>\ 113. 

60s. lloi.voKK — «Fre neh) J. I firmiere, 41 Cabot. 
400 Hudson — G o« . K. Uryaiit, Box 125. 

196. Hyde Park <?. Daly, 55 Luring st. 

111. Law run« f T. Dixon, 310 Pur st. 

596. Loxm.i.l— K rank Kuppler, 203 Lincoln -t. 

106. Lynn— M. L. Delano. IU3 Lewis st. 

152. Malden — K. W. Perry. 

221. MaRBU head— J. Lent. B«x 178. 

154. Marlboro— r. I .alia mine. 160 Main st. 

192. XatifK — ( ii'». K. Allen. 

409. Xew Bedford — J ames Quirk, 8 Tremont st. 
275. Xewt«<N— Jos. Butler. Box 71. 

19«. North Adams — K. F. Kollett.6 K. Brooklyn st 
308. North Kaston— K lmer E. Watts. 

415. Norwood — J as. Hadden. 

417. iJuini'Y — A lfred Shaw. Wollaston. 

159. Revere— H. P. Halcoin,Wintbropav.,Beacli- 

iii' mt. 

67. Uox BURY — David Cnmpl*ell, 48 Norfolk st., 
Mattapan. 

I4«i. Salem — F. Wilkinson, 3 Parker st. 

702 Saxon vii.le — K. C. Tuttle. 

24. Somerville — A. F. McIntyre, 95 Franklins!. 1 
220. 8. Framingham— J. R. Dexter, Box 341. 

96. Springfield — D. P. Hall. 48 Terrence. 

491. Stoughton — G. W. Fernside. 

216. Waltham— J. P. Veno, 205 Charles st 
426. W est X ewton — B. F. Ryan, Box 566. P. 0. 

420. Weymouth— E. J. Pratt, Weymouth Heights 

421. Woburn— T imothy Ring, Winn st. 

93. Worcester— C. D. Frisk, 720 Main st. 



MEXICO 

■ 293. C. P. Diaz— W.S uiith, Box 21 Eagle Pass, Tex. 

MICHIGAN 

85. Ann Arbor— J. J. Ferguson, 16 W. Summit 
77. Battle Crkf.k— M. M. Haynes. 125 Clay st. 

129. Bay City— K. Forsyth. 

6 *6 . Benton Harbor— C. E. Jinkins. 

418. Charlotte— C. L. Cover, Box 532. 

Detroit — S ecretary of District Council. 

10. L. C. Hutchinson. 66 W. High st. 

32. F. Persinger. 37 -<u st. 

59. T. S. Jordan, 427 Beaufait ave. 

219. (Ger.) S. Schmidt, i30 Gudden st. 

I©. East Saginaw— J. F. B.ivley, 2401 Jefferson. 
2t8. ( dill) A. A. Yeager, 510 X. 12th st. 

466. (Ger.) Peter Frisch, 1502 So. Warren ave. 

Grand Rapids — S ecretary of District Coun- 
cil, H. Heaton, 229 Fifth st. 

65. E. L. Prohcrt, 9 Foster st. 

583. (Hull.) Casper Verheek, 186 Seventh st. 

| 771. T. Edwards. 670 Jetferson ave. 

793. H. Heaton, 229 Fifth st. 

411. Holland— 

j 195. Iron Mountain— J. P. I«angloisis, 618 W. 
lluyitt st. 

26. Jackson— H enry Behan, 211 Devo st. 

181. Lake I indkn — ( ieo. W. Guibord. Box 678. 
213. Lansing — J. K. Moore, Box 378. 

372. Marine City — A dolph Booskc, Box 7 J. 

I 3. <2. Marquette— (F rench) Z. Riopell. 307 Spring 
' 100. Muskegon— A lbeit Bcllenger. 51 Walton st. 
123. Owosso— Charles H. Cherry, Box 701. 

651. Saint Igsa« k— F. A. kiniels. Box 490. 

334. Saginaw City— G. AV« tzel, 1023 S. Harrison, 
W. S. 

784. Taw as City— H enry Gale. 

538. vandotte — F rancis Sntliff. 

MINNESOTA 

3fil. Dui.utii— W. A. Morris«<n, 32-5 E. Sii|>eriorst 
3)6. tScand.) P. ilelgenio, 1922 W. Michigan st. 

1 239. Little Falls— P. G. Potter. 

Minneapolis — 

411. (Scand.i A. C. Olson, 3133 18'_- ave . S. 

452. J. Xewgnist. 2i09 Irving a venue X. 

87. st. Paul— A ug. J. Metzger, *23 Rondo st. 

362. Winona— C arl Kne.lerli 107 E. Seeoml st. 

595. West Duluth — \\ illi.im McClelland. 

MISSISSIPPI 

312. Greenville— J. 1«. Guptile. 

528. " J. M Walker, Box 285 

68(1. Jackson — 'C ol.) John Dennis. 725 West Pearl 
749. Meridian- s. R. Smith, Care Sash anil Blind 
Factory. 

496. Vl< Ksnuiu, — W. C. Crnmriiie, Box 5«. 

562. " (Col.) Charles Taj lor. Box 2t 3. 

MISSOURI 

•51 4. Benton Station— J . Cook. Garner ave. 

790. Carthage— W. II. D. -vault, 1170 Grand ave. 
255. Hannibal — . 1. F. Yandumciil. 1210 Cnion st. 
160. Kansas city — A lex. McDonald. 1717 East 
Eleventh st. 

619. “ A D. Baird, 3015 Locust st. 

5,,. Marshall— S atn'l .M Xeus. 

98. Sedai.ia — J. W. Travis, 31 Harvey st. 

3s6. SLATER— Will. Ililldell. 

377. Springfield— J. W. Crouch. 1141 E Atlantic . 
522. St. Charles — (C ar Builders) Edw. Hackman j 
78*. Stanberry— H. H. Da via. 

130. st. Joseph — A. C. Curtis. 22d and Holman st. 
st. I.oui — S ceietaryof District Council, 

Chas T. Pa.rish, 2101 Whittier st. 

4. Geo. J. Swank. 1701 Xewstead ave. 

5. (Ger. i A. F. Kindlcr, 3020Salina st. 

12. :Ger. lb nr\ UosenlKtiiui, 2210 Blair ave. 

71. (Carsi J. M. Schatz, 1102 Montgomery st. 

1 13. V. S. Lamb, 3979 Gratiot st. 

2». (Ger.) J. Rue 4s. 1417'.. X. Market st. 

357. C. W. Clieniberlin, 1101 X. Jefferson ave. 

27d. Will Robbins, 4579 Evans ave. 

395. (Mill Paul Gamier, 106 X. 12th st. 

42-1. C. Strieder, 1321 U nion st. 

518. -Ger.) Henry Thiele, 2112 Do Kalbst. 

578. (Stair Bldrs.) Geo. ltupp, ls.30 8. 10th st. 

1 '99. John O’Connor, 2907 Cuss ave. 

731. (Ger. Mill) J II. Mittendorf, 2335*.) S. Seventh. 
789. Cnionville— J. B. EarhnrdL 

MONTANA 

88. Anaconda — B. A. Young 

112. Butte City— A. M. Slattery, Box 623. 

-*>. Great Fai.i>— G. H. chase. Box anti. 

280 . Helena — J. II. Schwaleu, 621 Second st. 

797. Kalispell— S. T Cobh 
586. Missoula— .1. J. Hassell 
3:7. Xeihart— 

NEBRASKA 

148. Lincoln— J. W. Embersou. 3003 S st. 

3.30. .Nebraska City— W.C. Willman, 302 S. 17tli. 
Omaha— S ecretary District Council, C. Rein- 
hart. 9!S X. Twenty-seventh st. 

58. ff. J. Schneider. 

271. Ger.) R. Ruppert. 2016 Martha st. 

68 1. C. Petterson. 140? S. Nineteenth st. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

283. Concord— D. W. Challis, 4s Bacon st. 

IK Manchester— W ilbur G.Colcord, 334 E.High. 
5»5. Portsmouth— K. C. Frye. 14 Vaughn st. 

NEW JERSEY 

750. Asburv Park— J. F. Scger. Box 897. 

42a. Atlantic City— J. E. steelman, 124 North 
Tennessee av. 

486 . Bayonne— Gus Sippel. 3« W. 24th st. 

711. ” J. Anderson, 478 Ave. F7. 

121. Bridgeton — C. E. WimmIhuU, 141 Kavette st 
2*. (’asiden— T. F7. Peterson, 3.17 Mechanic st. 

187. K. Orange — M. E. Rverson, 45 Oliver st. 

167. Elizabeth — II. Zimmerman. 8 Smith st. 

617. Englewood — G arret Springer. 

391. Hoboken— F. Steigleiter, 61 Bloomfield st. 

265. Hackensack — C imrles Wood, James st 

Hudson County— D. C., Secretarv, Joshua 
Travis, 105 Pacific ave., Jersey City. 

18'2 . Jersey City— G eo. Williamson. *310 Grove 
4.8». A. F7. Stewart. 117 Pine st. 

561. Amos Turley, 484 Central ave. 

570. ( Five Corners.) Jas.Dut'rane, 18' .Chestnut av 
7 ''. 'Greenville) liii h’d Kfkins. 3 Pamripo ave 
151. Long Branch— I. X. Cnbberlv, B«..x 183 
232. Mii.HUKN— J. H. White, Short' Hills. 

305- Millville— L uke Vanaman, 80S X. Second 
6.s. Morristown— V an Dents, Box 163. 

Xew ark— S ecretary of District Council 
C. ll.Uoyd, 195? Bank st. 

119. W. Nairn. 46 Centre st. 

172. Hier.) I« Meiler, 47 Lillie st. 

L5. Ger. • Andrew Rager, 20 Wall st. 

t.7. Orange— ’ r li«<s. Ferguson. Central place 

•372"». Paterson— O scar Zuhriskie, 34 Erie st. 

4*.«n. Passaic — F rank Wentink, Box 122. 



557. (Millwrights) Frank laibey, 11 Willow »1. 
639. Jas. Sullivan, 179 60th at. 

Buffalo — Secretary of District Council, 

A. E. White, 1075 Division at. 

9. C. Parker, 37 Locust. 

355. (Ger.) C. Roeaaler 242 Strauss st. 

374. E. O. Yokom, 19 Ferguson ave. 

440. M. A. Carter, 47 Puffer st. 

99. Cohoes — A. Van Amain, 22 George st. 

307. Corning — E. D. Chase, Dodge ave 
581. Cornavali^on-Kudson— A. 8. Halsted. 

315. Elmira — F 2. M Snyder, 761 15 Market 
662. Far Rock away— L. E. Brooks. 

323. Fishkill-on-Hcdbon— Jm. Hayes, Mat- 
teawan, X. Y. 

500. Glen Cove, L. I.— Fred. Craft. 

229. Glens Faux— W. B. Stevens, 18 Grand st. 
447. IIaverstraw— E. A. Waldron, Box 375. 

272. Herkimer— C has. Cristmau, Box 631. 

173. Hoosick Falls — E dwin Chapman. 

149. Irvington— H enry Baker, Box 38. 

60.3. Ithaca— J. W. Skinner, 1 -0 XV. Buffalo st. 
627. Johnstown — G. II. Boxvinaker, 8 Glebe*. 
261. Kingston— J. Deyo Oliipp, Box 100. 

591. Little Fail* — A A. Miller, 

709. 1/Ockport — F. Fisher, 112 John st. 

465. I.OXG Island City— F. Koselius, 881 AllK-rtst 
643. Mamaroneck— W illiam Hopps. 

150. Middletown — W. R. Roger.-, :5 Houston av. 
493. Mt. Vernon — A. L. Baily, 56 S. Third ave. 
103. New Brighton, S. 1.— F. 15. Salfelder, 47 

York ave. 

>01. Newburgh— J ohn W. Gib-on, 83 Dubois st. 
42. Xew Rochelle — J os. Gähne. 

507. Newtown— 

New York— Secretarv of District Council, 
T. C. Walsh, 537 F5. 81st st. 

51. Chas. A. Judge, 626 E. 1 loth st. 

63. Thomas C. Kelly, 427 F5. 1 4tli st. 

64. J. V. Lounslniry, 813 Columhus ave. 

200. (Jewish) S Jacobson, 5 Gt. Jones st. Care 
M. Wislunsky. 

340. A. Watt, Jr., 833 Amsterdam ave 
382. H. Seymour, 1300 Second ave. 



st. OREGON 

520. Astoria— O le E-ms. Box 44.3. 

*' 50. Portland— J. F. Grimes, Box 518. 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allegheny City- 
211. C. L. Mohnev, 70 Wilson ave. 

237. (Ger.i lt«*liert Gramlawg, 2 Bluff st. 

476. (Stairs, «Ve.) IS. M. Evans, 49 Kilbuek st. 

487. Altoona — T. Kenner, 1.328 8th a\'e. 

296. Apollo — J. C. Mears. 

246. Beaver Falls— 11 Kirker, 1004 Fourth ave. 
• r , 254. Hkllefonte— 

Wftl * j 492 . Bellevue— C. W. Murray. 

655. Belle Vernon — I» iu»e Coldrcn, Box 207. 

, 342. Blairsvillf—J. M. Reid. 

Ml ' 180. Buadmm k— John V. Brairthoover, Box 6i0. 
550. Bradford— C. F Cummings. 

733. Bkockwayville— Fred. C. Miller. 

450. Bryn Mawu— J ohn 1*. Hat* h. Box 79. 

222. Butler — J. W. Rie« . 409 F’ranklin st. 

**7 7:?8. Cakbondale— F redSluiiian 21 Thorn st. 

294. Charleroi— I ra L Xiekson, l!ov 101. 

207. Chester— E ber S. Kigley. 240 K. Firth st. 

408. Colt VOPOLIH — Joseph Miller. 

• 53i. Du Bow—' Tims. Boring, 
ertsi I)U«|I'KHNK— 1 ('has. Stauffer. Box Ii. 

. 787. Klwood City. — I t. A. White. 

’ j 16. Erie— W. II. Peat, ‘D7 W. 23.1 st. 

, e ’.- 422. Frank FORI»— John Davies, l*«s Sellers st. 
r ’ ‘ 401. Franklin — A. P. Cooper. I?<*\ 23s. 

. I 671. Frkkpokt— W. W. Wolfonl 
8 ' 122 . Germantown— J. 15. Martin, 53 W. Duval st. 

462. Greensiiurg — J ohn Franeis. 

.„.<1 39s. Greenville— T. M. Campbell, Box 216 

’ 587. Grove City— 11. I«. Blaek. 

287. H AKRisiU'!«;— Eli llolliiigcr, 6!9 North st. 

1 288. Homestead — J. A. Wold', Box 473. 

1 25«. Jeannette — P. E. Robbins, 
j 205. Johnstown — C harles Zore, 32Ö Bedfonl st. 
i 110. Kittan.nin« — A lvin McGregor, B <x 222. 
i 208. Lancaster — (' has. Hen-ell, New Holland av 
‘ 691. I.ATKOBK — A. " . Cramer. 



38J. it. seviiiour, I30J iseooiiu uve. : ... 

4-57. (Sean.) II. L. Hansen, 63 x.deottst.. Hr k’iii ‘®‘- J’V! ’ 7- ‘f 1 ’ ^ * *' 



464. ( ( »er.) F’. Hollerieth, 33 1 3rd ave. 

468. Dennis Devine, 58 15. Ninth st 
473. David Petrie. 347 W. lltli st. 

478. Chua. Bickel, 611 Bergen ave. 

497. (Ger.) W. Schmitz, 304 Pleasant ave. 

509. James Iamhioii, 340 W. Seventeenth st. 

513. (tier.) H. Knobloeh, 26 Elizabelli st. 

715. Christopher Coffey, 201 > Columbus ave. 

474 NVA» K— Hobt. K. Wta.l, Box 193. 

302. Ogdensburg — J ohn Wert, Pickering st. 

101. Oxeonta— F rank McKee, 6 Gardner place. 
443. O-WKGo — Chas. Ward, 207 East Bridge st. 

31 Peek-kill— T heo. Birdsell, hi .6 south -t. 

4. <4. l’oKTi'HE-i ER — Allen McDonald, Kve, X. Y. 
006 . Port Richmond — J. Keenan, Xew Brighton, 
H. I. 

203. Poughkeepsie— N. R. Dalzell. B.»x 32. 

675. RtM'KAWAV Beach — T. F*. Lowe,Oceauua,L.I. 
Rochester — 

72. H M Fletcher, 34 Cypress -t. 

179. (tier.) Krank Schwind, 4 May Place. 

146. Schenectady— J. A. Malloy. 214 Clinton st. 
768. Sea Cliff — J.S Koop. 

413. Sheepshead Bay — W in. Cramer. I«ox 71. 

667. Stapleton — J. Hutchinson, Bath Building, 
Jersey st.. New Brighton, S. I. 



319. Lekchhi'Ru — I. \x . Long. 

1 436. Lock Havfn — F. Bittner, 52S<i-t|iiebaiii»aav 
i 177. McKki>poRT— Whi. Mit'oni, 706 Co in -t. 

I 438. Manavunk — 15) J< ini m F’ra'rtz. 449 Given la. 

! 569. Manor Station— E li Nnley. 

I 431. Man-field — Roheit Ilauhri< h, Man-tield 
Valley P. O., Box Is*. 

552. Mkadvii.i.f— P. P. Kelling. 7«1 >l:He st. 

; 278 . Mkrcfr — A. B Moore. 

; 653. MonoN'.ahei.a City— J. 1». si. war'.. Box 623. 
741. Mount Carmel — J ere M. Joint. 

; 589. Mount Pi.fa.-ant— H. W. Zundell 
: 35«. New Kkn-ington H. Kekapi. ! ■•!•• l-<v 63. 
1 2 ()*>. New Ca-ti.k-.I.M tilende.ini: g. :«i W.Wa-h 
;tss. Norristown — w. J. lics.-cr. H>.\ :• J.lb idge- 

pll'1. 

411. Oil City— II. L. Mt Veagli, S oil < ily. 

PiliLADELITilA — Secretary of Di-t. Council. 
J. K. X.iee. 6810 i'ainiimd -t.. Tneoi.y. 

8. J. ,1. Maguire. J5i3 Clarion st. 

227. 1 Keii-iiigloii Clias. L.S|tangler,2164Sergeanl 
238. (Ger.i Geo St liinidt. 4(1 tiaekley st. 

StW. (Southwark) (’has. Mitchell, 1009 Ts-ker -t. 
359. (Mill Geo. W. Milier. 2336 X. Fiftc enta st 
Pittsburgh — Secretary of District Council. 
W. P. Patton. 61 Mahan ave. 



im-ij-c* 8<i m ,xr*v ill 1^111(111, t’’. I. , .... - 

Staten Island— S ecretary of District Conn- 1 ri2. II. (•. Scliomaker. I26 W eb-ter ave.. Ain 



eil. W. 11. Messenger, 73 York ave., Xew 
Brighton. 

Syracuse— 

15. (Ger.) Abe Frey, 217 Saile st. 

124. J. C. French, ll9 Delhi st. 

:«(>•?. (French) II. St. Pierre, 614 Robinson st. 

3i4. Taruytown — D. Page, North Tarrytow 11. 

7s. Troy — J ohn J. Hanlon, Box, 145. 

125. Utica — II. Schneller, 14 Edward st. 

3>8. ** (Ger. 1 John Specht. 10 Faust live. 

5*0. Watertown— D. B. Willex, 19 W. Mullen 
'.’33. Wavkri.y — J. M. Terry. I Center at. 

252. AYkstTroy — C Stewart, 1 '67 Broadway. 

273. Yonkers — J as. Boomer, 267 Xew Main st. 

NORTH CAROLINA 

384. Asheville— J. 15. Stevens, Box 493. 

289. Charlotte— A. C. X. Beehrter, 70615. 7th st. 
796. Greensboro — W. O. Divinev. 

668. Winston — G. B. Daniels, 118* Chestnut st. 



399. PHII.LIPSBUKG— Win. Hodge 9>1 Ferrv st J’; A ^ T Li VEKPtKH.-M . S. Piltenper, E 

Easton. Pa. ' ’ Findlay — A. D. Xeunieyer, Bt.x 491 



OHIO 

84. Akron — J. Glass, 111 Thornton st. 

723. ” (Ger.) R. Weymullcr, 6 2 Sunnier st. 

757. Ashtadula— A. L. Howard. 

17. Bellairk— Moses Vogle. 

44. Bowling Green— J. II. La Fam e. 

170. Bridgeport — E lmer Justice. 

501. Bucvrus — F'. Sheoly, Jr., Box 179. 

14.«. Canton — D. Van Kirk, Spring st. 

182. Celina — H. A. Tomlinson. 

Cincinnati — S ecretary of Distriet Council, 
A. L. Bauer, 131 Molitorst. 

2. M. A. Clements, 134 Clark st. 

209. (Ger.) August Weiss, 359 Freeman ave. 

327. (Mill.) Geo. 'Marshall, 4i7 Main st. 

481. (Stairs- B. Meukhaus, 192 Western ave. 

628. W. Ringel, 248 Dane st., Station A. 

664. (Ea-t End.) — George Rust, Fairfield ave., E. 
Walnut Hills. 

667. R. Patterson, 4 Elmw«>o«l av.. Walnut Hill. 

676. A. L. Bauer, 134 Molitor st., Corryville. 

681. Win. Parker. 12('hestnut st. 

6*3. J. Schwarz. 1398 W. Sixth st. 

692. John Spcllhrink, Sedam av. 

713. (Mill A Elevator Bldrs. 1 II. Btaney, 19 Hat- 
maker st. 

Cleveland— S ecretary ot District Council, 
R. R. Kart. 165 Oregon st. 

11. John F'raser, 247 Streator ave. 

39. (Rohem) Kr. Divoky, 65 Petrie st. 

234. (Ger.) Cn. Witt, 40 lianny ave. 

241. D. F. Erwin, 1233 Ixtrain st. 

282. (Polish) John Peplinsky, 177 Fullerton st. 
393. (Ger.) Theo. Wei rieh, 16 Parker st. 

449. (Ger.) Herman Seherr, 77 Seiden av. 

461. John Milner, ‘.»52 Oakdale ave. 

632. . Bob.) Wm. Mares, 1372 Central ave. 

6C«. (Mill) J. Muetzel, 18 Svobotla st. 

231. College Hill— W. k. Howard. 

Columbus — S ecretary of Distriet Council, 
J. F. Hepner. genl. delivery. 

61. AV. G. Wildermuth, 691 McAlister ave. 

326. H. A. Goddard, 269 X. 17th. 

350. (North side) J. II. Conklin, 22 E. 10th ave. 
1<*4. Dayton — U e<>. Brenner, 303 Howard st. 

346. (Ger.) Frank Herfurth, 11 Sears st. 

396. “ (Car Bldrs ) John Cox. Kiser st. 

187. Defiance — AY ulter I-amlx'i t. 315 Seneea st 

677. Delaware— B. p. Williams. 2u> X. Union st. 
775. Delhi — J as. Slattery, Home City. 

782. Df.lphos — J acob I -a uni. 

■328. East Liverpool— AA t . S. Pitteneer, Box 6«4 

1 vW L'i > >.■ . >• a lv v* > . .. . 



15' Plain-field— 1». A. A anFleet. 43 E. Third st. 
6u2 Red Bank— G. Iznigstreet, Oceanic, X J 
573. Rutherford— J no Holland. 

065. Somerville— AY. W. Pittenger 
45>. SUMMIT— R Wood. Box 158 
31. Trenton— O. B. Gaston, 91 Jackson st 
543 Tow n of Union— J. Britton. AVeehuwken 
•>.2. AN e-t Hoboken— J as. McCabe. 

NEW YORK 

274. Albany— T ims Mt X. il M X. Knox st. 

659. (Ger.) Ed. Junker, 12 Quail st. 

6. Am-terda m — H erbert Clark. 15 Putman st 
4-53. auburn— AY. AY. Gillespie, 119 K. Genesee 
13. Batavia— o. Dewit, Box 223. 

131. Binghamton— AY. F. Hulse, 35 Colfax ave. 
216. “ C. X. Greene, 21 Park ave. 

Brooklyn— S ecretary of District Council 
AA m. Cheriton, 177 Fifth ave. 

1(0. Adolph Sillter, 236 Fourteenth st. 

147. Jno. J. Powderly, 19U Alltanv ave. 

175. C. F. Douglass, 116 Powers st. 

223- ItolR»rt H. A oung, 589 Lorituer st. 

247. (L Paynton, 1349 Fulton st. 

25s. H. P. Culver, 17 Cornelia st. 

291. (Ger.) John I>aiig. 134 Hamlturg ave. 

349. (Sash, etc.), H. Kolicrson. 223 47th st. 

381. J. H. Padbury 20 Rochtister ave 

H Ri« hardson. Box R., Fiatbush, X. Y. 
451. AA m. Carroll, 792 Bergen st. 

471. Fred. Brandt. 267 Ninth st. 



51". ’’ (Mill) A. 15. Smith, .803 Putnam st 

202. Fostoria— J. 11. Faler, 722 AY. 1 V.iar st 
250. Fremont— AY. II. Tlmmpson, 208 S Wood st 
641. Greenville— F. M. Sw ope 
637. Hamilton— P. A. Daugherty,. 33 X. B st. 

767. Jackson — J. AY. Pierce. 

267. Lima — J. A. Kepner. 613 Ileiudel st 
4S5. Dockland— (M ill.) F. S. M.isstellur, Sharon- 
ville, Hamilton Co. 

703. " Chas. E. Hertel, Box 182. 

369. Madisonvillk— 15 II. Hunt. 

555. Mansfield — X. H Kime. 

256. Marietta— K. H. AYagner. 

14. Martin s Ferry — L I. Shipman. 

725. Middletown— J. A. Lamon.S. Yankee rd 
736. X EI>o N v 1 LLE— F. Barron. 

16«. Xew Portage— J a*. II. Davis. 

705. Norwood— A. E. Beat, Ivanhoc. 

708. Salem— AY m. Bonsai, :«71 AY. Main st. 

107. Sandusky — 11. L. .Schumacher, >016 Central 
281. Springfield— E. L. Kendell, 280 S. Yellow : 
Springst. 

186. Steubenville— lam. Whittaker. 320 Ix>gan 
243. Tiffin-AV. H. Btehicr, 202 AV Pern- st 
25. Toledo— A. Smith, 633 Missouri. 

** ( (i Vf.) Gregor Eggl, 612 John st. 

605. Toronto— C has. E. Harris. 

412. AVakuen— D. A- Bradlcv. 

792. Washington, Court House.— J as. Goings 
1.1. A OUNG8TOWN-1I. J. Casner. 225 AVoodlaud. 
<16. Zanesville — F red. Kappes, O’Xiel st & 
Central ave. 



Box 12. 



!. Kettle Falls— I*. .1. McC’arlhev 
I. Olympia— W. L. Clark. 

I. Port Angklkh — AV. AV. Maltbv 
1. Puyallup— J ohn Mugford. 

. Port Townsend — G. A. Riielile. 

. Ak.'TTI.f -N. Swenson, lk>.\ 1450 
• . “ (Mill.)O. IIougan.821 Lak. vicu lv . 

. Spokane — J ohn Hearn, Box .1 t e- 

. Tacoma— H. M< Li-an, Box inn 
. Whatcom— D. II. McArthur H ,x i < 

WEST VIRGINIA 
. Buck iiannon — J. AV. Nell’, M..x 17 
. Charleston — J. L. Jones. Box *9. 

. Charleston n— C liarie> || «.rim' 

. < 'la rksiu'kg — J II Ridcno'ir 
. Elkins — AV. II. Head Box 3. 

. Grafton — C. F’. Burk Box 3m. 

, Huntington— M et'h Han Rom i,. 

. MOUNDVILLE— I.. Helms. 

. New Ci mberi.cnd — J I) Frank 
. Parkersburg— R. C. Himiette, 53! .s, - , . ,i, 

. Piedmont— T. J. I’ettit. 

. AVkli.mii RG Samuel Patterson. Box 243 
Wheeling— E. Grosseurth,82 New ,l< r« v .t 
WISCONSIN 

. Ashland — A. Beaton, 1019 Prentice ave 
Chippewa Falls— J oseph Guv. fill P. ei-, „t 
. Eau Claire— G. Hoppe, Forest -t. 

, Green Bay — 15. Eliding, 1275 Stuart - 
. I, A Crossf. — AI. Cil llnann. Ili|5 F, r. 3 . 
Milw aukee — S ecretary of 1 »ist t i < t ( ,unril 
Fritz Maurer 1(N»C Xineteentli «1 
, (Ger. ) I«. Platz, 18(17 Fon «In l,acaw . 

(Ger.) John Schulte. 520 Third ave., r. a' , 

;< irr. Emil Haertel. D91 Thirtl «t 
(Ger.) F. Seliuerer, 696 Twenty-fourth -t. 
(Mill.; AV. H. Schade. Jr.. 811 Garden -I 
It. 15. Herman, 1305 Prairie st. 

Tlii'o. I»embinski, 821 Eleventh tt\ e. 

North Lacrosse— E. Knudser. KJOO Avon. 
Oshkosh — A. Nelson. 33 Merritt t. 
Sheboygan — (< » er.) Henry Krimi» nac'er, 1110 
.superior M 

Superior— P et-r Tamble 
( Wf.-T SUPCitlORl — Fred It 'e^e. 703 Weck» ax 
(.xSout:? 9' l'<:i(l»li(l-A. Mordell 



er 



^G/STEPt- 0 



• 161. (G<-r.i Adolph Balz. 131 Twi lrth st . s. s 
165. ( K. End) F. B. Denman. <7 In wood »t., fc. F. 
230. T. J. MeKelillU, rear 12? MeKenu st. 

3*5. (AV. End) Jas. S. Connell, 191 Steuben st. 

402. (Ger.) J. P. Dreikosen, 153 Sixteenth st., S. S 
737. Jas. Reeil, 11 Southern ave. 

615. Pittston— J. U. I .cigli ton. 16 Tompkins »l. 
145. PUNXsUTAW NLV— ( '. G. Hcilliigll. 

336. Reading— T. Kissinger. 510 X. I3tli 
36*. Rochester-- A. N. Giitermuth, lk<\ 152. 

1 730. SALTS BURG — J. P. I«eccll, Box 13. 
j 3-19. Sc ottdai.i: — . 1. Ai. Carson. Box 384. 

■ 563. Sc ranton— G. M. 11 ii linger. 1408 Hampton st. 

I 718. " Emmet Puder. 4 14 Phelps st 

j 75). “ J. Nolan, 504 Oak st. 

481. S. ScRAVroN-(Ger.)J.Rruiiacliwiler 624 Ahle> 
•'?7. Shamokin — E.A\ . Deibler, 23S. Shamokin st. 
268. Sharon— A. R Peters. 12 Kim st. 

185. SHAicrsi'.URG — W. C. Pfusch. 

514. SHARRsviLLE— AV. Rciclmrd, Box 170. 

276. Tarenium - G. T. Owens. 

551. Turtle c 'am:- .lamc-s Strang, Box 216. 

I 520. Tyrone — AV. 1. Ab-Kiimey. 

! 459. UnIontoWN— 11. ( ■ . Case. 161 Grant st. 

370. A'i Ro.VA— S. \Y, rf ,.!. .1,.. Box 9., IIulloii. Pa. 
51*9. AVarrj.n— D. J. Grindlac . 

4«'. AV.asii 1 ngTon — . 1. Y. Mi l lain, Box 227. 

6!l. AVr>T I.EISESRIN«.— AV. U. Reede. 

02. WiLKFs-BARrE— Thi s. Tamblyn. 231 Xortli- 
111t pton s|. 

458. AVilkinsrurg— J am s TimI.J, 

2*-c>. A) ii.LiAMsi'tiRT — I,. F. Irwin. 4D Hepburn «t. 
191. A ork — \ t . P. (• r* ictsch. 518 \\ . Pritiet ss st 

RHODE ISLAND 

I 510. Narragansett Pie* — H. Chapman. 

| 176. Xewt*ort— A. Dmlany. 2 Perry st. 

; 735. Pawtucket— J ohn Stephenson, 15 AA’el.b si 
; 94. PltoviDENt k— W in. slack. 23 Willow- eouit 
I 691. Woons.m ei t— A. W. Fountain, 28 Ciimb» - 
land st 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

52. Ch a rli >T o x — (Col.) AV. II Burgess, 5 Kür.« 

belli st. 

69. Cot UMBIA — (Col.) S. I«. Thomjtson. 178 Esst 
Jervais st. 

670. Grkexvii.i.E— C. B. Arnold, 109 West st. 

682. '* (Col.)S. S. riiolii|tsoti, 108 Augusta s; 

427. Spartanburg— I,. A. Justice. 

TENNESSC- F. 

669 < hattammi'.a— E w it g White. Riilgedale 
406. t'UMm Ri.AMi («AP— J. W. Hudson. ~ 

614. ilAItirlM an— G. A. Ben. 'er 

1.4. Ja« Kson — W. G. < 'handier. Box 4 «5. 

139. Johnson City — J. M. lYter-, 

225. K noxvii.lk— G. 1,. Cox, |*0 Morgan st 
391. Memphis— X. M. l.inom, 151 MiH »i 
*63. Nashville— B. ( Tallcy.Tilden A ( lieatlinin 
766 “ (Mill) J. T. Parker. 518 X Market st. 

TEXAS 

300. Austin — C. .1. Arm-irong, 704 F5. llili st 
731. < «iksh ana— A. D. Shields. 1217 E. 7tli ave 
198. Dallas— O. L. AVilev, B.ix 299. 

371. Denison— C. II. Miller, 213Scullin nve. 

414. Ei. Paso — Frank DeRov 615 Campbell st 

277. Ft Worth— S T. Murphy. 16t 9 Hemphill. 

• , 2>'. Galve-ton — AV. .1. ( 'hiipiuan, 1 *<20 ave. 6k 
6J1- “ (Ger.) H. Rube, ave. I. an.l 33<l si 

114. Houston— B ruce l.eacli.270 Walker st. 

539. Paris — AV. II. Norris. 204 Plum st 

i48. San Angelo — T. II. Hollowav, Box 39 

367. San Antonio— A. R. ymann.' 5iB Wconiiii" 

16 ?. Temple — E lias Land Box l«*5 

26?. A Elam o — T. I.. M<d51hc*iev, Box 9 

559 . AV a x A 11 atctiie — AV m. R. Norman 

695. Yoakum— 

UTAH 

635. Ogden— H ubert Be 1. Box 124. 

489. Sali Lake City — C lias. M. Stamm, Box 12 

VERMONT 

512. Bellows Falls- D. R «llehan. 

329. Burlington— J as. Childs. 176 X AVillard si 
390. Brattlkhoro-K. S. AViman, 5 (irgaV, aL 

53. Rutland — A. \\ . A\ hite, 52 state st. 

VIRGINIA 

256. Hampton— AV. B. Walker 
348. New port News— J as. Ujisliaw- 

*• So KÄÄ- «. I 

78t. I’ORTssionu-ll E. Mcggs. 603t>ueen «t 
134. Richmond— II. W ivc®? Uo s &7ry\t. 

498 Roaxokf 1 vc n ' Mas< ‘"' 71 " s ‘- James st. 

xt- OANOKE ~" J- Bacon, 324 3d ave. X AV 
303. AA AYKE8BORO — H.S. Phillips Box 74, Basic Cv. 

WASHINGTON 

743. Aberdeen-AV. T. Iliff, Box 617 
689. Anaooktes— AA’ sine 
612. Blauix— M. V. B. Smith. 

527. hVKRETT— 

675. Fair Haven— A. J. Holton, Box 556. 



This is a Facsimile «<f the LABEL of the 

UNITED HATTERS 

OF NORTH AMERICA. 

Tin* Ijib«»Iiias rcec'ivcd the indorsement of the 
General Executive Board of the K. of L. and of 
the An criean Federation of Ijihor. 

lie 1 ab«d is placed on every uni<ui-ninde 
hat before* it leav« s the workman s hands. If a 
dealer takes 11 label from one hat ami places it in 
another, or Inis any detached laltelain his store, 
do not buy f.- .m him, as hi* labels niav be coun- 
terfeit ami his hats muv be the product of scab or 
non-union labor. 

1 ewiiie oi Counterfeits. Sometimes they are 
printed on w hile paper and sometimes o" velinw 
pap* r. As a general thing tin t are not pertnrah'd 
«•ii the eiiges. A oolluterlcit !»Ih* 1 with perforate I 
*-<iges i.as !ai**ly made its appearance It is largi 
than the genuine one. The genuine label is alx. it 
an inch and a linif square and is printed on bur) 
colored paper. AA'heu purchasing a hat sec to 11 
liuit you get the genuine label with the j>erforai. i 
edges. 

This is the On!y Ccrreot Union Label for 
Fur-Felt Hats. 

BUY NO FUR-FELT HAT WITHOUT IT’ 

Edward Barrett, President. 

Hat Makers' International Association 
James II. Penrose. S«'cretary, 

523 äuyder Ave., 1'hiladelphia, Pa.; 
Taos. F. O'Rourke, President, 

Hat Finishers’ International A>> u. 
John Phillips, Seeretnry, 

•5!“ Park Avenue, Brooklyn, X. A* 

THE UNION LABEL. 

THE CHUR MAK CHS' HU E LAKE1 




I I?« 

1 ^ 

< $ 

0 Ai- I 

! 2 ik $ 

ililiil 

»’S till? 

1 s Ulf» 

1 1 ml* 

?-i ml 



'Jm " ä 

SI If 
slfll 

Ö 2 



w| At the Four 
IM teen th Annua. 
Session o f t h - 
I jl Cigar Maker.* 
$ Internationa 
U’nion, held 
^ P Chicago, in th«- 
^ 0 month of Septum 
M ber, iS-6, the a«. 

i companying lab«* 
Avas adopted .is 
trade mark to b* 
pasted on tV'.n 
y box of cigai 
B made by Unio 
is men. 



\ if men. 

1 vmß 1 ' : = r ' 

If you are opposed t«> the servile labor«» * 
les, smoko unimi-made cigars. , 

If you are opi«ise«l to contracts f* ,r ' 
labor, in deadly competition with tree <""' 
smoko union-made cigars. , 

If you favor higher wages, smoke union- 
cigars. . 

If you arc opposed to filthy tenemen - >0 
factories, smoke none but union-made es ^ 

If you favor shorter hours of i.abob, * 
union-made cigars. , 

If you favor a permanent orgunzatumo 
otrieüy union ehops, do not purchase tin ! 
duet of scabs, rats and black! Ago. 1 

See that the Blue Label is ea the B<* 




; *£ - S*” "HÖ V, ’a; v 
/ 



f"W^sa ~w 



■ft 




CAR PEN 



m 



XT "P 

i_j Jcl. 




Once t o every man and nation comes the mo- 
ment to decide, 

In the strife of truth with falsehood, for the good 
or evil side : 

Some great cause, God’s new Messiah, offering 
each the bloom or blight, 

Parts tue goats upon the left hand, and the sheep 
upon the right, 

And the choice goes by forever, ’ twixt that dark- 
ness and that light. 

Careless seems the great avenger; history’s 
pages but record 

One death grapple in the darkness ’ twixt old 
systems and the Word ; 

Truth forever on the scaffold, wrong forever on 
the throne— 

Yet that scaffold sways the future, and behind 
the dim unknown 

Standet h God within the shadow, keeping watch 
above his own. 

Then to side with truth is noble when we share 
her wretched crust, 

Ete her cause brings fame and profit, and ’ tls 
prosperous to be just; 

Then it is the brave man chooses, while the cow- 
ard stands aside, 

Doubting in his abject spirit till his Lord is 
crucified, 

And the multitude make virtue of the faith they 
had denied. 

For humanity sweeps onward; where to-day 
the martyr stands, 

On the morrow crouches Judas with the silver 
in his hand ; 

Far in front the cross stands ready and the crack- 
ling fagots burn, 

While the looting mob of yesterday in silent 
awe return 

To glean up the scattered ashes into history’s 
golden urn. 

They have rights who dare maintain them ; we 
are traitors to our sires, 

Smothering in their holy ashes freedom's new- 
lit altar lire« ; 

Shall we make their creed our gaoler? Shall we 
in our haste to slay, 

From the 'tombs of the old bigots steal the fu- 
ueral lamps away 

To light up the martyr-fagots round the prophets 
of to-day? 

New occasions teach new duties ; Time makes 
ancient good uncouth ; 

They must upward still and onward, who would 
keep abreast of Truth ; 

Lo, before us gleam our camp-tires ; we our- 
selves must Pilgrims be, 

Launch our Mayflower, and steer boldly through 
the despe ate winter sea, 

Nor attempt the future’s portal with the past’s 
blood- rusted key. 

— James Russell Lowell. 



Unions 270 and 699 of St. Louis, Mo., | Union 631, Wabash, Ind., only lacks 
have been carrying on a series ot joint de- eight men of having all carpenters in the 
bates and fraternal visile all winter. city. 



JU iT SEE THE DIFFERENCE. 

Taking $1,000.000 is called Genius. 

Taking $lii0,000 is called Shortage. 

Taking $50,000 is called Litigation. 

Taking $25,0(10 is called Insolvency. 

Taking $10,000 is called Irregularity. 

Taking $5,0 )0 is called Defalcation. 

Taking $1 ,000 is called Corruption. 

Taking $500 is called Embezzlement. 

Taking SiOO is called Dishonesty. 

Taking $50 is called Stealing. 

Taking $25 is called Thievery. 

Taking one loai of bread is called Total 
Depravity. 

From a moral point of view, there is no 
difference in the act of taking, and the 
term of thief should be applied to each or 
to none. 



TH PROVIDENT SIDE OF TRADE UNIONS 

Mr. Geo Howell describes in the last 
issue of the New Review, with detail of 
statistics and the fullness ot knowledge, 
how trade unions encourage thrift. He 
«ays: “Viewed, therefore, from every 
standpoint, the provident benefits of trade 
unions confer estimable advantages upon 
the members ; economically, in their in- 
dustrial relations ; socially, as regards the 
home, the man and the family, the latter 
being no longer dependent upon the doles 
of charity when reverses come ; nor is the 
bread winner compelled toaccept less than 
the current rate of wages in his trade. 
Self-reliance and self-respect are incul- 
cated, thrift is promoted, prudence is en- 
couraged, and industry is insured by the 
constant watchfulness of the members for 
each other’s welfare, vacancies for effi- 
cient workmen being secured for those in 
the society who may be out of work.” 



\ 



The Conover Patent Adjustable and 
Reversible Spoke Shave is far superior to 
any other in the world. Its advantages 
over other tools are that the blades can be 
easily adjusted. It will cut on a flat sur- 
face, ami when reversed from one side to 
the other it will cut on a small curve, in 
which it has the advantage over all other 
spoke shaves. This tool is guaranteed to 
lie perfect in every respect. Price, $1.00 
Address Conover Tool Comnany, 40 Sheriff 
Street, Cleveland f. — Union 
-y a fire in its me 



The Indianapolis, Ind., Carpenters’ 
Union are forming a Ladies’ Auxiliary 
Society of members’ wives and daughters 
to help on the movement. 

Long Island City, N. Y., Union, 465, 
has adopted the card system and placed 
John Hogan in the field as walking dele- 
gate. Trade dull; prospects fair. 

The Handsomest order of dance ever 
issued by auy trade union was given out 
by Carpenters' Union No. 738, Carbon- 
dale, Pa., at their New Year’s Eve ball. 

The National Builders’ Exchange held 
its annual convention in January in Cleve- 
land. O. They had a genuine monkey- 
and- parrot time, and did but little prac- 
tical good. 

Paducah, Ivy. — Union No 201 gave 
a public installation of its officers, and 
with good effect Other labor organiza- 
tions were a'so represented and very excel- 
lent speeches were made. 

Hot Springs Ark. — The members of 
Union No. 469 turned out in a body at the 
funeral of Bro. Tillbrook. We have also 
formed a live Trades and Labor Council, 
and will soon have the card system. 

Conventions of National Trade Unions 
of the Horse Slioers, Boiler Makers and 
Ship Builders, United Garment Workers 
and Journeymen Barbers have been held 
recently, and were all well attended. 

Union 385, Norfolk, Ya.. is working up 
a State Convention of Carpenters’ Unions. 
Two imp. .rtant labor bills before the Vir- 
ginia legislature are certain of passage, 
viz: a Labor Holiday and a Mechanics 
Lien Law. 

J. S. IIeatlev, one of our members in 
Jersey City Heights, N. J.. suggests that 
one of the best means to organize the car- 
penters would be to inaugurate an endow- 
ment plan, so as to pay $1,000 on the death 
of a member, and tax each member 25 
cents per month to pay this benefit. 

Carpenter work all along Puget Sound 
on the Pacific Coast is actually paralyzed. 
Swanns of idle men throng the streets. 
And the incessant rains of the past three 
months make matters worse. Eastern 
men are unwise in going to that section 
of the country just now. New What- 
com, Wash., is particularly in bad shape. 

Denver, Col. — Trade slow. The car- 
penters, however, are pushing an active 
agitation and have put A. H. Higgins in 
the field as Business Agent, and a good 
live Executive Committee is at work 
Many new initiations are the result and 
several contractors have conceded to 
union terms and are working their men 
on the eight hour plan, where they for- 
merly refused to do so. 

At The Norfolk, Va.. Navy Yard, under 
charge of the United States government 
mechanics are only paid hour for hour for 
overtime night work and Sunday work. 
Wages in this Navy Yard are paid at 
union rates, and there is no-reason why 
overwork should not be paid for at extra 
rates. General Secretary McGuire has 
written President Harrison and Secretary 
Tracy of the Navy to correct this wrong. 

Chester, Pa. — Union 207 opened a 
grand Fair Feb. 18th, and General Secre- 
tary McGuire delivered the dedicatory 
address. As the Union needed a hall for 
the purpose they erected a wigwam 50x70 
feet in the centre of the city. The mem- 
bers did all the work of construction in 
seven hours in one day. They started at 
7 A. M., and finished the building com 
plete at 2 P. M. Forty seven members 
were on the job. 

New York City. — Trade extremely 
dull. There is far too much indifference 
among the men of the U. B. in this city. 
Even foremen, who are members of ours, 
seem to care little about hiring U. B. men 
where they should give them the prefer- 
ence. Some go so far as to hire men of 
other societies. Those who are at work 
seem to pay little regard for those who 
are idle. There is far too much selfish- 
ness and base greed. This is not good 
unionism and will react against the organi- 
zation, if it is not stopped. 

Lynn, Mass. — -The wives and daughters 
of members of Union 1"8 have formed 
what is called the “Ladies’ Club” of 
Union 108. These ladies meet every two 
weeks, and their object is to hold fairs and 
entertainments, the proceeds of which will 
go to the purchase of a lot of land for the 
erection of a carpenters’ hail in this city 
at an early date. The officers are as fol- 
lows : President, Mrs. W. N.Van Blarcom ; 
Financial Secretary, Mrs. M. L. Delano ; 
Treasurer, Mrs F. Dame. Sick Commit- 
tee— Mrs. J. Blovell Mis. M. L. Delano, 
Mrs. G. II. Murray and Mrs. E. C Pink 
ham. 



I Forty cents per month is the amount 
of capita tax paid by the local unions of 
Brass Workers to the general headquarters 
of their Brotherhood. That organization 
believes in high dues and a large reserve 
fund, and is rapidly becoming a power. 

The annual convention of the Building 
Laborers’ International Union was held in 
Williamsport. Pa., last month. It was 
I largely attended, and the organization is 
progressing splendidly. W. D. Davidge. 
of Toronto, Canada, is general secretary. 

At the Ohio State Trades Assembly 
Convention last month iu Columbus, O., 
twenty four carpenter delegates were pres- 
ent. Arrangements were made for hold- 
ing a State Convention of our Ohio Car- 
penters’ Unions some time in April or 
May. 

Haverhill, Mass. — The Boot and Shoe 
Lasters’ Union of this city insist that the 
National Convention of their trade, which 
meets next April, shall take practical 
action for the adoption of the eight- hour 
day among the boot and shoe workers of 
the whole country. 

The Brotherhood of Painters and 
Decorators will open their Biennial Con- 
vention in St. Louis, on August 1, of this 
year— at the same time the United Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters hold their Conven- 
tion in the same city. There will be a 
grand fraternization of painters and car 
penters on that occasion. 

The American Flint Glass Workers will 
have Ih-ir National Convention at- Corn- 
ing, N . Y., next July And on that occa- 
sion there will be unveiled a monument to 
the memory of the union glass blowers 
who were killed in the ten ible railroad ac- 
cident at Ravenna, Ohio, last July. The 
monument will cost $5,0 (0, and will be 
paid for by the National Union. 

Edward Loughran of Haverhill. Mass., 
was President of the Boot and Shoe Work- 
ers’ Union of that city, and at various 
times held positions of trust and confi 
dence in labor organizations. Not long 
ago it was discovered that Loughran had 
been a Pinkerton detective for twenty five 
years and in the employ of the manufac- 
turers for the purpose of revealing the 
executive secrets and work of the Unions 
When this was known Mr. Loughran had 
to make hasty flight to escape the wrath 
of the organized. workmen in that section. 

From the February report of the Amal- 
gamated Society of Carpenters we learn 
there are 543 branches and 35,102 mem- 
bers in that society ; 1,332 of them are on 
unemployed benefit ; 1,287 on sick bene- 
fit and 340 superannuated. The Amalga- 
mated Carpenters, out of the above mem- 
bership, have 1,830 members in 28 cities 
in the United States and 8 cities in Cana- 
da. with 51 branches in all in America. 
John Ballentine, of New York City, is the 
new District Secretary. W. H. McCord, 
of New York, will be the delegate to their 
General Convention, which meets this 
Spring, in Manchester, England. 

BOYCOTT ALL OF THEM. 

Boycott the following by order of the 
American Federation of Labor : 

Flewchmann & Co.’s yeast and bread 

Ehret’s New York beer. 

Illinois Staats-Zeitung, Chicago. 

Miller, Hall & Hartsell, collars and 
culls, Troy, N. Y. 

All Cincinnati beer excepting that of 
Banner’s and Sehaller’s breweries. 

PUBLIC AGITATION. 

Since our last issue General Secretary 
P. J McGuire has addressed public meet- 
ings in behalf of our organization in Som- 
erville N. J.; Chester, Pa.; Boston, Mass.; 
Providence, R- I ; Springfield, Mass.; 
Mariner’s Harbor (Staten Island), N. Y.; 
Morristown, N. J.; New Rochelle. N. Y„ 
and Norwalk. Conn. Besides that he 
visited Elizabeth, N- J., Feb. 16, for the 
purpose of having a joint conference be- 
tween Union 167 and the contractors to 
establish the nine-hour day in Elizabeth 
and he paid several visits to N ew York 
citv to secure the settlement of the Downey 
strike, which ended victoriously for the 
carpenters. 

On March 5th James McKim spoke at a 
large public meeting of carpenters in Corn- 
wall, N. Y. 

W. F. Abrams, of Detroit, Mich., last 
month spoke in Michigan to large public 
meetings; in Bay City, East Saginaw, 
Muskegon, Grand Rapids, Lansing and 
Jackson ; and in Indiana at Fort Wayne, 
Anderson and Marion; and in Ohio at 
Findlay, Tiffin and Sandusky. He was 
out on the road in the interest of our 
order. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Thomas J. McCorry formerly con- 
nected with our organizations iu Phila- 
delphia and Los Angeles, Cal., is now As- 
sistant Building Inspector at Seattle, 
Wash. 

General Secretary P J, McGuire has 
been appointed lo the honorary position 
of a member of the Advisory Council of 
the World’s Congress Auxiliary on Labor 
Congresses for the World’s Fair at Chi 
cago- 

P. J Kelch, Memphis, Tenn., T S. 
Jones, Pueblo, Colo., J. F Jordan, Deni- 
son, Tex., and Henry Gale, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind., have been appointed District 
Organizers for the United Brorherhood 
on recommendation of their districts. 

Adolph Strasser, ex-President of the 
Cigannakere’ International Union, retired 
from that position the first of this year 
after fourteen years of continuous official 
service. He is now so broken down in 
health he has gone to Florida for a vaca 
tion. 

John D Allen, of Philadelphia, who 
was our General President in 1882-1883, 
has risen to he one ot the foremost archi 
tecta and building superintendents in the 
“ Quaker City ” We regret to sav he has 
been dangerously ill of lace, hut is now on 
the road to better health. 

John McBride has been identified a 
dozen years or more with the miners of 
Ohio, and has been a leading spirit in their 
national organization. For the past two 
years he has been Commissioner of the 
State Labor Bureau of Ohio, and in every 
post of duty he has ever filled he has 
proven his zeal and fidelity to the labor 
movement. He is a wise, conservative 
leader among the miners, and at their 
convention iast month he was elected 
unanimously to serve as President of the 
Mine Workers’ National Progressive 
Union. 



VI0T0MES GAINED. 

Union 169, E.St Louis III , has union 
ized the work on the new track. It was 
started originally as a non-union job, and 
finallv employed 60 members of Union 
169. " 

Union 348, Newport News, Va., put 
the card system iuto effect Feb 1st, and 
lias inaugurated a set of trade rules with 
nine hours a day and none but Union 
m -n to be hired. _ 

Logan sport, Ind.— Union 744 has been 
I successful in securiftg the nine-hour day 
at $2.25 per day as the minimum for jour- 
neymen and$1.50per day for apprentices, 
with one apprentice to four journeymen, 
to go into effect May 1st. The card sys- 
tem is also to go into vogue that date. 

On March 1st Union 701, Winchester, 
Kv , instituted the nine hours and a good 
set of trade rules. The Carpenters’ Union 
of Grand Rapids, Mich., have also been 
accorded the nine-hour day on February 
1, 1892- Pocatello, Idaho, and Ny&ek, 
N. Y , have also secured the nine-hour 
day 

The Chicago and Erie Railroad shops at 
Huntingdon, Ind., have been working 
overtime at sit gle pay. The carpenters 
and a tew other organized trades iu those 
shops decided to stop this practice or 
have time and half for overtime. They 
decided to sirike and were hacked up by 
Carpenter’s Union 310, and after being 
out half an tiour the railroad company 
came to terms 

Union 333, New Kensington, Pa., has 
secured the nine hours day and $2.75 per 
day. Exeter, N. H . is working nine 
hours a day Union 652 El wood, Ind., has 
made an agreement vvi h the contractors, 
which secures the eight-hour day and a 
minimum rate of wages. Evanston and 
South Evanston, 111 . are now both eight 
hour towns for all the building trades, and 
also on all public work. 

For some time back certain contractors 
in New York city have been making it a 
practice to hire cabinetmakers at less 
than carpenters’ wages at carpenters’ 
work. This drove our members in New 
York recently to strike on all of Con- 
tractor John Downey's work, and in this 
move they were backed by the Board of 
Walking Delegates, and over 1200 men 
were involved in the strike. Mr. Downey 
finally came to terms, and conceded the 
carpenters’ demands after the men had 
been out two weeks. Financial aid from 
this office was donated to our New York 
members in this struggle. 



L. Lippman and Sons, and Todd, Sul- 
livan & Co., clothing firms of New York 
city, have at last given in to the Union 
rules and signed an agreement with the 
United Garment Workers of America. 
1 Ience the boycott on these firms is now 
removed. All Union men are urged to 
look for the white label of this Union in 
buying ready made clothing. 



TRADE M0VEM NTS THIS SEASON. 

Union 352, Anderson, Ind., proposes to 
carry out its new trade rules this spring- 

On May 1st Union 642, West Hoboken, 
X .1.. will demand the eight- hour day on 
[Saturdays. 

Holland Mich.— Some few contractors 
here are moving to oppose Union 441. but 
they will tied the men prepared for them. 

On April 1st there will be movements 
for the nine-hour day among the carpen- 
ters in Lacrosse, ttis., and Little Rock, 
Ark. 

On April 1st all unions in the building 
trades of Toledo, (.>.. will institute the card 
system. The Marietta, O., curpenters do 
likewise April 1st. 

The fight against Stewart Bros., elevator 
builders at Galveston, Tex , still con- 
tinues and the prospects are the firm will 
have to pay $100 per day forfeit for its 
inability to complete the job on time- 
The eight-hour rule will be asked for 
this season, on May 2d, by the carpenters 
in Keokuk Iowa; Salt Lake City, and 
Mobile, Ala , and on July 1st in Vancou- 
ver, British Columbia 

Cornwall, N. Y.— On April 1st Union 
581 will hoist a flag on Holland Enslie’s 
shop a« on tiiat clay Mr. Eusiie concedes 
us the nine-hour day and eight hours Sat- 
urdays, and we propose to make that the 
general rule. 

Union 712, Covington, Ky., has adopted 
rules for nine hours it day at 30 cents per 
hour, while the mill hands’’ Unions of Cin- 
cinnati, Covington, Kv.. and Newport, 
Ky.. as well as Stair Builders’ Union, 481, 
of Cincinnati, have made advanced de- 
mands specially for their organizations. 

Newtown, Long Island.— Union 507 in- 
augurated the nine-hour day March 14, by 
an agreement with the contractors to hire 
Union men and stop piece work. This 
will apply to the towns of Maspeth, Wood- 
side, Winfield Newtown and Corona. We 
now propose to organize the carpenters of 
Flushing N. Y. 

Increases in wages will he insisted on 
in South Bend, Ind., May 2d, and by the 
carpenters stair- builders and mill men’s 
unions of Cincinnati Covington, Ky , and 
Newport Ky ; also in Jersey (Jfi.y ; leighcs 
N J.; Cleveland. O; Indianapolis, Iiidh 
Tom pie Tex ; Lafayette, Ind.; Springfield’ 
O-I Middletown, u.; Evansville Ind.-* 
Salem, ().; Sandusky, O.; Fort Wayne’ 
Ind.; Wabash, Ind ; Gluey 111.; Bern’ 
Ind.; Huntington, W. Va., Sharon, Fa.’, 
and \\ shington Court House, O. 

On May 2d there will be demands made 
tor the nine-hour rule by the carpenters of 
Holyoke. Maas.; Marion, Did. ; Pough- 
keepsie N. Y. ; Paris, Tex. ; Decatur, HI. ; 
Peekskill N . A ; Springfield, Mo. ; Somer- 
ville, N. J. ; Akro>\ O. ; Norwalk, Conn. ; 
Galesburg, III. ; Dubuque, Iowa; Hender- 
son, Ky ; Grand Rivers, Ky. ; Muncie, 
Ind. : Cairo, III.; Ottawa, III. ; Elizabeth, 
N. J. ; Concord, N. JL; Tiffin, O., 
Meadville, Pa., and Owosso. Mich., by 
Union 7B5 and mill men of Baltimore Md. 

OFFICIAL NOTICES. 

Twenty- rive cents will btly one of our 
handsomely plated badges for members. 
No member should be without one. Watch 
charms cost $1 .25 each. 

Local l nionb need not pay any hoed 
to circular appeals sent them for financial 
aid unless the appeal bears the approval 
and seal of the General Office of our Order. 

On March 15th the password for ensu- 
ing quarter, also all necessary blanks will 
be mailed to each Local Union. Unions 
not receiving the same should at once no- 
tify the G. Si. 

Don’t send in any more by-laws to the 
General Office for approval, as the Conven- 
tion is so near that it is hardly worih while 
for laical Unions to pass on new by-laws 
until after the Convention. 

If you have any suggestions for the 
next Convention of our U. B., or any 
amendments to tiie constitution, now w 
the time to send them in to the G. 8. Our 
next convention will be held in St. J-ouia, 
Mo., on Monday, August 1st. 

There is a large number of LocaD 
which have not sent in their Trustees’ re- 
ports for the term ending Dec. 31 1891. 
We now serve warning on all such Union- 1 
that we will publish a list of them in our 
next issue ; so if you have not sent in your 
Trustees’ reports you had better do so. 

Our death rate the past year is fear- 
fully enormous on account of “ la grippe ” 
and kindred diseases. We have refrained 
from assessing our members, thinking we 
might weather it through; but it now 
looks as if we wifi be forced to levy an 
assessment. In the past few month's we 
have been paying out from $6,000 to 
$8,000 h month in death .and disability 
benefits. 









N 













mL 



,,. tu uuc wjiorea carpenters. 



' 2^r- v 













Ti 



V 



1S.W 



* z 



The CARPENTER. 

OFFICIAL JOURNAL. OF THE 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 



Fukh'shed Monthly , on the Fifteenth of each Month, 
AT 

124: N. Ninth St.. Phil«., Pa. 

P. J. McGujrk, Editor and Publisher. 

Xntored at the Poet-Oftice at Philadelphia, Pa., 
as Meond-dass matter. 

Subscription Prick;— Fifty cents a year ii 
advance, postpaid. 

Address all letters and moneys to 

P. J. McGuire, 

Box 884, Philadelphia, n- 



THE CAKPENTlhR. 



PHILADELPHIA, MARCH, 1892. 



Hold public meetings, social festivals 
or entertainments this season and work 
up sentiment in favor of your Local 
Unions. Agitation is the life of the move- 
ment. Personal activity and zeal among 
the members is also essential. 

Tiik Dkath of Cardinal Manning is a 
severe loss to the labor interests of the 
whole world. His fervent zeal and de- 
voted interest in behalf of the down trod- 
den was well displayed in the stand he 
took, in behalf of the strike of the London 
dockers. 

Samuel Gompeks’ re-election as Presi- 
dent of the American Federation of La- 
bor was a well-merited tribute to a 
staunch and sturdy trade union man, 
who has stamped the vigor of his per- 
sonality on the whole movement, and 
who has never stooped to duplicity nor 
political trickery. 



J. P. McDonnell, of the Jxihor Stan- 
dard, Paterson, N. J., has been doing 
effective work in the State Legislature of 
New Jersey in securing favorable action 
on labor laws. lie has striven hard to get 
a good, effective Mechanics’ Lien law, and 
this year has labored just as hard to keep 
it from being emasculated by its enemies. 



Tue Massachusetts State District 
Council of Carpenters meets the first and 
third Saturdays in each month at Tem- 
plar Hall, 724 Washington street, boston, 
Mass. All our Local Unions in Massa- 
chusetts are earnestly requested to con- 
nect themselves with this State District 
Council, as it has done good and effective 
work for the cause and can still do more. 

Congressman Watson of Georgia has 
introduced an excellent resolution. It 
proposes to have an investigation of the 
workings of the Pinkerton Detective 
Agency in its relation to strikes and 
workingmen. This armed force of 15,000 
Thugs is used as militia in many States to 
coerce workingmen by force and blood- 
shed, and is liable to be used for the most 
dangerous objects and as a menace to the 
civil institutions. AH carpenters' unions 
and every labor organization should lire 
in petitions to Congress in favor of the 
Watson resolution. 



There is no truth in the report recently 
published widespread in all the daily 
papers that the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters would enter into a general 
strike all over the country on May 1 next 
tor the eight-hour day. That report was 
maliciously put into circulation by the 
Associated Press from boston, and our 
General Secretary contradicted it at once- 
But the contradiction has not been pub- 
lished as generally as the original “ fake ” 
story. Our organization has no thought 
of making any general strike this year. 

* « " » * 

Tue locals of the Furniture Workers’ 
International Union are paying an assess- 
ment of 25 cents per member for agitation 
and organizing purposes tosend their own 
speakers out on the road. This is the 
second assessment of 25 cents levied by 
that organization the past year for use in 
agitation. The bakers and brewers and 
several other trades with national heads 
hav elikewise raised special funds by as- 
sessment and did good work by sending 
out speakers and workers the past year. 
It is time the carpenters also had a special 
ind for agitation and organizing pur- 



THE COMPLAIN 'S FROM CHICAGO 
INVESTIGATED. 

On February 23rd, President Samuel 
Gompers paid a visit to Chicago on ac- 
count of the complaints as to the way 
union carpenters and workmen have been 
treated on the World’s Fair Buildings, as 
published last momh in our journal. Mr. 
Gompers got a letter of introduction from 
Mr. Lyman T. Gage to Mr. Wm. T. Baker, 
President of the Exposition Company, 
who then had Mr. Gompers pay a visit to 
Mr. Burnham, the Superintendent of Con- 
struction, who took down the complaint 
in writing, und then referred the case to 
Mr. Geraldine, Superintendent of the 
buildings on the grounds. Here is Mr. 
Gotnper’s report, verbatim, as to what 
followed : 

Upon the following- day I visited the grounds 
and had an interview with Mr. Geraldine, in 
which the entire subject matter was gone over. 
Mr. Geraldine denied the allegations so far as the 
Directory or its agents were concerned. He dis- 
claimed that the eight hour rule was violated 
except in one or two instances, and then the con- 
tractors were called to uecount and the violation 
was discontinued. He slated that the only cases 
in which work was permitted more than Blgb" 
hours a day was when it was absolutely essential 
to the safety of the construction or work which 
it was absolutely essential to continue in for the 
safety of the property, and that then the direc- 
tory and himself hud insisted that the men be 
paid time and a half, but that these were very 
rare occurrences. 

I made inquiry as to the method of obtaining 
employment and could discover no means by 
which a discrimination could be made against 
Union men except the one that whereas the 
Union wages of the Chicago carpenters is thirty- 
five cents per hour, some of the contractors in 
truth only pay twenty -five cents per hour (which 
of course is discrimination enough). You will 
bear in mind, however, that in the conference 
between the directory and the representatives ol 
labor an agreement was reached that the eight 
hour work-day should govern the construction of 
the buildings (except in cases of extreme neces- 
sity )* *but the question of a minimum rute of wages 
as well as the question of the employment of 
Union men exclusively were not agreed upon 
In other words, these were left open questions 
upon which the directory refused to take posi- 
tive grounds for the reason that they had lei the 
work out to contractors. 

It seems to me that the entire trouble arises 
from the fact of the indiscriminate and joint 
employment of Union and non-Diiion men ami 
the friction which such conditions usually bring. 

Mr. Geraldine, as well as every other represen 
tativeofthe directory, expressed themselves in 
favor of the organizations of labor, but declared 
that, as representatives of all classes of people 
they were not in a position to discriminate 
against non- Union workmen, and to use their 
positions to force them into the Union. They 
had no objection, however, to non-Union men 
joining the Union. The matter of wages was a 
subject for adjudication between the workmen 
and the contractors. 

Much stress was laid by Mr. Geraldine upon 
what he alleged to be the uugentlemanly con- 
duct of one or two meu who acted as the repre. 
seutatives of the Carpenters’ Union, and the va- 
riation of statements made by both of them to 
him, and in their statements to the Union and to 
the men on the works. He claims that the cause 
of the whole dispute lies in this fact 
Itseems to me from iny investigation that if 
there has heen any discrimination or any grounds 
upon which the complaint is based, that my 
visit will have the effect of its discontinuance, 
and that it certainly was beyond the knowledge 
of Mr. Geraldine and the directory. 

(Signed), 

Samuel Gompebs. 

President of American Federation of Labor. 

Chicago, III. — Several members of the 
U. B. in this city have arranged to organ- 
ise a carpenters’ braes band. 

THINGS TO BE REMEMBERED. 

Three Months in arrears subjects a member 
to loss of benefits. 

Steady Attendance at the meetings gives life 
and interest to tue Union. 

Mkmhkkh Going Off to another city should 
be provided with a clearance card. 

All Local Treasurers should be under bonds 
and the bonds tiled with the President of the L. U. 

Trustees Reports should lie prepared semi- 
annually and forwarded to the G. e*. Blanks are 
furnished free for that purpose. 

All Chang ES in Secretaries should be promptly 
reported to the G. 8., and name and address of 
the new Secretary should be forwarded. 

Organize the Carpenters in the unorganized 
towns in your vicinity, or wherever you may go ! 
Hold public meetings or social festivals at stated 
occasion«; they will add to the strength of your 
union. 

Letters for the General Olllce should be 
written on official note paper and bear the seal 
of the Local Union. Don’t write letters to the 
G. S. on monthly report blanks, as such commu- 
nications are not in proper shape. 

All Moneys received by the G. S. one month 
are published in the next month’s journal. 
Moneys received can not be published in this 
journal the same month they arc received. It 
take« some time to make up the report and put 
it into type. 

The only safe way to send money is by Post 
Office Money Order or by Bank Check or Draft 
a» required by the Constitution. The G. 8. is not 
responsible for money sent in any other way. 
Don’t send loose cash or postage stamp* in pay- 
ment of tax or for any bill due the G. 8. 



THE VOTE ON THE FOUR PROPOSITIONS. 

Only 352 Local Unions out of a total of 
798 Unions have voted on the four propo- 
sitions submitted to general vote of the 
Locals, and only 8,800 were cast. The 
most of the large Unions have not voted 
at all, so the result is not as indicative 
as it should be of the wisheB of the mem- 
bers on these four important questions. 
On the question of fixing the monthly 
dues at not less than fifty cents per month, 
there is a large majority in favor of the 
change, as the vote stands 4,069 in favor 
of it and 4,129 in the negative. 

From the remarks accompanying the 
vote on this question it is evident many of 
the Locals misunderstood the proposition 
They thought that to i aise the minimum 
of dues from 35 cents per month to 50 
cents, carries with it an increase of 15 
cents per month more all around, even on 
the unions now charging their members 
50 cents or more per month. That is a 
mistaken idea. And yet many of the 
very unions now charging 50 cents or 
more per month, voted against raising the 
minimum dues to 50 cents. The idea of 
fixing the dues at not lees than 50 cents 
per month means, that all Onions now 
charging only 35 or 40 cents per month 
must advance <heir dues to not l ss than 
50 cents. -While those now charging 50 
cents per month or more need not raise 
their dues any higher, unless they wish 
to. if the Unions which are charging low- 
dues would only come up to the 50 cents 
standard, there would be more certainty 
of their permanency and success. Among 
all the Unions which have lapsed or gone 
to pieces, the bulk of them have had low 
dues and could not pay their running ex- 
penses, or have any local sick benefits. 
The Local Union with low dues will al- 
ways find it hard to get along and will 
always be embarrassed financially. 

Next on the question of sending the 
Reserve Fund or Protective Fund to head- 
quarters with the capita tax each month, 
the vote stands 3.534 in the affirmative 
and 5,323 in the negative, with only few 
of the large Unions voting. Were the 
members fully acquainted with all the 
facts the vote would be otherwise. A 
large number of the Locals when they be- 
come embarrassed in funds draw on their 
Protective Fund and spend it. So when 
it is called for by the General Office these 
Unions have not got it on hand, and some 
assess their members to raise it, and that 
practice of assessments drives away mem- 
bers. When Unions get weak and lapse 
they, too, have spent all this fund, and 
the general organization in this way is 
loser of thousands of dollais annually. 
Then again if we are to wait until strikes 
and lockouts are actually at hand before 
we can call for the fund, it is a slow and 
risky way to do business. The Ixtcals in 
numbers of instances fail to beep accurate 
record of this fund from month to month, 
and the result is dispute and contention 
with the General Office as to the amount 
they should pay when called on Besides 
that, to have the fund on hand at head- 
quarters saves considerable bother all 
around, and leaves the General Executive 
Board and General Office free to take 
better care of all the strikes and trade 
troubles cropping up without being em- 
barrassed by the details and annoyance of 
getting in the money and receipting for it 
in the midst of trade troubles. 

On the question of increasing the Re- 
serve Fund or Protective Fund to 10 
cents per month for -each member, the 
Unions voted l,52t votes in the affirma- 
tive and 7,359 in the negative. 

And in the matter of the advantage of 
having sick benefits in the Local Unions, 
the vote is 5,893 in favor of them and 
2, 692 opposed^ 



EIGHTEEN CHARTERS GRANTED. 

During the past month charters have 
been granted to eighteen new Unions, 
viz : 533, Cocoa, Fla,; 576, Kane, Pa.; 594, 
Lakewood, N. J, ; 610, Pocatello, Idaho; 
641, Dayton, Ky.; 663 Creed, Col.; 672, 
Freeport, 111.; 742, Evansville, Ind. (pla- 
ning mill, etc ) ; 765, Baltimore, Md. (sash 
and planing mill); 773, Americus, Ga.; 
778, Mt. Sterling, Ky.; 126, Amorilla, 
Tex.; 297, Stephenville, Tex.; 332, Ameri- 
cus, Ga. (colored) ; 347, El Dorado, 111 ; 
455, Holyoke, Mass.; 544, The Dalles, 
Oregon ; 547, Clinton, la- 



FREEDOM OF CONTRACT. 

Labor organizations first arose in Eng- 
land because capitalistic production and 
the factory system were first established 
there, and they have been extended to 
other countries just as fast as factory 
methods have been adopted. Inasmuch, 
however, as they arose in an apparent op- 
position to capital at first, they have been 
as I said, violently opposed from many 
points of view, and especially by the cap- 
italists 

And one of the prominent objections 
urged is that these labor organizations 
tend to destroy the right of individual con- 
tract. Now, if combination is so injurious 
to the freedom of contract, why do not 
capitalists avoid it? Is it not a little sin- 
gular that employers should be so very 
jealous of the laborer’s freedom and so 
indifferent to their own? Surely it is a 
little odd that industrial organizations 
should be so injurious to laborers and so 
beneficial to capitalists. It is a peculiar- 
fact, however, that the freedom and wel 
fare of the laboring classes have most 
st eadily advanced during the period when 
the power of labor organizations has most 
increased. This opposition to labor unions 
for the laborer’s good is quite historic. In 
the early struggles of English laborers to 
secure a reduction of working time for 
women and children in factories from 
twelve to eleven hours per day, the pro- 
position was opposed by statesmen and 
economists on the ground that it would 
destroy their freedom to work as many 
hours as they chose ; and more than forty 
years later the same objections were urged 
against a ten hour factory law in Massachu- 
setts. Edward Atkinson and others pleaded 
for the sacred rights of working women to 
make individual contracts ; just as if fac- 
tory women and children, or men either, 
had ever enjoyed this precious boon. 
AS a matter of fact, no such right has ever 
existed since the factory system began. 
It has been rendered impossible by the 
very nature of specialized and concen- 
trated industry. The right of individual 
contract means nothing, unless it means 
that every individual can make a con- 
tract for himself without regard to others. 
Experience has shown that such contracts 
are incompatible with a highly complex 
productive system. The subdivision of 
labor and interdependence of depart- 
ments upon each other, the similarity of 
work and the necessary uniformity of 
product in each department, the depend- 
ence of all upon a single motive power, 
make it necessary to tireat all laborers in 
each branch substantially alike for the 
sake of economy in administration and 
uniformity in cost of production. To the 
modern employer laborers constitute vari- 
ous parts of a vast productive enterprise, 
and must work in practical uniformity or 
not at all- This is not only true of the 
laborers in a given shop, but it is practi 
«illy true of laborers in different sbops.in 
the same industry, whose products com- 
pete in the same market. 

Thus it is the economic conditions ot 
production, and not labor combinations, 
that have destroyed the feasibility of in- 
dividual contracts, and it is beyond the 
power of either laborer or capitalist, or 
both combined, to destroy them without 
abrogating the factory system. Since both 
capital and labor necessarily move in large 
aggregations, it is manifestly as irrational 
as it is uneconomic for organized capital 
to object to the existence of organized 
labor. Since individual contracts are im- 
possible, and wages in the same industry, 
like prices of the same commodities, must 
needs be practically uniform, it is clearly 
for the interest of the laborers that their 
conditions should be governed by the 
more intelligent of their class, and this 
organization makes possible. 

The truth is, no such freedom on the 
part, of laborers to make Individual con - 
tracts for themselves different from those 
under which their fellow-laborers in the 
same shop are working, is ever intended 
by the much-heralded phrase, ‘freedom 
of contract.” All that it really means is, 
that employers should have the freedom 
to take laborers Bingiy in order to make 
them jointly accept their terms. In other 
words, it means that in making a con- 
tract. laborers shall not have the right to 
be represented by the most competent of 
their class or craft, in that each one, how- 
ever ill-informed or incompetent to pre- 



sent his case, shall be dealt with singly by 
the representative of corporate capita 
Thus, while uniformity of price for th 
same work in the same shop prevails, tin. 
method enables the employer to impose 
the maximum hardship and give the min- 
imum pay, which the superior men can 
j endure ; where s, if laborers acted col- 
lectively as capitalists do, the more com- 
petent of their number could be chosen 
j to negotiate a contract for the whole, thus 
J preventing the inferior from being used as 
a means of destroying the contracting 
! power of the superior. 

And since a contract made by the su- 
' perior would always he as favorable as 
that made by the inferior, or more so, the 
poorest laborers have everything to guin 
and nothing to lose by associated or rep- 
resentative action. Any system of juris- 
prudence which should permit represen- 
tation by counsel on one side and re- 
fuse it on tlie other, would, throughout 
Christendom be pronounced to be a scan- 
dalous violation of the principles of equity ; 
yet tills relation obtains between em- 
ployers and employed in the most civilized 
countries, except so far as it has been 
rendered impossible by the power of 
organized labor itself- As both capitalist 
and laborer now necessarily move in large 
aggregations, it is manifestly alike irra- 
tional and uneconomic for either to object 
to the organization of the other, especially 
as the most efficient use of either cannot 
be obtained without it. 

Tiik Locals connected with the Car- 
penters’ District Council of Cincinnati, 

O , have decided to fix the initiation tee 
at $25 for all journeymen carpenters, stair- 
builders, millmen and millwrights 

Spartanburg, S C. — Union 427 works 
only nine hours a day Saturdays. Trade 
dull now, good prospects for Spring. 

OUR PRINCIPLES. 

Resolvtd, That we, as a body, thoroughly ap- 
prove of the objects o£ the American Federation, 
of Labor, and pledge ourselves to give it our 
earnest and hearty support. 

union-made goods. 

Resolved That members of this organization, 
should make it a rule, when purchasing goods, 
to call lor those which bear the trade-marks of 
organized labor, and when any individual, firm 
or corporation »hull strike a blow at labor organi- 
zation, they are earnestly requested o> 
that individual, firm or corporation their careful 
consideration. No good union man can kiss the 
rod that whips him. 

KNIGHTS OF LABOR. 

Resolved \ That we most emphatically dis- 
courage carpenters and joiners from organizing 
as carpenters under the Knights of Labor, os wo 
believe each trade should be organized under its 
own trade head in a trade union. This does not 
debar our members from joining mixed assem- 
blies. 

LAHOR LEGISLATION. 

Resolved , That it is of the greatest importance 
that members should vote intelligently; hence, 
the members of this Brotherhood shall strive to 
secure legislation in favor of those who produce 
the wealth of the country, ami all discussion sand 
resolutions in that direction shall be in order at 
any regular meeting, but party politic» must be 
excluded. 

IMMIGRATION. 

Resolved , That while we welcome to our shores 
ail who come with the honett intention of be- 
coming lawful citizens, we at the same time con- 
demn the present system which allows the 
importation of destitute laborers, and we urge- 
organized labor everywhere to endeavor to se- 
cure the enactment of more stringent immigra- 
tion laws. 

FAITHFUL WORK. 

Resolved, Tbat we hold it. as a sacred principle 
that Trade Union men, above all others, should 
set a good example as Kood and faithful work- 
men, performing their duties to their employers 
with honor to themselves and their organization. 

SHORTER HOURS OK LABOR. 

We hold a reduction of hour?* for a day’s work 
increases the intelligence and happiness of the 
laborer, and also increases the demand for labor 
and the price of a day’s work. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

We recognize that the interests of all classes of 
labor are identical, regardless of occupation, 
nationality, religion or color, for a wrong done 
to one is a w rong done to all. 

We object to prison contract labor, because it 
puts the criminal in competition with honorable 
labor for the purpose of cutting down wages, 
and also because it helps to overstock the labor- 
market. 

SOMETHING FOR CARPENTERS TO READ 

The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America was founded in Convention, 
at Chicago. August 12, 1881. 

At first it had only 12 Local Unions and 2042 
members. Now. in eight years, it has grewn to 
number over 798 Local Unions in over 689 cities, 
and 81,000 enrolled member«. It is organized to 
protect the carpenter trade from the evils of low 
prices and botch-work; its aim is to encourage a 
higher standard of skill and better wages, to re- 
establish an apprentice system, and to aid aid 
assist the members by mutual protection and be- ol- 
nevolent means. It pays a Wife Funeral Benefit 
of §26 to 860; Members’ Funeral Benefit, 8100 to ,-}c 
$200, and Disability Benefit, $100 to $4(0. In these ,or 
General Benefits, §14,732 have been expended the 
past year, and $166,250 the past eight years, while id 
$110,000 more were spent for Sick Benefits by the 
Local Unions. Such an organization is worth us 
the attention of every carpenter. The Brother- m 
hood is a Protective Trade Union a« well as a >k 
Benevolent Society. It has raised w ages in 482 
cities, and placed five and a half million dollar» ki 
more wage» annually in the pockets of the ear- pr 
neuters in those cities It reduced the hours of 
labor to 8 hours a day in 41 cities, and 9 hours a 
day in 831 cities not to speak of 352 cities which 4}X 
have established the 8 or 9 hour system on Satur- 
days. By this means 9.200 more carpenters have 
gained employment. This is the result of thor- 
ough organtz^neo uTt not a teeret oath-bound 
organization. ft,«., tv,.,.. M carpenters are eli- 

gible to join. art n r H 






r mk 



TJtdJE C-^FtPKJN TEK 



I j 

If:. 






General Officers» 

OF THE 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 

Office of the General Secretary, 

124 N. Ninth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



General-President — W. H. Kliver, Box 150, 
Grand Crossing, Cook Co., 111. 

General-Secretary - *^* J* McGuire, Box 884, 
Philadelphia, ^a. 

General-Treasurer— James Troy, 2020 Christian 
St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Genera l V ick-Presi dents. 

First Vice-President— P. M. Wellin, 20 Twelfth 
St., near Market St. San F'uucisuc, Cal. 

Second Vice-President— P. W. Birck, 798 Nos- 
trand Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

General Executive Board. 

(All correspondence for the G. E. B. must bo 
mailed to the General Secretary.) 

Hugh McKay, 302 Paris St., E. Boston. Mass. 

T. E. Deegan, 111 E. 89th St., New York. 

E. A. Stevens, 150 Pearl St., Jefferson vi He. Tnd. 
W. F. Abrams, 451 Monroe Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

S. J. Kent. 20 If» S St.. Lincoln. Neb. 



OBITUARY NOTICES. 

(Insertions under this head cost ten cents per line.) 

Cincinnati, O., Dec. 30, 1891. 

At a regular meeting of L. U. 667, U. B C. and 
J. of A., held on the above date, the following 
preamble and Resolutions were unanimously 
adopted : 

Whereas, It has pleased the Supreme Archi- 
tect of the Universe to take from our midst our 
fellow-workman, Brother Leandkr Meyers, and 

Whereas, Our Union has lost a true anu faith- 
ful and staunch worker for the principle he has 
so manfully espoused Therefore, be it 

Resolved, While we deeply deplore the loss 
we have sustained we how in humble submis- 
sion to tlie will of Him who doeth all things 
well. 

Resolved, That we extend to the bereaved 
family the sympathy and condolence due the 
family of a deceased Brother, and will be ever 
ready to extend to them a helping hand in time 
of trouble. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to the family of our deceased Brother, also 
spread on our minutes and published in the local 
labor papers of this city and our ollicial journal, 
Tiik Carpenter 

A. G. HENSIBY, ) 

L. WICK WARE, -Committee. 
HOBT. PATTERSON, J 

Union 592, Muncie, Ind. 

Where ES, It has pleased the All-wise Ruler of 
the Universe to remove from our midst the be- 
loved wife of our brother and co-worker, 
Charles Van Tress. 

Whereas, She was not a member of our or- 
ganization, we feel that we have lost a true 
friend of our cause, our Brother a true and 
worthy helpmate, the church a willing, earnest 
worker, and the community a model of true 
Christian womanhood. 

Resolved, That we tender to our Brother and 
family our heartfelt sympathy in this their hour 
of sorrow, and trust that the hope of a happier 
reunion in a happier world than this will help 
them to bear their great loss wiili resignation. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be 
ses»t to the bereaved Brother and to The Car- 
penter, and be published in the city papers. 

JOHN W G ALENA, ) ' 

THOS. DUKE. /-Committee. 

E. L. CaSTATOR, J 

Cincinnati, Feb. 18, 1892. 

Whereas, It has pleased the Supreme Ruler 
of the Universe to remove from our midst 
Brother C. A. Rockwood ; be it therefore 

Resol ved, That we, the oillcers and members 
of the Carpenters' District Council of Cincinnati 
and vicinity, do extend our heartfelt sympathy 
to his bereaved wife and family; and that in the 
death of Brother C. A. Rockwood the B. -other* 
hood has lost a faithful worker and the be- 
reaved family a kind-hearted father and a faith- 
ful husband 

And be it further Resolved, That these resolu- 
tions now adopted by this Council be spread on 
the minutes and published in The Carpenter, 
and a copy sent to the family of our late es- 
teemed Brother. 

DA VI D F I S H ER, Secretary. 

S. F. MEYERS President 

ALEX. ZOL» . I 
HARRY MORSE, -Committee. 

I). P. ROWLAND, J 



WARNINGS AGAINST DEAD BEATS. 

G. W. Vaughn, a contractor of Grand Rivers, 
Ky., is advertising for carpenters under promises 
of steady work and big pay. When the men get 
to Grand Rivers he gives them a few days’ work 
a week and pays them at less than he promised. 
We warn all carpenters to keep clear of Vaughn 
ami to stay away from Grand Rlveis as work is 
very dull there. 

Joseph Marcus, a Swedish boss carpenter, has 
been lately hiring carpenters in New Rochelle, 
N. Y., and has defrauded them of several weeks 1 
wages. He is now located in New York. Be- 
ware of him ! 

S. More came to Omaha, Neb., and has de- 
frauder! Brot) er Manner, President of Union 58, 
of a chest of tools, after having room arid board 
for two weeks by kindness of Brother Musser. 
This fraud H. More, first asked for transporta- 
tion to Lincoln, Neb., and got money to go there, 
and then he wanted to go to Sioux City, Iowa. 
He ought to be arrested wherever he may be 
found. 



TRADE DULL. 



Work is extremely dull all over the 
country — worse than it haa ever been in 
seven years back. The prospects for 
Spring are fairly good. Trade is prostrate 
in these places, and carpenters are ad- 
vised to not go near them, as the con- 
tractors are fraudulently advertising for 
men while there are plenty idle : Port- 
land, .Ore.; Winnipeg, Man.; Oakland 
Cal.; San Francisco and the whole Pacific 
coast; Nashville, Tenn; Port Angeles, 
Wash. ; Owosso, Mich ; Marion, Ind.; St. 
Catharines, Can., Augusta, Ga.; Car- 
thage. Mo.; Winfield, Kan ; Benton Har- 
bor, Mich.; Norfolk, Va.; Brooklyn. Nf. Y.; 
Richmond, Va.; St. Louis, Mo.; Marion, 
Ind., and Newport News, Va. 



V/ 

»u£fiBoB8. N. Y. — Union 99/eafl bnln the 
Recorjer by a fire in its me" i. and 

'■■fui. it nr ,< ED. 

IT. S. McCdmbek, 5523 Jackson ave., Chicago 
111., wants to '-now the whereabouts of Bro! 
'hos.Ijtmminj oerly of Union 516, Colorado 
-ings, Colo. 



Moneys Received. 

0UKISG THE ttOKTB ENDING JANUARY 81.1*92 
fibjtJßeYar tny error« appear notify the G. 8. without deny. 

All money received in FEB., will be published in next 
month'« (APRIL* paper. Till« report included oil mono;» 
roovivud by the G. s. from the Looal Union* for tue ond «upplie» 
for the p>«>nth of JANUARY only. 



— d 

S-2 

$5 


Amount. 


Local 

Union. 


Amount. 


_ s 
go 
§S 


1-S119 80 


IG6— 


8 60 1 331— 


2— 


60 00 


167- 


8 80,332— 


3— 


20 15 


108— 


7 20 333— 


4- 


46 40|H>9— 


24 4 !| 


334— 


5 - 


Ii> 00 170— 




335— 


6— 


2 7ii 171- 


13 40:336 - 


7 — 


7 3ft L72— 


6 5ft 1 337 — 


8 — 


54 80, 173 — 


1 20 338 - 


9— 


7 97 


U4— 




319 - 


to- 


10 15 175 — 


21 50 310 — 


11— 


41 25 


>7*> — 


15 0ft 341— 


12— 


U 80, i77— 


29 81 


342— 


13— 


1 40 j 178 — 




313- 


14— 


3 20| 17'.)— 


6 90 214— 


15— 


5 H i 


180— 


8 10 


315 — 


16 — 


3 10|181— 


31 6ft 


316— 


17— 


6 15| 18! — 


8 40, -W— 


18- 


3 60 183— 


3 80 848— 


19— 


3 40 184— 


1 4u|349— 


20— 


17 95 185 — 


7 90 1 450 — 


21— 


21 85 180 — 


5 20 


351— 




€3 90 J87- 


10 20 


352— 


2-1— 


3 75! 183— 


6 10 


353 - 


24— 


9 O') 


189— 


4 l<‘ 


354 — 


25— 


27 O ' 


190— 




355— 


26— 


8 70 


191— 


9 50 


356— 


27— 


13 40 


193- 


10 20 


357— 


28— 


66 60 


193— 


t 30 


358 — 


29 — 


93 10|I91- 


5 80 


359— 


30- 


. . . 195- 




360 - 


31— 


3 10 196— 


I 60 


361— 


32— 




197— 


8 60 


362- 


33— 


49 20 K'8 — 


6 00 


363- 


34— 


2 60j 199 — 


13 10 


361— 


35— 


9 70,200— 


6 2ft 


305 - 


36— 


21 051201— 


8 45 


366— 


37- 


3 85 


202- 


4 10 


367— 


38— 


5 20 201— 


8 30 


368— 


39— 




204— 


3 101-389— 


4ft — 


IS 10 205- 


4 80 


870- 


41— 


4 10|206— 


13 65 


371— 


42 — 


fi 55 ! 207 — 


25 60 


372— 


4,3— 


23 20 j 208- 


4 !0 


373— 


41 — 


( 80 209 — 


16 40 


374— 


45— 


2 40—10 


1 90 


375— 


16— 


2 90 


211— 


51 90 


376 — 


47— 


5 Oft! 212— 


4 60 


377— 


48— 


1ft 00 


213- 


4 7ft 


378— 


49— 


10 ooi 2 14 


3 00 


379— 



2D 



50— 

51 — 
52 — 

53— 

54— 

55— 

56— 

57— 

58— 
59 - 
60— 
61— 
62- 

63 — 

64 — 

65— 

66— 

67- 

68— 

69— 

70— 
71 — 

72— 

73— 

74— 

75 — 

76 — 

77— 

78— 

79— 

80— 
81— 
82— 
83— 
Hi- 

85 - 

86— 

87— 

88— 

89— 

90— 

91— 

92— 
93 — 

94— 

95— 

96— 

97— 

98— 

99— 
100 — 
101 — 
102 — 

103— 

104— 

105— 

106— 

107- 

108- 
10O- 
110 — 
111— 
112— 

113- 

114— 

no- 

ils— 

in- 

ns— 

119- 

120- 
121 — 
122 — 

123— 

124- 

125— 

126- 

127— 

128— 

129— 

130— 

131— 

132— 

133— 

134— 

135— 

136— 

137— 

138— 

139— 
1.40— 
141 — 

142— 

143— 

144— 

145— 

146— 

147— 

148— 

149— 

150— 

151— 

152 — 

153— 

154— 

155— 

156— 

157— 

158— 

159— 

160 — 
161— 
162- 



13 4ft 121*5- 
23 60 2.6 - 
6 50 217 - 
218- 



16 7«) 
7 20 
1 59 
1 35 
3 80 
13 00 
22 60 
21 30 
30 00 
20 15 



6 On 
10 20 

2 00 

2 40 

*40 60 
10 70 
10 90 
13 00 
6 60 
1 4' 1 
10 20 

3 50 
1 90 

*14 60 
26 20 

7 50 



4 90 



219- 

220 — 
221 - 
222 — 
22 > — 
221 - 

225— 

226- 
227— 
228 

229 — 

230— 
231 — 

232— 

233— 

231— 

235— 

236— 

237— 

238— 

239— 

240— 

241— 

242— 

243— 
241— 

245— 

246— 

247— 
?48 — 

249 — 

250 — 

251— 

252— 

253— 



380 — 
18 90| ; J®J— 

5 40 «® '' 

7 ,i0 -St 

6 OO P» 4 — 
1 20 

5 65|3S»- 

5 CO 3 ® 8— 
10 0O lS89— 
20 10 3a*'— 

1 ;u 3J1 — 
:»2 — 

IS -10?®®— 
10 00 

10 00®«- 
I 30 

1 30 
34 85 

7 40 

2 10 



6 50 



10 00 

13 60 
4 30 
1 "0 
3 601 
12 40 
21 40 



* “ 35= 

23 G0 .^;_ 
5 30 2Ä8— 

259 

8 »»- 
8 1 1) ' 



1 70 



14 20,: 



6 50 
4 90 
8 10 ! 



1261 — 
212— 
263— 
>64— 



3 OO 1>( yt 
2 OO ojnCZ 
1 so 5^1 

7 » Bk. 

4 50; 2^0 — 



7 70 



270— 
Ü271— 
•272 - 
273— 



271 



9 90 
22 80 4 
47 60 1 275 
*2 80 276- 

2 30; 077 

JJ 27H- 

5 20 279 

5 30,280 — 
9 «OI28I- 

20 10 282- 

6 3' » 288 — 
21 4“ 284- 

H IK) 285 — 
13 10 286— 

* * • 287— 

1 90,288 - 

2 00 289 — 
8 70,290— 

. 291— 

• * .92 — 
J 60 29-3- 

* • • {'294— 

* ■ .295— 

H 30 296— 

1) 10 297— 

8 30,298- 
2 60,299— 

2 50,;*)0_ 

301— 
4 00' 302— 

10 w ; 303- 

1 ou :m— 

*5 10 305— 

11 05 30(>— 
41 80 307— 
. . . 808 — 

* • • 309 — 

3 10 310— 

12 20 311— 

312 — 

2 80 313— 

4 101814— 

9 HO 315— 

11 00,310— 
. . 317— 

75,318— 
. . 319- 

8 90 320— 
321— 

5 00 322— 
4 60 323- 
2 40,334— 
2 60.325 — 

. . .326— 

17 85 .327— 



: S ^3- 



* <°|«7= 
11 sn M ‘ 



5 40 
5 80 



82 80 j»! — 

7 50I452— . 
1' 40 458- 
2 60 454 _ 
25 60 455 — 

2 70 SJz 

' 2 fii/'ftt- 

. . . 461— 



10 65 
26 70 
3 50 
12 60 



462— 

463— 

464— 

465— 

466— 



1 80,467 — 

10 20 tea- 
ls S’ ‘ : 470— 
12 70 471- 

1 80' 472- 
4 50 .473 — 

2 00 474— 



6 60 
6 70 

’ 8 20 
4 50 
I 70 
11 00 
10 00 



26 

10 00 
10 00 
2 50 
2 00 
5 70 



175— 

176— 

177— 

478— 

479— 

480— 

481— 

482— 

483— 
481 — 

485 — 

486 — 

487— 

488— 

489— 

490— 
601491— 

30 01(492— 



7 30 



; 98 — 

399 — 

400 — 
4m— 

402— 

403— 



13 75 
2 50 
7 60 

5 00 
4 90 

6 20 
24 eo 
41 40 

1 4f 
4 90 

10 Oti 



3 20 

4 50 
6 60 



2 50 
* 2 90 



404— 

405— 
106— 

407— 

408— 

409— 

410— 

411— 

412— 

6 00,"*: 

7 <]L 

- ..1416 — 



r 80 

1 801 



9 2ft! 



418- 



« “0,4 * 9 — 
■420 — 

29 20 

•iiSst 

2 3«|PeZ 
1 inlj 2 ri 
10 76 

1 HSt: 

* 20^ _ 

2 1 » IS. 

s 00, 

9 SO 

•» 4|i| — 

16 90 



2 10 
90 
15 25 
4 50 



2 40 



8 10 



4 <2 — 
433 — 



3 60 



411 — 10 00 6<l6 _ 



tit- 1 *0 ( 



448— 

449— 
4-Stl — 



1 ( 55 



; 10,517— 
12 »'-,61»— 

8 40 #10— 
• 6»>— 

3 10,521—- 

9 00 (,<» 

20 50 603— 
15 00 6 o 4- 

1 so e 6 _ 
« 20 62(1— 
27 45,527 — 
• • • !628— 
5 90 e ;o— 
17 'HI (30- 
8 25 6S1- 

3 90 532— 

21 «" 0.'«— 

12 90 #34 — 

5 80 535 — 
23 00,636 — 

4 50 637— 
10 10 «38— 

8 60 630— 

1 85 610— 

641— 
7 5016-12 — 

7 60 613— 

614— 

13 7" 6(5 — 

10 50 1 646— 
12 90|647- 
17 501543 — 

8 ’0'#49— 
3 40 650 — 
8 10,551— 
7 KC652 — 

6 30|a53 — 

3 70 654 — 

4 101655 — 

2 20,656— 



ioft- 


2V.8 31!«- «,* 9(1 49^- „ „A- 


5 6ft 


161— 


. . . 326— 


28 5ftl|91— . 


. i65<)— 




162— 


16 4ft 1 327— 


31 60 492— . 


. . 1687— 


8 40 


163— 


8 On 1.328— 


5 8*'l493— - 


90 658— 


3 60 


164— 




494— 


20 659— 


2 10 


166- 






n 660— 


2 70 



. . . 496— 
i»97— 
2 10 498— 
4 10 499— 
20 60 .500— 
4 70i501 — 
502 — 
2 10 1 303— 
. . 804— 
5> 2ol505— 

6 30 '80S— 

807— 
9 2' 1808 — 
8 101509— 
,810— 
2 80 811— 
. . . 512— 
513 — 

12 40,514 — 
. . 615 — 

7 601516— 

8 00,317— 
. . . 518— 

8 50 1 519— 
6 io 540— 
6 80,521— 

1 40,522- 

623— 
' 8 SO 524— 
6 601525— 

2 00 1 526 — 

2 7" g7- 

2 00 *28- 

3 40 529— 

13 8.5I53O- 
3 SO 5*1— 

13 70 1 p32- 



533— 



. 401534- 

3 50,535— 

2 ^1537= 

1 30 5M- 

4 90 1/ 3 -*" 



7r!-'H 0- 
541 — 
512 — 
M3 — 
ft44— 
545— 
54b- 
647— 
548— 
649— 

560 — 

561 — 

1 eo|*g- 
28 "miZ 

’ « 90 
3 20 «2 
ftiJS“ 

66H— 
559 — 
660— 
*1561— 
5*2— 
603— 
661— 
6*:.6— 

* 7 20 |2S5 

8 20,^Z 

3 fJ o Kl 
« w tt- 

2 40 



6 . 8 — 
r >79 — 
680 — 



5H2— 

583— 

584— 



’ 585 — 
5H6 — 
'.'■87— 

'jkSSi 

1 50 590 — 
5 85 1591— 
. 69*2— 



5‘KL- 



8 3ft 504 

3 70^_ 
6 *> 596— 

597— 
10 40 5y8 _ 

4 90 599— 

r A ^ '0 

J *0 601- 

1 01 602— 

2 10 603— 

’ ^0,604 — 



605 — 



607— 



23 80$“: 

2 LÜ Ö12- 



613— 



2 

life 



4 80 
‘20 00 



3 70 



2 60 
3 00 
2 80 
10 00 
10 00 



4 50 
12 <0 
4 40 
46 50 

16 80 

1 30 

10 no 
)7 no 
50 
3 9) 

2 <10 

’ 2 60 

7 90 

8 90 
10 00 

’ni) 

3 90 
2 40 
2 20 

4 10 



1 70 
1 Ö0 

1 H0 

2 80 
10 10 

5 60 
2 10 



6 90 



1 10 
2 70 
5 60 
4 80 
l 40 
9 50 

4 80 



3 30 
3 30 
3 00 
8 00 
7 60 
7 85 

t 90 
10 90 



1 95 
8 70 



5 10 

* 4* 55 

5 60 
4 15 

7 00 
4 20 
2 00 

8 70 

6 90 



1 80 
1 60 



2 70 
2 90 



16 00 
3 90 



4 60 
4 40 

1 20 

2 90 
4 40 



2 95 



2 80 
6 30 



8 10 
1 50 



4 10 
4 00 

3 70 
17 80 

4 75 

’ 2 50 
17 70 
29 16 
3 20 
1 00 

’ 2 75 
2 50 
9 80 

19 90 
19 70 
19 20 



6 on 

4 61) 

4 60 



10 10 
' 6 90 



6 50 
26 



11 60 



~ a 
$■§ 


Amount. 

Local 

Union 

t 


0 

S 

< 


l! 


Amount. 


g J 
3 d 


j Amount 


661— 


8 C0|696— 


13 00 


Til— 


2 00 


766— 


2 10 


662— 


. . . 697— 


3 4ft 


732— 


40 10 


767 — 




603— 


. . . 698— 


31 40 


733— 




768— 


3 20 


664— 


17 30'G99 — 


5 70 


734— 


6 80 


769— 




6<i5 — 


2 50 ,700— 


2 30 


735 — 




770— 


13 lfl 


666— 


1 60 '701— 


5 10 


736— 


2 4" 


771— 


4 10 


667— 


17 66 7u2 — 




737— 


3 30 


772— 


2 00 


668— 


2 25|703— 


9* 10 


738- 




77.'1— 




669— 


2 80 701— 


19 ( .0 739— 




774— 




670 — 


1 20I706 — 


4 40 


710— 




776- 


5 8'» 


67 J — 


J7l-K> — 


8 50 741— 


1 2C 


776 — 


8 : 0 


672— 


. . . 1707— 


3 60 


742— 




777 — 


6 30 


673— 


. . . |7ft8— 


6 P' 


713— 


3 60 


778 - 




674- 


1 00 709— 


2 50 


741— 




779 — 




675— 


1 4<> 710— 


4 no 


-4-— 




780— 


1 60 


676— 


6 50,711— 


4 90,746 — 


2 HO 1781— 




677— 


5 40,712 - 


17 20 747— 




782 — 


2 25 


678— 


19 76 713— 


1 00 


74 H — 


1 60 733— 


1 40 


679 - 


2 20(7)4— 




740- 


2 80 


784— 


2 00 


680— 


1715— 


11 70 


750— 


7 40 


786— 




(>81— 


15 40 716 — 


16 101751— 


2 10 786— 




682— 


2 10 717— 




752— 




787— 


4 70 


683— 


718— 


16 60 75:3— 


2 15 788— 




684 — 


4 40 719— 


3 00 


754— 




789— 




685— 


2 6N|720 — 


1 00)785— 


6 00 790— 




686— 


2 00 721— 


9 90 756— 


2 30 791— 




687— 


|722— 


2 00 757— 


2 26 792 - 


4 00 


688 — 


. . . 723 — 


1 76 758— 




793— 


6 70 


689— 


1 501724— 




769— 




791— 




690 - 


725- 


1 20 


760— 


2 10.795- 


1 10 


691— 


2 69,726— 


4 80 761— 


1 00 


796— 


6 00 


692 — 


6 10 727— 




762- 


7 40 ,797— 




693— 


. . 728— 


2 30i 763— 


2 90 798— 


6 30 


694— 


1 90 729— 


18 00 764— 








695— 


. . 1730— 


1 4ü'76Ö — 




— 


— 


Total 











Financial Report. 



$5,313 7 
15 00 

15 00 
20 20 
15 65 
3.7U6 62 



RECEIPTS, January, 1892. 

From the Unions (Tax, etc.) 

“ Rjintanri Gas 

•* Advertising . . .... 

Union, 23 • suspended 

14 C learn nces, etc. . . ... 

Balance on hand January 1, 1892 . . 

TotAl $0,095 21 

EXPENSES- January, 1892. 

For Printing . $210 98 

“ Office# etc. 622 09 

“ Tax A F.cfL 90 00 

“ Meeting of G. E. B. • 437 25 

“ General Trmsurer’s Salary .... 60 00 

“ Traveling and Organizing. . * * -0 81 

“ Benefits N* s. 1 541 to 1590, inclusive 5,026 itO 
Balance on hand Feb. 1, 1892 2,569 08 

Total $9,096 21 

DETAILED EXPENSES, January, 1892. 

Printing 5,000 Members’ Cards .... $12 50 

1 ,50 1 Postals • 4 2S 

“ 2,000 Envelopes 4 76 

5.0< 0 Noteheads .... 12 ; 0 

“ 50ft Cards, with changes . . 4 25 

“ 100 Secretary’s Order Bucks 25 00 

“ 45,0 0 Copies February Journal 226 73 

“ 1,000 Agitation Cards . .... 200 

Wrapping and Mailing Feb. Journal . 19 23 

Postage on February Journal ..... )4 84 

“ “ Supplies, etc 25 10 

“ J ,50'> Postais . 15 00 

“ 2,000 Stampe«! Envelopes ... 43 HO 

Expretsage on Supplies, etc 80 91 

Eleven Telegrams 6 30 

Salary and Clerk Hire . 382 66 

Office Rent for January 26 <J0 

Rent of Post Office Box 3 00 

M. Kiernan, Organizing . . . t . 4 75 

J. G. Snyder “ G CXI 

P. J. McGuire, Travelling Expenses . . lu o i 

Tax to A. F. of L . . 90 00 

Rubber Seals and Daters ...... 19 2u 

Gas Bill for Thr ee Months 24 60 

Stationery and Incidentals 7 16 

Janitor for Cleaning Office . . 5 u»j 

James Troy, General Treantrer, Salary 50 <X) 

T. E. Deegan, Meeting of G. R. B. <6 00 

Hugh -McKay ** “ ‘ “ “ . . 04 25 

W. F. Abrams “ “ “ “ “ . . 85 25 

E. A Stevens ** “ . 9ft 50 

S. J. Kent “ “ “ “ . . 143 00 

BENEFITS PAID IN JANUARY. 

No. Name. Union. 

1541 — M W. Kenny 163 

1542 — Jacob Benner 270 

1543 — Mrs. C. Schaber .... 107 

1544— Mrs. A. J. Blatchford ..... 509 

1545— Jos. Degenhard t . . . . 5!8 

1546 — Mrs M Murphy 42 

1547 — Mrs. M. Rhuinolir 32 



1548— W. II. Foster 

1549 — James Dunn 

1550— John Nolle . . 4 . 

1551 — Thomas La Rose 

1552— Fred. Beau master . 
1 53— Mrs C. Weckerle . 
1.554 — Mis. Sarah J. Gow 
15 -5 — James K. Dmm . 



■ 401 
3s2 
. 705 
1*4 
. 416 
. 15 
192 
621 



556 — Mrs. J. Raith 199 

1557 Mrs Elizabeth Harrison . . . 247 

1 - f *58 — Mrs. Mary Dorati 2 

1659— Mrs. S. Sternberg . . .518 

15 f 0— Mrs. Minna Grewe 12 

1561— Mrs. A. Schilling 219 

1562 — Mrs. Jane Shine 477 

1563 — Mrs. Mary Butler 122 

1564— Mrs O. Sandberg 7<>2 

1565 — Joe Dickinson 19S 

566— Mrs. M. E Switzer ... 2H0 

16'»7— Mrs Emma Beamer .... 22 

15o8— Mrs K. F Perry 22 

1569 — John Lahancy 22 

16.0— • harlcs E. King 451 

1571— Mrs. Effie Taylor , . . .655 

1672— Herman Liedceke . . . 234 

1573— Mrs. Sedia Hein .... .197 



1574— Mrs. Andina Sinclair 87 

1675 — Mrs. Bridget Gerard 142 

1576— James Forrester 142 

1577— Mrs. L. A Shank 498 

1578— A. P. Wilhide 171 

1579— Mrs. M. E. Rouse 469 

1580— Peter Lyons . 488 

1581 — Mrs. Lizzie Powell 206 

1582 — David Gibb 36t 

1583— Mrs Kervu Burrell 462 

1681 — Edward Gifford 8LI 

1585— Patrick Brophy . . ... 310 

1586 — II. Kreulzfeld ...... 155 

1587— Mrs. C Wahl hammer . . 355 

1588 — Mrs. C. J. Or Ison 28 

1689— John Jones 443 



A mi . 

$200 

i<x> 

25 

50 

200 

25 

eo 

200 

2 <l 0 

200 

1U0 

1<;0 

50 

50 

200 

50 

no 

50 
50 
50 
60 
60 
50 
5ft 
200 
50 
50 
50 
200 
200 
50 
100 
25 
60 
50 
2(0 
60 
100 
5 ft 
100 
50 
200 
50 
200 
200 
20ft 
60 
50 
160 
2C0 



1690— John Riber 287 

Total 13 



SPECIAL ASSESSMENT. 

Below is a report of all moneys for the Special 
Assessment, levied une U, 139:, um { received 
from Dec. 1, 1891, to Jan. 31, lH9i (inclusive). 

All moneys received since Jail. 31st will be re- 
ported in the April Ca HPKNTKK. 



RESERVE FUND. 



Report of moneys received for Reserve Fund 
from JANUARY 1st, 18»2, to JANUARY 81st, 
1892 (Inclusive). 

All moneys received since JANUARY 31st will 
bo reported in the APRIL Carpenter. 



NINE-HOUR CITIES. 



Below Is a list of the cities and towns v 
Carpenters make it a rule to work only 
hours a day: 



— a 

«3 2 



19— 
37— 
44 - 
46— 
56— 
68 — 
70- 
76— 
79— 
102 — 
117— 
120 — 
151— 
166— 
j79 — 
213 — 
220 — 

232— 

233— 
219— 
256— 
268— 



— P 
a o 

& 



262— 
268 — 
276— 
278— 
285 — 
287— 
295— 
314— 
341— 
346— 



n 70 

I 95 
90 

1 46 
3 6« 

65 
1 20 

2 05 
7 85 

3 CO 

10 06 ; 363- 

11 75|378 

6 75,380 — 
3 76-383— 
3 20 89L— 
2 10 392— 
2 )0 398 — 

406— 

66 f 12 — 
2 85 <11- 

7 10 416— 
11 IÖ 425— 



5 55 



?- 2 



_ a 



429- 



Total 



4 66 439— 
8 46 452 — 
7 80 456— 

2 9ft 458— 

3 75 460— 

1 30 466— 

2 26 482— 

3 15 484— 
1 40 488— 

1 05' 496 — 

2 50 500— 
28 25 '503— 

70 506 — 

5 15 515— 
1 CO 523— 

1 26 52*5— 

2 00 537— 
1 50 '539— 

3 90 671— 

4 60 579— 
75 680— 



B 

< 



82 20' 630— 
95 687— 
1 i 6 047— 

1 55 6 7— 
3 40 679— 
3 10,084— 
3 75 1 694— 
6 45(697— 

2 55 705 — 

3 15|7J0— 
'■2 20 728— 
1 85 734— 
1 301743— 
1 40 i 751— 
8 75 753 — 
1 30 760— 
1 451762— 

85708— 
90(777— 
85)787 — 
1 70, 

3 50 j 



Albina, Oreg. 
Allsten, Mass. 
Amesbury, Mass. 
Atlantic City , N. J. 
Arlington, Mass. 
AnacosteH, Wash. 
Astoria, Oreg. 
Asheville, N. C. 
Auburn, N. Y. 
Auburn, Me. 
Altoona, Pa. 
Apollo, Pi 



l2 8S 
3 30 
2 20 
90 

1 70 

2 20 
2 20 
I 15 
3 40 
1 30 
1 06 



I 35 



$312 40 



Expulsions. 



Marion Hyland, from Union 249, New Or- 
leans, La., for misappropriating the funds of 
the L. U. 

Robert H. Jackman, suspended from Union , 
157, Haughville, Ind. for' using money belong- j 
ing to the Union and not replacing it 



W. 
N. J. 



J. Fleming from Union 151, Long Branch, 
, for malicious talk. 



Joseph Crandai.l, from Union 19, New 
Albany. Ind for violation of Sections 66 ami 79, 
and for contempt. 

J. W. Skipper, from Union 781, Portsmouth, 
Va., for violating Section 79. 

Denis Nickils, from Union 221 Jacksonville 
Fla., for misusing the funds of the Union. 

P. S. S. Kling from Union 602, Atlanta, Ga.’ 
for scabbing it during street car men’s strike. 

Wm. Clinchy, from Union 561 Jersey City, 
N. J., for defrauding a brother member of a 
board bill. 

W. H. Howell, from Union 669. Chattanooga, 
Tenn., for embezzlement of Union funds while 
he was F. S. 

John R. Lewis , from Union 285, for violation 
of trade rules and bad conduct generally . 

IL G. AND J. E. Button, from Union 489, Salt 
Lake City, Utah, for letting piece work. 



: CO 

9 70 . ~ r , _ ... 

0 80 Anderson, Ind. 
Allegheny City, Pa. 
Albany, N. Y. 
Austin, Tex 
Bakersfield, Cal. 
Bay City, Mich. 
Bello Vernon, Pa. 
Bath Beach, N. Y. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Butler, Pa. 
Bayonne, N. J. 

70 I Boise City, Idaho 

1 00 Bridgeton, N. J. 

2 4 r » Burlington, Iowa, 
j 45 I Blaine, Wash. 

1 t>0 \ Bridgeport, Ohio. 
Bradford. Mass. 
Bellaire. Ohio. 
Belleville, III. 
Belleville, Can. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Boston, Mass. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
Brockton, Mass. 
Beaver Falls, Pa. 
Brookline, Mass. 
Butte, Mont. 
Carrollton, Ga. 
Chelsea, Mass. 
Charleston, W. Va. 
Covington, Ky. 
j Chester, Pa. 
Columbus, Ga. 
Columbus, Ind. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Camden, N J. 
Concordia, Kan. 
Columbia. S O. 
Collinsville, 111. 
Cohoes, N. Y, 
Corsicana, Tex. 
Columbus, Ohio, 
Cambridge, Mass- 
Charlestown, Maas, 
Coraopolis, Pa. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Colorado City, Col. 



GENERAL LAWS. 

Weekly Pay — W eekly payments are the most 
convenient for members of this Brotherhood, 
and where practicable should be adopted. 

Convict Labor. — W e will not use any mill or 
other work manufactured in a penal institution, 
or brought from any town or city where cheap 
labor prevails. 

Labor’s Holiday.— We favor the adoption of 
the first Monday in September as Labor s Holi- 
day, and we recommend that our L. U. ’s shall 
endeavor to observe the same. 

Eight Hours.— O ur L. U.’s shall do all in their 
power to make the Eight hour rule universal, 
and to sustain those unions that have now estab- 
lished the Eight hour system. 

Amicable U ndlrstan ding — The G. E. B should 
do all in iU power to discourage strikes, and 
adopt such means as will tend to bring about an 
amicable understanding between Local Unions 

and employers. 

Lien Laws.— W e desire uniform lien laws 
throughout the United States and Canadas, mak- 
ing a mechanic’s lien the first mortgage on real 
estate to secure the wages of labor first, und 
material second. Such liens should be granted 
without long stays of execution or other un- 
necessary delays. 

Building Trades Leagues.— E ach L. IT. shall 
strive to form a league composed of delegates 
from the various unions of the building trail es in 
its respective city, and by this means an employ- 
ment bureau for these trades can be created. 

Grading Wages.— We are opposed to any sys- 
tem of grading wages in the Local Unions, us we 
deem the same demoralizing to the trade, and a 
further incentive to reckless competition, having 
the ultimate tendency when work is scarce, t.> 
allow ibst-elass men to offer their labor at third- 
class prices. We hold that the plan of fixing a 
minimum price for a day’s work to be the »rufest 
«ml best, and let the employers grade the wages 
above that minimum. 



No -| Amt - No , A P ... 
t»-\ mon of Yonk N. Y. 
removed to Danbury, Conn. 

Samuel Moobj-: 
powder marks o 
came to Denver, C ' pi 

rowed too’ 
and ho’ 

' T 55 



to JiyiYgjj 



Rfiet 



lie 



HEED THIS APPEAL. 

To the Tradk ani> Labok Unions of 
America : 

Fellow-Workers : You no doubt have 
had the case of E. W. Clark and George 
Miller now confined in prison at Thom- 
aston, Maine, serving a life sentence, 
brought to your attention, 

They were mutineers upon the schooner 
Jefierson Horden nearly seventeen years 
ago. Th< y were brutally maltreated which 
provoked the mutiny. 

A movement has been set on foot by 
the American Federation of Labor to se- 
cure a pardon for them from President 
Harrison, and I now appeal to you to se- 
cure that end by forwarding a petition to 
President Harrison, Washington, D. ,0-, 
asking him to extend Executive clemency. 
Send the petition signed by your Presi- 
dent and Recording Secretary under seal 
of vour Union. In the cause of Labor 
and humanity i ask you to bring this to 
oppression, unnatu' your Union and to take 
conditions, would th pon the matter. 
j. fc Ak,.-.vp i«t> of. vour traue a«yhoyj, and 1 sue 

i .i.-v ....i •• ii. _ . . I 



Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

New Britain, Uouu. 
Norfolk, Va. 

New Orleans, La. 
Newport, R. I. 
Newport, Ky. 
Newbury port, Mass. 
Nanaimo, Brit. Ool. 
Nyack, N. Y. 
Norwood, Mass 
Natchez, Miss. 

N'av Cumberl’d, W. 
New Castle, Pa. 

New Haven, Conn. 
New Haven, Pa 
Norristown, Pa. 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 
New Westminster, B. C 
Nyack, N. Y. 

Newark, N, J. 

Natick, Mass. 

Newton, Mass. 
Newburgh, N. Y 
New Bedford, Mass. 
New Albany, Ind 
New Brighton, N. Y. 
Norwich, Conn. 
Oswego, N. Y, 

Ogden, Utah. 

Ofean, N. Y. 

Ottawa, Can. 

Ontario, Cal. 

Omaha, Neb. 

Orange, N. J. 

Olympia. Wash. 

Port Chester, N. Y. 
PunxButawney, Pa. 
Peterborough, Can 
Portland, Oreg. 

Port Townsend, Waal 
Passaic, N. J. 
Plymouth, Mass 
Portland, Me. 

Port Angeles. Wash. 
Portsmouth N. H. _ 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Paterson, N J 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Plainfield, N. J. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pierre, S. Dak. 
Pasadena, Oal. 
Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Porterville, Cal, 
Peoria, III. 

Quincy, Mass. 
Rochester. Pa. 
Richmond, V». 
Richmond Kv. 

Rock Island, 111. 






Colorado Springs, Col. Rondout, N- Y 



Corsicana, Tex. 
Corryville, Ohio. 

Des Moines. la. 
Davenport, Iowa. 
Dover, N HJ 
Detroit, Mich. 
Denison. Tex 
Dedham. Mass. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
Duquesne, Pa. 
Dubuque, Iowa. 
Dallas, Tex. 

East Liverpool, Ohio, 
East Saginaw. Mich. 
East Orange, N. J. 
East Portland, Oreg, 
El wood, Pa. 

Erie, Pa. 

Englewood, N. J. 
Evansville, Ind. 
Eureka, Cal. 

Fair Haven, Wash. 
Fall River. Mass. 
Findlay, Ohio. 
Fresno, Cal. 
Frankford, Pa. 
Franklin, Pa. 
Frankfort, Ind. 

Fort Worth, Tex. 

Fort Wayne Ind. 
Franklin, Mass. 
Galveston, Texas. 
Greensburg, Pa. 
Greenfield, Ind. 
Gloucester, Mass, 
Greenville, Pa. 
Germantown, Pa. 
Greenwich, Conn. 
Grove City, Pa. 

Glen Cove, N. Y. 

Hot Springs, Ark. 
Homestead. Pa. 
Hamilton, Can. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Halifax, N. S. 
Hampton, Va. 
Hanford, Cal. 
Haverhill, Mass. 
Hackensack N. J. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Hudson, Mas.«. 



Herkimer, N. Y. 
iek Falls, N. 



Y. 



jo be. aged 40 to 43 vl Tirespntq i, J the column a of the organ of our trade j 120 

i on lace medium In i, I v ' ^ JIabpemer, and sp^yl upon the ■ 

sr, P 'pi*' I ours trtii > bis Union- ,, (Q 

L, G. PowKtv 



Hoost 

Hyde Park, Mass 
Uol>oken, N. J. 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Houston, Tex. 
Hinghum, Mass. 
Irvington, N. Y. 
Jacksonville, 111. 
Jackson. Mich. 
Jersey City, N. J. 
Kearney, Neb. 
Knoxville, Tenn, 
Kittening, Pa. 
Kingston, N. Y. 
Lansingburg, N. Y, 
lAwrenoe, Mas«. 
lx>well. ^tas». 

Lynn, Mas«. 
Leominster, Mas». 
Lafayette, Ind. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Lewiston, Me. 
Lincoln, Neb. 
London, Canada. 

Long Branch, N. J. 
Marlboro. Mas«. 
Morristown, N. J, 
Manayunk. P» 
Malden, Mass. 

Millville, N. J. 

Media, Pa. 

Medford, Maas 
MaHdehead, Mass. 
Mayfield, Ky 
Monongnhela, P». 
Memphis, Tenn 
Mt. Vernon, N Y 
Martin’s Ferry. Ohio. 
Mamaroneek, N. Y. 
Mercer, I'a. 
Midftleehoroiigh, Ky. 
Meriden, Conn. 
Moline, Til. 

Mobile. Ala, 
v> us): egon. Mich. 
McKeesport, Pa» 



Roxbury, Maas. 
Rochester. N. Y. 
Roeedalc, Ind. 

Revere, Mass. 
Riverside, Cal 
Red Bank, N. J. 
Redlands, Cal. 
Rockford, 111. 

S. Framingham Mas«. 
Springfield, Mass. 

St. Augustine, Fla. 
South Omaha, Neb. 
Salem, Mass. I< 

Stoneham, Maas, 
Somerville, Maes. 
Saltsburg, Pa 
San Angelo Tex, 
Shreveport Lu. 
Stamford, Conti. 

Sea Cliff, N Y . 
Springfield, O. 

San Leandro, * al 
Santa Anna, Cal 
Santa Rosa, Cal 
St. John’«, N. B. 

Salt Lake Oity^ Utah. 
Schenectady, N. Y. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Scottd&le, Pa. 
Spokane, W««h, 
Sharon, Pa. 

Sheffield, Ala. 

Staten Island, N, Y. 
Stoughton, 

B. Abingdon, Maw. 

St. Catharine, Out. 
Sun Antonio. Tex. 

San Bernardino. Cl 
SharpHville, Pa. 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Santa Cruz. Oal. 
Saginaw City, Mivl 
Stockton, Cal. 
Sacramento, Cal. 
Sbeepahead Ray, N. 
Seymour, Ter. 
Seymour. Ind, 
Summit, N. J. 
Sii|>erior, Wia- 
Tampa, Fla. 

Tawaa < ity, Yicli. 
Tarry town, N Y. 
Terre Haute, Ind 
Toronto, O. 

Toledo, O. 

Toronto, Out., 50 hrt» 
Trenton, N. J. 
Trinidad, Col, 

Troy, N, Y. 

Tacoma, Wash. 
Tarentum, Pa. 

Turtle Creek, Pflb 
Union Hill, N. J. 
Utica, N. Y. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
Vanoouver t B. C. 
Vicksburg, Mtim. 
Victoria, B C. 
Vinoenuea. F»d. 
Visalia, Cal. 
Waxaliatehie, Tex. 
Welleburg, W. Va. 
West Hoboken, N. J. 
Went Duluth, Minn. 
Warren, Ohio 
Wükesbarre, Pa. 
Winthrop, Maes. 
Windsor, Can. (Ou 
Weymouth. Mas«. 
Waltham, Mae« 

Waco, Tex. 

W. NewtpO 
Worceat* f 
Washiiq 
Witmingu 
W' hitman, jv 
W hatoom, Was. 
Woburn, Maea. 
Winchester, Maxj, 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

Washington, j> c 

WUkiHsburg, Pa. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Yoakum, Tex. 
Yonkers, N. Y 
Youngstown, Ohio, 
Zanesville, Ohio. 



ADDITIONS TO XWJ&’P 






Arra r 



‘1 



( Continued on page J.) 
r> , v ‘ 

. i A 00 brewery. 



ouiuiea awpenters. 



THE CARPENTER 



THE WALKING DELEGAT E. »™ ^ ™ M ™ #F »* U0T8 - h S SÄÄÄ S dSK 

Y Perhaps there has been no clap? of peo- I have endeavored to picture a few of Birmingham, Ala. conspiracy laws have been used, and all tcrfamment, ant i espite a blinding snow, 

pie po maligned in the columns of the the difficulties that a Walking Delegate .. , T e t y . nf tdorv for our forces which money can command doiin t ,e 111 "*•' jammed. On March 

press, w persistently abused and vilitidi has to contend with from his organiza- Br i an ‘; zfl t; ori i iafl been reached ‘ \fter the 1,ave ready to oüset the growing 8th Union 1 had a splendid pui,H c 

by the employers of labor, and even in tion. Now I purpose to show the diffi- to o v< »ars in an nnenual strumrle we find P ower °f la h° r or M an . lzatlon8 - lo remedy meeting, and on the loih inst. had a 

some instances by their brothers in the cul ties and temptations he is beset with t . • 1 ‘ to these evils, the working men must be edu- , basket party. hv holding meetings and 

labor movement, as the Walking Dele in dealing with the employers. In the ! * * ,, » . . n f i*anln ’’ which ll P to a knowledge of the present , entertainments this way once and twice a 

ga‘e. first place, heat all times nuist lie able to ' .} 7 ’ t} f ’ r (\\ a n fiocial system, und to the necessity t or bet- mot’th Union No lus finds it pays well in 

When a Ubor organization decides that argue any disputed point with an em-'\ ‘ P° bones ter conditions. keeping the nienibers alive. On April 1st 

for its best interests it is advisable to have plover intelligently. If not he sinks at ! ‘ ! . . , . i: ’ i J i As an agency to reach that result, the all the building trades of this city will en 

S*»rnp ODP to tn irs nllt^idp mik-p in tlio octiiifitirm nf tlixx 6mn lnr W w awerea. i nemoeremp < eniomuw «m wnr kin® clm«^ must lie organized. and in force the card system, and ti„. . . 



some instances by their brothers in the 
l*dx>r movement, as the Walking Dele 
ga‘e. 

When a Ubor organization decides that 
for its best interests it is advisable to have 
s ene one to attend to its outside business, 
of course it naturally follows that they 
al.-o decide to pay him fur his services. 
And in looking around for some one to ii!i 
t i it* position, they invariably select tie 
i lost intelligent man they can get. for f e 
r :ison that they know that every *i:iv he 
will be hro'ig.’it into contact with employ- 
er', w ho. from the force of circumstances 
Hid the natural advantages they }»>-~s 
are siipp >se<l to l>e l>ettcr erhicated t 
the repr tentative of tlie workingme. 

N >w, in accepting the position of Walk 
ii.g Delegate t:.e party who does so doe- 
it with the full knowledge that he will lie 
compelled almost daily tu match himself 
against some employer in diplomacy, and 
woe betide him if in "the unequal encounter 
the advantage rests with the employer, or 
it cn account of his failure to reach a>atis- 
factory settlement, a disastrous strike is 
precipitated. In either event iu most 
young labor organizations they ;'o not 
stop to consider what he has had to con- 
tend with, but summarily depose him. 
forgetting that in discharging him they 
have rendered it almost impossible for him 



«n. c tn the estimation of the employer, , dis ,. 0 „ r . pd tlmt , he ^ ork of years shows 
wt„, is not at all chary in ri.hcuhng I, ... i wu ,£ . „„ wort , ofH , J or manv . 

to the men, here of Ins ontan.zat.on, and ; T|le ( plainly stated, the labor 

when once the organization I organizations ai St present organized, are 

; ' t. '” cf ' .vll . o l ' th. rn , t's 'vhollv and utteriy m.poUmt to ellcct 
ms davs ot usetu ness are over. But sup- .. r _ J /, , 

. e 1 ■ reforms dt- sired, as would be so manv 

I it i f Ml Tllll lll’llill'lM' i . C'Kl.O * » i 



ter conditions. keeping the members alive. < m* April let 

As an agency to reach that result, the all the building trades of this city will en 
working classes must be organized, ami in force the card system, and tins i Kl8 
their meeting rooms discuss the relations i brought us many members, 
of labor and capital, and the whole held , ,, ,\rk — ... 



I of social economics. Then after they have 
. j become a unit in economic and industrial 
. thought, they can exert their influence 



cunning, the intiigue and bribervof the 



»• V/**» Htv U. Ill OLIU I ITIKI ' 1»^ It | 

are being educated to the fact that we are ; ‘ rease ‘ lLl1 ‘’Uidem-. 



»•mplover. for when an emplover lias met ‘ — „ . , , 

l.=s niatcti in the Delegate, and cannot 1 > »l»P"*wd. without the knowledge 

mould him to bis purpose, in manv cases I ol from . ';l‘ence proceeds the oppreestou ; CARJ 

. c will not hesitate to embavor to bribe u ,° :i e k \ d to tight the bosses for 

him; hut to the credit of the body of f horter l ‘ours and more pay, when the lasten 

Walking 1 ^legates, in no instance bis it | J«»» «« 1,ttle t ,° l,la,uc 1 f ! r the wn,Jl - e 



CARDINAL MANNING’S WARNING. 



* » umni, i 'tn «..»nc. in iiu iiiriaiii c iia.? u .• . x i 

been proven that anv of them have been 1 U T ? that 1 purround U8 1 a '“ 1 aa ou «"- 

so recreant to the trist and confidence re- ' ee '^{ and -. as H ^" eral tll,n -; lke J know 
nosed in them as to betray their fellow- ail lltt . ,f \’ or the cause that has pro- 



jiosed in them as to betray their fellow- 
workmen, although it has I wen proven 
that large sums of money have been 
ollere«! to various I )elegates for that pur- 
p se. In regard to the salary paid to the 
Walking Delegate, the impression has gone 



«luced the effect than do we, for we have 
a smattering of reform education while 
they have practically none. 

These are fretful times, and very prolific 
of schemes, and the country ami society 1 



Listen to the wise words from those 
eloquent lips which but vcstenlay were 
closed forever — the lips of goo«l old Car- 
dinal .Manning. The words were uttered 
when a committee of the House of Lords 
was investigating t he sweaters’ dens in 
Jaomlon. They are wondrously applica- 
ble here to-«lay : 

If the hours of labor, resulting from the 
unregulated sale of a man’s strength and 



to obtain employment, lor, if he ha» l reen forth that it is away above an adequate ar . e 1,1 . danger; m imminent danger skill shall lead to the deetrurtion of do- i 

zealous in the interest, of his organization remuneration for the services rendered 01 a * | * ü kitiam on tbe one hand, and if the j mestic life, to the neglect «*f children to I 
he has necessarily created antagonisms In reality it is only a few dollars per week tn »‘ level headed and earnest . heaned men turning wives and mothers into living 
with the employers which debar him even above what lie would receive at bis *rade a , wr,n,en of the country donut exert machines, ami fathers and husbands into 
from seeking work at his trade or calling, or calling, and that is tacked on to pay Ives to prevent, is serioiislv threat- errat ureti of burden, tbe domestic 1 fe of 

Again, in almost ev-.ry instance, agreat bis legitimate expenses in the service «if eilt ‘d '\ith unbridled an I vicious anarchy men exists no longer and we «lare not go 
portion of tbe work tliat devolves ut*un bis organization. At all times and at all otl ier .More earnest, pra -tical j on in this path, 

iiim is the collection of «bits and assess- , hours be must be readv t«> do the work ot ' v °r k ls< " „ etl fbe end that equity and | — —- 



from seeking work at bis trade or calling. 

Again, in almost ev^ry instance, agreat 
portion of tbe work that devolves upon 
him is the collection of «bits and assess- 
ments where, through tbe neg igeiice of 
tbe members of bis organization, or 
through their refusal to pay, they have 
fallen into arrears. This is the most fruit- 
ful source of trouble to the Walking Dc!e- 



Littlk Hook, Ark.— Unions inj ;i | 1( j 
Ö41 gave a grand ball March 1st. 

FIRST-CLASS BOOhs: 

CHEAP, USEFUL AND PRACTICAL. 



Bkix’s Oarpentuy Mam: Kasv «-.on 

Tnn Bcii-hkr !« (iniiK ask Ksiimatok'h 
I’ri'T. Hook. IIimIksoii. . 'j nn 

Tiik Sikfi. Sqi-ark. am» Ho« TO I -I It. I t»| 
I'lUITIPAL CaUPKNTRV. I HI 

Staik-Bcii.dix«; Maui: Ca«v. 1 1 . i j»» 

Hand Kaii-ixo Maok F,asv .... 1 uj 

Ili.cstkateu Ait iuTKcTrit at. ami Mr- 
« HAMCAI. I) . a \visi;-Book. A Self-In- 

«truiTtir. «villi CO» Illustrations 100 

TllK t’AHPENTKR's AS1» Bl IMiKH .1 ( OM- 

Pi.i:*r: c'omcaniox ... . . t: io 

Address P. J. McCUlRE. 

Box 881, Pbila»lel[»lii)i. 



Awoit 

ijfMM 

hi?, 

•V v '-j • / 



ds organization, attend all meetings ami l^hce shall not perish from the earth, 
make a daily report ofbis actions Inat- , e buds are plum. We must unite «.oir 
tending to his duties it sometimes hap- ^ , tH ever > r other reform element, 
pens that lie oversteps the law and lavs 1 I »iis-1 1 foir domains to a suecesstnl 
bimselt liable to impns«.nnient, simply be- 1 " H,e thro,, K h the onI . v channel that is 
cause he has lieen zealous in the interest j 1 .°t ’. el1 reforms ; that is votk tor our 



gate, for, if he «lues his duty in ibis resjK-i t eause he has been zealous in the interest 
eoneeientiously, he raises up enemies for of the body he represents, 
himself that at some future time may work These are a few of the difficulties the 
injury to him in the organization. In some Walking Delegate lias to contend with, 
instances where full power is vested in He not only has to tight toe emplovera I j ,u " u S n wtiat agency we gain shorter 
him he i^s compelled to order a strike in for the men he represents, but in turn has | „ ant J i [ , etter pay so we do gain our tie- 

order to competthe member or meuil»ers to tight the very men he lias been con- 
to settle up their just indebtedness to their temling for. 



and push our demands to a successful 
i-sue through tbe onlv channel that is 



convictions and for the measures we de 
maud, or quit. 

It is a matter of small importance 
through what agency we gain shorter 



organization. In that ease the loss tliat 
will ensue if unsuccessful is cre«lited to 
the rash or inconsiderate management of 
the Delegate, and at times he is hauled 
over the coals for doing what he was 
electe«! to do. 

Again, he is expected to exercise a con- 
stant supervision over all places where 
men of his craft are employed, and if they 



.V w York. 



Thomas J Ford. 



mands. We must strike at tin* root of the 
evil. The causes being removed that have 
produced the effects the rest will he com- 
paratively easy. 

It is the duty of every labor organiza- 
tion to rally their forces and he readv tor 



HE’S A CHUMP 

W ho’s a chump? 

I he man who works hard to make his 
farm worth. >v! (loo and votes to reduce its 
value to jj, wo. 

The man who works hard to double the 
products of his farm and votes to re« luce 
the r price one half. 

The man who moves heaven ami earth 
to secure an eight-hour day system ami 
vote-; to reduce his wages one-half. 

The man who works hard to earn 
clothes for his own children, and votes 
them to another man's children. 

The man who works ami prays oOJ davs 
in a year, and on the :i6öth* «lav votes 



^G/srERfcP"’ 

This is a Facsimile of the LABEL of tl e 

UNITED HATTERS 

OF NOKTII AMERICA. «. 

The I-nheUIins rc<H-iv«*iI the Indorsement of the 
General Executive Board of the K. of L. and of 
the American Federation of Ijiinir. 

fi i> -The Lalx-1 is placed on every uniou-maile 
hat before it leaves tin- workman'» hands. If a 
dealer takes a label from one hat and places it in 
another, or has any detached labels in his store, 
«lo not buy from him, as his labels may be coun- 
terfeit and hi- bats may he the product of scab ot 
non-union labor. 



JEALOUSY IN LABOR ORGANIZATIONS. IL " . , ■ \ a "' 1 l>6 reauv tor • in a year, ami on tht? iJG«)tli clay voles mp*r. 

... ’ tne coming lrRy, and educate all hands for awav half his earnings and savs he is worse 0,1 the edges, a 

Osborne Ward, tn hie “History of the the coming battle of ballots. than an inlidel he won’t nrovide for hia f'^esba* lately 

Anctent Working People,” very pally . Should this opportunity be let pass noth- family ’ he «on t prowde tor h, 8 

0 ,. , , - -1 , . . ing will stay the hand of a desperate and The man who prays that this “earth c ?’ lore 

Uf all the fratricidal passions that bloody revolution, if indeed, it does not may he as the kingdom of heaven ” and ', at y< 

PlirSil nni WIT hor tlio Imium ... ,1 .... rvtv.l f ..r K.I. _ . X - . . C? ... . tUIU 6«lL f P8. 



v*. ill. VI ««lb u» V CllIVA 11 ^ J • » . , 1 ~ - - . . . ’ *- »«Vib •-'V. «»S3 UIC IWIiEUUllI Ul Ilfsl Vt'Il , il 1 1« I 

are not union men he must make them [* ur ^ an . ier hopes a?. d career of forever end the freedom of the masses and votes to make it a political hell ” Xu- 

. .. - T La amanvintiAn 1..1. 1. . - * 1 1 iw .... «I. _ i* .1 . « . _ r v “* * 



Beware of Counterfeit». Sometimes they are 
printed on while paper and sometimes on vellovr 
imper. As a fjeneral thing they are not perforated 
on the edges. A eouut«-rfeit label with |»erforated 
edges has lately made its appearance it is larger 
than the genuine one. The genuine label is about 
an inch and a half square and is printed on buff 
colored paper. When purchasing a hat see to It 
that you get the genuine label with the perforated 



4U4VII «IV UiUCI. Illimc lilt ill al • . /•II »! • . . « mivi I 

union men it possible. Now, if it should * organization of labor, jealousy is the wipe from the face of the earth every sein- f;"i 
happen that, in spite of his vigilance, a ! nos ^ 'enomous and deadly. Born of the blance of «jur boasted American liberty | 
non-union man should happen to obtain h a man spirit, it runs m lurid juices, as of and independence 

tnn .ru .• f.nw»r< n . I ..i I . .... » a . I 1 'PL .. «' ! 



employment on a union job, and lie fails 
either t<> get him to join the union or ob- 
tain his diseharge from the employer, he is 
sure to have some member out of employ- 
ment complain that lie is not doing liis 
duty if he does not get him the other lel- 
low’s place. The Delegate lias the alter- 
native of either ordering a strike that may 
throw hundreds ot men out of employ- 
ment in order to have that man dis 
charged, or, if lie deems it advisable to 
recommend to his organization in the 
interest of peace “to let mutters rest in 
abeyance,"' to have it imputed that lie 
stands iu with the bosses, ignite frequently 
he lias the same imputation Hung at him 
if, in the settlement of a strike or any diffi- 
culty, lie counsels a moderation of de- 
mands previously made, or proposes a 
withdrawal in part of a proposition. Lverv 
act of his is looke«l upon with suspicion h"v 
some of his fe! low-members, who are at 
all times only too ready to condemn the 
most trivial infraction of his duty 

In every organization tli- re will he 
found some one who thinks the Walking 
Delegate has a soft snap, and is jealous 
because his superior abilities have not 
l>een recognized and himself chosen to till 
the position. Consequently he takes oc- 
casion to criticise unfairly every act and 
utterance of the Delegate, endeavors to 
«•reate suspicion in the minds of the mem- 
bers ag:iin.-t the honesty of the Delegate, 
limls fault with all his doing«, and en- 
«leavors to show how much Letter he 
could do it were lie the delegate ami in 
this way keeps the Delegate perpetually 
explaining his motive for doing this or 
saying that; in fa«t, keeps him contin- 
ually on the defensive. The only time he 
can silence unjust or unfair remarks is 
when he has achieved a victory. Mi st 
labor organizations have a labor bureau 
which the Delegate, in addition to his, 
other duties, is obliged to take care of 
lie is supposed at all times to be on the 
alert to obtain hi. plovn.ent for tlu.se liiem- 



ouitl Reform r. ZLZ*. 

BEN TILLET ON UNIONISM. 



the cobra s fangs, and strikes death under The time is ripe for our cause to enter TILLET ON UNIONISM. 

«•over of fascination. With the adder’s the political arena and join hands with the in .» „.m 

blindness it envenoms the atmosphere by ! farmers’ hosts who are battling so nobly live of aTuiiXh naner \I r “ 

putis mistaken for zephyrs and halm, ami for the cause that is common to all. " u, i'l ‘unmni-n ^ 

to the innocent, like Spartacus.it throttles „ . ?• , , 

the spirit with the dark, moral shadows of B- Andrus (Carpenter). Ue shall go marching on. ami tin 

doo,,!.” wave will sweep onward over the greai 



THE FOLLY 07 NEGLECT. 



A REVIEW OF THE SITUATION. 



,fTt ur The condition of working men generally 

Lai Kir organizations are the natural re- { | n United States is much better than 



tive of an English paper, Mr. Len Tillet 
thus spoke of trade unionism: 

“We shall go marching on, and the 
wave will sweep onward over the great 
bar of time, enguiling the grinding harsh- 
ness opposed to it, until every home slm 1 
l>e maile heautitul, and every life w« rt!i 
living. I would sav to all our enemies, to 



suit of the antagonism ot interests he- H* was ten years ago, wherever they have tkos ? who decry us in the press, from the 
tween capital and labor Labor mu-l orga- J oiganized and ma<le better conditions lor tlie platform, or in the Senate 



nize to secure recognition of the most I themselves, 
molest demands. As soon as this is' ^ome 
understood l»v a number of the workers Bie con« lit io 
at a tra«le, an organization is formed. But even iu a fe 



• “ IllUrl ! mo mcinvci — — x. j mu * X»»» c «11 v » v_» 

this is j In Home branches of labor, however *lo not sit up 

workers i Bie condition is not perceptibly improved' ^ • VoU uu ‘an well, coi 
ed. But 1 even iu a few skilled trsules, such as the - vmir shoulder 



House, if you can do better than we are 
doing do not sit up there and sneer. 
If you mean well, comedown and take 
your place shoulder to shoulder with 



This is the Only Correct Union Label for 
Fur-Felt Hats. 

BUY NO FUR-FELT HAT WITHOUT IT! 

Howard Barrett, President. 

Hut Makers’ international Association; 
James H. I’exro-e. Secretary, 

5A1 Snyder Avc.. Philadelphia, Pa.; 
To os. F. O'ltorRKE. President, 

Hat Finishers' International A— n, 
John Phillips. Secretary, 

47 ; Park Avenue. Brookl> 77. V. 

THE UNION LABEL. 

TUE CIGAR MAKERS’ BUIE LA UFA, 



when the workers have, through organiza- 1 machinists, textile workers, and hoot and 1 us; L r,ve Ud tlie benefit of vour better 
tion obtained some heiterment of their ! workers. While in a few occupations | educalion 5 of >" our larger experience 
condition, they are apt to forget that what there are evidences of lower wages and 0 f i Co,ne out and in the warmth of your 
was gained hv united action, can only l*e poorer conditions than prevailed a decude ,leart the tire glow that shall per- 
maintaine«! through the same factor They a “°* This is particularly noticeable ,1,ei ‘te through up. Show us a better 
are inclined to led secure in their im- among the miners, coke workers, and in ' va - v » | ,ut until you do we shall bdieve 
grove«! position, and to consider the or- p oine branches of the iron trade. But in more hrmlv than ever that our course is 

.....L, . ...l i. a l •. 4 l a. 1 : a. j « . A» Ä • i . iK ... v ,D 



condition, they are apt to forget that what there are evidences of lower wages ami (J f j L'ome out and in tlie warmth of your 

was gained by united action, can only Inj poorer conditions than prevailed a decade r ,eart the tire glow that shall per- 



from tlicm. The workers, guttering under her of cases to eight hours per day. The p,10w us that there is* a real live relmion 
the o*d grievances, again come to their derke in stores have shared in tlie redm-- with the sentiment of morality underfvin» 
senses and rebuild their organization, tion of the hours, the Saturday half holi a11 its teachings— the true sentiment tha7 
1 bus. in some trades, the work of organ da > T 1,as taken a tinner hold, and on the ,nakes f °r human progress that listens to 
izing lias been done three or four times vrliole there are comparatively better eon- the ery of hunger and distress that looks 
over After each «-ol lapse some declared ditions for the organize«l mass of Anieri- at th e baby in the cradle and cares for it 
that there was no further use in repeating *' a n workmen than prevailed in 1881. until P r ^y hairs and totterim* limbs shall 1 



I*ut we want all influences, 
women and the men, the 
ountry, to came to ns and 
us better men, to make our 
and by their example to 
there is a real live religion. 



senses 



jo *|- 

• | g f li 
if a ifi 






SSffi 



nd indirectly by the i,,,r K ' n ?° 8 y etein , °f manufactur- 
mion effected through a te " e,nent lun,se « is to he 

labor questiou. Tlie in.r S 'i, t r , g f t f < f l y C < ? n « rep , s - ulso thework- 
:»ofis that in the trades I If»!!,) a,t8 ? f the ke<leral w»rht-hour 



THOMAS CARLYLE’S WORDS. 



uiract con- 

overnment 



alert to obtain employ ment for tlu-se mem- Among the many telling and oft quote 1 ti 10 m . v 16 , wo . rkers 

hei-s of his organization who are out of words of Thomas Carlvle about work and i, n th » l-Ü^io' 6 f *y steni f °r husuu-ss 
employutent. In connection with this part workers, are the following : ootn piacetatior between the u;.pe 

of his duties he is sure to create ankm»i “ A man willing to work and unable to rim i 

ties against himself, for no matter how find work is, perhaps, the saddest sight many “ -r ev^^ üT % 

ÄnÄ U uI^ hf :SS "ÄS Ä frd °‘ 'TH a n^Ä- 

obtain, there will he some who will con- on a level with the four-footed worker« of i i' at>or » ' Lhmese C°oli e ] 
!l e J. unfairk treated, and of the planet, which is h.s! There is not a comitants Th 



nu^t convincing proof is that in the trades a 18 . the i‘ight-hour 

best organized the largest percentage of * e • 0y ? e,,t ot (, ° n,ra ‘‘t eon- 

advancement m higher wages and shorter V ..i ° n U,llted states (.iovernuient 
hours has been noticeable among the ' 
working classes. “ j ., 

The wage system for the workers, and Car. n'mei-« ' of’ '\ mv- U v ‘ I)( ‘ le< - rate of the 
the competitive system for business men i f - New ^oik city, is being 

both place labor between the Uj.per and InsuechirafX P 0 ^- 111 *? 11 ^ ta te Factory 
nether millstones of our present social re 1 ° f * Ne "' ' ork ' 



At the Four* 
Sij teenth Annual 

Session of the 
tsjjl 

Cigar Makers' 

International 
^ ö Union, held at 
i Q Chicago, in the 
‘ H month ofSeptem- 
H her, 1SS6, the ac- 

1 company ing label 
was adopted as a 
trade mark to be 
pasted on every 
y box of cigars 
y made by Unioi 
N men. 



j both place labor between the upper and lnsuector of x P°^. ltu ? n ^ ta tß Factory 

nether mill.stnnes r»f nur nvocani ... 1 ... I ^ Oik. 



:i«’ Council, of St. Louis, 
1 working people not to 
our or products of the 
Company ” of that city 



SHS-SESs SSSSSSlg Äwasäs««» 



?.2 HJiI 
t igsi*! 

I ©||st 

!< sills 

j| 



If yon nro opposed to tlie servile lal-’f of * ■ 
les, smoke union-made cigars. 

If y«»u are o]»posed u* contracts for con 
lat»or, in deadly competition with lice lid- 
smoke union-made cigars. 

If you favor higher wages, smoke unioti-u- 
cigars. 

If you are opposed to filthy tenemenfc-h* > - £ 
factories, smoke none, but union-made cigar*»- 

If you favor shorter hours op labor, sun»** 
union-made cigars. 

If you favor a permanent organisation of labor, 
strictly union shops, do not purchase the p«»' 
duct of scabs, rats and blacklegs. r 

See that the Blue Label is on the Boi« 



r 



CARPENTER. 



< XII. — No. 4. 

SKILL AMD COMBINATION. 



PHILADELPHIA, APRIL, 1892. 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS. PICKINGS OF ALL SORTS. 

1>e Si KEand eend in a’l your Protective Denver, Col. — Union 55 is booming in 

rund to April 1, 1892. It is called for. membership. 

vouTiave miHinpL^U' assessment, if Boston bricklayers have been conceded 
iheÄiÄydue.^ «.needatopay the ei,h„hour diy. ,o go imo eft* Nov. 

The QrARTERLY Meeting of G. E. B. u XT v ^ „ . 

was held from March 28, to April 5 at the boycott the New York .Stunt* Zatung. 
General office in Philadelphia’ The 11 ia a “rat” sheet. The Illinois .Stunts 
printed proceedings will appear in the Ze,tun 9 has conceded the demands of the 
May paper. German printers and is no longer boy- 

. ’ _ cotted. 



PERSONAL SNAP SHOTS. 



Published Monthly. 



TRADE MOVEMENTS OF CARPENTERS. 



"\ , ;rX 1 r VC UU ‘ “ tri,c Rna rCB,i ** Hk SrRE and send in a’l your Protective 
"L tin* t»M t’lU’litt lit nu*nt of a more roman- r und to April 1, 1892. It is called for. 

tio aye. c 

, i i im r of all the iioroe», who Hliureii me r ' KND in your 2o cents assessment, if 
u in - » a i»ov. you have not done so ! We need it to pay 

“i ,M ‘ f V.f aw k Al!u,los *“ ,d ,lu ‘ the benefits legally due. 

lJ't'll III 1 1 0 \ . I D * 

:i,^"iveii r0 '“ 1 th ° Ili,4 ‘ 1, k “° M Uu ‘ The Qi arterly Meeting of G. E. B. 

. : . e I need not say the r.iiutii* belli was a "as held from March 28, to April 5, at the 
. „ , „ General ollice in Philadelphia. The 

• lernte y ^ j P™ted proceedings will appear in the 



W. H. Grizzkll, Murphysboro, 111., has New Casti.e, Pa. — Union 206 has 
been appointed a District Organizer tor adopted the card system, 
our U. B. 



meat of the recent assessment of 25 cents F' eneral lockout and conflict may be ex- 
per member, levied March 17, 1892. It is P ectet * at au y time. 

to replenish our fimds which have been xc,, \* • 

m- 1 ._ Mt. \ ernon, Ind.— The bosses in this 



!f Ho. General ollice in Philadelphia. The 

V ‘ V ' the f ,rinte,i Proceedings wiil appear in the 

■ i : !•*•' slit* left her “ huhhv," lik«* a wirkotl ' 'l^V paper. 

! ,i in iii*- «ay in* .tight roili«*M*. 'tis« very yhk two tist*al years for 1888 to 1890, 
'wuni\ tin r,, * we had 222 wife funeral henetits. and in 

'"''v;«-« were 1,0,1 MU ’ 1 ' ,H ' forc tH * l ! ie P ast ly months since the last Conven- 

-(.■Hitvly neeil rcniiitd you how thom fiution-* tion in August 1890, we had 258 wife 
strove Hinein funeral henetits amounting to nearly 

How Greek an.1 Tro;n i fought anU fell, or tied $17 000. * 

iUid fought tlg.lin . I ’ 

1 ti’.e'foeii'-lu '.'.Cl 11 “’' 1 ! ““ 1 luard A Circular ias just gone out from the 

.. is* -i*iu* ot adverse fitte, the eity vouht 11 ueral ^ S?e< retarx , calling on the locals 
hold out. to send in all tlieir Protective Fund to the 

..i.-tiniuv tried the Greeks and they < ieiieral Ollice up to April 1, 1S92. lot! 

v nV', ‘.l h.inied.' 'iiv :..ve my boys : we ll th is '' a!1 . ,,e la ‘t'ded. The money is needed j 
iiiufi that nty >tt.” to sustain the many strikes and trade 

i . i lie eertiu u messengers and bade struggles under our sanction this season 

them ijineklv tramp. 

g i ii all t.u* earpenters that might be No Local Union ’’n good standing 

, - 1 ' a nai. i* an’ an hiteet a sculptor too ! Mjrch 1, can exempted from pay j 
v. i- found, meut of the recent assessment of 25 cents ; 

n w;th rule an i . mipasses they men- per member, levied March 17, 1892. It is 

'imVeVim k nf wood, • that eunni«.g to replenish our funds which have been 
,i. "..mt cried, | exhausted by the large number of deaths 

-• enough to hold a squad of warriors and disability henetits which have been 

will ha* k this horse of mine to ter- P*tid b\ Us ill t.ie last t\xe!xe months. 

he ,, ui?hin't»»e l eitv’s walls disgorge his ,, FoR . th f invention of our U. 

lie. y maw." 1 1»- in bt. Louis, Mo„ next August, the G. 

li. kiy - ame those earitenters, each man preparing a Souvenir or Hand Book ; 

, .d Trimmed, and trulv built, a "hicli will W very interesting It will 

i i.iity horse of wood. contain original articles on the labor 

. w ;,..t if 'tw a.~ day work; or if taken by nioveuieiit and its varied phases from the 

Nr lÜ'S'kl'io^ the rules that governed ear- pens of the best writers on such subjects.! 

i nteis in v>«-ece. It will he interspersed with photographs 

ia: ; w;is t!ienft brotherhood, we might of tlte general ollieers. General Executive 

:-* i'Äf’ and cunning Greeks could ! Koar.l, and Past General Presidents of The 
i t have .lone so well. | organization, an 1 other illustrations, iiie 

\ t: you know the Grecian host with- t *ost wi 1 he covered hv advertisements, 

-X ! V!T‘'at S s:p,LTw^ R inthe horse in artful and a limited number will be given each 
ambush lav ; local Union, 

u know the Troian boys came out and dragged | ,, .. , , 

. , horse within, C ■ INVENTION Notices. — 1 he delegates to 

ii- .ever hebi that horse, the fate» di- the next Convention of our U. B should 
.red should win , .. come prt pared to st av in session nine or 

th • . ’.tv'* gate, ten da>s until all the work ol the C onven- 

\ i *1 ai :■'**. Troian fellows met the horse tiuu is lul.v completed. K ectionofdele- 
t lie v es’ usual fate. g,i;**s takes place in the Local Unions at 

the tirst meeting in .lime.— Experienced 

w„ id not draw- a moral as Borne sloppy rDym-| nion s { lou lJ selected as delegates. 



8. C. Downey, a member of Union 1G2 
llvde Park, 111., has invented a folding 
steel degree equare and a new level. 

A. J. Higgs, of Union 11. Cleveland, O., 
A- W. Parcell, Tampa, Fla., and T. Ent- 



Hockaway Beach, N. Y. — Union 675 ia 
in hopes of getting ihe nine hour day 
next Fall. 

Watertown, N- Y. — L T nion 580 has es- 
tablished a minimum of $2.50 per day and 



A State Labor Convention in Arkan- 
sas will be held in Carpenters Hall, 719 
Main Street, Little Hock, Ark., June 7th, 
1892, to arrange for a general observance 
of lothor Day this vear all over the State 
and to frame labor bills for the next ses- 
sion of the Legislature in 1892. 

I The Manufacturers’ Association of San 
Francisco have formed an immense coin- 
i bination of all the employing interests of 
the l'acitic coast to break up the Council 
of Federated Trades and to destroy the 
1 trade unions. The workmen are making 
a lirin stand against this scheme, and a 



pected at auy time. James Carty. a member of Union 38, 

St. Catherines, Canada, is quite an artist 
Mr. \ ernon, Ind. — The bosses in this and his genius in rare etchings is only 
town are trying to break up all our equalled hv the work he did on the artis- 



a» • V» . i Am LbL, laaawa. iia., auu x. r „ . . j 

ner, i^exington, Ky., have been appointed e 0 ■ »turdays. 

District Organize«. Ottawa, III —Union 661 called the car- 

J ames McKim, Walking Delegate of the P ent ers out April 1st, because the con- 
Carpenters in New York City, lately ad tractors have broken their promises to 
dressed a Carpenters’. meeting in the Opera £* ve the nine-hour day. The men will 
House, Nyack, N. Y. 

Jas. F. Grimes, formerly of Portlaifd, Middletown, N. Y. — Union 150 got the 
Oregon, is now in Springfield, 111. His promi.-es of the contractors to concede th® 
presence in the latter city has stirred up nine-hour day May 2, and avoid a strike. 
Union No. 16, and by public meetings lias |^>ut some of them have gone back on it, 
inc reased the membership very largely. and we propose to give them a taste of 

Congressman W. L. Wilson, of West our luetaK 
Virginia, made a masterly public address Belleville, 111.— Union 433 has union- 
not long ago in behalf of our Order at the i ze d this city so there is onlv one scab 
court house in Charlestown, \\ . \ a .by bosa and h e employs only 6ne hand, 
invitation of the Carpenters Lmonolthat This boss is Wiu. Wiemar, and he will 

soon come to terms, as we are being helped 
James Carty. a member of Union 38, Lv the painters. 



For the coming convention of our U. 
1». in St. Louis, Mo., next August, the (i. 
8. is preparing a Souvenir or Hand Book 



unions. They have locked out the Cigar 
Makers, and Coopers and Carpenters 
Union, 798, are etandin?* by the men. 
These two mills are using “scab” barrels, 
and should lie boycotted ' The Hudnut 



which will l»e very iuteresting. It will Hominy Mills and the Peerless Holler 
contain original articles on the labor Mills* 

movement and its varied phases from the ; , 

pens of the best writers on such subjects. f ,,E L rRU ?P 9 .’, , e . rea ^ lirm °f 6 * n P* 
It will he interspersed with photographs 1 niiDlers of 1 hiladelpina, have made a big 
of the general Olliers. General Executive *“pl ur S^ a * W ashington before the Labor 
Board, and 1 ’ast < ieiieral Presidents of the Ctmimitteeof the House against the pend- 
organization, an 1 other illustrations- The in B F, ^. in Fongress to have all contractors 
cost wi 1 he covered hv advertisements, 0,1 united States government work re- 



tic coat of arms he recently made for the 
court room in St. Catherines. 

N. Morse, 703 Broadway, New York, is 
Secretary -Treasurer of the International 
Machinists' Union of America. He has 
helped our U. B. in trying to start new 
unions for us, and in return our locals 
should strive to organize the machinists 



builders of Philadelphia, have made a big into lox-al Unions. Write Mr. Morse for 
splurge at Washington before the Labor documents and information. 



tard, and Past < ieiieral Presidents of the f ommittee of the House against the pend- 
.puiization, an 1 other illustrations The ln £ j,’ 1 * 1 . 111 Congress to have all contractors 
-t wi 1 he covered by advertisements, 0,1 United states government work re- 
d a limited number will be given each p l’ ec ^ . an ‘J enforce the eight-hour law. 



local union. 

U* » n v .: ntion N « *T 1 1 - e> . - 



-The delegates to 
ur L T . B should 



Organized labor should make its power 
feit in insisting on the passage of this 
law. as against the desires ol the Cramps, 
who want to evade the eight-hour law. 

In “ Harmonized Melodies.” the pub- 
lisher, F* Trifet, 408 Washington street, 
Boston, Mass., has given us a collection of 



Samuel Gomters, President of the 
American Eeileration of J.ibor, is lectur- 
ing this month to large houses all ill rough 
the New England States. 1 1 is presence in 
Massachusetts lias been very helpful to 
the nine-hour law, now pending in the 
Legislature of that State, and he has 
aroused the trade union movement in 



The Heport in the newspapers that 
there was a strike of the carpenters in 
Wheeling, W. Ya.. on April 1, was a pure, 
unadulterated “fake.” There was no 
strike or trouble in that city at all, nor is 
there likely to be, as the contractors and 
men are working together very harmoni- 
ously. 

The Carpenters in these places are 
now out on strike since April 1, and men 
are warned not to go near these cities : 
Sandusky. O.; La Crosse and North I .a 
Crosse, Wis.; Freeport, 111.; Newport, 
H 1. Matters are also unsettled in Evans- 
ville, lnd.; Grand Hapids, Mich.; Ma- 
rietta. O.; Olney, 111.; Winchester, Ky., 
and Punxsutawney, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa — The Carpenters’ Dis- 
trict Council, of this city, has been very 
rudely repulsed in the demands it pre- 



everv one of the large cities in the “old seated to the Builders’ Exchange of this 
Bay State.” city. A better state of alhrirs could be 

11. M. Ives, President of the Kansas the E *‘ han S e consented 



nut .Irnw a mural as some sloppy rnym- 

-ters do. 

i.. . -e who would I’d like to see butli drawn 
: -..I quartered too ; 

e ■ ii* luural absent, but a lesson we may 
find. 

-1 \* - what carpenters can do, when skill 

. id w ill eoiuhilied. 



Krt. a itlAr.-; ill UK duuu v. luviur ak , «»»m. ^I t w* »«. I» V uiivv Ii'./u Vi 11 , Jl. 1 ICClUCUb UiC I\auOAC Fill f 

the first meeting in June.— Experienced , songs that are worth ’serving— songs State Federation of loihor, proposes to JP comerence witn tue representa- 

tnen should he selected as delegates. ! that everybody with music in the soul de- deliver a series of labor addresses in that i PiCqoiirnevmen. Arrogance and 
Wiierea Union lias only a small treasury, i lights to hear or sing. This is not simply State in the near future, i 1 is purpose is 'Py 1 ' 1 •' , 10 “ . 1:1 Y. e '' a '. to niulual recog- 
it should not bankrupt itself to send a dele- a hook containing the words and the tune, to encourage the trade unions and further 1 nUlon am a rle111 - * eellll S ou “‘J“ 1 sides, 
gate, as all laws made at the Convention like so many of the low-prioed puh'ica their work all over the State. <hir Car- 1 Carpenters Keep Away from these 



< •.* , T'H onto , 



R. r. CROOK LSDLN. 



THE GOSPEL OF HÜSTLE. 

. genius for keeping a labor orguni- 
■; alive and energetic is all to j rare 
.i .ii-tinct quu ity. When a local or- 
ti ci 1ms one or two good “hustlers ” 
r.-i 1 in its welfare they can do mueh. 
i dole sv*ret is that the gospel of 
. ild 1..* the administrative policy 
v . rv labor society. M ore local unions 
tVoiii drvrot than from any other one 



(L'irs a number of our Unions in the 
small towns and in the low-paid cities are 
opposed to having the rule of 50 cents per 
month as the lowest amount of dues. 
These Unions argue that cities or towns 



CURRENT MENTION. 

The Nine-hour work day has been 
adopted by the New Haven, Conn., city 
government. 

Meriden, Conn — The carpenters and 



1 1 111 nie. canoou. .c I. ^ ^ ,T an not pav a8 high du t S 

",‘ Ui ,7; ,vt ,‘ s tia ^ . tl ‘‘ pe ,,°J’ as places with high wages. ’ In this these | Meriden. Conn— The carpenters and 
- . . lid he the aumniistiatixe policy ^^ions forget that all Unions receive like joiners also the hod carriers’ union of this 
. . rv i.thor soi’iety. .More local unions l)enefitg uu j er ou , i awP . That the death city did secure the nine-hour work day on 
t min dry rot tluin tn»m any ot.iei one aml ^iaaljility benefits for their members, i April first. 

;-.* Do fconietlniig to atti act nieui >e . ^ ^ strike or lo< kout benefits are the v v tv n , ,, 

, ir meetings, to reach the non-union f üenenil üffiw , for 1 . V™**™ Carpenters Ln- 

■ i outside, to advance your craft inter- or VOOT paid town, equallv as >otis of this nty propose to place a wa k- 

aud your class interest. 1 lave some , f tl or hifrlier pald ( *i t ies. mg delegate in the held on May 2d, and to 

„ation.il feature m each evenings pro- Jn an ln6uriuu . t . Company the Policy a >^ have the card system, 
ininio; have somelvodv read m wsajr, | Hojder j n the low wage town must pay Cincinnati. (). — All mail for theDis- 
gasong. play ou a lnM.e .ui tiling . . ^ game amount as in a large town. tr ’ lc t Council of this citv should he ad- 

! ‘vci. matters up >nce darted on th^e | dre8Sed to David Fisher. 55 Clifton ave., 

7 ® ns . wlU , ;“”'t‘ t Or ) tl;emsel\es, — I ] , strict 148. Cincinnati, < >- Bro. Bam r, 

|\"ii\M.ihe a ne *)gti u 1 . K r EP AWAY the former Secretary of the I). C., is now 

M-uimis' — who come because they R.tP away. wwiin* W Yk 

. . • dm,. !,„f oicii th* _ . . i r • i.. in » neeiingi > a. 



• . _ . I i »fit at lUi HiC laiuvi » n.x*.. 

i, at.onal feature in each evenings pro- In an Inguraiu . e Company the Policy 
.•r.muue; have somel»od\ read an ^say, 1 1IolJer in the lovv wa;:e town must pay 
. ga song, play on a lidd.e am tiling to . t t j Je 6ame amount as in a large town. 



liven matters up < >nce starteii on these 
a*.v sugg: -t oils will come ot themselves, 
fid v.tu will he able t< > get not only the 

* !d-timns'' — who come because they I 
.’i n-*» it to he t’ieir duty— hut also the 

»rent, who nee<l stimulus most ofall. 
i \ .ung, who want a little excire - 1 
• t i i «-ide the routine business of the 

• . :;./ iti jn. Trv it — I.nUtr 1. uihr. 



SIGN THIS PETITION. mui> 

i :.e following petition should headoptetl com, 
t .. Ii of our Carpenters' Unions and ridiai 
„1 a oov to the Senate of the United Ly.; 



KEEP AWAY. 

Trade this season promises to he fiirly 
»mod. and it is welcome news, alter the 

r 7 ... .. ... .. . > Xtf* . .. 



long ago before the National Conference 
in Philadelphia, on the su *ject of “ Uni- 
versity Extension.” The address was 
highly praised by the I’rufcssors Clergy- 
men and Teachers present. He com- 
mended the Extension movement and 
punctured the old time narrow exclusive- 
ness and assumed aristocracy of the col 
leges and universities Next month we 
will publish his remarks. 



WHY J9IN A TRADE UNION? 

J. T. W. Ixie, formerly a member of 
Union 198, Dallas, Texas, lias this to say in 
the ‘S'Mtliern Mercury of that city: — There 
are many reasons why men should join 
the unions of their trade. The trade 
union tends to raise wages and keep them 
at a living rate. It begets strength which 



individuals can not possess. It makes 
Boston, Mass. — We will have an eight- labor respected— power rightly directed 

. .. i \ .v~;i tl« / c... i i 4ii ..I. n * 



cinnati, <>. ; Covington, Ky.; Newport, 
Ky. ; Decatur, 111. ; Galesburg, 111. ; Hen- 
derson. Ky,; Holyoke, Mass. ; loifayette, 
Ind.; Logansport. Ind.; Marion, Ind. ; 
Meadville. l’a. ; Middletown, O.; Nor 
walk. Conn.; Haris, Tex.; Scranton, Ha. ; 
Somerville, N J. ; South Bend, Ind.; Salt 
Ioike City, Utah. 



THE VALUE OF HIGH DUES. 

Many unions lack strength and stability 
because their members are unwilling to 
pay high dues. If these unions, continues 
the Ixmisville A c- Era, will take the 
trouble to investigate, they will find that 
the most successful unions are those that 
pay the highest dues. A strong union 
can not he built up on twenty-five cents 
per month as dues. Reserve funds ean 
not he built up on such a paltry sum to 
tight the battles of unionism and enforce 
its demands. The battles of to day are 
fought with money an i brains, not with 
muscle. We talk a great deal about the 
power of public sentiment* and the influ- 
ence of numbers, hut the “almighty dol- 
lar ’’ is more powerful than either. It can 
buy Congress and Legislatures ; it can de- 
feat the will of the people; it can stop the 



Knoxville, Tenn.; Ha du ah. 



r.d prevent a repetition of it in future - • C. t 

ml that is, the letting of Government 

r .'k to contractors in convict labor, FIFTEEN NEW CHARTERS. 

V ; a !’ lj and Ä Si” 88 “ 1 ' a ” lng ’ Since the March Cab.*«™, wae pub- 
Wr’prav that a iaw he enacted that in hshed chartere have been granted to 
, . comracte for public work a clause be fifteen new mon-. £ • « 



ent’Union463 is gaining in membership. 

Cambridge, Mass —Some time ago, 
Walking Delegate Maloney of Carpenters’ 
Union 1 S3 was forcibly ejected, without 



ami Recording Secretary of your i mon, t G Terre Haute Ind. (millmen); shook up the 

“J 1 r 1 ° f y#ar Vmm m ÖtoltaSSo (Äüdere). wee here. 

w»*lXCll to 1*. ^ 



463 f on March 20th, anu this month he ^ ereit ol all. It obliterates selfishness, | or sorrow to every home. It is the weapon 
delivered an able address on the eight- t . urbp egotism, places all ou an equality,’ which unscrupulous men use to corrupt 
hour question before the Central I^ahor abolishes the “ boss.” It means hap- the Government and wring from the toil- 
Uuion of this city. Trade has been fright- ier familieeT uiore money, more comforts, ers the fruits of their industry. It makes 

fully dul>, hut is now better, and at pres- It is an enen ’i V of mob law and revolution, palaces ami creates hovels, and is responsi- 
ent’Union4G3 is gaining in membership. lt makea - lts members more skilled, hence hie for three-fourths of the crimes com- 

p... nRiru* e Mass— 8ome time aeo is a saving to the employer. These are uiitted. It is King! If, therefore, capital 

Cambridi.b, ^me^ lime ago, of the reasons whv a man should gams victories over unions, not by the 

ITn/o^fs^v^^forcüJr^fMWted^wfi^ho^it i° in ’ attend regularly, and keep his dues power of public opinion, hut by the use of 
Union 1 S3 was hircibly elected, without ' id in a y nion of his tra<le. The money, or. at least, prevents them from 

fnd^°BaUv J orChe^ m cL 0 - f higher the dues the better-money en- making more radical demands, why should 
Belmon ^ -Judge Bady ^ o the h. Cam ^ uized people t0 6tand fi rra f or not labor hght capital with its own weap- 

bridge court recently rendered a verdat ritrhts. Once more: li everv ons? Capital wins its victories by starv- 

for the a d trade union in the United States would, ing workingmen into submission If all 

brought b> the Lmon against Mr. Lmery. in opeu Pees io n , discuss political eaonomy, the unions had a large fund on hand, 

Providence R. I.— The painters of this study government in a non-partisan man- employers would think twice before order- 
citv gained the nine-hour ’day, April 21, ner, ‘ no demagogue could lead them ing a reduction of wages or resisting a 
without much trouble. What is the mat- astray, and all branches of skilled labor demand of a union. If a union can 
ter with the carpenters of this “ gilt edged would soon learn that what is the farmers’ aluml to support its members as long as 
city ” ° Perhaps they would rather have interest is their interest, and the present an emp.oyer can afford to have Ins busi- 
io "hours a dav and e dollar a day ! Gen. oppression, unnatural, and un-Americah ness at a standstill, there would be fewer 
<ec McGuire'speaks here April 26. He conditions, would the sooner be changed, strikes and greater victories for labor, 
shook ud the c£r bones th e P last time he Join the union of your trade anyhow, and Such a condition can only be brought 



ing a reduction of wages or resisting a 
demand of a union. If a union can 
afiurd to supi>ort its members as long as 



stick to it. 



about by members paying high dues. 



/ 




The CARPENTER, 

OFFIl 1AI, JOURNAL OK THE 

United Brotlierliood of Carpenters an- 
Joiners of America. 



Publhhrd M <nth!\ . >n if).' / . fhviit/i fr.: 



1> I X. X' in tli St.. Phi!».. Pn. 

!‘. .1. Editor a:nl I’ul -lie 

Kitten . I :it the 1 ’o-t-OtVnv tit I’liihiil,!) ’.i t. I*. 
!;■» -f«innl-cltl-' liinttrr. 



Sitm RtrTH'N Prim:— F ifty triiti a :•< ir. in 
at \ ;t > *•. j* >- I a i.l. 

Auiln-> all letter* untl minify* to 

1». .1. M' ' KIKE. 

I5nx s*l, I'bii ■’••Ipliia, Pa. 

PHILADELPHIA, APRIL, 1892. 



TITJa C ARPENTEE. 

CARPENTLRS’ VICTORIES. settlement. It was only after long consul- not so much through the power which or- eo bif Jliiftrcu. uii.i, (uuii h ömimten*,. 

eration, and as. last alternative, that this ganiaation gives them (and which or- ^ ^ uf « 

Srm Nr, field, O.— Carpenters got the twenty- five cents assessment was levied, gamzed despots on the capitalist siue, nc ^ m (, aie0 2 legu ualem u;i r , ? r Cl . n 3r = 
nine-lie ur day easily on April 1. We could have levied a ten cents assess- ever ready to use their own power, call gerbe 2lib- it fidieit. itfenn Die 

Mini den, Conn.— Carpenters and hod- ment, but it would have taken several such “violence,”) as through moral suasion ^ntaqKi^buvclj bie 2Lil)anMu i( i n niö! t ^ r 

carriers enforced the nine-hour rule April 1. ten cent 3 assessments to meet this extra- and rational argument, they have led hun- !|Jgj | t j| ont , n r 

Fk eei’ort 111. — Union 672 asked for a ordinary crisis. Let us hupe the Unions dreds and hundreds of men to the right fin j cber j f)cil (,e dt ift, bin 
minimum scale of wages April 1, and which have not sent in this assessment, or path of action through organization. ft etc». Xte ftörffte 6 f.te fiHre bt dJS’ 

, ilt only sent part of it will at once send on Many scabs are simply "compelled to Dingungen bco ,ynebenä tror, » mct ^ 

.. . ... _ n ,. . , the full amount of the twenty-five cents join the union and it is in the power of al- ^ !L l 1 ° ^ It ’ l! ^ r ‘ v ’ ,el h 

I kemont, Col.— Union 50b, when only . , * , , . , ,, _ . , ben tann. Cs lit titdjt <*>. r : 

- .i.i • K ' assessment without further delay. most every delegate from a well organized - t r on b e - n w Qd)t t,. t! -Ü? 

i or.e month old, inaugurated the eight-hour . , . . . . . J - K 'tössip 

, trade to make a man take a union card or .Hratt, btc ooUUanbigite Crgamf ,te 

' a * an 1 ” throw him out of employinent. But no ftiiifften fiimitjieUen i'iittei bcDtnoen 

Llizabcth, N. .1. Carpenters are hum __ . WAI Wlkir walking delegate who thoroughly under- " tncl,t mclcf): in ftin V uv :i : : aet^* 

likely to get the nine-hour day by consent THE WORK AND TR ALS OF A WALKING ptam]jj hjp Juty UFe8 this power if be can {^'J ^ 0 .' flf cla ‘H.Lit a .s* 

of the contractors. ’ avoid it by first convincing a refractory (sieioerffrfjaften, gut oram-fi-t 

IIakriman, Tenn.— By agreement with “As to riches, it may truly be said that individual of the value and the advan- p{. n i. t, begünftigen' feine - tnf: ‘ m‘ 
the contractors Union 614 secured the wealth does not lie in the path of walking tages of union ; because, men who are ffiigen Doveiltge unb vnnorl ,t\ 1 ; 
nine-hour day March 14. delegates. If one has been in office for compelled to ioin cannot be exnecteil to 1 ß cn * uni niirflidje ober eine»' ir. : . t W,.!*... 



minimum 
got it. 



F ,J3; ^e 



assessment without further delay. 



(UNION 




LABEL) 



duv March 1 ;. yz. 9 ■ ,4,1 ‘ 'Cull mi>. ... 

* * throw him out of employinent. But no fiat fiten ftnanjieUen i'iittei be0ino.cn v' 

Llizabeth, N. .1. Carpenters are now __ . k|wp walking delegate who thoroughly under- " tncl,t rodefi? in bem : .• 

likely to get the nine-hour day by consent THE WORK AND TR ALS OF A WALKING ptam]jj hjp Juty UFes this power if be can ^ ^ 

of the contractors. ’ avoid it by first convincing a refractory pjeioerfidmiten, qut ornrn-h-t 

IIakriman, Tenn— By agreement with “As to riches, it may truly be said that individual of the value and the advan- p{, n i. t, be^ünftiften' feine ‘ m‘ 

the contractors Union 614 secured the wealth does not lie in the path of walking tages of union ; because, men who are tfjiflen Doveiltflc iinb ennort ' .i\ t : / . 

nine-hour day March 14. delegates. If one has been in office for (‘omjielled to join cannot be expected to 1 •l' -11 ' ll!n obei emcu’tc. .jr.e-: 

La Junta, Col.— Union 590 has been any number ot years, be is almost unfit to be relial.le members immediately, al- • • 

organized only two months, 'ami will be again work at his trade, and if lie were tit, though a great many, if they have once ftrer.ipiiiflen, foroeit jolcfje bie l: !; nc i " 

granted the nine- hour day May 2. there would be few bosses who would care become aware of the value of organiza- bco 'Ibbeiterö julaffcn, bte L ■' . rien - • 

Sharon, I>a.-\Ve gained an advance in to employ him, for they are always afraid tioni also become good members and the L ' ” 1 1 " : i!, F u ’ 

wages on April 1. Two firms are holding he m, « ht n ^ ke trouble. It is » sacrifice union can rely upon them. IjaupUn, auö'aUenbe SptacbL^c^lnip^,, 

out, but we will bring them to terms. for any good workman to accept the posi There is Kill another duty attached to 'Jlrttfd unb L {an, Pl)I e f e fuiö ber n.v: 



am aiuciiuiiiciiia iu ui in Stkkvpik 111 —Union cart>enters gained . * , - , , , ... 1 ‘ uuujunuuic Aimoa uno paeie uutli.'n 

constitution to offer ? Don’t wait their demand on April 1 . for the nine- hour ^ er * are wh ° "° U . ' e u ' ,ion - In ortJer to fintl out ar, - v violation t! 

until after the Convention to pro- ^XldTjur of the harJehips of ‘he office, and who walking delegate must be on deck pun,- acfdjiperbm fidiern. 

pose them, and then find fault. . fancy that his earnings amount toso much t ually at the U«ir ^ning and the stoDDimr 

Semi them m now! The Con- ™.„rae,<, re , »□,! with work at the Tsüt wha X.-" U ? T " y once at u f-iven job, 

vention meets in St. Lotus, Mo., tTO tiow a , ree ,i t0 Bwk nine * ^ to Z Zl "">— «'•««" and 

«UUUU1U IU . Will HlUllUS 111 IllOK * ahlr. 11 !)•« V 1 1 1 1* ca t/t ntf a Of - I*. ...... t 



Tic L'o&norbcit, 



Aug. 1, 1S92. 

THE BRUTAL TEACHINGS OF A CAPI- 
TALISTIC BLOWHJRD. 



hours a dav this vear. 



amuuni io . uur salaries 111 most cases, „.nocpectedlv, so a* to prevent deception, 
are equal to the average vages in the To lind out whether hi« men receive the 



bic$ muffen iid) nlle 2 b beiter 311 m ? 
'B'lPufjtfeinbr »nen, iff nidjto ipat-.r. 



Wabash, Ind.— Union 6:51 secured on trade with an additional allowance of tU regular union wa*'es he mu«t 1« here and ! ” cue,t0 111,0 i*f*nfaU* lebte ^o-m Per 
Mar,'!, 1, a minimum rateol tva*es an.l the «-«If to 81 fur car fare ami eapenr«.. Yet. ,| K . re and every.here to listen to and it.- :T 

nine-hour .lay. one of the boaew refirw it happens ,,uite fre<|uently tl.at a .lele.-ate veatij-ate rumors and eontirm auapi.i.ma. «enia-rmtaen ..iahten, ha,, mmt: ' 
the demands, and only one union man is ls compelled to pay over $2 per day to As it would never do to trouble men who öer1 ’ dt ’ ou ift f.d) ber w upthidje nad ,± 



im vaure ber ^afjttaufenbe me: 



The official organs and mouth-pieces of ou ^- ' °' er jobs, and then everybody ex- are upright and honest, when 

the Contractors ami Builders seem sorely Lafayette. Ind. — The union carpenters P e ch? to be treated by him especially in j n ^ ,l tf legate thinks lie has si 

distressed at the increased and spreading on a job in this city last month refused to l * lue •‘ itr ‘ ke > "lien a walking delegate sons to suspect anyone of tak 

growth of organization among the jour- 1 work with a nonunion painter. The °^ ten spends more than hiB weekly salary his union has resolve«! to den 



u \T* ^. h r, < l wh *r*r » -> k - ' «Ä 

m,- »lelegate thinks he has sufhcient rea- 1 uerti — b e “cit cicenfi^aft — bit* I'oljn 
sons to suspect anyone of taking less than o ol>c biofer brei Wnmfcfoimin ift e i : • ■ 



1 0 f f i .1 I, v.t ivm mai uic viv -Ciuiwuiumj im nu 

strain in regard to st. ikes and labor organi- t ally holding firm to the nine-hour day ,, ^ g \ ‘ e ‘ ance of such a dutv cannot be pleasant to 1 ^ ^ oriu bd ’ ta " 0 ^ »jerm ber ciclaucr 

zation: “The only alternative is force, despite the efforts of some employers tö - ^ ut * thls w not ^ worst. The walk- any man, yet it has to be done, and the 3ad,e bebair 

only to be resorted to in extremities, but return to ten hours. There is nolikeli- ,n « ^ e, f^ te « constantly ,n danger of walking delegate must be at the same time anl)emq«*qt*6en roar Si"! if? 

last resorts are always desperate remedies, hood of losing the nine hours now. bodily injury and insults on the part of , )o!ite and determined, or else he would cfononuicji ^”n bereiten > Jarin p % 

No choice is left employers and those bruta 1 foremen, bosses and policemen who ^ a d ienia i in the task assigned to bec 'r clrt . üe für feinen öertn arberen mufi 

whose :capital is imperiled, except com- F Ll . ELAND * ( • -*-be building trades of not only threatefi and curse but even as- JjJhj ^ roobei biefer ifjm für feine Arbeit bien;:- 

pact organization, and to trv conclusions are a fi combined in one council, sault and arrest him. No, sir, to be a Annth^r nt n n • , . wibigen Vebenomit’el uerabfolpte, bie gr* 

;.v a patient mittag until the a<r,.rc ff ors " n * “•«>>” leerer the »alking de egate ia anything but pleas- toZttattheZ nh'L f Z ,le,e " ute 18 Kl"* *^"2 V? 

are exhausted as to resources. These are car l* en ters and other trades recently t-arne ant.” ZZdu« ° Tf W 

not the methods that ought to prevail out st»ke and won their demands. Such were the words of a veteran walk- f a , t that a large majority nVeinbe^Vr ■“ nx ? für . ben ^ rrn - Xcm ift nsir 
among civilized people; but then there Jacksonville, Fla.— We will enforce delegate, of New York City, some time labor tinrqnivitmn • „ . it . , !?L ,^ cr ^’ rr d.H'f burcfinuo bio ncrl i • 

are no. a ,h„ nsand people on earth truly the nine-hour day May 2d. A shoe flru, in « interview wnh a reporter of indiderenee in the general ZLZ ' S' Ä 

civilized, therefore, barbaric j methods of this city was erecting a new building, and ^ a weekly la bor paper now m their unions. They do not attend th* Arbeit I) at alfo ber Zdovt für fi* f itv. 

force are excusable, because necessary.” would not lure union men. By a local existence in that city. Then to define the meetings regularly and conso n tl - f n S’ audn - ba bofj. roao er burcb ■r 

The above screed does not bear testi boycott on this firm we brought the firm dutied an(i trial of the position, that intnurw#™ tu ’ ir q ent v fall i SIrbcit eneuett. für ben .Ferrit oiel mef)r : 
ntony that the K liter of the Pittst.nrg to terms, and now the iohTs a Ion one » this very Zphi,- T f Z ^ la' h » We bleferttfa 

“ Journal of l!tul-lin<i ” is one of the "truly _ ., . ' * sketch whirl, very fully sets' forth the ZI T . “ b - V rt-ZZ & ; 

• ... - ,, T , , , . , * Tue Carpenters m New \ork citv had • . , r , * ,* ° l H financial secretary, containin'' the nan i.«j I u V rtL9 but pt otter on Jbeil feiner 21 rt 

civilized. In-leel his suggestions that to make ;l second strike the past month ‘ ll ® uiucl1 abused, but ever of the men who have not paid their «lue? rtni> cren, leinen ^ rrn, gebiftet. 

employers should use 1 barbaric methods . T a . useful \N alking «lelegate. .... i i . , . p e r aues - SEBortn benefit bb’ "vurm 

of force " is fully worthy of a JoumalUtir I “ f „“".'union nZ LV'r' i e’V'T 1 "' T ° thoro "* hl - r do hia work a walking them " "°" " iere tu li '“ 1 »«ft 8« » einm nnkntln gr-.r 

Zulu. r ,0 . num “ , > After nearly three drfralte m „ st a__ . „„ ,. ... J - ,h ™; . .. uh.r m «neu, (■«„ernhett, bar. ,t. 



attend the 



Tin: Carpenters ii 
to make a second s 
on Contractor Diwnt 
of non-union men. 



ot non-union men. After nearly three i i . . ' , V “ 

woi.be’ ctrib^ a . * delegate must always be on the alert 

weeks strike the men were victorious „ . *• . , \ , ‘ lcri , 

» IWIILHI,.' I Off nn.l .. . . 1 . 1 . If* 1 • a. 



THE INCREASED COST OF OUR BENE- 
FIT SYSTEM. 



of force ” is fully worthy of a Journalistic ^ ^ 1 T ° thor ^ hl >’ do Wa work a walking Zm ™ l ° find ber 

Zulu. b- , tin ea . - V t liee delegate must always lie on the alert Tl B t i • 11 bl ^- r J n S tne ”J. baiicrnbcn, bao jjanjc btL 

weeks Strike the men were victorious, sometimes «luv an.l ni.rh« ,, ; i - ! . T 8 keeps lum instantly busy. He »'«^ffenben £icntt< unb 2lbl)ärqitiVityr : 

Over 4,UU0 men of all branches were in- : .- * ^ Hi- tluef ob- baa to approach them, demand a ?how ^ alt,u:; ,t0 ^- Nub baö inn« re 26evn t 

THE INCREASED COST OF OUR BENE- vo | ve ,|. left » to mcre^ the metnbereltip of the rards , Ztin.l them tf Z IT.. , '» »«id^v 

fit qvqtfm n T fT . organization and prevent scabs from m#*. 4 n . . outy, anti limtclultcrlic&c ^cibtiocno mift# ni?r 

q. . « nnt«h| H E ' Ia '~ l nion secured i juite ting work l u or der to lie successful in f th ^ eaten the « n "ith suspension [ ['hitern feine* fieri n um f onft arbe-ton, or 

Smce our last convention-m the past a notable success against two contractors this Cask ihe walking Ti from wo»k. 1 he walking delegate who at- boi . tc ‘ c al, ° für einen anberen ; aber 

wenty months— we have paid out the who last month attempted to bring the i ifct «m, ?i D . x J. eep tends to this duty conscientiously is heln- ' ''«beiscnfcfjartäfterr mufite feinem run : 
sum of $100,ii:i:L4o for tleath andilisabili < a rpecters back to the ten-hour dav- The «• • 1 * w iere the “embers of ing to fill the treasury of his uni.in «n,i » oiel ^eit laffen, baft biefer feinen 2i.::: 

tybeneHts from onr general „Hoe. Thnt men have been working nine hours, day , “Zip’ 1"?^ *° rk ' 1,6 »“» -«•ure for it a etea.ly ami ZXt ' B "1 t FT? 

ie equal to 85,046 per month, or about 8| for a year bark, and they refused to work evervo'neof These ' h cln ' u " 18tance8 al of reliable membership. ’ ' alio infoitcit ifir ftt^fcuV'oijP hi,V"iu-"t 

cents per month for each member. ten hours. The contractors in a few hours i 0 «p rnnsi.Wa.hL Z ’ °f > “ U ? ht 11 ia hard and tiresome work but thp » cu Ö un 9 ^ jljm burefjauä noffiroentua ? 

But in the past twelve months the pres- euccumbed. “ e t ne. A good walking walking delegate who is faithful Ln i i JejWmittel errorberlitl> roar ; im übrigen or* 

sureonushas been much more severe, - d t legate knows a,most to a certainty his work conSenrimJv nl. Ki « f»r leinen £>eirn. 

for in the year front April 1.1681, to April !*!£!?" 1!? ^T r . #f “** bein * h » took is accomuliehnd uJUTl J taiÄÄ“ !"«*»«■ « 



e e r:' r yan 't ‘ gh ‘- lnSlhMob - I.»U..PP^.4 .,Ih« ^ den, „d 1, fuitm, 

(eft ts to tnerease the niemlteisitip of „tu ,. ar , ls , Ztin.l them „ Te 1,0 . in Uo'U'miidKW SVtirte: 

organization and prevent s«abs from get- eventually tlireatP,, th? u. ‘ ,,lll ! d altcrli^c Veilvictcno irufite av.* b.’R 

d.jmte ting work. In order to be successful in oil « I. ® ^ e,n w,th «’»»Pension Wulern icineo fiertn um r onft arbeiten, er ■ 
factors this task the walking delegate must keen I°t he ^k.ng «lelegate who at- Jür einen onberen ; aber be: 

n- the a lifit of th4 , • . \ r »"i- »keep tends to this duty conscientiously is heln- ' ,b - tftC ?l d, ? T - te6e ? f mu|;tc k '«nem Vut,: 

f The t- - ,0 Whefe the ambers of ing to fill the treasury of his union andT ««« » laffen, baft biefer feinen 2i.i:r 



’ . : v — v ^ v *• xovuyua' uu'iurt'. 

j — - -> — K v. uoo„, - — , -cuwcu to tvorti every one of thp«» ifth« 1 v, • u .«ciuuereuip. afro miorccit für fid) felbff alsbte^titr^r- 

cents per month for each member. ten hours. The contractors in a few hours | ne p V 0 „ s i (lpruh * ’ °. e,se i he u "? ht It is hard and tiresome work but thp S eu 9 ui *« ^ >*fm bureaus notbroenbiae : ? 

But in the past twelve months the pres- succumbed. . e t ne. A good walking walking delegate who is faithful Ln i i t e »ömittel erforberlict) roar ; im übrigen ar> 

sureonushas been much more severe, - d ^ ate know8 to a certainty his work conSenrimJvnl. K; ^ 6citftc « für leinm £>Cirn. 

for in the year from April 1, 1891, to April W ‘ ere there 18 any dan Kc r of scabs being his task is accomnliehpH ii • a ^i r So ^ na .^ e ‘t entfielt umgele^rt, irii 

1, 1892, the sum of *73, 879 in death and EXPLANATION AS TO REASONS FOR THE emplo T ed Suth he must keep surprising that tht 1 bdtete f $ d " ' ^ Z 

disability benefits has been expended. TWENTY-FIVE CENTS ASSESSMENT. f ?° metime9 the flesh of bos^es-and that the mollth 1 «^enen ^u^eit. nn cr Kfommt Ü« 

This is equal to 56,156 per month, or Some few I ocals disnute thp , there at sunnse, before the pieces of capital are m i * S' fdjeinbar eiiicn Grfafj für bic 

about 9J cents per month per member. ^ ° f “® n to ln ^ to have an op- L mi , to vdllf y ^ ^ «n father cL' *Tcr 21r 



disability benefits has been expended. 
This is equal to $6,156 per month, or 
about 91 cents per month per member. 

In comparison with previous years, the 
past year has been a costly one for our 
organization, in so far a? our benefit svs- 



TWENTY- FIVE CENTS ASSESSMENT. «»'>« constant S urveiUance. Sotne«^ ih, ftZ ofZZZnd" t 

Some few Locals dispute the power, „f „LZ t„ Zl‘LT".*V bef ' l,e the P iec8s °* ca P**,*i are ever 



•»‘•«•'■«uv/ii, k t a c\j i4«.i ne vriAi UCUCUI 5»VB- ’ IpVV QT1 aococcmonf . * rtll- 

tern is concerned, as can be shown by these cents per member «,,» °? ian ten dresses and to see them at their homes in 

figures taken from the successive reports extr ^^ ^evening. 

of the General Secretary. the time Sec 56 wa« nai ’- reme ‘ Ies * At ^ ot onI y 18 the walking delegate ex- 

From 1883 to 1886, the cost was about organization had noexw^tatiorfof^’ ^ ^ to be u V1 ? l,ant watch dog, but he 

5 > ‘ ents P er m< >nth for each member. EU cli an extraordinary run or '* * -° reqmred to be weil v e^ed in the 

From 1886 to lSS*q it was 54 cents per for death benefits as within the 
month for each member. in,„„ i . , . 



ff arpcntcr. 

^^ilabelp^ia, 2(prif, 1892. 

<*in ilrf^fil über Sfrif«. 



the good L’itcr erjeugt im Xifnflc boö (Fapitali’ton 
mehr 20ml), alö biefer ifim im iofji e il l: 
rol fiT Set Sofjn reidjt turdjfcönittlicli m:r 
«l3 , r“ k ’ c um bie nbffjiiien vebenolv :• • 
mife 311 berfen unb oft felbft bioe nid ; ei:: 
'Äft * m » b ®l°»» frof)t, au^ bier arbeitet fc-TÄr* 
bcitcr ”»r inioroeit für fielt, a!o er bie fur : a 
notfiroenbiaen iiebendmiitef, b«*3tebuiiiv>roe 
192. c ” u ’ n henfelben gleidjen 2'Jertl) er3e1i.1t; ' • 

«engen arbeitet er für ben tiapitalifteii. ~ 

oorm ber cefauerei hat aff? aeroedi’elt: d>' 
innere öfonomifdje ailcfen berfelbeii i»'t *' • 



month 



month 



oniu, ana irom i>in to 1892 it This twentv-fivp n nn ia * “cts and 

averaged 9J cents per month for each levied is imperatively reauir?d to ^ nmn Wh ) has at »ny time 

member. tL dpt LiZ ?*■ ■ Q epIaC ® attem P ted convert his fellows to the 

This increased cost of late in our bene- largely increased defth»?^ tonav ITT'Z* tb « Iabo f “°v e “ent knows 



convert his fellows to the 



fit system has bee™d ^ g Z t0 ^ ^ ^ that - ver^ diScffit ‘f r ««igfhn 

„ally increased deafh r; „e ,U ove/the *** k «> 

country, on account of La Orippe, Ty- l, er . A ten cents assessment would not ^ T"” 8 ” epeCtive Srif*" ^ lie 6‘ b « SrtSÄ “"<« mrf4itben« , Sonnen immer )U 0,„|W 

photd lever and kindred diseases. p av one haif the “ l °'S an,,; ations. To the credit of most of ~ arteiter fteUt hie ärteit 5h! mc ! ,Iel " e, ' (Sln D e »eoorjuater aWt.it!'' 1 

pay one half the legdlcUtma now await, ng the walking d legates it must be said that Sr". W ™hteh« etaS. sSSfdSTs ^° rb ?'- L'oJnarbeit ijV hie net, rite ttt 

oeeaia that, ober einen etrtfn. 3n ffiirtiijreit “JS l'“»"!« 1 » I«*«e Sorm biefer uralten Sjuahtu- 

1 hing. Grundstein. 






General Officers. 



OF TBK 



Joiners of America. 

Office of the General Secretary, 



General-President— W. H. Kliver, Box 156 
Grand Crossing, Cook Co., .il. 

(»eiKTül-Äxr. Utry — P. J. McGuire. Box KS4 

PhlU-lelphii, l a. 

(o n. nil- Measurer— j .ues Troy, 2026 C bristian 
HL, Philadelphia, Pa. 

General Vice-President*. 

I ip-t Vii ••-Pr» «iflpn*- P. M. W cilin, 26 Twelfth 
n i r M.-irk* l st. <an 1 Diucisc* , Cal. 

Se«*ond Vice-President — P. W. Birck, 798 Noa- 
traiui Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

General Executive Board. 

(All eorreenondence for the G. E. B. must be 
mailed t<i the General Secretary.) 

Hugh McKay, 302 Paris St.. E. Boston. Mass. 

T K Deegan, 111 E. *9th St., New York. 

E. V Stevens, 150 Pearl St.. Jeffersonville. Tnd. 
W. F. \hmms. 451 Monroe Ave., Detroit, Mich.' 
S. .1. K -m. 2016 S St.. Lincoln, Neb. 



THERE MUST BE SOMETHING WRONG. - 



BY ALFRED S. IIOUnilTON. 

While sort Te D.-ums echo o’er the Hehls ol 
ripened grail* ; 

V. ‘ ilc burdened orchards join the eliant of na- 
turc's grand refrain; 

V liile fruiis and ilowers, ears and sheav* s, from 
our prolific soil. 

Proclaim the Great Creator's power to till the 
hand- that toil. 

If little children droop and die 'mid pestilential 
w ant ; 

If stalw art men parade the streets with aspects 
Krim and gaunt ; 

It grarefm women bend and break o'er -l.irts 
« ilhont a souk : 

If plenty elbows poverty, there must be some- 
thing wrong. 

While looms and forge», steam and steel, in- 
i rca-c the nati .n'- store ; 

While grand inventions. genius, art, are addins 
more and more ; 

While mt man's producing powerdoth many 
fold augment : 

While warehouse rooms me crowded full and 
shelves with goods arc liesit. 

If strikes and lockouts multiply; if want and 
failure spread : 

li greedy rob the needy ones of fuel, clothing, 
hr* ad ; 

If hungry children, idle men and weeping 
women throng 

The citi. s' cheerle-s tenements, there must he 
something wrong. 



de nier's cross. 

M'hile altars (lame with sacred fire and gleam 
with glit’eiing dross. 

While | tews with shining -ilk adorned blaze out 
w ith diamonds rare. 

While richly cushioned floors support the 
wealthy while at prayer. 

If in the crowded, filthy dens where service 
labor dwells 

The anthems sung are vengeful threats, the 
prayers are funeral knells ; 

If grief is drowned in drink and joy is sought in 
liipior -trong : 

If low is p ist, if hate is found, there must he 
something w rong. 



paradise, indeed ; 

To feed the hungry Iambs of God, to succor 
those in need : 

To rescue those whom grim despair is driving 
to the wall ; 

To lift the pro-tratc to their feet, to strengthen 
those who fall ; 

To help the w* ak. to curb the strong, to plant 
ii|h>ii the »oil 

The reign of justice till no man shall usk for 
leave to toil. 

This is tite work we're pledged to do, united 
now we stand. 



demand. 



- X'tliumil l.conootisl. 



Expulsions. 



Dominp x Df.Kum. from Union 433.' Belleville, 
III., for scabbing. 

Joseph Smith, from Union 84, Anaconda, 
Mont , for bad conduct. 

Jamk- H. Powell, from Union 681, Cincinnati. 
O.. for ' scabbing." 

D. Henderson, from Union 670, Greenville S. 
C , for einbe/.zliiig union funds. 

W. E. Mori, an, from Union 621, Cairo, 111., for 
passing counterfeit money. 

J. F. Harding, from Union 699, Tampa, Fla., 
for defrauding e brother member. 

Frank Garean, F. Campagna and Jos. Du- 
rand, from Union 21, for piece work- 

Oh as. Froetschkl and Joseph Geiser, from 
Union 402. Pittsburgh, Pa., for dishonesty. 

J. B. Long, from Union 1.0, Venice. 111., for 
dead beat games and “jumping" his board bill. 

Jan. F O'Brien, from Union 509. New York, 
N. Y.. for forging two months’ dues on his card. 

Martin Jackson, from Union 1, Chicago, 111., 
for “scabbing" on the Leiter jc b when it 
was on strike. 

C. J. Hide has been reinstated in Union 283, 
Jeannette, Pa., and the publication against him 
-ome time ago was an oversight on our part. 
Pro. Rice is now a union member. 

F. B. Reynolds, from Union 602, At'inta, Ga.. 
for “scabbing" in street ear strike. The publi- 
cation of P. S. S. Kling last month for this 
offense was a grievous error, for Bro. Kling is a 
staunch union man through and through. 



A WARNING AGAINST A DEAD BEAT 
BOSS. 

Joseph Jennings, a lioss builderof New York, 
hits |..ft eight buildings unfinished on Warfield 
>t.. Brooklyn, N. Y., ami skipped out with $.00 
of wages due the carpenters. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

H. 3. Me Cumber, 5525 Jackson ave.. Chicago, 
111., wants to know the whereabouts of Bro. 
Thos. Lamming, formerly of Union 516, Colorado 
Wpringe, Colo. 





1 Moneys Received 


L 1 


_DCEOHl THE MOW ^ HTDING FEBRUARY 


WS«n»T« taj «non a, mu mo.t. wUNoat data, . 


AD mao er reoelTad 


Id MARCH, will 


be pcbbfrhed 1 a next 


■ < •'I A \ » |»p»r. ThU report lmsiade« 

rtosred by the 0 . p. from the ,rorm\ Union* r c/ ter ini 


mau-y* 
«eppü» | 


»T tue month of PFRRUaRY iv>1y. 




i 




J 


w 




w 


X o 


3 - 3 


? ** z 


= ! = - 
o z 




z z 


r a ^ 


Z * J ~e 


z 1 


Z 


— — 




< -Ui 


< \2C 


< 


1 -s 


... » 6 C — 


'7 '.«i 831— 


8 » 30496— 


» . 30 




49 70 167— 


8 7o 332— 


10 (.0 497 — 


20 I'O 


-i— 


16 8 ) 1 . 8 — 


7 on 33 J— 


2 00 498— 


7 60 


| 4 — 


52 5 > li,9— 


29 10 334— 


4 10 4'.i9— 


4 96 


5 - 


14 2n 17')— 


3 20 33.4— 


16 I/O 500— 


5 ; 0 


6 — 


3 1 1 171 — 


12 80 i)56 - 


5 6 501— 


1 4b 


» — 


7 30172— 


5 Ml ■«;— 


4 20 502— 


8 £0 


l 


173— 


1 30 ÜS - 


. . . 503 — 




9 — 


10 60 174— 


. . . )>19— 


. . . 54- 




1 1 °“ 


9 52 175— 


19 70 340— 


65 50 505— 






3) 65 i7'j — 


15 70 311 — 


6 80 5«— 




1 \ 2 r 


i0 9. 177— 


. . 342— 


. . 507— 


10 00 




1 *' 178- 


25 343- 


. . 5.«— 


16 80 


1 14 — 


2 2" 179— 


8 !0 344 — 


9 75 509— 


36 70 


1 K> 


9 05 180 — 


7 3 li 345— 


. . 510— 


4 50 


IB — 


1 HU 181— 


26 3u 316— 


2 90 511— 


12 40 


17— 


6 30 IH2— 


. . . 347— 


10 00 .512— 


4 00 


18— 


3 50 183 — 


. . . 318— 


11 85 513— 


25 00 


19— 


3 40 184— 


1 40 349— 


7 80 514— 


12 40 


20 — 


19 03 18£— 


8 40 350— 


. . . 515— 


15 ,0 


21 — 


• • . IS 6 — 


4 6*1 351— 


6 80 616— 


1 30 


22 — 


60 00 187— 


3 »0 352— 


8 00 517— 


2 26 


23— 


41 60 188— 


6 00 353- 


18 8 - 51 8 — 


17 00 


21 — 


189— 


4 60 354— 


8 7 * 1 619 — 


5 00 


25— 


27 55 190- 


1 15 355— 


5 3d 520- 


3 30 


26— 


. . . 191— 


9 60 356— 


5 80 521— 


2 00 


27— 


11 90 192— 


9 86 357- 


. . 622— 




28 — 


«1 90 193— 


1 30 358— 


. . 6.3— 


S 20 


29— 


78 80 194— 


. . 359— 


7 60 -524 — 




30— 


. . 195— 


3 8 *. 360 — 


6 Id 5X5— 


3 40 


3l — 


3 on 196— 


361— 


1 Ni 626 — 


11 3d 


32— 


2 50 |97— 


4 85 362- 


2 50 527— 




34— 


1 00 198— 


5 10 363— 


. . 62 s — 




^t— 


50 199— 


11 75 361— 


. . . |5*29 — 


80 


35— 


. .(«— 


. . 365- 


7 Ou 530 — 


3 90 


36— 


21 00 > 01 — 


14 55 366 — 


3 20 5(1— 




37— 


4 45 202 — 


3 80 J07 — 


13 it' 32— 


1 10 


38 — 


5 1" 201 — 


8 Hu *>)H 1 


7 30 533 — 


10 0 *J 


39— 


204— 


6 20 369— 


7 


1 70 


40 — 


18 50 205— 


5 5 * 1 


535— 


3 *.0 


41 — 


3 3 ) 200— 


11 70 371— 


2 5" 1-536 — 


7 uu 


12 — 


4 50 317 — 


5<i 3*72— 


2 b0 >)(7— 


1 70 


43— 


18 >.5 208 — 


4 20 373— 


. ;.538 — 


1 i 0 


4 1 — 


2 5o 209— 


15 7o .374— 


4 90 >39— 


8 96 


45 — 


1 60 Jlo— 


5 5(1 « » « 


12 5) 5«i— 


2 70 


46— 


2 70 211— 


6 » 20 376— 


541— 




47— 


4 70 212— 


5 00 377— 


7 70 > 2— 


6 75 


48— 


8 i« 213— 


3 30 .378— 


4 3u 0»:>— 


4 90 


49— 


10 2o 214— 


2 b*' :^9— 


0 to a 44 — 




50— 


13 30 215— 


9 20 3»0 — 


5 9.. 545— 


3 50 


51— 


24 6 2)6- 


4 80 381— 


. . . 54*i — 


3 00 


52— 


12 70 217— 


7 65 .182 - 


40 00 617— 




53— 


2 40 218— 


3S3— 


1 20 518— 




54— 


22 50 219— 


5 70 rvvl -- 


4 70 6)!*— 


1 10 


55— 


1 1 lo 220 — 


4 20 385— 


. . . 560- 


2 80 


50— 


3 50 221— 


1 60 3«6 — 


. 551— 


5 ' 0 


i>4 — 


3 50 223— 


8 ««) 387— 


7 5u 552— 


2 10 


58— 


1 35 22 J— 


5 oo :»4— 


1 it* '.5-*— 


l 40 


59- 


3 90 221 — 


8 ^6 *>Hy — - 


2 10 651— 


9 10 


BO— 


13 5 i 225— 


20 60 39)— 


.>56 — 


5 60 


61— 


2.’ 2u 226— 


1 90 391— 


7 70 550— 


3 20 


62- 


20 90 227— 


7 00 39*2 — 


7 8 ''67— 




65 — 


. . . 228- 


17 60 393— 


6 >0 66.8— 




64— 


17 50 229— 


7 7‘* — 


3 30 559— 


1 ‘0 


65— 


3 90 230— 


10 30 395— 


6 * >b 560 — 


3 30 


— 


6 00 211 — 


1 10 396— 


4 »0 561— 


6 30 


67- 


7 00 232— 


1 20 397— 


1 f.O 5*:2— 




68— 


9 40 233— 


1 20 .98— 


2 40 663— 


6 50 


69 — 


2 00 234— 


14 90 399— 


4 0.5 561— 


5 50 


70— 


2 60 235— 


7 lo 400— 


2 80 665— 




71— 


2*6— 


2 6<> 4*'l— 


7 20 '^00— 


90 


72 — 


18 10 237- 


. . . 102— 


7 20 567— 


10 80 


73— 


113' 238 — 


6 9 4u3 — 


7 8' 568— 




74 — 


7 60 2)19— 


1 60 104— 


3 80 569 — 




75— 


1 90 249— 


9 9* 405— 


3 5u 5.0 — 


11 70 


76— 


4 85 34l — 


11 10 406— 


571— 


1 20 


77— 


. . 242— 


. . . 407— 


28 80 672— 


11 60 


78 — 


11 60 243— 


4 30 108— 


. . . 573— 




79— 


. . 244— 


1 i0 *w 


2 70 574- 




8*)— 


. . . 245- 


3 70 410— 


24 40 575— 




81— 


4 30 246— 


11 60 111- 


6 liO 570“ 


10 00 


82— 


13 6' 247— 


21 6*' 412— 


3 lb 577— 




8.1— 


2i 8o 248— 


4 40 413— 


. 6. S- - 


5 90 


84— 


7 60 249— 


3 7f 414— 


. . . 579— 


3 id 


85— 


3 15 250 — 


2 20 415— 


1 30 680 — 


1 75 


8t>— 


2 7' 251— 


5 60 416— 


10 40 581— 


6 55 


87- 


4 90 2V> — 


. . ,417- 


1 00 .582— 


2 «) 


88- 


. . 253— 


9 00 418— 


80 >83— 


4 4’) 


80- 


5 70 254— 


*2 9> 4'9— 


. 584— 


1 10 


:«>— 


24 30 255 — 


9 00 420— 


3 60 58.5 — 


5 50 


J 91- 


. . . 256 — 


! 421 — 


3 80 586 — 


1 90 


| 92 


4 50 *257— 


28 00 422— 


2 in .587— 


2 90 


93- 


. . . 258— 


1 0" 423 — 


17 05 588 — 


1 60 


91- 


2 5 259— 


1 Si .24— 


3 70 589 — 


2 80 


1 iAJ — 


3 90 260— 


1 70 425— 


1 50 5oC> — 




1 9*)— 


6 tO 261 — 


2 45 4 6 — 


7 10 591— 


1 50 


97— 


lo 45 2* 3— 


1 1*1 127— 


2 60 Vrj— 


21 6u 


98— 


3 90 26 f— 


2 35 124— 


5SH— 




99 — 


1 80 264 - 


1 10 1*2'— 


4 60 >94— 


10 00 


I loo— 


2 Ob 265— 


5 9 ■ 430— 


3 55 505— 




Ml— 


1 30 2**'» — 


*2 Ti 131 — 


5 7b •>'.*>— 




I M2 — 


. . '267 — 


3 9*1 4*2— 


6 50 597 — 




103- 


. . 208— 


9 30 134— 


11 U 5 .598 — 




M4 — 


9 30 269 — 


. . . 131— 


4 10 599— 


.3 60 


| 105— 


3 00 37')— 


8 00 135— 


3 00 ('» O— 


64 


1 06 — 


. . . 271 — 


»36— 


2 M 6ol — 


6 00 


107— 


. . . 272- 


1 70 137— 


. fib 2— 




M6- 


22 9* 273— 


. . . i.38— 


1 70 ' 03 — 


3 60 


lU9— 


46 *8) 274 — 


10 on 4)19— 


1 80 604— 


9 75 


110— 


2 70 275— 


4 50 440— 


2 9i) 6Ui— 


11 9<) 


111— 


2 20 276— 


1 00 411— 


• • * Ö '6— 


* 4 SO 


1 2— 


13 80 277— 


7 50 412— 


. . . 607— 


• . . 


.13— 


6 10 278— 


413- 


. . . 608— 


2 10 


114— 


5 an 279— 


2 4 0 444— 


. . . 6**9 — 


4 On 


115— 


7 00 -280— 


2 00 415— 


610— 


11 75 


116— 


1 00 281— 


. . . 446— 


27 20 fill — 


2 40 


117— 


9 20 282— 


. . 447— 


• Cl 2— 


5 00 


118- 


7 » 0 283— 


8 50 448— 


6 60 613 — 


a a . 


119- 


18 40 284— 


5 80 449— 


11 60 614— 


9 86 


120- 


. . 285— 


6 70 -450— 


1 70 615— 


1 00 


121 — 


11 60 286— 


451— 


17 20 616— 


2 00 


122- 


25 (6 287— 


7 90 452— 


2 60 617— 


• • a 


123— 


1 70 288- 


10 60 153— 


12 80 618— 


• ■ a 


124- 


2 50 289- 


2 60 454— 


3 40 619— 


• 


125— 


290- 


22 10 455— 


620- 


1 75 


126— 


10 00 291 — 


. . . 456— 


3 00 621— 


4 i0 


127- 


6 On *292 — 


2 20 457— 


10 10 622— 


• a . 


128— 


1 50 293— 


3 75 458— 


60 623— 


3 90 


129— 


. . 294— 


7 80 459— 


14 00 624— 


IS 25 


130- 


10 30 295— 


2 fO 460— 


. . . 6.6- 


2 50 


131— 


3 80 296— 


. . 461 — 


3 60 626— 


10 80 


132— 


9 60 297— 


10 00 46 2— 


25 00 627— 


2 10 


133— 


8 20 298— 


7 2- (46. J — 


2 50 628— 


8 45 


134- 


4 »0 299— 


21 71* 464— 


5 90 629— 


15 60 


135 — 


4 10 300— 


3 40 165- 


13 20 »530— 


• • a 


136- 


4 40 301 — 


. . . 166— 


7 30 631— 


7 70 


137— 


3 80 302— 


1 70 467— 


3 90 i 32— 


• . . 


138— 


2 00 3< '3 — 


4*8— 


20 7" 633— 


7 85 


1.19- 


304— 


9 51 Ifl'.i — 


4 70 6)(4 — 


a a . 


140— 


6 30 .305— 


a a . 470— 


4 70 635 — 


3 SO 


141— 


9 no 30*5 — 


5 4" 471— 


21 6' 636— 


3 70 


142— 


47 60 307— 


1 80 472— 


2 40 637— 


6 8') 


14)1— 


4 10 SOS— 


1 90 473— 


10 40 38— 


16 60 


144— 


16 60 309 — 


1 90 474— 


8 70 639— 


9 CO 


145— 


.3 lo 310— 


6 4o 175— 


. . . 640 — 


a . . 


116— 


1 25 311 — 


5 70 4 * f> — 


. . . 641— 


13 00 


147— 


13 00 312— 


2 00 477— 


7 60 042— 


1 00 


148- 


. . 313— 


. . . 478— 


7 40 613— 


1 90 


149- 


4 00 314— 


8 65 i79_ 


. . . 644— 


1 60 


150- 


9 70 315— 


6 8) 480 — 


13 40 645— 




151— 


11 90 316— 


10 56 481— 


10 60 646— 


3 £0 


15*2— 


317— 


. . . 482— 


1.3 10 617— 


7 10 


153— 


10 20 318 — 


a a 483 


17 70 648— 


9 26 


154— 


9 70 319— 


. . . 184— 


649— 


7 60 


155- 


8 50 320- 


2 00 435— 


4 00 650— 


25 


156- 


321— 


. . . 486— 


4 40 051— 


• 


157— 


£ 00 .322 — 


. . 487— 


6 ?0 652 — 


9 70 


158- 


323— 


1 90 488— 


5 9 J 653— 


• • . 


159- 


*2 80 324— 


489— 


654— 


• a • 


160- 


2 40 325- 


6 80 190— 


7 30 655— 


5 60 


161— 


. . . 326 — 


28 50 491— 


. . . 65C— 


• • ; 


162— 


16 40 .327— 


31 60 492— 


. . . 657— 


8 40 


163- 


8 08 328— 


5 »> 193— 


10 90 658— 


3 60 


164 — 


15 50 329— 


3 80 494- 


1 20 659— 


2 10 


165— 


35 7C 330- 


3 301495— 


6 50 660— 


2 70 



TlT.il) 0_A.-tt.f JUJN TJdlH. 




RESERVE FUND. 



$8 60 696— 
. . . 697 — 
10 « 698 — 
10 90 699— 
3 15 700— 
1 4( 701— 
16 C 703— 
. . . 703— 
1 80 701— 
. . 7C6 — 



9 CO 707— 
. . . 708— 
709— 
7 20 710— 
6 30 711 — 
2 70 712- 
18 30 713— 

1 90 714— 

2 40 715— 
11 10 716— 

2 20 717— 
20 lo 718— 

3 60 719— 
3 55 720— 
5 40 721— 

. . 722— 



96 724— 
16 00 725- 
. . 726— 

. . . 727— 



$12 70 73i_ 
3 C0 732_ 

16 00 733- 

tt OO 734 — 

2 30 735— 

3 00.736 — 
1 80 737 — 

9 70 738- 

11 95 739— 
. . ■ 740— 

3 00 741 — 
3 40 742— 
5 90,713- 
. . . |744 — 
8 20 745— 

5 00 746— 

17 60 747— 
3 60 748— 

. . . i749 — 

10 90 750- 
14 80,751— 
. . . 1 752 — 
19 20 753— 

3 00 754— 

1 15 755— 
10 40 756- 

2 00 757— 
. . . 758— 
• - ■ 1 769 

6 55 760— 
. . . 1781- 
. . . 1762— 

2 20 763— 

12 60 764— 
. . . 1 765 — 



a — § 

2 8* 
a c a 

$2 90^766 — 

• * • [767 — 

. 768— 

7 60 769— 

• . . (770 — 

3 75 771— 

773- 
6 40 773— 

6 10/7“ 4 — 
... 776 — 

1 00 776— 
. . . ,777- 

2 10|77S — 

4 20 779— 

. |780 — 

8 30 7.81— 
13 00 782— 

1 60 783— 

2 60 784— 

7 60 786— 

7811 — 
1 70 787— 

1 tO 788— 

. -789 — 

5 70 796- 

2 85 791— 
7 40 792 - 

5 9* 793— 

6 50 794— 

. . 795- 

1 60 796- 
4 00 797— 

2 80 798- 



Report of moneys received for Reserve Fund 
g I from FEBRUARY 1st, 1892. to FEBRUARY 29tb, 
< | 1892. (Inclusive). 

- j j All moneys received since FEBRUARY will 

1 20 j be reported In the MAY Carpenter. 

2 50 . . --- 



_ fl 
#.2 


«4 

i 

a 

< 


Ixical 

Union. 


8 • 
s — a 

| 1 ? ® 


«i 

8 

0 ”« § 
S fa 
•< «S3 


Amount. 


9— 


$3 75 


233— 


$ f.O 425— 


$ 75 684— 


S 1 75 


19— 


1 70 


219— 


2 85 429— 


2 26 697— 


1 80 


37— 


1 95 


262— 


55 439— 


90 710— 


4 10 


40— 


5 00 


268- 


4 66 452— 


1 3 • 728— 


1 10 


41— 


1 66 


27 H— 


3 50 456— 


1 50 734— 


12 20 


46- 


1 35 


285- 


2 80 466— 


3 65 743— 


1 05 


48 — 


4 05 287— 


3 70 488 — 


2 95 749— 


1 30 


61- 


11 26 *294— 


3 90 496— 


1 66 752— 


85 


56- 


1 76 295- 


1 25 508- 


8 40 753— 


80 


68- 


65 314— 


2 20 515- 


7 9 ) 758— 


1 46 


70- 


1 30 341 — 


3 40 619— 


2 50 759— 


3 26 


76— 


2 05 346— 


1 45 023 — 


1 10 762— 


2 00 


85- 


4 05.(78— 


2 15 535— 


1 30 763— 


1 40 


117— 


4 60 380— 


2 95 587— 


S6 777- 


3 05 


151— 


6 9*. 883 — 


GO 5 !9 — 


2 10 781— 


3 50 


166— 


3 96 387— 


1 75 570- 


5 86 787— 


65 


170- 

179— 

190— 

205- 


1 * 0 391— 
4 05 892— 
45 898— 
47 75 400- 


3 65 671— 
3 90 637— 
1 20 647— 
15 05 667— 


60 790— 
3 40 
8 55 
8 70 


60 


220 — 


2 10 412— 


1 56 6 7— 


1 8* - 




232- 


60 416— 


4 90 679— 


961 




Total .. 


• • • 






$278 98 



Financial Report. 

RECEIPTS, February, 1802. 



From the Unions (Tax, etc.) 

“ R. i t 

“ ( ll H'HIICCS, etc. . . .... 

Bulan*-. on hand February 1, 1892 . . . 

Total 

EXPENSES— February, 1192. 

For Printirg 

“ Otliee, etc. 

“ Tax A F.cfl 

" Traveling and Organizing, . . . 

“ Badges ... 

“ Benefits Xrs. 1591 to 1628, iutlusive 
Balance on hand Match 1, i892 



OBITUARY NOTICES. 

>4, »39 03 

(Jn*erMofu under thU head cost ten een t* per line.) 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

At a meeting of Union No. 115, U. B. C. *k J. 
of America the following was udopted. 

5T Inasmuch as our Ex-President Isaac Hilt z has 

depai teil this life. 

Itexotrrd: While we submit to a Superior 

Power, still we and the cause of Ijthnr have sus- 

$4,839 03 tained the less of an able and earnest advocate 
lit Uo in his death. 

17 *0 A'txolrnl: That onr heartfelt sympathy is ex- 
2,559 t.8 tended lo his widow and children in their be- 
reavement 

$7,125 11 Resolved: That a copy of the above he trans- 
mitted to the widow and also print* din our 
official organ The Carpi ntfr. and the same 
fr66 69 '■piead upon the records of our Union. 



$.766 69 
544 29 
90 00 

215 72 

216 00 
5,0 « 00 
1 002 41 



Total $7 426 11 

DETAILED EXPENSE»*, February, 1892. 



Printing 5,000 Apjieals 

5,(XKt Notices of Arrears . . . 

5.000 Mein tiers’ Cards .... 

1. 00- : Ode Cards 

" 6.0l 0 Applications ..... 

500 Postal Receipts 

“ 2 000 Blank Claims 

5.0»« Noteheads 

1.000 Stamped Envelopes 
100 Treasurers' Ree. Books . 

*? 100 Fin. Seer’y Ree. Books . 

45,0(0 Copies March Journal. 

“ Electrotypes 

I-, Ream Wrapping Paper . . 
W nipping ami Mailing Mar. Journal . 

Postage on March Journal 

“ “ Supplies, etc 

500 Postals 

1 iOO Stamped Envelopes 

Ex pre-sage on Supplies, etc 

Twenty-two Telegrams 

Salary and Clerk Hire 

Office Rent for February 

H. McC’onuaek, Organizing 

P. J. McGuire, Traveling Expenses 

through New York State, and to 
Toronto, Canada, and Erie, Pa. . . 
P. J. McGuire, two trips to New York 
and ex|ienses in Downey strike . . 
P. J. McGuire, trips to Elizabeth, N. J., 
Somerville, N. J., Boston, Provi- 
dence, etc 

S. J. Kent, Chicago Investigation 
W. H. Weismiller, Rochester, N. A'., 
for organizing ... 

W. F Abram«, Lecturing Tour in Mich- 
igan, Ohio and Indiana 

Tux to A. F. of L 

I, 080 Badges 

Stationery and Incidentals 

Janitor for Cleaning Otliee 

BENEFITS PAID IN FEBRUARY. 



$7 50 
12 60 
12 50 
2 6 « 
7 .'« 
1 50 
16 50 
12 50 

1 25 
25 U0 
25 00 

226 73 

2 65 

4 06 
19 23 
14 67 

25 07 

5 00 
23 16 
SI 45 
10 56 

382 66 

26 00 
4 00 



No. Name. 

5 t-J. F Fleck 

I •"> *2— Bernard Nash . . . . 
1593— Ed w. McGui ness . . . 

1 >'.*1— Mrs. M. Handler. . . . 
1595— Charles Augustin . . . 
1696 — Mrs. M. Unebner . . . 

1597 — A liiert Grove ..... 

1598 — William H. Mayes . . . 

1599— P. H. McKamey .... 

1600— Mrs. M C. A. Villere . 

1601— Airs. W. Heller 

1602— W. H. Gibson 

j 60< — Mrs. E. M. Anstey . . 

1604— Airs. M. A. Tucker . . 

1605 — Mrs. C Fletcher . . . 

1606— G. C AlcCIary 

1607— H. E Wilson 

1608 — Airs. M. E. Coale . . . 

1609— Airs. M. C. Turner . . 
16/0— Henry Hall . . 

1611 — Airs. E. Peterson . . . 

1612— Airs. C. Whalen .... 

1613— Airs. AI. AI. Thompson 

1614— II. S. Stick ney . . . . 

1615— B. C. Boyle .... 

1616— George Handley . . . 

1617— I-eamier Alvers .... 

1618 — D. I.. Enstwright . . . 

1619— Airs. E A. Payne . . . 

1620 — Ottmar Zoller 

1621 — Jos. Passnner 

1622— John Brierly 

1623— Airs. AL E Garrett . . , 

1624— John Harding 

1625 — Isaac Hiltz 

1626— Peter Kagan . ... 

1627 — Alartin Aleir.s 

1628 — B. X Hubbard .... 



Union. 

. . MS 
. . 3 49 



6S 75 

(Hi 01) 
216 (N) 
2 50 
6 90 



Amt. 
200 I« 
2t)U 1.0 
100 00 
25 00 
200 00 
50 00 
100 00 
201 ) 00 
210 00 
50 00 
50 00 
200 00 
50 00 
25 00 
50 no 
200 00 
100 00 
25 00 
50 00 
2C0 00 
25 00 
50 00 
50 00 
200 00 
200 i« 
200 00 
100 00 
2(W 00 
50 00 
200 00 
200 < 0 
200 00 
50 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 (0 



Jamüs Wheeler, ) 

Timothy Shanahan, -Committee. 

R. H. Cullen. ) 

Attest, AIilton It. Smith, Ree. See'y. 

Dallas, Tkx. Union No. 19 s, 1892. 

Whereas; It hath seemed best by the all- 
wise Creator to i-all from our mid«t our . »teemed 
brother, ami honored President, E. P. Dawson. 
Therefore be iti 

| Rt solved: That by his dentil we lose a faithful 
I member, and a worthy and etlicient officer, and 
. that in token of our sorrow an expression of 
1 sympathy with those who mourn ; he it further. 

Rcso/nd: that the members of Local Union 
No. 198. wear an appropriate emblem ami its 
i Charter he draped in mourning for thirty days, 

I and a copy of these resolutions lie furnished the 
Carpenter for publication. 

O. L. Wiley, ) 

C. A. Lane, -Committee. 

C. A. PREUBLE. ) 

St. I.OUIS. ABi., Union No. 699, Alareli 3, 1892. 

Whereas; it lias pleased the all-wise Bulor 
of the Universe to remove from our midst the 
wife of our worthy Bro. John O'Connor, and 

Whereas; although she was not a member of 
our organization, yet we feel that Bro. O'Connor 
has lost a true friend and helpmate, therefore 
be it 

BRtsoIrrd: thnt we tender Bro O'Connor our 
heartfelt sympathy to himself and family in 
their hour of sorrow, 

RtsiJrtd: 'hat a copy lie sent to Bro. O’Connor 
also a tMj.y lie published in Carpenter. 

By order of Local Union No. 699. 



Boston, At ass. Union No. 23. 

Whereas; the late Arthur B. Trusseel, a 
member of this Imdy has been removed from 
uni' midst by death, it is 

R, sol red : That by his death, we have lost a 
valuable member, whose faithfulness to our 
cause which he espoused, had won our esteem 
and admiration. 

Resolved: That the sympathy of this body he 
coiiv* red to the widow anil family of our le- 
ccased fellow member. Committing them in their 
bereavement to the kindly consolation of lliui 
who doetli all things well. 

Resolved: That a copy of these resolutions, 
signed by the President and Secretary «if this 
body be transmitted to the widow of the late 
Arthur B. Trussell. 

Resolvtd: That these resolutions be spread 
upon the minutes of this body, and a copy be 
published in our official journal. 

H. Lloyd, Pres. 

J. D. McLaurin, Sec. pro tern. 

Galveston, Texas. 

Carpenters’ and Joiners’ Local Union No. 526 
and No. 611 in regular meeting assembled ex- 
press their grief in the following resolutions : 

Whereas, the all-wise Creator has 6een fit to 
remove by death, our beloved Bro. Franz Wolf : 
Be it resolved that we extend to his bereaved 
family our heartfelt sympathy, and mingle our 
griefs with theirs, feeling assured that in him 
they have lost a kind and indulgent father and 
husband; and we an earnest faithful brother 
and fellow-worker. 

Be it resolved further, that a copy of these 
resolutions be furnished the family of the de- 
ceased ; also, thnt they be published in the 
Galveston JVY ws, The Carpenter, and spread 
on the minutes of the meeting. 



H. A. Sn attitk, j 
R. A. Shofler, ! 
W. J. Chapman, f 
Hv. Rare. 



Committee. 



$6,422 70 



WARNINGS. 

Petfr Stoneman, of Yonkers. N.Y., is hiring 
carpenters for a certain price and pays them oil' 
25 to 60 cents per day less. 

Dave Burgess, is a scabby skin-flint contrac- 
tor and in vain endeavored to injure the Car- 
penters Union of Yonkers, N. Y., and has now 
removed to Danbury, Conn. 

Samuel AIoobe. aged 40 to 43 years of age, 



■Providence, R. I. Union No. 94. 

| At a regular meeting of this Union held Jan. 
i 21, 1892, it was moved and unanimously carried, 
■ that a committee he appointed to prepare suita- 
| hi*- expressions of sympathy for our esteemed 
Brother Thomas J. Kiernax, in his late berenve- 
ment in the loss of his beloved wife Annie 
Franc es. Therefore be it 
Resolved : That we the members of U nion No. 
94. l . B. of C., and J of America, deeply 
sympathize with our Brother in his afllietion, 
and desire thus to convey to him and his re- 
maining family our deep sorrow, commending 
them to Him who has said i“ come unto me, all ve 
that labor, and are heavy laden and I will give 
you rest, and whosoever eometb, I will in 
no wise cast out.” And therefore be it further 
Resolved: That a copy of these resolutions be 
presented to our grief-stricken Brother, also in- 
serted in the coin inns of the organ of our trade 
The Carpenter, and spread upon the re- 
cords of this Union. 



John H. Cook, 1 
John McCarthy. V 
Francis Shanley. ) 



Committee. 



FINANCIAL SECKFTARIES. 

ALABAMA 

357. Anniston- Geo. S. Owen. 

612. Bridgeport- J. S. Maguire. Box 141. 

89. Mobile— E Marscbal 607 S. Elmira st. 

92. “ (Col.) W. G. Lewis. t«ir. Scott *k SI. Louis. 

389 Sheffield — Ward 1’arker, Box 46. 

ARKANSAS 

469. Hot Springs- M. H. Packard, 1C9 Tulip st. 
292. Little Kock— D. W. Gaskill, Box 371. 

541. “ C I.. Lucas, 214 E. l4lh st. 

432. Pise Bluff— J. C. Gibsou. 

CALIFORNIA 

D. C. of California— S ecretary, W. R. Jack, 
23 Ninth st. San Francisco, Cal 
47. Alameda- Jacob Hoeck. 1510 K K. ave 
217. Eureka— M B. Fowler, Box 336. 

660 . Hanford— S. M. Joiner. 

56. Los Angeles— J. D. Newman, Box 482. 

36. Oakland— J. F. Gallin, 1419 Ninth st 
645. Pasadena— C E. Jeremiah, 813 Grand ave. 
722. Redlands — A. S Backus. 

235. Riverside— W. J. Embree, 283 E. 10th st. 

341. Sacramento— E. S. Mason, 1201 J st. 

376. “ (Cars.) D. I). l’axton, 1706 E st. 

86. San Bernardino— H. Wegnori, Box 797. 

San Francisco- 

22. H. Meyer 260 Siegel st., B. H. 

S04 (Ger.) Will Keinhold, Birch ave 
483. Guy Lathrop, 108 Taylor st. 

616. (Stair Bldrs.) J. W. Nisbett, 1917 Stevenson. 
707. (Mill.) P. Belton. 613 Twenty flftli st. 

316. San Jose- L. D. Smith, Carpeuteru' Box, G. 

A. R. Hall. 

85 San Rafael— R. Scott, Box 673. 

226. Santa Barbara— J. Krallman. 

133 Santa Cruz— G W. Reid. 74 Locust st. 

337. Stockton— Jas. Kerr, 239 Weber ave. 

CANADA 

75 Calgary, Alberta— W Pittmnn.Jr., Box 191 
83. Halifax, N. 8. — A. Northup, 169 Morris at. 
18. Hamilton — D. Barnard, 59 Florence st. 

194. London— E. J. Aust, 706 Dumias st. 

Montreal — S ecretary of District Council, 

B. Lainoutagne, 141 Canning st. 

134. (Fr.l J. O. Beausoleil, 1443 St. Catherine st. 
311. (Fr.) Isidore Gagnon, 1211 St. James st. 

376. A. O'Leary, 3 Dutt'erin Ter., Dorchester st. 
666. (Fr.) Jos. Lamontagne, 53 Duluth ave 
755. Nanaimo, B. C. — W. T. Kemp, Box 12. 

574. New Westminsteb.B.C— N.Gilchrist.Boi 245 
321. Ottawa— V. Vilhpiette, 411 St. Andrew st. 
548. “ W J. Taylor, -»22 Concession st. 

38. St. Catharines— llenrv Bald, Louisa st. 

397. St. John, N. B.— W. F. Cronk Adelaide st. 

27. Toronto — D. D. McNeill, o9 Hamburg uve. 

Dovercourt Branch Ollice. 

617. Vancouver, B. C —Geo. Gagen. Box 798. 
354. Victoria, B C. — Win. Miller, 67 View st. 
343. Winnipeg, Man.— G. Ireland, Box 9H> 

COLORADO 

630. Aspen — M C. Hayes Box 407. 

560. Colorado City— G. F. Harnil. 

515. Colorado Spros— M. Klemmedson.Bo'* 442. 
663. Creede— M. K Comfort, Box 44, Amethyst. 
55. Denver— C. J. Hemlershott, Box 427, High- 
lands P.O. 

506. Fremont— A. II. Patterson, Moreland P. O. 
590. La Junta— John Gwyn. 

410. Pueblo— W. S. Marble, 1110 Cedar »t. 

46 Trinidad— M. A. Love, Block 18, High st 

CONNECTICUT 

115. Bridgeport— W. J. Barnwell, 168 Park st. 
364. Greenwich— E. F. Clift. Box 117. 

43. Hartford — Geo. Gerety,247 Wethersfield av 
49. Meridkn — Geo. J. Stanley, 115 Grove. 

97. New Britain— A. A. Fuller, 75 C'urtiss. 

137. Norwich — Jas. Grierson. 15 Elm *i..PrenU>a. 
746. Norwalk — E. L. Griswold, 9 Elm st. 

620. Stamford — George F. Peck, 5 Bedford. 

DELAWARE 

40. Wilmington— R. Shinn, 120 N. Franklin st. 
DIST. OF COLUMBIA 

190. W A8HINGTON— L. Burner, 1741 Seaton, N. W. 
531. “ M. D. Bailey 606 Whitney av., N. W. 

FLORIDA 

583. Cocoa— W. E Booth 

224. Jacksonville— (Col.) F. Crocket, Hansom 
Town. 

605. “ W. P. Johnson, W.Brooklyn, 

74. Pensacola— R. F. Killgore, Box 71. 

127. “ (Col.) A. B. Pettiway. 

600. Tampa— (Cob) P. T. Sissionn, Box 82. 

396. *’ E. S. Cooper, Box 232. 

GEORGIA 

332. Amebicus— (Col ) Lincoln McKennis. 

773. “ J H. Colson. 

602. Atlanta— C. T. Printup, 22 Fortress ave. 

136. Augusta— (Col.) T P. Lewis. 23 Marbury st 
517. “ J S. Woodward. 740 Reynolds st. 

144 Macon — E. B. Nowell, 1543 First uv. 

IDAHO 

331. Boise City— J. K. Tomtelot, 1131 Grove st 
6lu. Pocatello— T. P. Davis. 

ILLINOIS 

79. At ton— Sam Springer, 419 E 3d st. 

697. Aurora — F. G Tenney 176 S Lincoln ave. 
(3)4. Belleville— Henry Shopp, 804 E. 1st So. st. 
726. Bloomington— Daniel Sweeney, 1103 N. Oak. 
70. Brighton Park— Cbas. Fournier, 3111 38th. 
6x1. Caih*i— Geo. H. Yunker, 1006 Commercial av 
Chicago — Secretary of District Council, 

S. S Baker. 7015 Oglesby ave. 

1. H. Wiehman, 894 Gerard st. 

21. (Freneli)A. Morency, 210 Centre ave. 

23. J. Haywood, 4943 Princeton av. 

28. W. S. Weeks, 465 Thirty-first st. 

54. (Bobem.) Jas. Sikal, 1046 Turner ave. 

73. (Ger.) Wm, Krugmann. 2634 Iglehartpl. 

181. (Seand) A Hansen, j68 N. Elizabeth st. 

242. (Ger.l F. Silkenat. 5133 Aberdeen st. 

269. L. G. Fritz. 156, 2$th place. 

416. Jas. Bell. i310 Van Hornst. 

419. (Ger.) J Suikrau, 916 W. 18th st. 

446. (Holl.) P. Tyson, Roseland. 

623. (Boliem.) Joseph Martik, 5140 Justine st. 

690. (Mill Bench Hands) F. H. Quitmeyer, 660 9. 
Ashland ave. 

296. Collinsville— Monroe Simmons. 

788. Decatur— G. W Trimmer, 330 E. Orchard. 
558. DeKaLB— Albert Horn. 

556. Du <iuoiN— E E Burbank. 

169. East St. Louis— R. J. Tojo, 814 9t. Louis av« 
347. El Dorado— T. J. Gram. 

244. Elmhurst— Aug. Lange 

62. Englewood— C. F Nugent 6359 Honore st - 
117. Evanston— A. F. Briggs, 706 Davis st. 

672. Freeport— M. D. Coble, 69 Westst. 

360. GalE-shubo — E. Chnlstran. 629 N. Seminary. 
141. Grand Crossing — A. Moline, Box 464. 

29s. Highland Park— J. H Zimmer. 

162. Hyde Park— S. S. Baker, 7016 Oglesby ave. 
Chicago. 

649. Jacksonville — S. P Carter, Carter Hotel. 
442. Joliet — Wiu. Stitt, 306 State st. 

434. Kensington (Fr.)— E. Lapoliee, Box 18Gano, 
Cook Co. 

178. Maywood — R Keun. 

91. Metropolis City— II. J. EUerbrook. 

762 Moline — J. I. Swim. 242n Fifth av 
8i>. Moreland — Alfied Daniels, Box 28].. 

378. Mukpiivsroko — W. H. Grizzcll. 

753. Olnev — S. Russell, Bwx 451. 

661. Ottvwa — Heim. Vieth, 923 Sycamore M. 

245. Peoria — Onro H*-«dia, 1005 Spencer st. 

313. “ (Ger.) — J. Semiow, 616 Fowitt st. 

1-89. Quincy— Herman J. Mareks, 9th and Hemp. 
636. UavenswooD — Aaron Johnson. Box 160. 

166. Rock Island — J, F.Newfleld, 2406 sixth ave. 
199. South Chicago— J. C. Grantham, Box 149, 

Cheltenham, Cook Co. 

758. S. Englewood— D. Bosgraaf, Jr. 

16 Springfield— John Dick, 615 Kastman av*», 
495. Streator— John Robertson, 201 Bridge ak 
120. Venice — Geo Miller. 

448. Waukegan— W. J. Strickland. 506 Julian 
281. Whbaton— James B. Weldon. 

INDIANA 

352. Anderson— Cbas. Moor, 18# Flrat «t. 

383. Aurora— J. J. Henderson, Cochran, Ind. 



1 



THE CARPENTER 



•74. Bedford — F. M. Russell. 

439 Bluffto* — J ohn N Hatfield. 

79>. Clinton -\V. Woodall, Box W. 

717. Columrus — I,. B. Meldend, lltli A- California. 
494 Crawfordsville— S.L ong.304 Whitlook av. 
662 Ki.wood — W. II. Sim iv. Box 245. 
EVAXüVILLK — 

90. F W Klein, 513 Edgar at. 

470 .'I. liallonberger, Law av., Hartmetz adtl’n 
742 (I*. Mill, Mavli. and B. II.) L. Kessler, 920 E. 
Franklin -(■ 

153 Four Wayne— A S. Hnug <1 Nerdlinger av 
728 Frankfort - (i. KirH'.)ihauru,606 N. Jackson 
640. G KEEN FIELD — Robert Ofliitt. 

ITT. TIaughville— 1 II. White 
05. Hartford City— C. Huffman. 

110 Huntington — G. A. Mcidzer. 

Indianapolis — S ecretary of District Council, 
H. Rollert«, Iso W. 1st st. 

57 (Stairs) Geo. Wertising. 74 Lockerbie at. 

60 (tier ) All». Siiiionse.t, 68 Buehauan st. 

299 11 K. Travis, 363 Indiana ave. 

446. W Itrannenian, 147 Ludlow lane. 

609. (Mil’.) J H. Daugherty, 237 N. Miss. st. 

796. J. 11. Whisner, 210 English ave. 

770. Jeffersonville— J. Page, 25 Missouri ave. 
Lafayette— 

215. W. Bottenburg. 112 S. Fifth st 
783. (Gor ) G. W. Davis, South Fifth st. 

636. La'vrencebi bo— Jas MuI.aster. 

744. L-aivNSPORT -Milo Gibmii. 31 1 Linden st. 
813 Madison — C harles Holwager W. Madison 
545. Marion — J R Blosser, eor.38th and Harmon 
798 Mr. Vernon— P reston Loveland, Box 363. 
392 Muncie— J. B. Miller, 123 W. Mich, st- 
19 New Albany — P G. Renn, 564 Vincennes st 
579. Peru— P B. Gridin 

756. Richmond — lohn 11. Cohorst 837 S. Sixth st. 
12!» Seymour— H. Moritz. Box 230. 

629. So ft it Bend— O. A Pattisou. I16S. Laurel st 
48. Terre Hafte— J. R. Warner. 104 S. 15th st 
6.58. Vincennes— Mien Greco hood, 61S Edisst. 
631. Wabash— S. Banister, National Hotel. 



1P3. T. 



INDIAN TERRITORY 

979. Stillw atf.k, Okla. Ter.— E. J. Myers. 

IOWA 

M4. Bvrlinotox— A. Bokeneamp, 1333 Angular. 
617. Clinton— T. E. Clara 313<>.i* st. 

156. Prestos— R. striekland, 1304 Burritt ,-t. 

554. Davenport— F \\ . Boettcher, 19.31 Maluiit. 
68 . Des Moines — D- Reinking 1308 K. Grand av 
678. Dubu.H E — M R. Hogan, 294 7th st. 

603 Kmmetsbukuh E. 11 Frederick. 

81. Ft. Madison — C. E. Peoples, 611 Park st. 

TOO Keokuk— II. 1-. Breitenstein, 1524 Bank st. 
721. Sioux City— J. Deary, 23d Jt Court sts. 

KANSAS 

264. Atchison— H. Stork. 4:38 S. Seventh st 
761. Chanutk— A. M. Davison. 

66 . Concordia — W. 11. Dennis. 

499. Lean i'.n worth — W H. Sliouse, Box 25. 

646. Pm> .r.a.u — Gilbert Snyder. 

158. Topeka— P E. Cook. Box 346 
729. Winfili !i — B. D. Moore, S. Main st 

KENTUCKY 

712. Covington— J. L. Lyons, 230 Western nve. 
776. (Mill) John Bmkemper, N. W. cor. Elm A 
Brighton sts, Newport. 

641. Dayton— J. Dolman. 

418. Grand River. — J. M. Milstead. 

259. H i'nd.ir-on — W. V Dykes, 1014 First st 
626. Lexington — J Henry, Box 417. 

l.ori'ViLi.E — Secretary of District Council, 
Jos. Hi n« man, 2315 Portland ave. 

7. D. R. G.eh, 70s W. Market st. 

1P3. T. .1 Murphy. 305 Thirtieth st. 

2.2 H. Ruby. 9 >6 E. W alnut st. 

214. (G* r.i A. B. rl'ericii,727 E. Broadway. 

358 J. s. !eii 1. worth. 2513 Bainlirldge st 
729. (Co l B n»j. J. D.dler. 91.3 W. Jefferson st. 

406. l.VDi.ow — \V. lyamlon. Box 135. 

684. Middle- no rough —Courtney Long, Box 65. 
778. Mt. Stkuiing — J nn. Thomas. 

597. Mh.i.pai.e — F red. Wincher. 

•93. New port— J. W. Crupper. 720 Central ave. 
201. Pa nut ah— C lias B.iicli, 13 Huntington ave. 
v 682. Richmond — W. M Pearce. 

701. Winchester— . 1. W. Crone, Box 46. 

LOUISIANA 

S22 Am xanduia.— A. P. McNeil, Box 164. 

279. Monroe— B. R. Truly. Box 80. 

Ni W l lRLI A'S- 

76. J. (L Bloomer, 432 , jS. Liberty. 

249. F. D. Ross, 6,3 Constance st. 

624. Chas. 1 Li v tc Is. H51 Camp. 

704. Ilv. ll.'illner, 1.32 Tolcilnno st. 

732. (Mill) A : -wt Wetzel. 121 Gravier st. 

739. Mai.m I Joaquin, 1 42 Washington ave. 

45. Sh i'ey E i'uK r — Peter Gar.-on, Box 339. 

MAINE 

619 Augusta.-- E verett Libby. 

845 Bat h — K. A. Howard, 52 Bowery st. 

6<v6 Gardiner— J. E. Drake, Box 185 

407. Leaviston— A. M. Flagg, 9 School st. Auburn 
S4I. Portland — L. W. Whitcomb, 62 Anderson 
772. Westbrook— V. L. Porter, Cumberland Mills! 

MARYLAND 

29. Baltimore— A. Faulhah»r, 929 N. Ann st. 

70V (Snsh Factory A* PI. mill.) John P. Heanv. 

208 D dphin st. ‘ | 

MASSACHUSETTS 

State District Council— Secretary, D. Ma- 
loney, 6 Parker st.. Cambridge', Mass 
184 A M KSQl'U Y — C. J . Diltnn. 2 Lincoln et 
61.3 F.v.vEKi.Y — Win 11. Cook . 15 Lovett st. 

Boston — S ecretary of District Council, 

W. T. Brady. 246 Roxbury st., Itoxbury sta 
33. S. J. Chadwick, 41 Ziegler st.. Roxburv." 

545 i '•lairs' 1 W. Speak man, 75 Rutland st. 

56 L Geo. Clark. 7 Medlmsi st.. Chelsea. 

130. Prockto . — E. SliHituck, .39 Howard st 
iJS. Cambri. .e— D. Maloney. 6 Parker st. 

JJ4. " A. s. McLeod. 53 Mt. Anhuru st. 

155. Chf.i.sea — L. Jonah 1 16 Shawmut st. 

37.5. Dedham— E liotwiek. 

3iK*. Dorchester— L. E. Tarhell, Hunt st Kt- 
lantic, Ma-s. ’ 

218. Et XT Boston II. A Dclorey, 7 Fnion pl.off 
Pi I'm tim st. 

ltv>. (Sliip.loiner-i i'/ra lincstis, 133 Trenton st. 
»“J. Fill Rivni .h.im B. I’ari-eault, 2 Bran* ii -t 
••»71. Franklin —.T. Hi:*-— v. Box 387 
XI. Gi-orut stkr— J. A. McD. i, aid, 13 Cleveland 
S2. Haverhill- D. I aroy Wilson, 9 Sixth ave 
424. 11 INGHAM — ( oliH Campbell. Box 113. 

503. Hoi yoke — ii'r« ;.i ii' J. I jirriviere, 41 Cabot. 
40'.. Hudson — G eo. E. Urea- t. Box 12.5. 

Its. Hyde Park— 11. I *u!y. 55 Lining st. 

1 11. Law ricm i:—T. '»» . \on, 31i Par st. 1 

196. Low ell— K rank Käppi, r, 2U3 Lincoln st. 

108. Lynn— M L. Delano. 1(13 Lewis st. 

752. Malden— E. W. IVrry. 

221. Marblehead— J. E. Steele, Box 4.32. 

-54. Marlboro— F. l-allainuie. 3*.ki Main st. 

192. Natick — G eo. K. Alien, 15 Western ave. 

409. New Bedford — H. M. Hammond, 64 Spruce 
275. Newton— J os. Butler Box 71. 

193. North Adams— E.F Follett, 1 North st 
»«. North Easton— E lmer E. Watts. 

135. Norwood — Jus. Hadden, ■ 

447. Quincy— John Parsons. - 

/?.>. Rex ere — II. P. Ualeom, Winthrop av., Beach- * 
mont. 

67. Roxbury— D avid Campbell, 48 Norfolk st., 2 
Mattapan. 1 < 

740. Salem — F. Wilkinson, 3 Parker ct. 

7U2 Saxonvillk— E. C. Tuttle. 4 

24. Somerville— J os. McIntyre, 96 Franklin st ** 
22o. S. Framingham— E. F. Stewart 41 Gordon ! 
J96. Springfield— D. P. Hall. 48 Terrence. f 

651 “ lames Malone, 37 Hancock et 

491. Stoughton— G. VV. Femside. 

216. Waltham— J. P. Veno, 205 Charles st. 

426. Weht Newton— J ohn Fleck. (p o 2 



MICHIGAN 

77. Battle Creek— M. M. Haynes, 125 Clay st 
129. Bay City— R. Forsyth. 

686. Benton Harbor— C. E. Jinkins. 

• 418. Charlotte— C. L. Cover, Box 532. 

Detroit — S ecretary of District Council. 

10. L. C Hutchinson, 66 W. High st 
32. F. Pcrsinger, 37, i3d st. 

59. T. S. Jordan, 427 Beaufait ave. 

• 219. (Ger.) L. Schmidt, t30 Ludden st. 

16.3. East Saginaw— J. F. Biyley, 2401 Jefferson. 
24' ” ( Will) A. A. Yeager, 510 N. 12th at 

1 466. “ (Ger.) Peter Frisch, 1502 So. Warren 

ave. 

Grand Rapids— S ecretary of District Coun- 
cil. H. Heaton, 229 Fifth st. 

65. F. L. I’roliert, 9 Foster st. 

> 583. (Hnll.) A. Stanhurg, 2 C 6 Eighth st. 

771. T. Edwards, 67'» Jefferson ave. 

793. H. Heaton, 229 Fifth st. 

411. Hot land— J ohn Ileetobry, Box 661. 

195. Iron Mountain— J. P. Langlois, 618 W. 
Hughitt st. 

26. Jackson— H enry Belmn, 211 Peyo st. 

184. Lake Linden — G eo. W. Guibord, Box 678. 

213. Lansing — J. K. Moore, Box 398. 

372. Marine City— A dolph Booske, Box 72. 

392 Marquette— (F rench) J. Cullin, 234 Mather. 
100. Muskegon— AI iH'rt Bellenger, 51 Walton st 
123. Owosso — Charles H. Cherry, Box 701. 

&M. Saginaw — G. Wetzel, 1023 S. Harrison, W. S. 
784. Taw- as City — H enry Gale. 

1 >538. Wyandotte— Francis Sutliff. 

MINNESOTA 

361. Duluth— J ohn Sutherby, 222 W. 4th st. 

306. “ (Scand.) P. Helgeino, 192*2 W. Michigan. 

239. Little Kali a — E. C. Mack. 

Minneapolis- 

411. (Stand. ) A. Olson, .313.3 1SU ave.. S. 

452. J. N< wguist. 2109 Irving avenue N. 

87. St. Paul — A ug. J. Metzger, 423 Rondo st. 

362. Winona— C arl Kuederli, 107 E. Sccoml st. 

MISSISSIPPI 

312. Greenville— J. B. Guplile. 

680. J \< kson — (Col.) John I tennis, 725 West PcktI 
749. Meridian— S. It. Smith, Care Sash and Blind 
Factory. 

496. Vicksburg— W. C. Crumrinc, Box 63. 

MISSOURI 

51 >. Benton Station — J. Cook. Garner ave. 

7101. Carthage — W. H. D vault, 1170 Grand ave. 
235. Hannibal — J. F. Vandaincnt. 1216 Union st 
1 100 . Kansas City— A. McDonald, 1717 E. lltli. 
577. Marshall — W. II Herrmann 
98 . sfdalia — W B. Hurtt, 15 '6 Vermont ave. 

377. Springfield — J ohn R. Talent, 2115 Lyon st , 
Station A. 

5 St. Charles — (C ar Builders) Edw. Hackman 

Stasbf.ury — H. H. Davis, Box 327. 

*3o. Sr. Joseph— A. L.Curti-s,22d and Holman st 
St. Louis— S ecretary of District Council, 

Chas. T. Parri-di, 2101 Whiltierst. 

4. Geo. J. Swank, 1701 Ncxvstead ave. 

5 (Ger.) A. F. Kindier, .5020 Snlinn st. 

12. (Ger.) Henrv Rosenbaum. 2210 Blair nve. 

71. (Cars- J. R. Pullen. 240> S. 13th st. 

113. V. S. Ijmib, 3979 Gratiot st. 

240. (Ger.) J. Ralfs. 144I 1 ... N. Market st. 

257. C. W. Chemberlin. 110! N. Jefferson ave. 

270. Will Rollins, 4579 Evans ave. 
i 395. (Mill i Paid Garnier, 105 N. 12th st. 

423. C. Strieder, 18>.; Benton st. 

518. Ger.) Henry Thiele. 2112 De Kalbst. 

57s. (Stair Bldrs.) Geo. Rupp, 1830 S. loth st. 

699. John O'Connor, 2907 Cass ave. 

734. (Ger. Mill) J.H.Miltendorf, 2335 1 jS. Seventh. 

MONTANA 

80. Anaconda— J. II. Laird. 

112. Bi tte City— A. M. Slattery, Bi.x 623. 

.'0. Great Falls— H. Chase, Box 3o6. 

280. Helena — J. 11. S luxalen, 6-1 Second st. 

1 5s,. Missoula— J. J. Hassell. 

I 3i7. Neiuaet — T homas Clark. 

NEBRASKA 

148. Lincoln — J. W. Emberson, 3003 S st. 

>50. Nebraska City — W.C. Willman, 302 S. 17th. 
Omaha— S ecretary District Council, C. Rein- 
hart. 9 8 N Twenty-seven til st. 

58. J. 11. Schneider. 2710 Caldwell *t. 

I 68». C. Peterson, 1403 S. Nineteenth st. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

2v3. Concord— D. W slmllis, Box 630. < 

118. Man« iirs.EK— Wilbui G.Coicor<:,334E.IIlgh. 1 
.»•>5. Portsmouth— K. C. Frye, 1 i Vaughn st. < 

NEW JERSEY 

750. Asrury Park— J. F. Seger, Box 897. 

4'6. Bayonne— Ghs Sippel. 3- \\ . 24tli st. 

711. ** J. Anderson, 47' Ave. E. 



323. Fishkill-on-Hudhon— Jas. Hayes, Mat* 
teawan, N. V. 

500. Gi.kn Covk, L. I.— Fred, t TaR 

229. Glf.ns Fallw-W. B. Stevens, 18 Grand sL 

272. Herkimer — C has. Cristman, Box 6<1. 

173. Hoosiuk Falls— Edwin Chapman. 

149. Irvington — M ichael Kiernaii, Box 

6<tt. Ithaca — J. W. Skinner, 1-3) W. HuIIhIobi. 

627 Johnstown — C 4. II. Bow maker, 8 Glebe st. 
26L Kingston— J. De.vo Chipp, Box 1°0- 
591. Litti.k Fali^ — A. A. Miller, 51 Arthur st. 

709. Lockport— F. Fisher, 112 John st. 

465. 1x»sg Island City-F. R.e-elms, 884 Albert st 
643. Mamabonei« —William Hopps. 

150. Middletown — W. R. Rogers, <5 Houston av. 
493. Mt. Vernon — A. L. Roly, 56 S. Third ave. 
lOi! New Brighton, S. 1. -F. E. Sal fehler, 47 

York ave. 

301. Newburgh — G eo. M. Walker, 128 Mill s'.. 

42. New Rochelle— Jos. Gahan, Box 820. 

607 Newtown— H enry Meister, Corona, L. I. 

New York— S ecretary of District Council, 
T. C. Walsh, 537 E. 8l«t st. 

51. Clias. A. Judge, 626 E. 146th st. 

6(3. Thomas C. Kelly, 427 E. 1 ' 4th st. 

64. J. U. Lounshury, 813 Columbus ave. 

200. (Jewish) S Jacobson, 5 Gt. Jones st. Care 
M. Wishinsky. 

340. A. Watt, Jr., 177 West 101 st. 

382. H. Seymour, 1303 2d ave., care Sta. K. 

457. (Scan.) H. L. Hansen, 63 ‘kolc-ott st., Br’k in 
464. (Ger.) F. Hollerieth, 33.1 3rd ave. 

468. Dennis Davin, 68 K. Ninth st 
473. David Petrie, 347 W. lltb st. 

478. Chas. Bickel, 611 Bergen ave. 

497. (Ger.) W. Schmitz, 304 Pleasant ave. 

509. James Ix*nnon, 811 Columbus uve. 

513. (Ger.) II. Knohloch, 26 Elizabeth st. 

715. Christopher Coffey, 2015 Columbus ave. 

783. (Millwrights and Millers) Chris. Schlenker, 
425 East 82d st 

474 Nyack— H obt. F. Wool, Box 493. 

302. Ogdensburo — J ohn Wert, Pickering st. 

101. Oni.onta — F rank MeFee, 6 Gardner place. 
413. Oswego — C has. Ward, 207 East Bridge st. 

31 Pkfksk ILL— T heo. Birdsell, 939 Diven st. 

4 >1. I’oRTi hk>ter — A lien McDonald, Rye, N. V. 
606. P. Richmond — J. Keenan. New Brighton. S.l. 
2o;l. Pouohkf :is-ie— N. R. Ihtlzeil. Box 32. 

675. Kockaway Beach— T. F. Lowe, Oeeaiius,L.I. 
Rochester — 

72. II M Fletcher. 31 Bartlett st. 

179. (tier.) Frank Schwind. 4 May Place. 

146. Schenk. tady — J. A. Malloy. 214 Clinton st. 
768. Ska C 1.1 uu— J.S Koop. 

413. Sheep.' head Bay— W in. Cramer. Box 71. 

667. Stapleton— C harles Shay, Lock Box, 46, 

New Brighton. 

Staten Island — S ec. of D. C , II. McCallum, 
51 York ave., New Brighton. 

Syracuse— 

15. (Ger.) Abe Frev, ‘217 Saile st. 

124. J. C. French, 119 Delhi st. 

363. (French) II. St. Pierre, 614 Robinson st. 

3i4. Tarkvtown— D. Page, North Tarrytown. 

78. Troy — J oint J. Hanlon, Box, 145. 

125. UTICA — H. Schneller, 14 Edward st. 

318. *• (Ger.) John Specht, 10 Faust are. 

580 . Watertown— D. B. Wiliex, 19 W. Mullen 
233. Waveri.Y— I. M. Terry. I Center st. 

‘252. West Troy— ('. Stewart, 1567 Broadway. 

273. Yonkkr -Jas. Boomer, 44b W. 47tli st., X. V. 

City. 

NORTH CAROLINA 

384. Asheville — J. E. Stevens. Box 493. 

289. Charlotte— A. ('. N. Rechtler, 706 E. 7th st. 
796. Greensboro — J. W. Causey. 

668. Winston— 4L B. Daniels, Box 31. 

OHIO 



180 Bkadimm k— J«> hn V. Ilranthoovcr, Box 636 

ft"!“ F O-ii«..» S' 

450 Bryn Mawr— John P. Hatch. Box <9. 

22> BUTLER — H. 4L Keil, 212 \\ . Penn st. 

738. Carbondale— F red Slnmmi. 21 Thorn st. 

294. CHARiJtROI— Ini ». Nickson, Itox 101 

•07. CHWiTER — KI kt S. 

408. ( 'oRAoroLts — Joseph Miller. 

535. DU Bois— Thos. Boring. 

5.(0. Duquesne — -C has. Staiitfer, Box 6. 

787. Elwood CITY.— It. A- White. 

116. Erik— W. H. Peat, *T»7 W. 23*1 at. 

42-. Fkankkoici» — J ohn Ihivit**, |.>},* Suik'ni hi. 
40L Franklin — A. i*. Cooper, Box 238. 
r,"i Krfki'okt — W. W. VV olfonl 
122. Germantown — J. K. Martin, »">3 VV . Duval at. 
46Ü! ( ; UKENSIU RG— John Fnuicis. 

3 *.h. (> kf.kn viele— T. C’ampbell, H<>x -16. 

587. G ROVE city— H. B. Black. 

287. Harrisburg — E li Hollinger, 619 North st. 

288. Homestead — J. A. Wolff, Box 473. 

253. Jeannette— P. E. Robbins, Box 2)6. 

205. Johnstown — C harles Zore, 326 Bedford st. 
57«. Kane— F. W. Patch. 

110. KlTTANNING— Alvin McGregor, Box _ — 

208. IjANUABTEK— C. IIeiiHeII,U04 New Hollaiidav 

«91. Latrobe— A. W. ('miner. 

601. Lebanon — C has. Foster, 1028 Church st. 

319. Leech BURG— I W. Long. 

43«. Ixx k Havi-N — F. Bittner. 62 SusqueliHniiR av. 
177. McKeesport— W in. Me4'or«l, 70» Coiirsin st. 
438. Manayunk — E phraim Frantz, 449 Green la. 



lorey, 7 Union PI. off 



i 121. Bridgeton — C. E. Woodnutt, 141 Favettest 
20. 4 ’amden— T. K. Peterson. 357 Mechanical. 
(0.7. K. Grange — M. K. Ryerson. 45 Oliver at. 

167. Elizabeth — II. Zimmerman, 8 Smith st 
G.S7. • (Ger.) Clias Mciser 10)7 William's st 

047. Englewood — G arret Springer 
391. Hobokf.n— F. Steigleiter. 117 Bloomfield st. 
265. Hackensack — C harles Wood, James st 

Hudson County— D. C.. Secretary. X. w. 
B.rxti r. 14 Prescott Place, Jersey City. 
4*2- Jersey City— G et». Williamson, 310 (»rove 
408. A. E. Stewart, 117 Pine at. 

564. Amos Turley, 484 Central ave. 

570. (Five Corners.) A. Wo! tie. Cor. Franklin at 
and Palisade ave.. St«. D. 

710. (Greenville) C. Van Winkle, 151 Linden av 
591. Lakewood— C nas. <>. IVllit. 

151. Long Branch— I. N. Cuhberlv. Box 183 
232. Milbukn— J. II. White, Sliort'llills. 

1305. Millville— L uke Vanaman, 80 i X Second 
6 >8. Morristown— V an Deals. Hex 15(. 

Newark— S ecretary of District Con mil 24 
X. 14th st. ' ’ 

119. W. Nairn. 46 Centre st. 

172. Ger., It Meiler. 47 Lillie at. 

4 '5. (Ger.) Andrew Rager, 20 Wall st. 

6 '2 0i Kami — W. I.ongsireet. 

477. Grange— ' T ints. Ferguson. 17 Centra! place 
325. Paterson— O scar Zahriskie, 34 Erie st. 

490. Passah —Frank Wentink, Box 122 
399. Phillipsburg— W m. Ho.lge, 921 Ferrv st 
Easton, Pa. * ’’ 

155. Pi ainfiklis- P. A. VanFieet, 43 E. Third at 
573. Rutherford— Jm, Holland. 

«65. Somerville— W. W. Pittenger. 

456. Summit— R. Wood, Box 15s 
31. Trenton — O. B. Gaston. 91 Jackson st 
543. Town ok Cnton-H. Beeker. 318 Union at., 
I m«*n i till ’ 

642. West Hoboken— II. Bougghraft Paterson 
Plunk R’d. 

NEW YORK 

274. Albany-TIios. McNeil 54 X. Knox at 
(tier.) Ed. Janke. 442 Elk at 
6. AMsTFHDAJj-IIerbert Clark, 1.5 Putman at. 
453. Ac Bl RN— VV . M Gillespie, 119 E. Genesee. 

1>. Batavia — O. Dewit. Box 223 
131. Bingh amton— W. F. Hulse, 35 Colfax ave. 
- 10 - " J. D. Marinas, 20 Carv at. 

BROOKLYN-Socretary of District Council 
‘ tw “°n, '77 Fifth ave. 

109. Adolph sdber, 236 Fourteenth st 
JiZ- J, 11 ®- J- Powderly, 190 Albany ave. 

175. C. 1«. Douglass, 158 Ainslie st. 

223. Robert H. Y oung, 589 Lorimer at. 

24,. G. Paynton, 1.(49 Fulton st. 

258. H. P. Culver, 17 Cornelia st. 

John Lang, 134 Hamburg are. 

349. (Sash, etc.) H. Robinson, 223 47th st. 

381. J. II. Padi>ury, 20 Rochester are 

3«7. Hias.H. Richardson, Box R.. Fiatbush, N. Y. 

451, \\ m. Carroll, , *'2 Bergen st. 

471. Fred. Brandt. 267 Ninth st. 

*£*• Frank I^hey, 14 Willow at. 

639. M J. Sullivan, 179 50th st. 

BrFKA Score to IV of District Council. 

A. E. Y\ bite, 1075 Division at 
_9. C. Parker, 37 Ixicust. 

355. (Ger.) C. Roessler 242 Strauss st 

4 I? It 1* I. ... r. 



84. Akron— J. Glass, 111 Thornton st. 

75'. Ashtabula— A. I.. Howard, 

17. Bell AiRR— M'.ses Yog.o. 
ft. Bow ling GREEN — J. 11. La Karree, llox 95. 
170. Bridgeport— Elmer Justice, Box 133. 

501. Bucyrus — F. Shooly, Jr., B< x 179. 

113. Canton — D. Van Kirk, 110 Spring st. 

Ib2. Celisa — H. A. Tomlinson. 

Cincinnati— S ecretary of District Council, 
David Fisher, 56 Clifton ave.. District 148. 
2. M. A. Clements, 131 Clark st. 

209. (Ger.) AngU'l Weiss, 359 Freeman aA - e. 

327. (Mill.) Geo. Marshall, 457 Main st. 

401. (Stairsi B. Menkiiaus, 194 Western ave. 

628. W. Ringel. 240 Dane st.. Station A. 

664. (East End.)— 1 George Rusk, Fairfield ave., E. 
Walnut Iliils. 

607. R. Patti rson, 4 Elmwood a\'.. Walnut Hill. 
«76. Wm. Leiman, 319 Cli'lon ave. 

6si. Win. Parker, PiCheatnut st. 

6S(. J. Schwarz, 1398 W. Sixth st. 

«92. John Spclllirink. Sileni av.. Eairmount. 

713. (.Mill A Elevator Bldrs.) II. Hlaiiev, 19 Hat- 
maker st. 

Ci.evei.and — S ecretary ot District Council, 
E. K. Bennett, 158 Superior at., Room 11. 
11. J M. B overs, 760 Hamilton aL 
S9. (Rohem.) Fr. Pivoky, a5 Petrie at. 

234. (tier.) < 'h. Witt, 40 Kauny aAe. 

241. D. F. Erwin, 1233 Ixraiu at. 

2h 2. (Polish) John Peplinaky. 177 Fullerton st. 
393. (Ger.) T!uo. Weirieh, 16 Parker st. 

419. (tier.) Herman Scherr, 77 Seiden aA - . 

461. John Milner. 952 Oukdale a\'e. 

632. iB<>li.) Wm. Mares, 1372 Central ave. 

63(. (Mill) J. Vuet/.el, 48 S\'ot»oda at. 

231. College Hill— W. R. Howard. 

CoLUMBia— Secretary of District Council, 
J. F. Hepncr. gen 1. delivery. 

61. W. G. Wildermuth, 694 McAlister ave. 

326. H. A Goddard, 269 X. 17th. 

350. (North side) J. II. Conklin, 22 E. 10th ave. 

104. Dayton— G eo. Brenner, 580 Herman st. 

346. “ (Ger.) Frank Herfurth, 11 Sears st. 

396. “ (Car Fldrs ) John Cox. Kiser at. 

187. Defiance — W alter Lambert, 315 Seneca st. 



569. Manor station— E li Naley. 

431 Mansfield — R obert Huubricb, Manslieid 
Valley P. O., Box 1.00. 

552. Meadvillk— P. I'. K idling, 701 Stalest. 

278. Mercer— A. B Moore. 

653. Monongaiikla City— J. R. SteAvart, Box 623. 
741. Mount Carmel Jere M. John. 

, 589. Mount Ple asant— il. W. Zundeli. 

3<3 jjfav Kensington II. Eckard. I.otk Box 63. 
20*i. New Castle— W. AV. MeCl. nrv. 250 Harbor. 
3 ns. NoRKisTOAVS — II W. \\ eller. 763 George st. 
414 . Oil City— ILL. McWagh, s. G I City. 

l'Uii.ADKi.PHiA — St-r.i laiy «»f Di-t. Connell, 
J. R. Niue, «010 Edmund st.. Taeony. 

8. J. J. Maguire, 52« N. 12tl) st 
227. iKensiegton Chits. L.spangh r,2l«4 Si-rgeant 
23S. (Ger.) Geo S< l.midt, 4 1 liai kley *t. 

306. (Southwark i t’ln.s. Mit 'lu ll. l' k. l*a-.y"iik. 
359. (Mill Geo. W. Miller, 2336 X. Fifb-enth st 

I'lTTsnuRGH — Secretary of District Council, | 
W. P. Patton, 01 .M. ih. m iaa'c. 

1 12. IT. G. Schomaker. 126 AA .d^t.-r ave., Alleg. 

161. (to-r.) Adolpli Balz, 1 il Tw.-lfth st., S. S. 

165. (E. Endi E. B. Denman. 7 Inwood st., E. K. 
2(0. T. J. M.-Keima, rear 12 I McKean st. 

,305. (W. Emli Jas. S. Connell, 191 Steuben st. 

402. (tier.) J. P. Pfcikosen, 153 Sixteenth st., S. S 
737. Jas. Reed, 11 Southern uve. 

615. Pittston — J. R. Leighton, 1« Tompkins st. 

145. PUNXsUTAWNEV— C. (i. HeUIUgll. 

336. Reading — T. Ki'-inger, 510 N. 13th 
368. Rochester - A. N. Giitermiith, Box 152. 

730. Salt slit* rg — J. P. Leech, Box 13. 

339. Scott dale — J. M. Cui>on, Box .-,84. 

563. Scranton— G. M. Hirlinger, 1 400 Hampton st. 
718. ** Emmet Puder. 43^ Phelps st. 

751. “ J. Nolan, 501 Gak st. 

IHI. S. ScRANTo.\-(Ger.i.l.Brmi*chwilcr «24 Alder 
37. Sha.aiokin — E." . Deilder. 2.3 S. Sliaiimkin st. 1 
260. Sharon — A. R. Peter*. '2 Elm st. 

185. SlI AUPSRUKl. AA c. Pflisih. 

514. S||ARI*SMLI.»:— W. Beil hard. Box 170. 

27«. Tap.entum-G. I', «»wi ns. 

551. Turtle Cun k— J ames Strang. Box 216. 

320. Tyrone— W. E. McKinney. 

15u. Uniontoavn R. L. D.-Kolt 110 Mill st. 

370. Verona— A. s. l.am . 

599. Warren— D. J. Grindlay. 

Hi. Wash ini. ton— J. Y'. Mi4'lain, Box 227. 

«31. West Leisenring- W. U. Reede. 

:02. W ilk i>-B.a i: re — T lios. Tamblyn, 234 North- 
ampton st. 

4*8. AA'ti KlNsr.ria;— James Todd. 

266. William-Port L. F. Irwin. 441 Hepburn st 
191. Y ouk — AA . J’. Groelseh. 318 AA’. Princess st. 

RHODE ISLAND 

510. ?7arragan*.sett Piep— H. Chapman. 

17«. Nkaapokt — A. initially, 4 Perry st. 

91. Provid: vi i: — Wm. Slack, 23 Willow court. 

694. Woonsim hi. r — D. l.amoureux, 48 Cumber- ' 
land st. 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

52. Charleston — (C ol , AV. H. Burgess, 5 Eliza- 
beth *t. 

69. Columbia— (C ol.) S. B. Thompsen, 178 Eai t 
Jervais >t. 

670. Greenville -AVm. Biirtv 130 AVaahir.gton. 
682. " (Col.) S. S. Thompson. 100 Align- tu -t 

427. Spartanburg— L. A. Justice. 

TENNESSEE 

«73. Bristol— H.O. Bunn. 

669. Chattanooga— E wing White. Ridgedale. 

4o6. Cl'M ukrlan u ( » ap — J. AV. Hudson, Harro- 
gate. 

«14. Hakriman — ( i. A. Bernier 

225. Knoxville — (». L. Cox, 180 Morgan -t 

394. Memphis— N. 51. Bloom, 1M Mid st. | 1 

•»63. Nashville — B. c. Talley, Fillmore \ Cheat- 

hum. ( 

7C>6. “ (Mill) J. T. Parker, 518 X. Market st. | 

TEXAS 

126. Amorilla— R. L. Dowling. 

30". Austin — <’. J. Armstrong, 704 E. 11th -t. 

731. CoK-n ana — J. s. Brown, 710 A\ . yth uve 
198. Dai.lv — <) L. Wiley. Box 299. 

371. Denison— I \ 11. Miller, Box 124 

414. El. Pa-o— F rank L.-Roy «17 < amphell -t 

277. I t At or i h — S. E. Murphy, 1 . Cummings st. 

•>20>. Galveston — AA' . J. ( hapinan, l">20ave. O'z,. 

. " 'Ger. ' H. IgiIk'. ave. K and 3.3d st 

Dl. Houston- M B. Leach. 270 AA'alker h\ e 
539. Paris -AV. 11. Norris. 2>M Plum st 
* jJJ- an* Anglia» — T. II. Holloway, Box 39. 



WISCONSIN 

379. Ashland— A. Beaton, 1019 Preidi.*« 

128. Kau Ci.aike:— ( 4. | ,,ss, H.s HoIihii i e ' 

5*0 . Green Bay-K. Ebeling, 1275 Stuarts. 

335. La Crosse — A I Cu Imann. loir, p, * 
Milwaukee— s ereurv of d , ,*; Kl * 

A. AV. vfaclmil/.kr. 40.1 17th ax',. 

.30. (Ger.) B. Platz, 212*. K illMHirn HVf* 

228. (Ger.) John Schulte. 520 Third ave 
290. (<ter.) Emil Harrtel, 651 Second »t W ' 
318. (Ger.) F. Hehiierer, «9« rwentv-r, )llrt h .i 
637. (Mill.) AV. 11. Sel.ude, Jr , k;| Garden .» 

572. R E. Herman, 1.(05 Prairie st. 

598. Tiieo. Dembinski, 021 ElevenUi av<- 
472. North Lacrosse— K. Kundser. 100-1« 
532. OsHKOHH— A. Nelson, 33 Merritt st ‘ T0 °- 

657. Sheboygan— (G er.) J. Kro. ger, Merthew. p, 
Superior st n - 

523. Superior— P eter Tumble 
4M. (AVest Superior)— F red B.>ese, 701 AV^ t.. 
752. (South Scpf.kiori— A. Morde)) |;, 1X , 5 

FIRST-CLASS BOOKS? 

CHEAP, USEFUL AND PRACTICAL. 



Bell’s Carpentry Made l'.t-v $«, q| 

The Bcilder's Guide and Estimators 
Price Book. Hodgson. . 2 00 

The Steel Square, and How to Use ir. 1 go 

Practical Carp» ntuy. Hodgs...,, ... j (w 
Stair-Bi d.dinc. Made E \ - y . Hodgson. 1 00 
Hand Railing Made Easy ... 1 OO 

Illustrated Architectural and Me- 
chanical I» a wing-Book. A Sei f- I ii- 

stru<*<*»r. xx il ii ■«►) 1 (lustr itions 1 00 

Tim. Carpen* tf k - and Bi ii.i.i k - * 1 m- 
pi.KIF. Companion ... . . 2 ju 

Address P. J. McCUIRE, 

Box SHI, Philadelphia, pj. 



TyS. 






This Is a Facsimile of the LABEL of the 

UNITED HATTERS 

OF NORTH AMERICA. v 

Tin* I-n'icOins received the indorsement of tn® 
General Executive Board of the K. of L. a >1 of 
the American 1 ' deration of Ia»K«r. 

K # * 1 lie Label is placed on every union-. .«4« 
hat before it leaves the xx*orkrnaii*s hands, i: a 
dealer takes a label from one lint and plar< s it m 
another, or lias any detached laltelsin Ii i-* st. 

<lo not buy from him, as his labels may be <• 
forfeit and his hats max lie the j,roduet of Mao ur 
non-union laljor. 

B ware of Counterfeits. Sometime* they are 
printed on white paper and sometimes on ve ow 
paper. A.* r general thing they arc not perforated 
«•11 tlie edges. A counterfeit label with (»erfurated 
edges has lately made its ap|>earauce. It is larger 
than the genuine one. The genuine label is about 
an inch and a half square and is printed ou bn • 
colored paper. When purchasing a hat aee to it 
that you get the genuine label xvith the performed 
edges. 

This is the Only Correct Union Label for 

Fur- Felt Hais. 

BUY NO FUR-TELT HAT WITHOUT IT! 

Edxxaud B.xrimtt, President. 

Hat Make: s' lute .'national Association : 
James II. Pen;:» i . Secretary, 

52» Miyder Ave., Philadelphia, Pa 
Tho>. F. OT,’»»’ f.kf'. President. 

Hat i-'inisheis' International A»* n* 
John Phillü". Seer, tavy. 

47 ; i'ui k Avenue, Brook 1> >7. Y. 



. THE UNION LAIjEL. 

TUL CIGAR MAKERS’ RLIE J.A WT.t* 



At 

teenth 



the Four 
A n nua) 



£Z' o’ Union at. 7i8. San Angi.i.o-^T. H. li10h.wav Box 39 

?S: -e s;r,MrNvur\’;;;; ,, M n ;i^ 

13 TEMPVKwKiigVi;,» d, iioxi.r 



328. East Livf.rpc >i.— W. S. Pittemrer. Box C34. 
108. Findlay — A. I). Neumever, Hox 491. 
r, '9. “ (Mill) A. E. Smith, 803 Putnam st 

202. Fostoria— .1. 11 Faler, 722 W. Center st 
64 1. Greenville— F. M. Sxvope. 

637. Hamilton— P. A. Daugherty, 320 S. Front st. 
267. Lima— J. A. Kepaer. 613 Heindel st. 

485. Lockland— (M ill.) P - . S. Mosstellar, Sharon- 
v.lle, Hamilton Co. 

703. “ Clus. E. Hertel, Box 182. 

369. Madisonvillk- E H. Hunt. 

6>6. Mansfield— X. II. Kime. 

256. Marietta- K. II. Wagner, 504 Charles st 
14. Martin's Ferry— L I. Shipman. 

725. Middletown— J. A. Lamon.S. Y’ankeerd 
736. N el-os v 1 lle — F. Barron. 

16). New Portage— J as. H. Davis. 

705, Norwood— A. E. Best, Ivanlioe 

650. Pomekoy-J M Fowler, Mason Citv W Va 

708. Salem— W m. Bonsai, 371 W. Main at.’ 

107. Sandusky— H. L. Selmmaelier, 1016 Central 
284. Springfield-E L. Kendell,360 W. Southern 
186. Steubenville — L ou. Whittaker, .320 Logan 
243. Tiffin-W. H. Bu-hler, 202 W. Perry st 
25. Toledo— A. Smith, 633 Missouri. " ' 

t (G ^> Gr £K°T e FF'- 612 John at. 

605. Toronto— C haa. E. Harris. 

412. Warren— D. A. Bradley, 13 So. Purk av. 



42»'. 5\ EYMOUTH — E. J Pratt, Weymouth Height« 374. E. O. Yokoiu, ly Ferguson ave. 
421. 5' oburn — T imothy Ring. Winn at. *40. M. A. Carter, 47 Puller st 

»3 Worcester— C. D. Fisk, 720 Main at. 99. Cohoes — A. Van Arnam 22 Ge 

_ _ OfY** f'on»« IS lx m J. 



MEXICO 

C. P. DtAZ -W. Smith, l)ox 2 Eagle Pa=«,Tex. 



.“* a-ohoes— a. x an Arnam, 22 George at. 

30». Corning — E. 1). Chase, Dodge ave 

601. CornwalitOX- H udson— E. J. Bond. Box 173. 

315. Elmira— E. M Snyder, 761 E Market 



Central axe. 

OREGON 

530. Astoria— O le Estos, Box 443. 

Portland — T. B. Shellhaminer, 32 N. 10th 
544. The Dalles — A. Biers. 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allegheny City — 

211 C. 1.. Mohney, 70 Wilson ave. 

_ * Robert Gramberg, 2 Bluff st. 

115* (; stairs . &c -) R- M. Ex-ans, 49 Kilbuek st. 

487. Altoona-T. Renner. 1328 8th ave. 

t£ SSSS.SS7 -"* Kirker - ,m F °“ n " "«• 

655. Belle Vernon— I saac Coldren, Box 207. 



263. Velasco — W m. McKinley. 

.»59. \\ axahatchik — Y\ in. K. Noruian. 

UTAH 

6-35. Ogden — L. N. Park -. p. O J(,,x 1’4 

4.09. Salt Lake City— C lias. M. sum mi. Box p* 

VERMONT 

512. Bellow s Falls- L. N. Davis, Box '».0« 

32«*. BuRLixc.TON-Jas. Child».. 1:0, x. Widardat 
W. Uctland-A. W. White, 52 State st. 

VIRGINIA 

2*6. H ampton— W. B. Walker. 

.318. Newport News — J os. Up-haw 
£85. Norfolk— R. E. Gay, 14-Jl Washington st 
Fort-mouth. * 

781. P0RT8M0UT11— R E. Meggs. 605 Queen st 
13.. Richmond— H. \Y . I»oore, 1H8 Cimfiin s*. 

juä ^ J- B. Mason, 701 Clark st. 

498. Roanoke \N. J. Bacon, 416 1th ave., N W 

WASHINGTON 

743. Aberdeen— W. T. Ilifl', Box 617. 

•3-4. E\ KRETT — Joseph Mersch. 

575. Fair Haven-A. J. Holion. Box 566 
553. Kettle Falls — p. h. MeCarthey. ' 

™ S LYMP i A ~ W * L ^»rk, 315 Union 
260. Port Angeles— W. w Matlv 
521. Port Townsend-g. A. Ruehie. 

6^' ^* A , TT, '^ r 7^ 1 * Sw'enaon, Box 1450. 

6 4l' SroKAiir ' ini 0 ' H°u pan. 824 Iaikeview ave 
10*' ' POKANfc *— -J 0 '*» Hearn. Box 1340. 

X . ACOMA ~ 11 M« Lean, Box 1011 . 

YV HAtcom-D. II. McArthur Box 1217. 

o., WEST VIRGINIA 

26 . Buckhannon-J. W. Neff, Box 17 

^8 ^ '* •'•»lies. Box . 99. 

Fn A ®‘r K8Tow x-C’harles II. Grim 
61«' ‘ bAKKsBURG-J H. Ridenour. Box 38 
- Q GRA^on— (\ E. B,.>k Box 304 

s «sisfsrs* 

helling— E. G roaaeurUi, 82 New Jersey st 



a ^ 

Ii s 



II 1 § a 



Q) il? J 

ö isBfl 

fT< ■= o * * r*. 

B llEfl 



on.> C — 



S° £ =s 

"to 

3 



V® Session of t li « 
•J'iS Cigar Makers’ 
Internationa: 

ö n 

Union, held it 
y Chicago, in tiis 
month c»fS*'jitvni 

K ber, iS'-O. the a" 

H 1 . x 

W companyingJaoe. 

« was adoptetl as a 

n trade mark to ! " 

pasted 0:1 every 

I box of cigars 

G made by Union 




If you aro opposed to the servile laltor o. (kK»l- 
I»», sinoko union-made cigars. 

If you are opposed to contracts for con»- 
labor, in dearlly eompetition with free la»» 1 
smoke union-made cigars. 

If you favor higher xx ages, amok» union-mo* * 
cigars. 

If you are opposed to filthy tenement-hous* 
factories, smoke none but union-made 

If you favor shorter hours» ok labor, smo * 
union-made cigars. 

If you favor a permanent organization of LsUkn 
strictly union shops, do not purchase the P rv 
duet of scabe, rats and blacklegs. t' 

See tbat the Blue Label is eit the Box« 



*« 






|> -sj. 




Li 



CARPENTER 



oi.ume XII. — No. s 

c' 



PHILADELPHIA, MAY, 1892. 



Published Monthly. 



LIFE ! WHAT IS IT? 



CHIPS AND SHAVINGS. 



PICKINGS OF hLL SORTS. 



PERSONAL CHAT. 



I. if.-! What is it" 

<i!dnn <if till- poor it» a liar«! and hitter 

light. 

. .el and »heiter all their day* : 

«« ein . where ne'er one heatu of light 
r>. — their path t<* waken joy or praise. 



Life ' What i» it ' 

1 fii.lren of the poor its a false and rotten 

pledge. 

tia t moeked I iv liendish men. 
an tin v ie rnhlied of natures' heritage ; 

. ai, \ hope the rest that death will bring 
lo tin m. 



Auburn, N. Y. — We liave just formed I Cincinnati and vici-iity has >3300 union 
;i Building Trades Council and it starts carpenters. 

OUt " cli * I Helena, Mont —A convention of the 

Creede. Colo. — In this new mining building trades of this city was held on 
camp there are 20 men lor one carpenter 13th inet. 



b. Tilings are overdone in this place- Dayton, O.-Car builders’ Union No. Legislature ot Connecticut ana atso an — - w ; i C ulwnilnüU9 , * 0 alHO wa» vote 

. ... , . 390 is booming and has now nearly 150 Alderman ot iiattioru. granting financial aid to X«w York I). C. on 

Atlanta, Ga.-lmon »02 has been meillber8 \V. F M.ufarlane, of Unum *>,4, tlf , . v strike , n)11 , the » mil ofS775 

>lding very gucceaeful public meetings Buffalo, N. Y., has been elected Business xpemle(t for lhat purpose out of the Si oco 

late and is building up its membership ' Corsicana, Tex— T. B. Mothershed Agent bv joint Y .»tes of Linons 9, Joo, »» 5 being returned. 

" a - v President ot Union 731 has been elected 1374 an d 440. of Buffalo. * ^ ,. iri , lIar ructions how to push trade 

. . . v Alderman. JosEPH Li. ClINKARD has been placed ,1 CIII11U ,1 9 and conduct strikes or to manage in 



Hugh McKay, of the G. E. B , and 
(General Secretary McGuire spoke in 
Trenton. N. J., March 21), in behalf of 
Union 31. 

Philip II. Fagan, of Union 43, Hart- 
ford, Conn-, is a member of the State 
Legislature of Connecticut and also an 



Life' What i» it 7 

children of the poor its a mirage »till re- 

• - ding. 

I- iv mg bright v ith ho|n*s most golden till 
! fade« in gloom away ; 

!.«t *air. tiend ghoulish, to death its vic- 
r 1 in— h ading. 

II. to us o'er the low Iv to resume its awful 



holding very successful public meetings 
of late and is building up its membership 
in that wav. 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE GENERAL EX- 
ECUTIVE BOARD. 

I' I R»T hay's SESSION— MARI It 28. 

The General Executive Board met at the of- 
liee of the G. S. at s A M. All day was spent 
auditing the accounts of the general olllee. 
sE< ONt* hay's SESSION- MARI It 29. 

Report of G. S. on vote of G E. B. on special 
a»»e«»ment was unanimous, -o also was vote 
grunting financial aid to New A ork I). C. on 
account of Downey strike, and the .»mu of 5775 
was expended for that purpose out 01 the «1 0C0 



J*! e 1 »oyi-ott: of .the Sew Seattle, Wash — T- J. MeCorry, of in the Held again as Walking Delegate tor lockout». which was prepared hy the G. 

'' • ' ’ , ° 1 T r V \n- LTnion331 hae teen d.tlv reinstated as he Unions 33, • »7, 218, 309 and .>bl, ot the s. t to send to local unions, contemplating mak- 

umon compositors has been endorsed b> „“.X-alv expelled. ' Boston District Council. His office is at illK in« spring, was read to the 

the American Federation of Labor. wa. me^ai.A expei e roomg , ;9 y Washington street, G . E. B , and was unanimously endorsed hy the 



Alderman. 



S. Kvanston, 111.— Union 117 has a Boston, Mass, where there is a Carpen- 1 Board. 

Tawas City, Mich.— Dull here. B. T. Walking Delegate in the field and he is ters’ Employment Bureau tor uniou men. . lh , ( ; K b ratified the action of the G. s in 



Life! YVhat should it he? 

■ v . hli»»ful state for every child ut man 
* i i !i. ui» poor, mi sorrow ativ whi-re; 



latiire'» «are i ternal pla n 



.• !i to a'.l that nature give« an heir 

T ' Wai-h 

r.a N i w York 



<mith & Co., are building a large building ttjl f uanv vv initiations, 
litre and employ none but scabs and work 

eleven hours a day for §2 per day. This The National Brotherhood ot Boiler 
tirm will furnish the World’s Fair job with Makers lias over 50 lodges, though organ- 
material. . ized only three years ago. 



JAMES MuKi.M, Business Agent of the «d uring a private loan of £2, 5 0 for sixty days 
New York carpenters, spoke in Nyack, from tile American Federation of Labor to pay 
y March 21, and Norwalk. Conn. , claims for death benefit now on file in the gen* 



April 19, iu behalf of our U. B. 

C. Pawley, Union 21«, £an Jose, Cal , 



eral olllee, and said loan to In* repaid from the 
moneys received from the »5 cents special as- 



— Milwaukee. Wis— The Brotherhood t siox iw, i,viiu,.'ibsb., ia uum K a no..- -■ — , 4 i • • ao 

BOW TMFV nil IT IN MONTANA ol Tunmrs an<1 Curriers, of this, city, drous work hy public meetings, sociables land. Orey., lu ) ve JT^oM°rV»!!lpr 

hOW THEY DU IT IN MONTANA. h aV e nearly 9i o men locked out on ac- and by the helpot the Ladies’ Club. District Organizers for our Older. 

\v F.. Deemy. P. J. Hiekev and E E. I count ot a reduction in wages The men ’ • JosKrit Neweielu is \\ alking Delegate 

ixi l-v. representative labor men ut Butte, have been out since January 25, and are Brooklyn, N. Y. — Union 258 wishes it tor the carpenters’ unions ot Bock Island, 
Montana, have been arrested for the mur- holding tirm. j known that its tieasurer, Richard Shaw, 111.; Moline, 111., and Davenport, Iowa, 

der of W. J. Penrose, editor of the Mumnj lias been absent only seven times in a as these three cities are adjacent to eat h 



Union 



,0s 1 vnu Ma«s w doing a won- and Wm. E. Henderson, Union 50, Port- »e»««ent. 

1 UN. Lynn ua.a. U uoingawoii «nnimiss oned as ItejK.rt from L. 1. 2s», Norlolk, Yu., relative to 



./■ o', in Butte, Montana, who w as mur- Providence, It. I— Union '.»4 is now | membership of live and a half years, 

leivd June 1«, 1*91, in that city. It | growing at a lively rate and holds public 

appears Mr. Penrose had been jHiblishir.g meetings the third Thursday ot each Non- Resident Carpenters working in 

Kune scurrilous articles against the labor month. We are gaining ground on the New '! ork city, will hereafter be re- 



other. 

James T. Sterling, of Chicago, is now- 



in charge of the work on a new hank and || ie c'liinigo convention 



carpenters in the Unite«! States Navy Yurfi work- 
ing overtime for » ngle time pay. The matter 
was referred to the G. S. lo follow up the matter. 

The G S. presented to the Board a tabulated 
statement of tile numerical standing of the L*. 
B., also the lluetuations of general receipts and 
increased expenses, death claims, etc of the U. 
B. covering a period of twenty months, oi’.-ince 



organizations of 1 utte and tl. -ir leaders nine-hour »jmstiou; the plumbers have quired to pay $1 per ijuarter to procuie a 
l'.\ manufactured evidence and concocted been <>ut solidly since May 2, lor the nine working card. In 8t. Louis, .lo., t te\ 



By manufactured evidence and concocted been out solidly » no 
testimony thes«* three men were alleged lmur*. 
to be the murderers, but so weak have 

been the proofs that the accused were Wilmington, Del 



charge $2. 



a large re>idence in Springfield, 111., tor a 
Chicago tirm. He has introduced the 
nine-hour day and will hire none but 
union men. while others work ten hours 



been the {»roofs that the accused were Wilmington, Del.— I nion 4o had ite _ ‘ ‘JJ*- |V e holding ^onen and Dublie meet” to Union 1«. 

released on bail of SIO.(mm) each. The trial hub burned out some time ago and lost ...Li initiat es ^a large roster of new y \y i-, MIS of Vanderbilt 

was to take „lace Auril 4. and thousands considerable of its property. Union carpen- ‘»b's and mitutea a torge ter ot new p R „v. E. \\ .^Ermis of \ ander > t 



SnusunELD, 111. — Union 111 is doing . His nonree lias been a great Help 



was to take {>lace April 4 , and thousands considerable of its property . l nam « m pen- momliprspvprv week it will get the nine- T-oi-i.;»,- \'i«hvillp Term is a tirm and settlement of the iliilieulty as tu the carpenters 

of dollars have been raised by capitalists ters everywhere should do the.r utmost to | I*!rn 2 t friend o ’ the if B ’ Oi! October 1 employe., by .bat firm 

to secure the conviction of these innocent discourage the mill work made in tins cit\ - h P will ooen a eries of lectures on labor fominunirntion from L. U. 49 *;, Vicksburg, 

1 1 icu so as to down the labor organizations by Jackson, Sharj» N: Co. It is piete wor ■ j Syrait^e, N. — Me have succeeded gnd economies in the L’niversitv I Mi»*., relative to »iH»eiui a».>»e»'meiit levieii.iuue 

ot that section I here are thirty- two trade ot the worst t}pe. in starting up a good live new union, and course of the Chicago l niver- u. isui.amlM»kiiig that the »ante be remitted, 

and labor unions in the county, and it is ..lit has started out iu a lively manner. , he mav | iave the eo- The G. K B deeiined todo»o 

one of the be>t organized sections in the \\ innere', Manitoba.— Larpenters We ha j a ^ ra nd demonstration May 2 of ..n 1 our Chicago memhers. Th.- ewe of J. F. Day, Uni«»,, i 9, Newark, X. 

United Mates. And not long ago the men Union 343, and the 1 am ters and brick- an ,[ Edward King ot New York city made 1 , , r be mav go in Illinois, Wis- J..wa» again brought i^fore the G. E. B, and on 

w>r.* powertul enough to stop the building layers unions bine joint \ u.te< up a the principal speech. ,T»n»in Ohio Indiana "and Michigan he ' K<*ing over the volmuinou» .lo. ument» presented 

ot a railroad in that county until tlie de- 1 rades union hall toi the tiiiee unions, . . ' . Live our helD in his lecture ii wa»decidv«l Hint the ease be referred to Brother 

mauds .if union labor were recognized, and oi»ened it* with be oming ceremonies | p CFFA ,, 0 , N. Y.— The talk ot a building 'j ‘ t e. ixtgan with i»ww to pro.-ced to Newark 

The union men in Montana are raising and speeches It is a handsome {»lace booln bere j g a ll buncombe The great * t “' — and »etile the mutter Aatbfactorily. 

ia »e funds and have secured the best j and the pride of all union men. Depew sbo{>s is the only contract given A DECLARATION OF UNION FAITH. Apia-ai of L. u. 12. st. Ia.iü». i„ < ,se of John 

hval talent to defend the tliree accused . 'out and it will not Ik. ready for months. twentv reasons whv men Utrvwe again»! «ie,i»i«m of t;.s„ ami g. t. On 

men. The nmrtlered man Penrose bore a Bbidgki-ort, Conn.— Mrs. Lizzie L. phe Gould coupling works anti other pro- . ‘f. f-Y,, ti 1P nninn their trade It going over the . vi.lt ncv in tin- <.«*• the G. E. B. 

I.a-1 repu-atiim an enemy of working- Hill/, widow of tin' I.«* .«o ltilt*. of ^ wi || not be reldy U.« year. lIÄhoÄ i“ 

ami at one ti„,e ivas -hot in Se- fnion 115 llmlyenort. Conn , »end. « 1 fj > “ nl > “ « x,w,ü »" to 1 of 

vada. very neat card ot thanks to our l mted Providence, B. L— At last the carpen- le "K l ■ . Th - Akr..n, Ohio, f..r »auction of trade .h mandi.. 

Later me complaints have been with- Brotherhood und P» l monlb» tor prompt ter9 0 f this city have pulled themselves L Le<-ause it tends to raise A,u.es. lhia j Tlll . (i B .. give ofik-ial »am tioi, to demands 
drawn and the defendants discharged, settlement <»f claim on death of her hits Qut 0 f tbe iu ud. Secretary McGuire is proven by all sorts of evi< » ue. 1 i„,t do not think financial aid nee« »»ary w 4ieu 34 

when the authorities saw union labor baud and for kindness shown her in Her , ttirre( j tbem bv his stinging, masterly 2 . Bc ause it helps to prevent reductions | <M , tuf 35 1 ,,,»«.» arc favorai.u* t.j.h mand». 



1 , iu,, lui « Tin* ft S. Hiilmiittcd ;i plan of a printed sou- 
jdueed tbe V enir f«»r tin* St. Louis conwiition whvrvhy the 
! nolle but 9alne nia y i,e pul,ii»lieil without cost to the or- 
• ^ IIOUIS j» M „jj !a ,j 0 |, > whii.-h w a» approved, 
great liel{) TheG. S. Wie» instructed to continue commu- 
nication with the Pabst Brewing Company, Mil- 
ilerbilt Uni- waukee, YVi».. and bring al»out a satisfactory 
a tirm and settlement of the iliilieulty as to the carpenters 



men s.» as to down the labor organizations by Jackson, Sharp N: Co. It is piece work Syracuse, N. Y.- 
of tliat section There are thirty- two trade ot the worst type. in starting up a good 

and lalior unions in the county, and it is , it has started out 

one of the beM organized sections in the Winnepe« , Manitoba.— L’arjtenters a ^rand dt 

United Mates. And not long ago the men Union 34:’., and the I’ainters and Brick- an ,{ F.dward King ol 
wn-c powerful enough to stop the building layers’ unions have jointly tilted up a tbe principal speech 
ot a railroad in tliat county until the tie- Trades union hall for the three unions, 



legal talent to defend the three accused 
n en. The murdered man l’eniose bore a 
bad reputation as an enemy of working- 
people, and at one time was shot in Ne- 
vada. 

Later me complaints have been w ith- 
drawn and the defendants discharged, 
when the authorities saw union labor 
unite to help these men. 



verv neat curd ot thanks to our l nited 
Brotherhood and t>» Union 115 for prompt 
settlement «»f claim on death of her hus- 
band and for kindness diown her in her 
distress. 



A NEW DECLARA I IUN Uh UNium r«nn. .\pp«*ai oi I.. 1 . U. >1. ixitus. 111 rase ol John 
Here are twenty reasons whv men I «wwe ngulnst . | «*w,", of G.x..umi o. T. 0» 
«hould join Lite union of their tra<le. It «••»»« «»’er the evi.lc.ei* in the c».- the G. E. B. 
mightlv easily be extende-l to twice its •■*«>eur 1.» .1 .-, m g. s. a„.n;. t. 

I * Application of I.ncul Unions H4 ami '28 of 



length : 



when the authorities saw union labor baud ami for kindness shown her in her ttirre( j them by his stinging, masterly 2. Because it helps to prevent reductions j 35 1,,.»^» am favoraMc to.u-mam,». 
unite to help these uieu. distress. speech of A{»ril «*». And now ( nion 94 in wages. L ut- downs rarel\ come to well— Application from L. U., 3#2, Amlci-sou. imi., for 

, T - ^ T1 \l ■ I crowded with new initiations. The organized labor. trade «li-mainl» which was laid over from last 

.r-.vir -rue duo unci out a oAiiv D. ’»ton Ma»s.— lhe Massachusetts car- ine .j 10Ur day must come here as else- i; e ,. au »e it aide in getting shorter ».ccting was taken up ami from information fur* 

LEAVE THE PHILADELPHIA DAILY 1H *nters’ District Council ap^aled to the where hour8 Unorganized trades work the ni-iu-d by the union the g. K B.. would advise 



RECORD” ALONE. 



» m December 15. 1M*1. after a re«jtiest 
f..r .11 increase in the price of composition 
«.♦ 5 cent» per l""o ems. Wm. M. Singerly. 



I ’ Ilult 1 J * j 1 . . * * . where. hours l nonranized traües work me ni-ht-.i i»v the union tin* <i. E. B., wouM auvi.se 

clergymen <»f the Mate to devote the last longest hours union *>2 to accept „.»> fair c.,,«*s»i 

c t».- \t.vil tin* advneaev of the I mto/1 Minn Workers’ I ninn mugw, huui. . I 1 



t .,-f III , | ] kiuu * v »iv v»»» — -- 

proprietor «.t the ththvh A""/' , per- , ieJ vvitb reques 
»1 iiiailv ttirned upon the street all the r 



• - .. , , . .1 .... 1 ... , , I II 111* 'll ID ufUf »I uu\ I. in Uimi r"PHi uuuiuti 

<nn. Jav in \i«ril to tl»e a«lvoe*rv of the Since the l mted Mine \\ orkers t nion luu ^ rru . . . #l . . ^ 

eight-hour movement. A «elf worded has abolished its strike fund the owners j t ^^geSimeS S^States '.Motion fron» L u.. Baltimore, for 8 

circular for that P ur,,.se was prepared of CO al mines are contemplating a general is as true ot *a e earners a. ot t. u ■ llours |>t . r , lay , f , lllrti „ n ; 

and »ein out and a few clergymen com* reduction of wages next spring, and the Because it lessens exiess. e tompet - , lt , IiaIllI « lllt . Illatt , r ..f fimuH iai .,i.i 



men will he unable to resist tiie reduction, tion for situations. Useless competition is j ' 1 ' “ 1 

. i . i i ,. i , : . , , _i r..: I on aii.-r .-»<•<-. 



uni- hi men in bis employ 



Just read that and don't forget it, you like useless friction. 



131 of the constitution has heen 



Trade Union National Conventions wbo wan t everything with low dues or 



cotii|»)i«‘<l with. 



. . . , • 11*1 I l)|,:i , x IV.X IT. .V*.- - » liu 0,011 V » V » 3 

or all tl a* papers publisnea in 1 inla- w ill Ik* now in fashion the next tliree no dues and poor treaeuries. 

i . t I .... . ... . » ft , a •••■« . »ix * • a • i »r» 



• • i 1*111 i »v nv ” * ■ * • - - — — - I H\J \A i * v • 

d**l{»liia the owes most t<> tlie wage- montbs . In June the International Tv- 
earners. To that class it has alwavi« , , (0gra nhieal Union meets in this city. Solomon 
tcied and from that class it has always 7j, e Amalgamated Ironan»lSteel Workers, furnishers, 

_ ;.. A 1 .. . </\n of »lies . I 1 • ,1 \ I »ft ... it ««* . I il. . L'i . .»... 



received a generous su{'port. the Boot and Shoe Work. 

The has assumed a position y ltwr ± .,„,{ a number i 

lio«tile to organized labor. In ordering tbe j r conventions in June, 
the union menfr<jm his office Mr. singerly 

announced that the would there- Pittsburgh. l‘a — C. B< 

after be a non-union ofliee, ami he has f i» IW , r ..„ e ,, are doin 



mon iN Buben, hatters and men’s ture 

el's, smithtield street, Pittsburgh, Because it gives 



«’». Because it educates as to public ques- A llliwtiuII of L . r . t 62 , t ( - air „. f or .le- 
tlOllS- I he trade union takes t le p a« e o man, I of 9 hours r.-< «-iv. .l, «Iciiiaml» «am tioncl 
the debating society and professor » lee- mil| tbeir>ttl , elI1(1 „. «| 1(> „ pr< .» p. *« ■( » .if slic- 



es men self-reliance- 



i-c»». tlic G. E. B.. believe financial ai.l will not 



«nice refuse* 1 to employ any man who 
w oul l not renounce this union. 

In 1 » s 9 the profits of the /«*< •’"/‘•l Pub- 
lishing Company were >l»» 4 . 0 uo ; in lS'JO 
the profits wcre > 19 ».ooo. Notwithstaiid- 
ing this wonderful prosperity. Mr. Mil 
gft-rly refused to grant an increase that 
would have amounted to less than $ 2.51 M 



the Boot and Shoe Workers the Steam p a ba ve awardeti the contract for their ^ servile boss truckler is not a free man. 
l itters and a number of others have handsome new huildiug_to (»eo. P. Kretz, Becaiweitdeveloiw traternity.CraltH- 

their conventions in June. a member of Union 23., 1 ittsburgli, la. jj ^ ; ea i 0 us of and suspicious 

, , , This guarantees that none but union men another even at the liest. 

Pittsburgh. Pa — C. Boehr and >ons, B hal» do the work, though memhers of * , . 

of P.ucvrus, <>. are doing consult rable tbe p ul iders’ Exchange cllered to do it at •' Because it is a good ime. tn 
work liere. They have furnished a car-load ^.-,000 less than the union estimate. other institution gives back so ; 

of countere. etc.', for the Pittsburgh Times \ * turn for expenditure of time and 

building. This tirm ot Boehr’s area Latest Bk*ort of the Amalgamated Car- 10 . Because it makes tlhnke 



Ik- iit-.'.U-.!. 



Tin 111. HAV« »K»«|.»V. mar. II 30. 



Application »>f L. U-. 7-NS. D.-catur. Ill,, for «le- 
I inrtii.l of 9 lioiir» per day at L0 cent.» pc hour re- 
ceive.!, tin- G. E. B., <lc. i.li d that llii» ca»c lake 



.. ceiv.-.i, me o. r.. r» . .lecnicu 111:11 1111 » ...«c u.k. 
9. Because it is a good investment. No |h|# tvlirst . a> ih tlu . t ,^. L L *.. 62i 
other institution gives back so large a re- < ijro ,,, 

turn for expenditure of time and money, j A ’ n „ uiuII ot - L . u.. oo. Evansville, ind.,fo! 



building- This tirm ot Boehr’s are a 



10 . Because it makes thinkers. 



Application of L. U.. 90. Kvansvillt*, Inti., for 
an a«lvaiM*t* of wa^ic* ami oiiforifiinfiit of trade 



I 'llll'lillp. * ■ ii.v I ' ft • * “ - O __ m I* . 

scabby set and hire none but scabs and pentere shows that the society has 35, 3B3 need to rub intellects togett»er in matters ruh», tin* G. E. B. approve ..f the rai»»-of wiikc». 
have done all in their power to try to break members of which 1852 are in the United of common concern. but .!<•* » not approve of tin- fuurth r» »..lution; 



p Carpenters’ Union 501 of Buevrue. States and Canadi- The Amalgamated u Because it enlarges acquaintances* pro»|H-ct* nppvariiiK «.»««1. imanval aid i» not 



American District Council have just is- Their world is too restricted for most wage .h-cnu-i ,u-«*»»ary. 



Chicago, 111 —A convention was held BUe d a notice that members of other ear- wor kers 



Application ot* I. I . 153, Fort Wiiyiu*, Ind., 



per year. j n city April 11, to form an inter- , » )en t er g and joiners urganizattoni? cannot pj Because it teaches co-operation. f..r <u maud «»r s hour- ami 35 emit- pur hour, the 

The etlect of Mr- Singerly 's action lias uatl ,, na l federation of the machinery i^, admitted into the Amalgamated unless When laborers co-operate they will own g. e b., «k-«-i.k- to lay ihv matt.-r ov.-r until the 
been tliat the price of composition has . Representatives were present thev have a withdrawal or clearance card the earth. \ report of Union'» arbitration eominiuee i» rt- 



been tliat the price of composition has tni ,j t , 0 Representatives were present they have a withdrawal or clearance card the earth. (report of Union'» arbitration eominiueewrt- 

bi-en reduced ott every paper in Blitladel- tr ^, n unions of the boiler makers, urn- f ro m the organization they belonged to. 13 Because it eurlis selfish ness. The grab- wived. 

! .Ilia, with the exception of the !.> rb j u i P ts, machinery moulders, pattern all is toned down by the fear of the opin- Application of L. u., 36?, Gaic-burg, ill , for 

the 1 im. »vom and the L>,„nig lit - , nakers naa .Rjm* blacksmiths, engineers, pun a Delphi a, Pa.— Trade stagnant. i ou 0 f his lellows. ’ »auction of demand of 9 hour» per day. ti„- o. 



prietors saw tiicir opportunity and re- 
duced the rate of compensation, which 
,nr Union was unable to successfully re- 
>ist. They tlid not lower the wages be- 
cAiise of necessity, but because ot their 
1 >uwer to tlo so. 

We anneal to the workingmen ot 1 enn- 

* * , ..I f k«l n*<> fix 4 /“ft 



Iliail Jrrrv cuu^u, » v«ouipuic, . . .. • .1 f fl lor immii- «imi u^tdonsm.icm 

On \t»ril 20 W. F. Abrams, of Detroit, Chris. Evans, J. B- Lennon, and other union man is the sutle* ot tut ni i^ ; ,i,cg. e b, a.ivi«e tin- i>. r , to accept at 

v u - 1 - > _ ., ,, i> 1 . „ ...id roccoil muptimr.; at, twn army • - - I till, (ft|ftaik.i>ltl I lino () ItniirM lwr cln\ Mild Siitlird:)V 



\ our allegiance to öel 



1 SCAB'S REWARD. parent of tbe mob and revolution. , lav and trade rule», the G. e. B.. «rant oilkial 

,, 18. Because it is scientific. The trade »auction, and a» no financial aid is a«kcd for, 

O Erien, ä notorious scab union principle stands the test ol uniilysis ^»cre is no need of pa^sinu on that suUjeet. 
it Hartford, Conn., has met an j applicatiön. Appli» tttion of 33i. E11 Crosse, YVia., for de- 

rard. lie haa been senteme«l Because il is labor-saving machinery, maud of 9 hour». theG. l B, reconmu-nd L. U., 

.. .»/xnr’n imnriCAnmonf Q 14 1 1 1 *- 7 * A ^ tvauöv * c . i « . * ... r - » .. ..1 ... 




laborer a service whose beneni aia> P IU ' 
incalculable. 

Signed ) Puila Typo. Union, No. -- 



aging ana iuti m moucc 
Abrams' powers as a speaker. 



well as a thief. 






HTFL 25 CARt'ENTER. 



The CARPENTER. 

«■FKK'IAL JOI RXAL <>K TI'K 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters an- 
Joiners of America. 



1 TMF PONDITION OF TRADE. a drudge to self respect, to a feeling of unb bco ^trcbonS liarf» irtl i f ur,^ er f ,-, 

Ä Carpenter work this month ha» a more WteT I Ä? 



Put’iiiini M "Hi' v. >■« th> i 



•:! h • h Month. 



l il \. Ninth St., Phil».. Pn. 

1*. .1. Mi ( .inti. K«l it or mul I *ulili-ln r. 

Et.ti ri ll iit tin- I’nrt-t ttliii' lit I’lii'.iili 5 1 *1 • ! . i . I*ii., 
-i t uinl-i la — matt« r. 

Sri» Rifiinv |*i:n i : — Fifty n ut' a yi ar, in 
aih a : • i . |m'l|iititl. 

A' cm " ail Icltci'w anil niniii'V' to 

1*. .1. Mi tiriur. 

Ilnx Pbiladclphia. I’a. 

PHILADELPHIA, MAY, 1892 



they really owe. So each account for season. There is every prospect of a busy 
a year hack has to be looked up and summer and fall season. In many cities 
examined. And many of the unions, trade at present is extremely brisk, while 
having spent the money for their running j D certain sections it is entirely Hat. 
expenses, or have never set it aside, send Along the Pacific Coast and particularly 
all sorts of pleas, excuses and voluminous j,, California, it is terribly dull and has 
letters to exonerate their illegal actions. |>een so for many months hack. In the 
( mr next convention must change our Northwest and the Southern States car* 
t i real system in this respect. It badly j, enters are having very hard times, and 



“»of 

ZJntu 



needs a change. 






I’M! ON 




f LA BEL/ 



LOOK AT BOTH SIDES. 



often unwisely and badly managed, that 
dishonest men otherwise conspicuously un- 
lit tor leadership sometimes get at the 
head of labor organizations. Put is this not 
true of every other form of industrial and 
social organization ? Are capitalist organi- 
zations free from these charges ? Do they 



„I- mu I.»-. .... M line9 an ,, , rale to ,|el,. KU tet. I, Jl,mn but mural, Ww:, : 

the bcnmsm those »evtion» have petered Insteailof beginning *utwn ,K[*tr ouo D» »«but: 

out badly. , , . ... . .7 . jeit entfpru gt. Sotjn^r 

Some cities complain as usual of being with the near and possible relations, it Den Duichgangig burchg'Kfet uud 
overadvertised by real estate speculators seeks to work for the remote and impos- „™„,d,lajt Me. kam» real: 

, , . ... sihle unitv of the mass. Instead of recog- eimtatyne ber «itgl-eber au» » 

and cheap-labor builders who want a sur- , r; 0 „ cn t 0 [[ a r<s n er 

. >i iiiiitinm \* rkf tUo trrrm iih it i' neu «. ‘oiui j U c r ,\c 



haben bi e 
-'Liftidjen 
■hbctts, 

11 K«ti 

: 'be IRehri 

' fflil. 



a surplus of idle men are the following 
cities : Milwaukee, Wis.; Syracuse, N. V ; 
Memphis, Tenn.; San Francisco, Cal.; 



self-interest, political methods demand nd)i 3mertt an$(|t geben i .1 v. . eine 
. . . . ... . . . ctutc (SJeroerfichart tft bte bene 3i.u? mV 

the subordination of self interest to the 



A better ! 



In oit. next issue for June) we will disaster to innocent investors. Have they 
publish a complete statement of all n 0 t Warners an<l Wards? Cannot the 
moneys received in the quarter f«>r the same impeachment be urged with quite as 

months of March, April and May, for the much truth against political organizations 

st.ecial assessment and Protective Fund ami <-lntw * J ureenvine, .uise.; Aspen, coio.; jmwoou, 7 *7 V • »öliiq juftitnmen föiineit. ü*jo baa Unter: 

lu lii JtHkrtl.l! r» „ b , , ,, f . Ind.; Huntington, Ind.; Seattle, Wash., ful - "’hat then? Issues of an economic jur ^untiactK r.u, :5 „ 

also expen L tires for strike. sea- \\ ould anyone venture to say that he- Greenvi „ (> Buffalo, N Y. ; Corsicana, nat,ire t<an no more Resettled by methods Drt0 be t melon engitfeben ©eiueifi^rhn ter 

eon up to June 1, 18J2. cause there are dishonest railroad presi- ^ Vancouver P.rit Col • Pari« Tex • ot State craft than these: latter can by the 3«U ift, DC.feblen Dteietten gerodmlid) i; ten 

— dents and corporation treasurers, the com- ‘ . ’ ‘ ... ’* fln( , ,L p zeal ot a praver-meeting. The Unionist I F fpriinqUdjen 3roetf. Sie werten !:n. 

hinatinn of eanitul should be Drohibited “ Lnannon, W. \ a., a n<i butte, Mont. • ... , , lertmtto," leqen bas öaui'tqenn^t au» Mi 

A STATE MENT TO ALL MEMBE RS- ’‘° at,on ol capital eliouKi he prohibited . re8erve8 his prayers for his own soul, and än , ainmdn qrilfeer ^ onb ,, unD u ,, tbcr . f t ; lU 

TU« m nth’a innmal ha« been held d workin b ,men l,e exited to TRADE UNIONS AND POLITICS. fe ^ lfJ no «nxietv to kneel to the (Jovern- ! intcc » u f nn i)me tee Kampfe* qeqcn tie Uu 

Ihis month s journal l a. been neia be more honest and wise than any other ment to do what he already sees is being beater. 2er i?eriaü ift Dann nur eine ^r.iqe 

bark so t- publish a complete statement clas9 in tlie community ? Why should A * ,he P ol,t,cal ,,a/ i °° ,e 8< ; unde 1 done bv concerted action with his fellow« Der ^eit. 

ot all our trade movements this season up perfection he demanded of them, when and the sonorous toin-tom beaten through - < 4 . r . intnn in M ‘ maq üterrafeben ju erfa^wn, baf bi 

to May -I, 1892. Besides that the ollice liabilitv to err « conceded to every liody the land ; Tojn and Dick are remembered eould not lift a feather Ä tufem jjal.r tn mebr unb 

of the General Secretary has been un- else - ‘since other social institutions are an<1 their ht>a,th ««eetionatelv inquired ^ite llouae he could not lift a feather ^Borc Cm, T hftc reruucfclt waren, nh :m 



social organization? Are capitalist orgam- N y. Pittsburgh, Pa and attainment of the common weal. In the fRit ber 8rüber f cftaft ftnb llnte:ü«|:;njj. 

zations free from these charges ? Do they .. ... LT*. Mi mi . si mix Cit v Ii- course of the development of Unionism faffen uerbunben unb biehlben baluit ui 
not fre.|uentlyact ra»hly often InvoIvlDg ^ ^ Frumwi’ek ; Mule Fills, ’ «« “’i“ 1 ^inpithies ire result», and ^ ' i j? 



I Minn ; Waxahatchie, Tex.; Poise City, 
la.; Pasadena, Cal.; Harriman, Tenn.; 
(hdveston, Tex.; Watertown, N. Y.; 
(jreenville. Miss.; Aspen, Colo.; Elwootl, 
Ind.; Huntington, Ind.; Seattle, Wash., 
Greenville, O. ; Butlalo, N.Y. ; Corsicana, 
Hi>x. ; Vancouver, Brit. Col ; Paris, Tex.; 
Buckhannon, W. Ya. , and Butte, Mont. 



k 1 ■ V . V 7 > ll«( u v l 'in latvs. » v... v . » . , -- -- • - , ■ -v 

. . . . , , ftlo.ltO m ftranfljetto gallon u.b ia :» 

their growth becomes more hardy and ?tr ^nebt betent aber ouobrucHi*. • PlL 

lasting when not forced by hothouse cul- ^ r über|c^aft in erfter L'in e cue t^e: erf: 
ture. Idiaft tein ‘oil, alio e-re Äantpioiaami«» 

Even were the political tinkers success- , ' l1n ?’ 1,e »luöannuq, ii’c.ctjer ir r nur 



V» eise : Mnce omer social insuiuiions are ' f rnm ^.pi.,1,» utii.)» Mi-nnomi.- 

usually ovemowded with increased work, to be judged bv their virtues, why should after But Wlth each repetition of the Whether vou attend t 

consequent upon the call for the special lallor organizations he judged by their » reat 3,1,1 u » r *valed quadrennial circus ^; in ‘ . ilnmateria 

assessment of March 17, and the recent misbikp«-* there is a growing unrest, tendencies to P ra > er meeting or a i.uku. i. immateria, 

UllBUtlkvc • f A t liA lounna t«AI« <<». qaIimik* nn.l l>«f aivinl 



condi- lebten. Tamatö (jab cs 111 Strife •* ::r.t 
tend a bctfjeiliflten Äitglieberit, Dieics :: 

laterial a ^ cr mit öl, TOO SHitqlitbtrn ©oetiH-.rt 
1 full fieo nnthricfteinlicb barauo. ba§ Die Ur. 



call for the Protective Fund on April Coneiderimr their limited onDortunitieB conciliate “ dieaftected labor ” and eeon- to the issues vou nr, solving, and by strict ternelmur Die unaflnftige ©efc^afte . 601 
1P L neutering tneir limited opportunities • i flr i v , llK i, Pf i tll *i,- adherence to the lines already followed junftur bonnet fyaben, um beit Arbeitern e 7 

. . , and the extent of the fortes arrayed ® niu ar |v I’® , k e d to tlie ( .i iem j 8trv 0( eociul vlianue will inev- lefleriutrclen. Sou F'H Strifcu utiir 3l::a* 

Tina mrreaaed work of receipting for, against them, the wonder is not that run ’ At mu Ii a time tin l nionist may ri , . .. . . id)Uif|etl mareit 148 ttcmonnrn, II hnrdi 

listing, booking and hanking all these ex- i u l>orers have made so many mistakes, do wel1 to calmly look upon the funda- ‘ *. a unai . oiuuon m in- g omprom ^ abjtefdtloijcn unb jdm fiir it n 

tra funds has come at a very inopportune but rather that thev hairr nnct- m lnl at n *cntal pi inciple.« involved in trade organ i- ‘ 1181,13 •■-'nancipation. Dyer D. Di m. oerloren. Xic bebeutcnbfte iJtiobcrlage roar 

time, when the routine work of the gen- a ii The«p mi«t' 1 kp« hpp nnt « rimwirv zations. The incoherent elements seek- L-L 77 uuHit biejenige in ^ittsburg. 

..... , . . au - mistakes are not a ne» essarv . , gf* Am ^tnammenlntnq bannt betont bir 23c: 

eral otlu-e 1« greatest on account ol tlie j, art of labor organizations any more than in ^ r an impossible unity in a 1 eople s 1 arty ridit einbringlid) bie fltotlnrcnbigfeit b« roet: 

increased growth of the organization in dishonest ministers area necessary part bai!e their efforts upon an entirely different ~ ^ - » feren ««rbefferung öer Crgonifdtion unbna» 

the spring, the issuance of new charters of Christianity on the contrary thev ,ine °* policy. The farmers, Knights of T* 1) i l a be l p b i a, fDlai, 1892. mentlid) ber grt)Öf)uug Der Jöeiträqe. (rs 

and the various trade movements, strike» arise from j.^ OMnce an(i , lliBt aken no- Ubor ' «weotavke». Xatiunalists, Pro- ßm «Vt»frf|(l|ai«.*etii7 iSfoÄnt» SäSeSft? Sm Skva. 

ami lockou.8 which crop out at this time tions among the laborer», which trade hibitioniata, and a-ountle.e other tin- Go ift neulid) an biefer 3teUe »on trüber, (tu übet „iximtom«" übvrflicfecn, befäauwrn 

of the year. unions are the most etlicient means of wh,etle ^»rieks have set before them a K$oft ber 3immcrleute bie Mcbe geroefen, tf)re «erbönbe bie 2lrbeiter ftjftemattfdi. tjm 

To attend to all these matters, and pass corre cting. glorious ideal, but we seriously question r or xctmtc^ Jafjveoberidit berieltcn Snftuim beifelbeti, urn ben iltbeitern bao 

on the many appeals, grievances, and dis- i| en ce we find to dav that in thnso in whether the road thev are pursuing will j? iM ^ranlaffung nodjmalo auf fie guriiefju* geroonnene roieber tu entreißen unb hire Cr= 

pn,«. and to consider the nnmeroos ^ ^ — j« fading »„Ler. 

aw. sent in for approval, to edit this jour organized and exercise the greatest in- between the avowed and ostensible ends roufen juin d’ittftcr bencn. nadjftcn $af)r cine beffere met ben. tray 

nal, and keep track of all the official de- fluenoe, strikes are fewest, wages are of those zealous reformers— and we grant rie Ttriiben'diait ift jefjn ^abre alt unb biefeo 3? ergaben cinigetmaBen eridtroeren 
tails of the general ollice is indeed no easy highe«t hour« of labor arp shortpst and them to be such— and the spirit of Trade »idd ct.ien eingigen biirfte. 

ta»k or »ineenre in an aggresive growing the .eUtio,,» between worker» and' ,i„. Fnioniem there ,» a ditterem-e aa wide a» iS‘l mu* |* Ltai.Unirab unb 

organization such as ours. 80 if at times plovers most confidential and harmonious. tl iat between East and \\ est, as high and gliebcrn, gafflt _ftc jefct 797 Unions mit n I, ä uculid) getagt rourba : Xio 33rüben‘d)aü be: 
in tlie past two months there has been Trade unions therefore are not only deep as that between Heaven and Hell. eiugcfd)ricbeiu’u JJiitgliebern, roooon 3 immer, °ntc ift cine muüerlnifte Ctcani’a 

any delay, omission or error we ask your legiti , liate economic and social institu- The Union is based upon the principle & Uon. icroeit ftxift gemcrfid;aTthclic 3mecfe n 

kind indulgence in view ol the foregoing tiona, bn, they are an intcgnU par, ot the “f fiance and in to history ha» & a/„ Jn&.LlieÄtÄgUcl! SS,. ÄfciÄ“® 

statement of the work we have had on industrial organization of modern society, dlustrated the social chemistry by which icf) a ft pi inrfolgeu. fire Tabelle gibt Dar: lidior Erfolge aufgurocifcn. 'JJimmt b;e 



• issues more dearly pushed to the “dhcrence to the lines already followed juitftur bcitnfct fjaben, urn ben arbeiten! <■ !- 

i Nr «neb n tiniP thp i' n inni«i , fl ie chemistry ot social change will inev- aefleriutreten. iß on 2.i8 S trifee ober 3F:5: 
t. At such a tune the l nionist may • * . . idjlufien roaren US gemonnen. 11 burdj 

veil to calmly look upon the funda- J* • , , nearer a final . olution in In- (Sonummtift abgefdiloffeii unb jelm oir gn 



■ t»oiniiromiB aogeiduoiien unb 3 dm ging a 

dustrial Emancipation- Dyer D. I. cm, oerloren. £ie bebeutenbüe SWieberhigc roar 

100M Diejenige in ^iltsburg. 

/jfT V» -tf-sw auf ah 3m 3ufammenlmng Damit betont bir 33e: 

I ridit einDringlid) bte iff otlurciibigfoit ber me; 

. leren fBerbefjerung ber Crgamfation unb na: 

f) i l a b e l p b i a, Jliai, 1892. ntentlid) ber Grbobung öer Beiträge, to 

a. , ... „ — — bab.n ndntlicf) bie Unter ne^mer fid) ght . 

win Ujfctuenfqaffj^mqt. faUö organifirt unb roviftrenb fte non libra* 

(To ift neulid) an biefer c telle non 35riiber: jeit über ,, Harmonie" überflicfeen, befdini»en 



our hands. They are the economic counterpart of tl'* e becomes transformed from a narrow äb cr folgutben 3luffd)lufe : 

And added to it we must say (ieneral that combination of capital whose exist- epoistic desire to a broadened mutual alii- \'J l s r j 

SecretarVjMcGuire has saved the organi- e nce and development are equally neces- an °c. w herein from the root of self-interest lss-> 

zation thousands of dollars this season by earv to harmonious social advancement. we have at length the flower of mutual in- INKL ! . ! ! ! 

go.ng out on the road, and. strengthened It is giiuple folIv> therefore, to regard terest - the growth of a plant have ! Ks f 

the organization by his public addresses. tra4 , e uniong as necessarily a menace to bwn the steps in this direction. From 

In advance of tlie date fixed for strikes industry and social welfare j they are con- Elated trades, jealous of each other, to Ur 

he has in many cases met: the employers Bt itutionallv important educational institu- alliance, federation, solidarity, each with Inks ! .* .* .* 

in their Exchanges, or where he could not tions, and can never be a power for other self-interest is seen to be best ,Ks! ' 

do that he has gone around and visited thjm pood thro%rh the discipline thev furthered when merged into mutual in- \™' 

them individually and secured settlements must con fer. ' terest. And this has resulte.1 because of J ' ’ * . ’ * * 



them individually and secured settlements 
favorable to the men in several cases with- <j n 
out strikes. I11 the Cincinnati district, e |i e ,. t 
which also includes. Covington and New- f lirn j f 



IHM . 

1SS2 . 

Ihn : 5 . 

IHM . 

Inn.’» . 

!**!.’ i.nöh ocrbefRru, fo fame unoetmcib'id) biv 

77 1 to»- Sec 3wi't*>fe in bie iSJcrcrfe, btn be 

l KS , ( 79?>< i SBoffe je^t fdion mit iferen Trabe: c dnhen ;;t 

, S!HI ;'■['* ferbertt petfndifit, märe fo grofe. bafebiecc 

i s i,i 'i'V- ' »eii*?'aftlid)e Crganiiation erlahmen nuifete. 

1,188 Tie 3i*mife hüte, tote alle ocrhaltnifemofe; . 

SBic moit fiefet, infolce bad gröfete, fa ge-- beffer geftellieit Arbeiter haben alio r . 
be, pi phänomenale 31>art)otf)nm b,r i'ht: gröfete 3ntaeffe Daran, an ber a 1 1 g c m 
eb’ihaft in ben 3dl)ten lH8*i unb I8f*9; im 11 e ,l ."öeburg Der Arbeite; (Elaffe ut in;! 

teren 3al)rint 3ufammentang mit Der afl» unb b?r Ser cht betont auch ihre bereden' 



dmul-mt. 

l,:3s 

4n; 

1 ,o;i 
1 .420 
17,0ö9 
4,ii7;; 
2,900 
3JJ78 



raidie (Sntroitflung Des üanbes, 10031t and) b 
bie jvon Dauer einer grefeen teinroanterung 
gehört, ihten ftorlgang fo root Den bie’V irr: 
folge fortbaueru. 2ie root Den aber fündig 
nidit mehr pi erfamo en fein, alö bieh r. 
2ßurbe fich Die Sage ber 3 , mmerleute babuvd) 
beträdulid) über Diejenige ber rlKaffe anbei. ; 



>inve labor organization» are the tnoat »^nva U. ita own ,i„ M „f TÄÄ'ÄÄt'X , Ä SÄ 

lectual and nearly the only means of a, t,on - »> hue consciously seeking sell- gliebfthaft in ben 3al)ten 1H80 unb r8!«i ; im iien .peburg 
niisliing opportunities for economicedu- i'd^ r eet. there accompanied it mutual re- cr,tcr . cu 3>df)r im 3ufammeithang mit ber all* unb b>r Sor'd 



4,1 «8 



But these trips added to the other official 
burdens and cares of the General Secre- 
tary are a severe task on a man's physical 
am l mental powers. 

In the spring of the year the general 
ofhee should he more free to attend to the 
many trade disputes, strikes and loek- 



suppress them.— Prof. <no. (iuntoninthe inaugurates ; a chemico-sodal fusion n! 1 !!'?! 5?hfc r i? cr s8crtd ’7 (r fan ten nmrbe, fcrauStrete. Sen einer Crgan 
...... ■ , ; na ;<■ uarn i... ,,,| : i 1U.1011, Untono bie 3lbl)aliutig con otfciitlid)ett 3hr= nitton, an Deren Spißc 15. 3. aihiSuire 

ja L(0ho " ,lst ■ 39 * •* properties arise jammlung guv «efprcdjung oon Jlrbeihr-'Jltt: fann man roof. I erwarten, bafe'fic prhnir: 

... lro,u precipitates in the crucible of g c h“Qonheiten empfehlt : „Agitation ift ba^ rooniaftero fo roeit geht, alo ber ltfe:c (J. 

social life. w. !iV •^ r ^r n i! at ‘‘il n * ^eruadjlrifpgung Rrefe jit ©eroerffdiaf en in feimn iBo dilü'» 

, . Dtr 'J niri.tiiin ill ai;iiii.,.v, w " ... m .... . 



n t ie spring o. ne ea, ne genera. TWENTY-ONE NEW UNIONS. In the 

ofhee should he more tree to attend to the f or a shorter <la 

many trade disputes, strikes and lock- In the past month, charters have been trated. Not onl 
out.« which then usually occur, and add granted to twenty -one new unions, viz : No. their fellows w 
to the volume ot correspondence. Such 85 Hollister, Cal.; 161 Cleveland, U ; 174 be desire« 1, was 



timp ,7 ’ ; ’ >lvJua ‘ impart muejjenuence, ein Kifeerfola iu ^ ^ T r « wa » * «^wwflcriditofomiteo, rocldjcr nib 

' O., 46( San Antonio, I ex., i<.erman); eradicate servility and foster a spirit that Sail glaubte man Die 'union nbhi m -ruct befinbet, gcigt.Dafe mahrciibbc*' iv 

Ihe moneys tor etrikes and lockouts 4 <9 Seneca balls, N. \ .; 624 Cairo, 111., will vet strike for far higher ends It is ( ^g }'u haben in »weiten mar ann»Mi* -h 0 * ? 8CK 7 af)rco H '‘ 2r ‘ 8 oorfanttn. rm: 

should be on hand and available. They (colored); 5ti5 Syracuse, N. Y.; 668 Lin- the struggle n a small «ruU «•) ; i V Wufelofigfeit erroiefen *?in bcnen . 'bTW betgclegt mürben, unb mnti , 

»lioul.l be »ent retralarlv ead, mnnti Ll„ III . \m i v v . .TL“!"??.. " * “>*« »•««<* Me „grow jtnsabr mi, Sjilfc brt M.mitrt. *: 



unb troar an 

llnmlt.-s '1 



Slerfilnt.«« k.L M 7 ‘»uuyeu. jiur :o ,yaue oon UJCioaitloanii 

v g b r Slrbeifotetf 3?erbinbung mit Strifes mürben berichtet. 






TirlJü CARVHIN'L'EK. 



General Officers. Moneys Received. 



OF THE 

C- t J Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 

v 'f the General Secretary, 

N Ninth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



, P-. -! !<•' i— w. H. Klivrr. Box ]56, 

kl. (.’< •« '.i ("«!.. 1 . 1 . 

. . r.-tury— P. .1. Mt-Guire. Bus 884 , 

«. 'a 

, - i • .»«.: r«T— .lam»"» Truy. 2» '26 i hri»tian 

»lit- . j • c. i. Pa. 

iif.vr.tuL Vi< e-Pre>tdest>. 

• !’ “t «■ tien' 1 ’ M. \V, iii . 2» Twelfth 

■ ~ : **a F < 

• V lit — P. \V. Biri K. 79» No«- 

rvt , Brooklyn. N. V. 

• lEvrpuL Executive Board. 
t . . *;«.iiileti<.v f" r the (*. E. B. nr.-t I* 
funeral r*. rt t.« r v. 

M Kay. 3i r 2 Pari» St.. E. Bofton. Ma«, 

1 _r i r i . Ill E. 'Vth >t„ New York. 

. \ *:■ -. ].V i*»arl St . .letTer^un ville. Ind. 

a - -i’ll-. 4M Monroe Ave.. Detroit. Slieh. 

r _> ■ i » S >t . Li m • In, Nri>. 



OBITUARY NOTICES. 

/«*»' t t-rt u»i.3<-*- f*iu hffid cr>*t fm cent* per line. 

<’L> e*iek. Ma— .. March 2 * 1-92. 

A c. u'.,r meeting of L. r.3-> 1' B. 1 '. arid 
\ helilon the arx.ve 'late, the following: 

■. ■ . •• ATi' I repolutioii» were unaiiimoualy 

&■ , * 

■ sre It ha* pleaded the S'li.reme \nbi- 
t ' n;\er*- to take from our mid«t our 
•a rk :n*n. Brother John M Elli** >n. late 
Pre* of o>;r t'nion, ani 
Wf Kt v- «» ir t'nion ha« lo«t a true, faithful 
at -t i h worker for the | • r : : . . iple- he so 
: ii y . «;.o -e>l Therefore t>e it 
f... .’-«■/ 'Chile we deeply dep ore the lo«* we 
f ..vi - i«w.ne<i. we how :n humble * ibtni**Hon 
• • - w o' Him who doeth ail thins- well 

T.it we e» tend to the bereaved family 
t:.* - in; ,thy .iiid condolence •: le tie family of 
• .o»ed broth. r 

: ■ T .at a copy of the«»- re-o .lions >ie 

*e of r. .r de< -ea-* i brother. a.«o 

on our minute« and pul'l:«hed :n our 
a ourr.a .TiiE Carpenter 

I . E v ! N :• KKR-'iX. 1 

All red Has»on > Committee. 

C M. t'CETi- S 



Cin ivsati « » . April fi 1--2 
a rec .r m.. t 2 •>' I l’ 6-1 I’ B C and 
A. Lei.. i, the . "'e date, t. e toil 'tt'.ng 
• e a., re- lution- were uiia> ns.-!- y 

ru a— I» ha« | • »- i the A ! 'Vim- 11 her 
-r-e t" *.ik- - m " ••• R. i-t our e.l- u- 



OCRnM# THE MO.VTB »DUM, VAR. H 31. l.tri 
•a“®*« “T error« ippar eerily vhe Ö. B. wtebrat 4 ».»». 

AJ1 iwivea It iPRU. Wlli be patched In ten 

J J*P « Tbu report lBOialeo «1 mosey« 

® T *** «• 8 - rra “ '-«»1 Cnlosj ter iax ltd nip pile« 
tee the Bwotb of M 4 (O H only. 



1 — S236 I«' l« 6 — 

2 — 4» M» 167— 

3— 19 no i-j-_ 

*- I»'. To 1'.*«— 

' - 2 ; ;<i 17" — 

6 — 2 171 — 

7 — 7 Vi 172— 
»— SÖ 30 173— 
f*— 10 10 ri- 

ia— u li> 175— 

11— II .5o 17-, — 

12— In »0 177— 

13— 17« — 

14 — 2 70 Tu — 

15 — 5 70 1-0 — 

16— 11 15 HI— 

17— 5 hi 1 « 2 — 

16— 3 50 li»3— 

1Ö— 3 60 1M— 

II 1«5 — 

- 1 — 1 Mr- 

22— 5» (Ci 1-7— 

2*— 20 .% 199— 

24— ■ 1»«— 

25— 25 nl.' pv— 

26— 20 191— 

27— 1 1 50 192— 
2 «— £3 0 |98— 

29— «.« 7' 194— 

30— 50 195— 

31— 3 10 196— 

32 — 2 50 197— 

33 — 97 1 ' 19 g — 

34 — 3 H i 199 — 

35— 4 4 ' AC*— 

36 — . 201 — 

37— S s. 202— 

is — 5 0 I 20 *— 

39— 3* HO 34 — 
4* i— 9 50 Jlö— 
41— 3 0(' -Oiv- 

12— 4 60 3V7— 

43— 22 50 ««- 

44— 2 .30 ii»- 

45 — 1 *0 210 — 

36— 2 4' all— 

47— 4 70 212— 

*' — a 3 . 213 — 

49— 20 60 214— 

50 — 1! 7'' 215— 

51— 21 60 ti 6 _ 

52— 6 »■ 217— 

53— 2 40 213— 

54— ii O' 219— 

55— 9 00 > 20 — 

56— . >21 - 

57— 1 9T 222— 

5« — 1 { J23- 

59— 4 7 224 — 

60 — 13 H 1 225 — 

61— 22 4 >-6 — 

62— .«■ V- 



< — — 

'7 7" 331 - 
10 15 332 — 

9 5 .3**— 

24 2i 334— 

3 40 335— 

13 In ii6- 

4 317 — 

1 30 3.» - 

•i39 — 
26 10 $40— 
H -0 >41 — 
15 i) 342— 

5 iO 343- 

14 m 344— 
7 10 345— 

25 SO 346— 

1 30 347- 

6 90 346 — 

1 40 > 4 .— 

7 M. 350— 

4 90 351 — 
6 9n 352— 

5 50 >>$- 

4 0i) 351— 

355— 

5 :tn.i's>— 
9 30 357- 

1 Si $5a— 

2 '« *59— 

2 -O $60- 

1 611 361 — 

3 80 362— 

6 30 363- 
17 35 364— 
13 10 365 - 
. . . 366— 

4 UC 367— 
9 H. j».s— 

3 70 :$69— 

2 so 370 — 

15 10 371— 

. . C 2 — 

4 40 373— 

16 o $74 — 

3 6 t .$75— 
V 4 376— 

4 Ai $77— 
6 55 J7S — 

3 hi 379— 

• SS > 0 — 

4 1" >1— 

6 SO 3S2 - 

HJ— 

5 41 3*4 — 
3 40 1*5— 
1 25 3«6 — 

I" IS .387 — 
5 00 3ah— 
3*9— 
20 H J90 — 

1 H J«l_ 

7 « 0 $92— 



< - - 

79 00496— 

. . 497— 

1 90 49*— 

4 30 499— 

12 00 500— 

6 30 5(11 — 

. . . 502 — 

4 20 503— 

. . . 504 — 
56 30 Vt5— 

6 In 506— 

V/7— 

4 70 5os — 

8 20 509— 

. . . 510— 

2 75 511 — 

4 75 512 — 

5 70 51.3— 
17 35 5:4— 

5 >0 515— 

5 9.1 SI' - 
lU A* 517 — 
■51 — 

> 10 619— 
10 $0 520— 

5 40 521 — 

2 40 522— 

3 .0 5'_3— 

7 60 524— 

6 >0 .525— 

. . . 52*1 — 

2 60 527— 

1 Hj 52*— 

6 60 529— 

7 35 530 — 

2 SO 531— 
12 9Aj 532— 

'■ 9" 533— 

7 5*' 534— 

10 50 535— 

2 30 5ifl — 

1 30 537— 

. . 538— 

5 80 — 
12 70 1 — 

3 51. 5P — 
9 (10 5!g— 

3 «1 >**_ 

6 ( 0 544— 
12 25 545— 

1 1 30 546 — 
37 60 54 _ — 

3 $. 543 — 

4 65 549— 

10 uo 5 * 0 — 

. . 551 — 

. . 552- 

1 40 5 * 3 — 

1 H« 654— 
566— 

7 30 556— 

'47- 



<3 


«* 

S *5^ 
< 2 £ 


«• 

3 - 
I is 

i iä 


a ! 

“ — 

1 1 \ 
< 2 £ 


Amount. 


66’— - 


12 8U 696— 


Sll 70731 - 


. . 766- 


S' 00 


66J — 


. . 697 — 


4 40 732— 


514 10 767— 




(v.3 — 


&i*— 


15 $5 7i$3 — 


7 ft* — 


... 


664— 


7 9" 699— 


7 75 734 — 


.3 30 769 — 




6fr- 


2 50 70« « — 


2 30 7-35 — 


770— 


5 50 


60',— 


1 40 7ol— 


•J 30 736— 


3 75 771— 


3 V) 


667— 


14 70 7U2— 


4 Hi 737— 


9 90 772— 


2 40 


068 — 


8 00 7«$— 


8 00 738— 


6 *0 773 — 


1 Hi 


669— 


1 90 704— 


. . . 7 -39- 


5 30 774- 




670— 


2 50 716— 


4 50 740— 


3 30 775- 


2 20 


671 — 


• 


. . 741— 


. . . 776 — 


8 20 


672 — 


3 (X • 7»)7— 


•3 00 742— 


777 




673— 


10 00 708— 


5 80 74-3— 


2 20 77* — 


3 V> 


674— 


. . 7u9— 


744- 


3 15 779- 




675— 


4 .*) 710— 


3 75 745— 


. . . 7H4— 


1 20 


676— 


6 (»» 7 1 1 — 


4 90 746— 


3 60 7-1— 


6 .VO 


K7T — 


5 2‘ 712- 


16 O 1 747— 


. . 782— 




678— 


22 1*. 7 1.3 — 


. . 7 4H — 


2 70 7*3— 


1 40 


679- 


1 80 714— 


. - • 49 — 


2 90 784— 




68 U— 


71-5— 


11 70 750— 


« H* , h 6 - - 




»81 — 


13 4* 716- 


1 4 *0 751— 


2 60 7 vi — 


1 00 


682— 


2 20 717— 


12 10 752— 


1 60 787— 


4 36 


6*3— 


9 on 718— 


19 90 753— 


1 50 788— 


10 10 


.'.*4— 


3 30 719— 


3 30 754— 


7<»9— 




(.85— 


4 91, 720 — 


1 <r> 755- 


§ 75 7'.^) — 


3 40 


686 — 


6 90 721— 


g 30 756— 


7 15 791 — 




687— 


30 0 722— 


2 00 757- 


. . 792 - 


5 70 


6 * 8 — 


723 — 


1 0 *i 738— 


3 40 793— 


2 40 





1 (0 724— 


759 — 


794— 




690 — 


7-5- 


6 «6 760— 


1 60 795- 


1 10 


691 — 


4 45 726 — 


5 *0 761 — 


1 *0 796— 


5 40 


692 — 


6 50 727— 


. . . 762— 


5 40 797 — 


... 


693 — 


lu Oli 728— 


2 10 763- 


6 66 798— 


3 70 


694— 


7'29— 


13 50 764 — 






65«— 


7J0 — 


. . 76>— 


16 00 


Tntal 




.... f 5,533 64 



REPORT OF RESERVE FUND AND 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS FROM JAN. 

I, 1892. TO MARCH 31, 1892. 

RECEIPTS«. 

Halali, e on hand Jan. 1 . 1 «92 72,641 66 

lie«crve Fund re«eive«i Jan. 1, to March 

31. 1*92 .... . 1,031 *5 

Special A**e»rnent .... *2 25 

Returned by New York I»i«trict Coun- 
cil. March 15, M92 22-5 01 

Total 73,953 16 



MONEY- i:.\ I I NI. ED. 

Fid*. 22. 1-92. New York City . . 
Balance on hand April 1. 1*92 . . 



S’ ,n *» on 
2.9-53 96 



! 3.953 96 



TECHNICAL EDUCATION. 

Attheile<iicationofthe ChildK-Idrexel In- 
ilurtriai X’hool or Institute in this » ity, 
Chauncy M. Ih-pew «Jclivered the oration, 
an*i it wat* one oftlie irran-leet of hiß many 
masterpiece?. In view of the ureat import- 
ance ot the question ot Technical Kduca- 
tion in all it“ phasee of Apprenticeship, 
Trade >chools, Indu?trial Institutes and 
manual training ?<-hools, and the poesi- 



every milestone in the upward march of 
man. 

The common school is aroused hv the 
clan^ of the combat and seeks to better 
! equip its recruits by evening classes. 
This method is a help, and a irreat one, 
but it is still the old education of the head, 
and tails short of the requirements 
of the hour. The college joinH in the 
good work of University Kx tension, and 
i brings the henetits ot itscurriculum to the 
1 doors of those who have neither the time 
nor the money to enter its ancient portals. 
But whether its teachings are given in 
venerable halls or in the lecture room ot 
the village, the henetits of its course of 
study must he mainly for the minister, 
the lawyer, the doctor, the journalist and 
the business man. Kor the vast army 
which must live by labor, and upon the 
results of whose laUjr depende the wel- 
fare of the country, no adequate pro- 
vision has yet been made. 

This splendid Institute of Art, Science 
and Industry leads the column and points 
the way. The manual training school 
solves the problem of labor and industrial 
development. Here will be given ir st ruc- 
tion in the principles of science, arl and 
mechanics, and their application to the 



Financial Report. 

RECEIPTS. March, 1*»2. 



From the t'nion« Tax. etc.) $.5 633 64 

“ Rent aii>l («.t* S9 !H> 

* ClEaraint*. etc. . . .... 4 6 1 '- 

I. «>aii fr«.ti Arner S'*-*:. <.f I-il.nr . . . . 2 500 00 
Btiiance oil hand March 1, 1*92 ],H $2 41 



EXPENSES- Mar* I., 1992. 

For PrintirR 

" (»fli«**. t-U*. 

*• Tax A F. of I 

•• Traveling arid Orgar ixing . . . . 

• Benefit- N« *. 1629 t*. 16-H, inclu*ive 
Sia.ance on nalid Apr:! 1, iVjZ 



. •, • -• I I mo iiaiu. aii'i uicii .iiiini" aiiijn in uio 

bilitv that this fiuestion will he discussed , ^ , ,, 

1 .. « i • n I mill ami the mine, the factorv ami the 

at our next convention, we tee impelled 1 /• , ,, , . . ’ _ . , 5 

.... . ‘ . . furnace, tbe shop and the engine. Here 

tA r. nut t h(.*o nvtrjctu trrbrn I hunner l * 



o print tbtw extract, from U.aun.y the Hu , eDt . ,, e , iaa tlie 

[•epe .6 a.l.lre« for the thought of our prin Hp lw , can learn the detail- of his 

rouitorc * r . . ..... 



readers • 1 e p er i a ]ty ) an <l grasp the intricacies of ma- 

The tendency ot our times is for the chinerv. In the art department his eves 
people to mass in crowded centres, where «ill l>e' educate* 1 and his hand trained 'by 
the immigrants add continually to the drawing and perspective, hv studies in 
ditficulties and necessities of the com light and shade, hv painting in oil and 
munity. Competition ia the law ot our | water-color, by theoreti* al and applied 
age, ami the survival of the littest its ( design, decoration and ornament and by 
fruit. Not only are individuals and cor- architectural and mechanical drawing, 
porations subject to its power, hut cities, j j* ut physical methods will he supple- 
states and nations. A line in a tariff bill rnented hv thorough instruction in the 
in one country throws out of employment theory and history of art In the scien- 
and reduces to pauperism tens ot thou- titi*- department the secret** of the labora- 
samls in another. New machinery or torv will be revealed, chemistry and ap- 
greater skill transfers the market for pije«l physics will solve the mysteries of 



«••• H m 
3' .t • 



1 .« 1 » ■«»;'• 

f«:ui. •>: 0 r 



rr.ft I HE ( AKi « 5 a F.. 



our :e. !»•**- 


63— 


34 5 228 - 


1» 7 Y'l— 


1 66 " — 


;o f«i 


and 


64— 


-7 *) 229— 


6 '-5 f* 4 — 


4 5u fi59— 


1 H) 


t r .a . 


65— 


3 (*. 2 $ 11 — 


16 h 


• 54 560— 


2 e 0 


•'* L.' hd» - - 


66 — 


231 — 


4 * $£«*— 


11 *0 6 r ", 1 — 


" 40 


4 


67 — 


6 iJ4 232— 


1 -■ ?.C— 


6 Do 6 2— 


> <•) 


ti »* 


68 — 


13 v .. ^_ 


1 5* >* 8 — 


2 $0 fr .$— 


13 45 


* ;*- n 


69- 


2 00 234- 


1 4 20 .499— 


584— 


7 30 


: g- u. .1. 


7>>— 


2 70 235— 


7 7 ( «>— 


2 -0 fri— 




-reAV. 


7 , — 


1 6 * >- 6 - 


4 v: 4c 1 — 


$ Ö 566— 


1 tai 


. -e . e t . ■ 


— •A 


S" 237— 


31 O 4 .r>_ 


7 20 567— 


10 *0 


1 lit *- ever 


73 — 


1- 4* 238— 


6 -0 4*»3— 


7 lu M 6 




ari : .11 tin.*- 


74 — 


6 $1 239 


h.’ t04— 


5 00 569— 






7V- 


4 4c jin — 


9 6 . 4i<S — 


$ fr 570- 


1 50 


«0 . 1 : • >n* •- 


76 — 


4 6» 241 — 


7 -50 406 — 


3 *6 571 — 


1 -0 


ri>t:;*T, a.i*. • 




2 «0 i4 >_ 


3 H . UK— 


13 »0 672— 


6 .0 


-Led m our 


7* — 


13 0 2 J .1 — 


• 50 4 * 18 — 


1 *0 57$ — 


. 




79— 


244 — 


3 5 4* V— 


2 6 674— 


1 30 



F Bor .erdiv., 1 

V.' I. Ci:**N* HEI. -ComnAttee. 

Im - " I 



Expulsions. 



I •• ■■■ l * Pa 
:. , : rt> . vi . 



T ' H v 5 ' r. *• 1 i 6 • « . ip.i 1 . 1 . 

<$ -j .1 "o ’. .*• r 

■ • ... . -• % • 

\ •' ■ of 1. ( f:!'.:. 



: *.|. iic. 



1* • 5 '.7* 

• t-v • ...a hi.- 



EY ,* : A I.:N - v T "' 4>' 

i • . • fc -. ... r.»..y 

• ■ v f v r m -i.p'iTopr'. - 

1 - Ht » *• F - * : 5> 

- f 1 . r ':. • •“ Air * • 

tii.tf ■><•- He 

_ . « - " •*.*- * . ._ . 

Buffalo. N* Y 

i.r- t . ►. . -r- a:.>i 



T"r. . 6-4. M 3 •— -or- 



. - I 78 M - 



¥j— 3 10 245 — 

81— > 46 — 

72- 12 0 247 — 

•vi — .*2 5 1 1 . 

«4— 9 *‘A ■>49— 

5>- 1 40 250 — 

«6 — 2 7. 25’ — 

*7— 4 • g r .2— 

v — 1 « 75 253 — 
<— .1 *.* 254— 

23 255— 

91— i 70 25 — 

92— 5 3 257 — 

93— 7 20 25*— 

94— 4 Vj 254— 

96— 10 * 260— 

96— 7 V 261 — 

97— 4 h i *-*_ 

9*— 4 6 2f.l— 

99 — 1 O ?fA— 

1. •) — 2 60 VA — 

lul— 1 30 26 *— 
: 2 — 6 2u 267— 

103— 3 *' >•.«_ 

1* «4 — I *0 _e9 — 
105— 2 h 270— 

K«$ — . . 27'.— 

PC— S'* .5 272— 
’Oh — 23 9*> 273 — 
109— 47 *0 274— 
1 li>— 2 40 2-5— 



3 *0 410— 
1! 60 411- 
2- .0 412— 
413— 
5 60 414— 
. . 4 -- 

5 4* 4 1*'. — 
* $0 417— 
7 *1 4 :-- 



1* «0 575— 
8 '*'■ 576— 
4 10 5~— 

4 m 57* — 

5 75 579— 

1 30 6H.i — 

:• 10 5-1 — 
. . 5- 2— 

9 'X$- 



1 »ETA I LED EXPENSE^, Mar-li, 1- 

Prb.ti:.K 6 ' A Arrear- Notices .... 

• ItO Tr* u*iirer« Book«. . . . 
6.if® Metjiljer*’ Cards .... 

1 V»l Po-tal* 

5 UUi Nc>teh*A«i* 

. •«• 1 . , - 

r •*) A|.|>.l‘viUoii« . . . 

*’0 1*8-- x» or. I (_ir< u itr- . . . 

• *V> «^iiurT.-riy Ciri-uIarH . . . 

2 4 ® N*ii*-«l.eet liemittuo« *-«. 

2 i*«$ Au-l'tor-' H..«nk« 

2 0*«. Fin. ** ■ tary« B.at.k*. 
5.048» CV,n*ti!.ition* . . 

I. 111 O .Stamped Envelope« . . 

5 1 00 A^itatifin Card» . . . . 
5J0-tr:E. C1r> nlars . . 

•• 45. 500 (Topics April Journal. . 

M" rapping ami Mailing 5prii Journal . 

Po-tage 01 , April Journal 

* Supplies. Pa— word«, etc . . 

1 0f»> *uin|»eil Envelope* 

1.5(8) Postal* 

Expressasre on Supplies, etc 

Twetity-thr«-c Teletrrams 

Salary an*i Clerk H:r>-. five weeks . . 
Office Kent for Mar« h . . 



f .59 -1 some product from one place to its rival. 
■° flfJ The »Hing mills of Alabama may put out 
- .? I, the tires in I'ittshurgh. The cotton mills 
47 o: of < »eorgia may stoj» the spindles in 

Massachusetts. Cheapness and excellence 

19 079 11 have become the factor* of prosperity, 
for nations and for towns < $ur main duty 
*-*-• i- not to waste precious hours in vain re 
: 5 25 *rets for the goo 1 old times, or w ring our 
*35 0 ) hands in helpless horror« over the didi- 



nature, and the wonderful works and 
pro[*erties of electricity will become 
known As the hoy advances from the 
elementary course he will receive instruc- 
tion and become familiar w ith the work- 
shop, ami its ma< hineryan*! tools, lie will 
grow skiiiful in the handling, manipula- 
tion, moulding and carving of wood and 
iron. Work on the bench, with the lathe, 
the drill, the plane and the screw, and the 



15 ai cilties of the present. The pace of progress Ilia king of tools, will be common an ! easy, 
12 U) H* a y ^ iHVe ^ ef ' n faster than o’:r prepara- an d the student will practical)'' run the 



2 0 tions. but exj>erieme has demonstrated 

10 so that, when intelligently met, the new is 
^ always I'e’ter than th*> old. 

5 75 The man who dies for a principle is a 

6 2 -j hero, hut he who starves, rather than 

abandon the methods which fed his 
1 25 fathers, is a fool. It is only a generation 
12 5o since a carpenter could also plan and 
2 > j - j nuild .1 house, and a single workman make 
19 23 a wagon, or a knife, or a shoe, ora watch, 

11 or any part of either. Machinery has so 
^ mtiltiphed and subdivided labor, and 

15 00 stiniulate*l prmiuction, tiiat only a part of 
3( :• any manufactured article .-on.ee to the in- 
5i dividual, and u[>on that he must show 



9 64 
416 66 



1 


l 


419— 






5" 4 — 


fi 


V.» 


.1. 


I. I 


,\u: (»riTai.izing Mill*! 


a!«*. K v . 


3 


5*i 




25 


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3 


Ot, 




5 


V) 


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• 


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1 


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i 


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i 




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Trenton. 






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1 


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10 


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• • • • 


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591— 


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593— 






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\«-ry nr.*l Ii.n<)ef.taL- . . 




3 


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has been the foundation upon which we 



42' — 
3 5*' 43D— 
3 3* 4il- 
432— 
9 4* 43.3— 
* '• 431— 
- (»■ 435— 

3 .0 4v>_ 

1 60 437 — 

13 65 , 

9 -< 4.Ä- 

4 > 4411 — 



2 70 V.*S— 
5 70 *>y— 

. . . -597 — 
10 Of* 5to* — 

3 7*> 599— 

1 «0 60s- 

2 00 «* 'I — 
1 42 61 * 2 — 
1 01 OH— 

1 «11 ou— 

2 6 ' 005— 



Jan.o.r (Aexiiifig Office 

» BENEFITS PAID IX MARCH. 

No. Nam* Union. 



W N L. 



. 257 !*• : - M. 

}-. uTtrar..' 



OFFICiiL NOTICES. 

k M ri'.. •• I-ihor 1 »...n:a ’.n it.' 

* I^i • r Cor. uers i :e : y thing 

:. E- .-.R. N. V- — "u;- Carj-nt.-rs 
, • A >■ i ^ calkin? 

.v 1:1 the :.*r 1. 

>•« n t ..aving sent m t.’.eir I'ro- 

. * — :r.d jt - . —7*.« (L-?e--2.(*Dt 

. ••• . - for i put dsh a.. 

i- .r. unions r.es: month. 

1 i e ■. . x t C .nve-n::' n . ‘ tbe 1 • B. **» 
: at !-• 1 - M » .and ■ open 

^ • •«,» ] * w. ^ * .eirai^ froiii io* 'ä*.* 

; a. j le ( -*n in 



i ts E?.. Col *. —The Flit- h harden 
;«rm-nt Company, ,.f tr-L- city, is un- 
fa. r t organize*! Ia l >or. ar. i has :>roken 
it- agr-em*-nt .th Carpenters L nion. 

N Ti. 



•”> 


3 r6— 


16 




*41- 


1 20 6 6 — 


T ^5 


I* 4 


2» TTT — 


12 


.0 


442— 


6H7— 


' 


7 


50 *^i_ 






443 — 


1 2- 6 — 


2 40 


3 


10 2K- 


3 >t> 


444— 


3 60 6 (* — 


4 40 


*S 


O JXI— 


11 


*- 


«45— 


.3 3 i 610 — 








) 


•0 446 — 


29 2.5 611- 


4 30 


19 


:0 tfr > — 


4 


70 


447— 


1 '*1 .,]2— 


4 15 


( 


4' 28 ^ 


*> 


06 4i* — 


1 'O 613 — 


; v$o 


13 


'4 1 2 *. 4 


9 


ii* 


449— 


12 4" 614— 


3 3o 


. . 




.6 


60 


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1 H «15— 




n 


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3' 




4-51- 


16 2*' 616— 


3 tCi 


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«52 — 


2 8 .. 617— 


18 5*. 




7 2«- - 


13 


“ 


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13 3 618— 


4 00 


J 


1 » >9 — 


O 


60 


454 — 


. . 619— 




17 


:< gv— 


y* 


7 1 


56— 


13 50 «30- 


12 70 




XI 




11 




3 (». 62! — 


^ & 


5 


< 


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457 — 


10 O f 622— 


. . • j 


1 


'52«,— 


*2 


»5 


45* — 


30 2* 6a3— 




i 


2> » 1 — 


9 


1 a . 


4V — 


15 20 «24— 


19 4' 




295— 


4 




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3 6 — 






«61— 


3 30 636— 


7 10 


'j 


Tu 






e’— 


«27— 


2 10 








ti' 


463 — 


6 50 «2?— 


12 10 




2 jy-— 


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e-4— 


. . . 629— 


10 A 


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> 




«66- 


16 *(> 


. . 


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j» 


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4*6— 


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4 50 


. 


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. . 




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22 f 


- . . 




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70 489— 


9 20 634— 


3 90 




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5 




470— 


4 90 635— 


4 10 


r* 


1f> v * — 






«7! — 


•26 -.5 636— 


• . . 


42 


4* ICC— 


. . 




4*2— 


1 75 637— 


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Ti*— 


4 


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473 — 


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30 


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9 6« 6.39— 


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1 Ii) 64 «' — 


. . « 


13 


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19 


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«76— 


64! — 


. - - 


] 1 


4- 312- 






4“ - 


7 842— 


3 4.5 




4 • 313— 


f, 


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9 70 6-3 — 


1 «0 


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4 


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4“9— 


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1 60 


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3 V 


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12 70 64.5— 




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6 5 4- 


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1 V 646— 


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. . 




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. 




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19 V- 




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7 K* til — 


2 *0 


7 


(f< 322— 






4*7 — 


7 I' 632 — 


8 63 


4 


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1 


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6 30 *>$— 


. , . 1 


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4 20 494 — 


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No. Nam*. 

16. — E nr»-!i*- P :r> • . . . 

1630—"' J. At. :r* w - . . . 
16.31 — Mr* M. Froniiiivll . 

16.2— E Sie* :*- . . . . 

1*33— I ». A . . . . 

1634— Mr». E .z. A«M:*on 
1 *Vj 5 — >I:cL*ei Schralz . . 
1»>.6-Mr«. E. h-:w*r«l* . . 
1677— Jamt* E (»: I . . . . 
16$> — M r«. M I>o '.'is . . . 

• P •: ini 

1640 — Mr*.».' F TriiA^ell . 

1641 — Mr«. D . . . 

1642 — Mr*. A. F. K:*-rjia.-i 

1644— Mr« E M. Kyle. . 

1 645 • .«•::. 1 *. "i *:l . » 

1646 — ‘»ec.r^-e " rat.b'e . . 

1647 — Mr«. J. I^i'i«rr . . . 

1649— J ict h , . 

164.*— Mr*. E Ko i-rt« . . . 

I «TO- Mr- * pirkin«on . 

1651— Mr*. M M *-i'.*-r. . 

1652— >1 J I.’ui/» nici.t . . 

, * ,‘i-3— " • T *.«.-* Wl * . . . a 
1«54 — J "’*-!'3 -d.i .* r . . . 
1(55 — J. Fre..- n < n- . . . . 
1*»V* — Mr*. M J Folly . . . 
I -'57 — Ai.'ir* ’■ J *- . • • 

165* — Prter K:r. :*er . . . . 
1659 — Mr« L R.iiL. 1^1 . . . 
16>>> — A ~t. Jc' .n . . . . 

p<61 — J. K. Lewi- 

1662— E. ->'in . . . . 

10.3 — Mr« M J. A:irier*on 
]fr i — I • ». vc.**y ... 



If# 3— Mr«. 




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man 


gel— Mr- 


E 




rr.ei 


.667— Mr- 


M 






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»5-.— Mr- 


M. 


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.lin . 



] TC- I» <T H .rw . . . . 
.671— Exc-i' e I»ef>* t . . . . 
l-*72— ii-i. G Roper . . 

\*T r— K«r. Tr 

1*74 — M A lo'-ir . . . . 
•*75- '• . H Un . . . . 

.67- — Mr« \ Gi - . . . . 
1677— (* fi. «La 1 > . . . . 

Jr 78 — Mr*. H. I.. Bacon . . . 

1679— >lr* A. Kijnkrr,ann . . 

1680 — Mr* M -«eirr.er« . . . 
Ir-’.— I-atc Hull. Jr . . . 
16*2 — Mr* M E Am.:*!«w*i 
].a> — W. W. Pruyn . . 

I- «4— Mr- J B Rower. tree 
I*>-5 — H. "--i’.riiti ... 
16*»'' — Henry I»»vi*on . . . 
168"— A- I. P i.-T.evr.iy . . . 
1-.-4 — Mr- M. A. Terikotte 



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have budded capacity ana character, and 
it hae superbly none its: work, but now 
the system require* ein er to i e strength- 
ened, or to be supplemented by institu- 
tion? iike the one whose opening we cele- 
brate. The unsolved problem which gives 
heartaches to parents, and anxious 
thought to teachers and preacher«, is the 
constantly increasing class of young men 
and women who have the rudiments of 
education, but are trained neither for any 
trade nor any business. They wi.l not 
; oin the ranks of unskilled lal or, and 
cannot work beside the mechanic or arti- 
san, or expert accountant. Th» y faii into 



1 and the student will practically run the 
boiler and engine. 

The graduates of this school will not 
be confined within the narrow limits of 
the apprentice, nor bound by the limita- 
tions of the specialist. Upon the broad 
foundations of their training can be se- 
curely built superior capacity for the 
paths in the industrial world which 
they ele* t to follow. They will nail the 
! »nventor a* their friend, and follow with 
■ k(«en delight his discoveries and im- 
provements. He may render ol -olete and 
u.-eler- the tools to which they are ac- 
cu.-tome. ! or the work which they produce, 
but their thorough grounding in prin- 
ciple? w ill enable them to instantly under- 
stand h:s device, and adapt themselves Jo 
the fresh roads they must tread, or retire 
to the rear. Disciplined intelligent e, and 
1 harmoniously cultivated minds and mua- 
: des, »ill give tue economy in the use ot 
materials, and -kill in the handling ot 
tools, which w ill command the markets at 
| home and abroad. again.*t the output of 
' mills and factories, where the.r brethren 
vainly strive, under old condition.* and 
training, to keep pace with progress and 
earn living wage- in the tier e strife and 
neat of modern competition. 



minor positions already 



iw led. 



AMERICAN 



where compensation is small and pr .mo- 
tion difficult. They are discourage 1 .u- 
they ?ee those who aie better equipj-ed 
an*’, di-cipiin.-d r..-e to competence or. in- 
dependent e. 

Invention is the Frankenstein of our in- 
dustrial life. It is the souller? creation r t 
human geniu*, and relent. e»rsly pursues 
its purposes It has deetroye 1 the a; - 
prentice sy-tem. It i.*- substituted em- 



FEDERATION 

NOTES. 



LABOR 



<»foro£ KiiRtT * New York lager beer 
i* stil. being boycotted by all organized 
.ai '.r. c- it is a non-union pro iu»-t. 

The otfice of the Federation i- now 
located at 14 Clinton I'lace, New York. 
It has removed from «'1 Clinton Place. 

The Feleka . :>»n recently ioai.e i the 



V ■ . , I a. « I A 2 . T- 4 r. J H • - *• »I * 1 « 4 I * 

plover and employes for master an ; ap- v , h> . (>{ to he!;. owin 

6 prentice. Where individuals found *otk ; , fJ 0 ., r 5llf . r ^ (i , Jeath rate. T..i- n.one’ 



and instrurtion, armies ire attending 
upon nr.riir er.esg sect: r.* of complicated 
machinery. The skilled workman who 
has conscientiously learned his part, is 
suddenly thrown out by a device which 
renders his tool* obsolete. He = liters 
hardship and privations until t.e . an a 
.nire a. mist a new trade, or he drop* into 
tiie crowded rants of unskilled labor 

Inventive talent c a n neither be curbed 
nor banished. The necessities of our Com- 
merz iai success demand its enco .rage- 
ment 

Civilization destroys the wild game 
which is the support of the savage, and 
he must earn his subsisten* e fron; ti e soil 
or die. Tine old warrior wraps his blanket 
about him and sints stoically into t:.e 
grave : the vo mg brave hurls hirriself 



is now repaid. 

Fisan> nr. \ib is being rendered by the 
American Federation f labor to help the 
c.ir.inet'i.aker* of New York city in their 
present eight-hour strme. 

The Federation has beer, actively en- 
deavoring to secure the passage of lal or 
law» in Congress at Washington this se*- 
-ion. but it to*» • usy in the manufacture 
of j-jlitii-a! t arty thun .*-r : t:>- Pr**i- 

dential .-ampaign. 

National Conventions >•: t .e -treot 
. ai emp loye*. of the hod-carriers and 
bidding labjrer- and of the i .ng-hore- 
n.en an l vessej- .loader- are t*eing ar- 
ranged by the r . .eration. They wii: r e 



with vain but dauntie-s courage upon the j L in ä month or two to form n ational 
Catling gun» or the bayonets of the 1 niiFn« 
soldiers, and his death song is the reouiem 



Total $ 9,032 64 



of the hop>e and happiness of the trioe. 
But for those who adapt themselves to 
the situation are homes and comforts 
never known before, and a moral and 
intellectual life which lifts them upon 
higher planes of usefu.ness and enjoy- 
ment. '•imilar losses and gains mark 



Dennett s bakeries and restaurants ia 
New York Brooklyn. Philadelphia lla.- 
timore, Boston and ?an Francisco are 
under the ban of organized .abor every- 
where for hiring cheap. n »r. union help» 
and refusing to recognize the baxers’ 






! t 



THE CAEPENT EH. 



i 

I 



I, _ 



i 

i 



i! 



• #» 



; 

1 J' 

* i 



PROCEEDINGS OF THK G. K. B. 

from 1 

A i > i « I i < 1 1 1 < * 1 1 of L. I’.. 172 North IAPr««"«- N\ i~. . 
Iiein-j suhk- a> I.. I'.. 335, tin- niiiii' ilt*ci»ioii a- 
al>««\«- i« remlm-d in their cnM- 

l*|ii ii ation of F„ U.. 292 and 541, I i 1 1 It* Rock, 
Ark. .»for nine hours, the G. 1!. B. dccidcil they 
taiun t traut <*llii*iiil sanction until See . 12* i~ 
eoinj'loil with and more complete r«‘|n>rt i' 
rcndei «-d 

Appl : i nl ion of F„ U.. 70. Iaigati|H>rt, Ind., laid 
over from la»t meeting, wa- taken np and as 
favoiaMe repoiis have si uce l»een iwoivril 
through eonfereuce committee having been ap- 
pointed. the (! U II traut official sanction with- 
out financial aid. 

Application of I. I*. ;55. Marion. I ml . to take 

diet t May 1 !»«.«2. The G I'. It . grant otlicial 
Min tion without linancial aid 

Applit ation of '556 Marietta. Ohio, to enforce 
trade rules, t h t - (;. u B decide they cannot 
grant otlicial sanction until Sec 12* of the con- 
stitution i' complied with 'll reference to con- 
ference committee being appointed to moot 
employers- 

Application of F. I ., 552 Mcadvillc. l*a , for 9 
hours ami r* tain old wages, referred to G. S . to 
pro« nr<- further information. 

Application «»f I.. I’.. 1‘0, Mhldleton, N. Y . 
lai.l over from last meeting and whicii was re- 
fi'rrcd bat k for further details was taken up and 
further information having been received the 
G. K. 1! grant otlicial sanction 

Application of I.. I'., 725 of Middletown, Ohio, 
to ilcmaml 9 hours, the G. E. B.. grant otlicial 
sa action. 

Application of L. U. 176, Newport, 11 1 . 

which was lni«l over from last meeting, and 
which was pr« sei.tetl t«> general office May 15, 
1^91, was again taken up. The G E. B grant 
otlii-ial sanction. 

Application of L. I*. 746, Norwalk. Conn . for 
nine hours per day receive«! ami the G. K. B 
grant otlicial sanction: linancial ai«l to be con- 
sidered when strike takes pla«'e. 

Application of I.. I'. 539, Pari*, Texas, for 
nine hours per «lav, the G. K. B. grant official 
sanction ns re<picstc«i . 

Application of I.. I*. 115 Punxsutawney. F’a., 
laitl over from last meeting, was taken up ami 
former «Itii-imi affirmed inasmuch as no furth«-r 
details have been furnished. 

Application I> C. of 1 mlianapoli*, Ind.. for 
puforeement of new trade rules, the G. K. B, 
satu tion tin' demand, the matter of financial aid 
t«« h«> considered after See. 131 of the constitu- 
tum has been complied with. 

Application of 50*. Holyoke, Mas.-., lordetnaml 
of nine hours per «lay and $2.26 per «lay mini- 
mum. to take effect. TIioG. K. B. grant official 
sanction. Financial ai«l conshlered not neee — 
sarv. 

KoVfcTII DAY’S 'Essioy— jiaKi II 31. 

The tiuanchil report of the Distri« t Council of 
New York on the Ihiwnry strike received. The 
G. s was given special instructions to communi- 
cate w ith the I*. « of New York as to irregular- 
iti«-' ami overcharges a; «par» t in the report. 

Application of I. U. t;-2 Biehmomi, Va . laid 
ov« r :’ri>m last me« ting for further information, 
tin G E. B , rcaftirm decision made (>i t . l*. 
I*M. the «pa« »tion «>f financial aid will Is- cou- 
siilert«! iu use a strike takes place. 

Application of L. I’. 311, Sacramento. Cal .for' 
hours per day, the G. K. B, grant ollieial 'am tion 
ami linancial ai<l will be considered \\ hen Sec 
111 of tin- constitution shall halve been compile«! 
with 

Application of I. t*. 107 Sandusky. O., for d«*- 
tnami of 9 lion per «lay, G. E. B. give official 
samtion and linai.cial aid will he considercil 
when s«-c. 131 «>f the constitution is cnmplmil 
with 

Application of I). C. of Scranton, Pa. for 9 
hour' per day, the G E. B. grant official sanction 
ami reserve sanction of financial aid until >«•«• 
131 of the constitution may tie complied with. 

Application of F, U. t'.e5, Somerville. N. J.. for 
demand of 9 hours ]>cr «lay, the G. K. B. grant 
official sill« tion and reserve grant of financial 
ni*i until S«-e. 131 of the constitution maybeeoiu- 
plied with. 

Application of I,. I*. 296. Sharon, Pu , for .le- 
niaml of iai-e «.f w ages, the G. E. B sanction 
stiiko. Financial ai«l will he considered w hen 
Sec. 1 !1 i- complied with. 

Applii ation of I.. l\ «29, South Bend, Ind.. f«.r 
dt imiml 2-5 cents per hour minimum ami trade 
rules, the G. I.. B. grant official sanction. 

▲ i« U« r a as rcail from Brother S. J. Kent this 
morning stating his it ability of being present 
at tlii' meeting «>t the G. K. K, owing to the 
sicknr — ««t his wife which was reeeivc«i with 
s\ iu j'.itliy ior Brother Kent in Id’s trouble. 

The G s. wa- instructed t<* visit the principal 
cili« - w iiere there l' a possibility of trade tr««u- 
l*I«-s this season, and emlcavor to secure an ad- 
justment of affairs w ithout strikes. .\n«l the 
memU rs of the G. E- B. are instructed to hold 
tlicmsclvc' in rta.liness to visit any city within 
• heir respt“ ti\c juris«lictious where tin re i' any 
likclilmotl tif tra«lc trouldcs this season, ami to 
secure settlements wherever possible without 
»tiikcs. 

The «pi« 'tion of tinuueial ui«l t«« 1>. C., of Cin- 
ciiuiKti. dliio, which was lni<l u\«*r from last 
meeting was taken up and the G. E. 1). decide to 
reserve granting financial ai.l until See. 131 of 
the constitution may .have been «•otnplicd with. 

I IK T H DAY’S SESSION', AFRIL 1. 

Application of L. I*. 776. Covington, Ky.. for 
demand . f 9 hours per day, G. E. B. grant official 
sanction but reserve financial aid until Sec. lei 
of the constitution may be complied with. 

Application of L. V. 712, of Covington, Ky., 
for enforcement of trade rule« May 2. G. E. B 
give the same div ision as in case of L. U. 776. 

Application of L. U. 605 Jacksonville. Fla.. 
for demand «>f S hours per day. G. E. B. grant 
otli. ial sanction but reserve financial aid owing 
to the very unfavorable report given. 



Application of I,. I’. 4SI. «if Cincinnati »>., 

stair Builders for enforcement of trade rules. 
G. E. B. decide I.. 1*. 4*« Ik* governed by same 
de« ision as rendered in ease of Cincinnati, 1>. 

By* orders of the G. K. B. Br«v McKay ami 
Abrams were on March 16, instructed to proceed 
to < hicago to investigate rumors of irregularities 
und bail management of affairs of the l' It. and 
will for all Itook.s, papers, persons anil other doc- 
uments necessary to such an investigation. This 
com mit tee of. G. K. B. re|iorted having done so 
showing a very complete and thorough investi- 
gation of affairs in Chicago, in proving that re- 
ports of such irregularities, etc , were to a large 
extent true. After due consideration the <1. K. 
B. decidol as follows .- 

bn report of Investigating Committee ap- 
pointed l«y the G. K. B. to visit i hicago and to 
examine the comlition of affairs in that city on 
account of complaints of members ami Local 
ITiions in Chicago, the G. K. B. renders this 
«lei isioii : 

first . — No person shall he eligible to represent 
any of our 1 -oval t'nious of the United Brother- 
hood in Chicago as «lelegatcs of the same iu 
citiicr the Unite«! Carpenters' Council or Carpen- 
ters’ District Council of that city, unless sai«l del- 
egates are actually engaged as journeymen at 
the carpenter tratle or some of its kindred 
biamhes. 

Second . — All Local Unions of our U. B. in good 
stamling in the District Council of Chicago shall 
he granted working card- for their members 
and shall not be deprived of the right of procur- 
ing working cnnls unit s~ found guilty of charges 
prcfci red in due form ami passed on subject to 
appeal to the G. E. 15 

The District Council of the U. H in Clih ago 
shall issue its own working t -ar«ls to our mem. 
Ix-rs iu Chicago, ami that power to issue work- 
ing cards shall not he waived or delegated to any 
olocr council or centrul laxly of carpenters out- 
s'ilc of the jurisdiction of the U. B. 

Third.— All rules or laws governing the D. (.' 
or central ho 'y of carpe liters iu Chicago shall 
be submitted to the General Office for approval, 
as rc<|Uirc«l by Bee. 45 of Constitution. 

1 mirth . — That all the charges ami evidence 
nimvruing certain alleged linancial irrcguhiri- 
ti. s of the United Carpenter- Council of Chicago 
l>c laid la-fore the next «-«invention of the U. B. 
for its action. 

The G. K. B. instruct' the G. S. to forward 
to each of the Local Unions of Chicago a copy 
of the decision of theG. K. B. oh the report of 
the special committee of investigation which re- 
cently visitcil that i-ity. 

Further repoit to be continued next month. 



GENERAL SECRETARY McGUIRE ON THE 
ROAD. 

General Secretary 1 ‘. J, McGuire has 
visite«! a nuiulter of cities within the past 
two months ami addressed public meet- 
ings iu the interests of our order. On 
April 5 he spoke in Millville, N. J., and 
on the 13th in Cleveland, U; 14th, De- 
troit, Mich.; loth, Lafayette, Ind.; 16th, 
Decatur, 111.; 17th, St. Louis, Mo.; 18th, 
Indianapolis, Ind.; 19th, Cincinnati, O. 
On April 20 he visited Covington, Ky., 
ami met the contractors of that city and 
Newport ami from 2 1*. M. to 8 I?. M. that 
«lay, was in conference with the carpenter 
contractors at the Builders' Exchange, 
Cincinnati, and from 8 I* M. until 11 1». 
M- covered the different meetings of our 
Cincinnati unions of mill men, stair 
builders, car builders, and German Un- 
ion 200 , all in different rooms of Work- 
men's Hall, Cincinnati. 

The « ieneral Secretary reached home on 
April 22 and worked in the ofiice all that 
day— left there 0.80 I\ M. The same 
evening after a ride of 88 miles he spoke 
in Jersey City Heights, X. J., and was back 
next morning to his olfice work. On the 
evening of April 23 he spoke in Asbury 
l ’a*k, N. ,L, on the 25th in New Britain, 
Conn.; 26th, Providence. K L; on the 27th 
he interviewed the contractors of New- 
port, 1L L, t«j secure settlement of strike, 
and the same evening spoke in Boston, 
Mass., to a splendid meeting under the au- 
spicesof Union 67 iu the Roxbury «lis- 
trict. After traveling all night, next 
morning the (ieneral Secretary was in 
Middletown, X. V., and had a rousing 
meeting, lie came hack and though 
severely prostrated by these continuous 
exertions he took hold of his olliee work 
and this month he has been to Scranton, 
l’a , May 3 ; \\ ilkes- Barre, May 4 ; Balti- 
more. May t* ; Scranton. l*a„ May 17, in 
conference with contrac tors for settlement 
of Scranton strike and on the evening ot 
May 17 he spoke in Binghamton, X. V. 

While on these trips the General Sec* 
retary has important letters forwarded 
him and attends to many items of work 
even while riding on the trains. After he 
returns he then has to work extra hours 
to catch up with all the routine business 
and accumulated work of his otGce. Hence 
it is utterly impossible for him to accept 
every invitation sent him to address pub- 
lic meetings. He can only go where he 
thinks he can do the most service. 



INDUSTRIAL PEACE. 

On the above subject l’rof. Ashley of 
Toronto University, Toronto, Canada, de- 
livered an admirable lecture not long ago. 
Here ate a few eulliugs from among the 
many good things he said : 

1 Ie said it was not true that the forces 
of supply and demand assign to the work- 
man the wages he is to receive, in the 
sense that if the men are absolutely isola- 
ted, without any combination, and made 
each his individual contract with the em- 
ployer, there is some economic force at 
work which will secure to each man his 
just wage. Such an opinion is no longer 
held by any economist of the first or even 
second rank. Within certain limits the 
reward of labor «lepends npou the terms 
which the laborer can succeed in pro- 
curing for himself. 

In his negotiations with the employer, 
many circumstances may ellect his suc- 
cess, an«l among litem the circumstance 
of his being united w ith his fellows or not. 
Supply an«l demand is only a short term 
for the majority of the circumstances which 
affect the workman in bargaining w ith the 
employer. Ic is, indeed, another and more 
scientific term for the struggle of interests 
which leails to the social war which we 
deplore. The supply of labor does not 
become any less a supply when it is or- 
ganized, just as war does not become any 
the less war when it is waged between dis- 
ciplined armies. 

Looking back over the development of 
industry, it will be found that all the great 
changes have come very gradually, and 
they have usually been unconscious in 
their initiation. The doctrine of evolu- 
tion teaches that the most individual re- 
formers can accomplish is to discover the 
direction iu which mure or less uncon- 
scious forces are tending and endeavor to 
utilize them. Now, looking out on the 
world of industry, is there any movement 
which bears the impress of spontaneous 
and inevitable development V Surely the 
trades union movement bears that charac- 
ter. In England it has reached a period 
of stability an« l permanence. Unionism 
is reckoned as one of the enduring forces 
in English life, and on the w hole a force 
making for good. 

In America the movement has suc- 
ceeded in creating a number of strong in- 
ternational societies. Labor combinations 
have managed to obtain a foothold in al- 
most every industry. It is now recog- 
nized in all the great staple industries of 
England that trades unions are come to 
stay. Most observers would go further 
and declare that to a very considerable ex- 
tent they had improved the relations be- 
tween employers and employed. Hut it 
is apparent that the feeling of the com- 
fortable classes in America is still in very 
much the same stage as that in England a 
quarter of a century ago. The trades 
union movement is not only, as John 
Stuart Mill recognized, an inevitable effort 
on the part of the working classes to se- 
cure a real free«lom of contract, which 
isolated they could enjoy only in name. 
It is mure than ibis. It is the' outcome of 
a true instinct of the nature of the labor 
problem. It is based on the feeling that 
the problem is not how to enable a few 
specially thrifty or talented workmen to 
escape out of their clasp, but how to raise 
materially and morally the class as a 
whole. 

The causes of the backward state of 
public opinion in America and Canada 
are evident. Industrial development has 
itself been later. The chances of getting 
on have been so much greater than in 
England that class feeling and class loyalty 
have been less. The emplovers, on the 
other hand, have been men who have 
risen, and they have felt that the condi- 
tions under which thev managed to get 
rich must be pretty satisfactory. Trades 
unions are, of course, in the first place, 
organizations for fighting purposes so 
that it may seem odd to speak of an ap- 
preciation of their natural place in modern 
life as itself tending towards industrial 
peace. But it is surely evident that many 
of the obstacle 0 to agreement in labor dis- 
putes arise from a refusal to recognize or 
a tartly and grudging recognition of the 
essential principle of unionism, namely 
that the men are ju<tilied in uniting to 
make common terms. If onlv these pre- 
liminary difficulties could be cleared out 
ot the way, it only all unnecessary causes 
of irritation an«l soreness eculd lie re- 
moved, there would he far more chance 
of a speedy and sober settlement of the 
business questions really at i.-^ue 

Here in trade unionism is a great spon- 
taneous outgrowth from existing indus- 
trial conditions. Here in arbitration still 
more in boards of conciliation, could be 
traced the beginnings ot a better social 
order— a method of industrial peace 
which, resting on Ihe union of the men 
on one side, on the prudence and on the 
honor ot the masters on the other sub- 
stitutes reasonable argument and agree- 
ment for passion and warfare. Is it not 
the duty of those who are placed in a 
position to advance the cauee of peace to 
give some serious thought to these lessons 
and when next some trade dispute is near’ 
mg to ask themselves whether these facts 
which have been related do not suggest a 
practical alternative to the old w eapons of 
starvation and ruin ° ^ 



STRIKES, LOCKOUTS AND TRADE 
TROUBLES OF CARPENTERS 
THIS SEASON. 



men’s demands go into effect Au^ «• 
next, without a strike an«l remain in 
ellect until May 2. I s '.* L The men's de° 
mantis are for maintainance «»f ll-hour 

The agitation among carpenter, this "'""I« 

_ . . (lav iio\ diu 6 ni so t i |0 riieii win 

season has aroused them m scores of cities p pr ^ minimum. 

to a great degree of activity, far beyond The miii men of Cincinnati, Covington 

all expectation. The membership has in- Newport J.orkland ami vicinity hail to 

creased with a boom in April and May, "d (,n 1-1 r ‘ ‘ V n ’ f *'“ 1 "" re out 

, , . . 1 . * nearly two weeks, when the bossee lit, -.n» 

and the number of new unions .bartered is ( . otl( . e( i e< i the nine-hour «lav ami fell 



full of hopeful encouragement 
We have gained the eight-hour «lav in 
sewral cities ami the nine-hour Jday has 



to go into ellect Aug. 15, ls92. I iy«-r jut) 
men were on strike ami every mill wag 
tied up. 



.. .. , The Stair-lmildera’ demands in Uincin- 

been secured in over two score cities, with nati , , f are not . Pt tled. they ask to fe 
with advances of wages and adoption of them go into effect in June. Tin* 
trade rules and other gains in many peet ot success is excel lent. 



,tve 

ii'oa- 



CHEAP, USEFUL AND PRACTICAL. 



places. Ami all of this has been obtained FIRST-CLASS BOOKS! 

with far less cost than has attended our 

trade movements at any period for several 
years. We have been successful in pur- 
suing the polmy of negotiation ami con- „ 

dilation m dealing with employers and Tbk Bcilder'» ocide and utimath* *, 

,, r • ", Price Book. IIod(fson. .... 

contractors. So far this season we have Tl(I steel s«jcakk. and How t«. I sk It. 

Practical Carpf xtry. HoOkhod. . . . 
Stair-Bcildino Made Ea-v. JIoffRson. 

Hand Kailixo Made Easy 

Illustrated Architectural and Me- 
chanical Dhawino-Book. A Self-In- 

MrtMor. witli 30* Illustrations 

Tilt. Carpenter's and Bi ildkr’s Com- 
n.rxE Companion 
Address 



$5 00 

2 09 
I «10 
1 .« 
1 0 ) 
1 00 



100 

. - - . 2 50 

P. J. McCUIRE, 

Box 8S1, F’hi'.ailel jilii... p*. 



spent eleven thousand dollars in strikes 
and lockouts, where in l*yi we ex- 
pended thirty-five thousand dollars, ami 
in 1*90 we spent seventy-six thousand 
dollars. 

At present strikes are still going on in 
Baltimore, Md-; Holyoke, Mass. ; Marion, 

Ind.; Scranton. I’a.; Winchester, Ky., 
and Newport, K. L, with prospects ot set- j 
tlement favorable in a short time. Most 
of the tra<le movements this year were 
made May 2, and that is a more favoable 
time as a rule than at an earlier period in 
the year. 

The eight-hour day has been secured 
this month in Fremont, Col., with a 
minimum of 8 :; per day, and also at Salt 
Lake City, Utah, ami more than two- 

tlnnls or our , non have «.Maine. I it in UNITED HATTERS 

Baltimore, Md., and so lias our mill- 

. ’ . . , . OF NORTH AMERICA. • 

"rights union in New V>rk citv. Sacra- 

, ... . , The Lalicrlias receive«! the Indorsement of the 

memo, Cal., will inaugurate the__ eight- General Executive Hoard of the K. of L. and of 
hour rule June«', next the American I Federation of Labor. 

. i Ää'lneI-alM*l iw pltu-ed on eA'ery tin ton-made 

The nine-hour liav lias been estab- I ^ at before it leaves the workman’s hand». If a 
t- i.„ j • .. ... " , , , dealer taki-s a Ial .el from one hat an«l places it in 

list ieu in the cities named below, and in another.« 




This Is a Facsimile of the LABEL of the 



or lau« any detached !al>elsin hi* store, 

most eases strikes were unnecessary I do not l»uy fr««m him. a* lii* lala-ls may become 
. ^ ^ ‘ - » i tent* it ami In* hub may be the product ol nab or 

while in pome eases there were strikes of a non-union labor. 

few «lavs’ duration or more Here is the of Counterfeit«. Sometime* they ar. 

. inuir. iiere is mi printed on white pa(»*r and sometime* on yellow 

list: paper. As a general thing they are not perforated 

... v . i. on the edge». A counterfeit label with perforated 

linaca. A. I ; iomeroy, O.; Akron, o. ; edges has lately made it* appearance. It is larger 

Cairo 111 ■ Tafearv- \lhTrt-, l n . i ... than the genuine one. The genuine label is about 

V airo, ill. , Ldlgan , AlDerta, (. anada ; De- nn inch ,U „1 a hair M,uare and is printed on bu • 

catur, 111 ; Elizabeth, N. J.; Galesburg °°* , *red paper. When purchasing a hat see to U 
in . ,. i ... that you get the genuine label with the perforated 

111.; Grand Rapids, Mich.; Jacksonville, edges. 

1 la ; La Crosse and N. La Crosse, Wis ; This is the Only Correct Union Label fo [ 

I A Junta. Col.; Louisville. Ky.; Logans-! Fur-Felt Hats, 

port, Ind.; Locklaml. (>.; Marion, Ind.; 

Moundsville, W. Va.;Muncie, Ind.; New- 
town. Long Island, N. Y.; Norwalk and 



BUY NO FUR-FELT HAT WITHOUT IT! 



Edward Barrett, l’re»ident. 

Hat Maker»’ international Association 



S. Norwalk, Conn, (after a week’s Strike James II. Denuose. Secretary, 

«r i- I, 1 52J Snyder Ave.. Philadelphia, Pa 

1 r t J " was successful ill raos. F. O’RorBKE. President, 

adjusting ytrik^i; Me Dalles Ure * HatFii>i>bt*iV Internatioiuil a-- n 

Parkersburg. W. Va.; Paris, Tex!; San- I Joas 

dusky, ().; Somerville, N. J.; Creator — 

111 .; South Bend, Ind.; Springfield, Mo.; THE U^NIOM LAliEL. 

Thfinf 0*|'and Wa/^^IndL tRl<le ' THE CIGAR MAKERS’ BLUE LABEL 

El wood, Ind. ; Sioux City, Iowa ; Ports- 
mouth, Va., and Springfield, ill., arc ar- 
ranging to get the nine hour day in a 
month or two, while it will positively be- 
come the rule on June 1 . in Flushing, 

N. Y., and Meadville, Pa. 

Salem, ()., Henderson, Kv., Middle- 
town, and < >lney, N. Y., have not yet set- 
tled their trade demands, but will do so 
at a later perio«i in the season. In Peeks- t 
kill, N. Y., there will be no strike this 
year notwithstanding talk that way. 

Lewiston, Me.; Knoxville, Tenn. Licli- 
uiond, Va.. want to insist on the card 1 
system with sanction ofG. E B t >ur 
union in Staten Island. N Y., though 
wen* successful in just inaugurating the 
card system without any trouble. 

“ moving tor a minimum ! 
an per hour tor nine hours a 
« ay and ( tica. N. ’i are liolding ready 
, ‘> , aj y more of the contractors to 1 
; eak down the nine-hour day and return 
o the ten hours. 



Harrisburg Pa. New Whatcom, Wash.; 
Grove LUv, 1 a., and Punxsutawnev have 
upheid the nine-hour day this season in 

• piti of several schemes to get back f o 

the ten-hour day. h *° 

b, unreif N J - i9 working 9 

Äv&ssssr" m l!e, ‘ i! ‘‘ uk 

to^ n T'v t ; u^ nsvil, f' Ind -i Middle- 
N Y »ni^L lnd ; Clitf, 

* ’ I’ , 1 ‘ baron, Pa., have made sure 

apohs FnTSf 111 Wage9 *, and in Indian- 
apolis Ind., the men made fair conditions 

as to trade rules for the season In St 
tifeT; ' V ?\ Br V n 8 wk ‘k’ son ‘e contractors 

nV« d i t 0 i^ e i hack t0 the hours but the 
men held firm for the nine hours 

Limannati 0. ; Covington. Ky.; New- 

pmt N\ ., and vicinitv, with aid an.i 

m^°' e of . General Secretary McGuire 
compromised with the con.r,cto re » ,h e 




At the Four« 
teenth Annua! 
Session o f the 
Cigar Makers 
International 
Union, held At 
Chicago, in the 
month ofS’ pt«. ru- 
ber, 1SS6. the c- 
companying! ■ e 
was adopt«, d 
trade mark u 
pasted on « "• 
box of c i ^ 
made by l t 
men. 



If you nr«j opi>o*e«F to the *er\ ile !»i*«r 
le*. smoko unioti-niatle cigar*. . . , 

If you nre opp»«*e»t to contracts for . 

labor, iu deadly competition with t«cc «a 
smoke union-umde cigar*. j. 

If you favor higher wages, smoke union- 
cigars. , i, ..... 

If you are opposed to filthy tenement- j*^ 
factories, smoke none but union-nuwe « I- _ 
If you favor shorter hours ok labor, *u. 
union-made cigars. . #1^.« 

If you favor a permanent organizatio n c> _ 

•trietly union shop*, do not purchase th V 
duct of scabs, rats and blacklegs. a 

See that the Blue Label Is ea th-3 ' 



4 




ac 









rHE 



CARPENTER 



Volume XII. — No. 6-7. 



PHILADELPHIA, JUNE-JULY, 1892. 



Published Monthly. 



LABOR’S NINETY AND NINE. 






INDUSTRIAL ITEMS. 



PERSONAL POINTERS. 



JP?/ S . M . Smith . 

There are ninety and nine who live and die 
In want and hunger and cold, 

That one may revel in luxury 
And be lapped in its silken fold ; 

The ninety and nine in hovels bare— 

The one in a palace with riches rare. 



Dorchester, Mass., — Union 309 is do- 
j ing splendidly and at its dance early this 
i month realized $75 over all expenses. 



Portland, Ore. — Union 50 is making a 
sturdy light to build up, and the members 
are ‘ ‘ gritty ” and faithful and that counts 
after all. 



FredT. Covne, of Tampa, Fla,, has 
been appointed District Organizer, vice 
A. W. Purcell. 



They. toil in tlie llelds, the ninety and nine, 
Kor the fruits of our mother earth, 

They dig and delve in the dusky mine 
And bring it* hidden treasures forth. 

But the wealth released by their sturdy blows, 
To the hands of one forever flows. 



New Kochelle, N. Y.— Union 42 had 
a grand concert and entertainment. May 
18, in the Casino, with a vast array of 
excellent talent. 



P. M. Arthur has been re-elected Presi- 
dent of the Locomotive Engineers. He 
has now been re-elected each successive 
term the past twenty years. 



From the swtat of their brows the desert blooms 
And the foreai before them falls, 

Their labor. has builded humble homes 
And cities Ayitli loity walls, 

But the on owns cities and homes and lands, 
And the ninety and nine have empty hands. 



But the night, go dreary and dark and long 
At last shall the morning bring, 

And over Wie land the victor’s song 
Of the ninety and nine shall ring. 

And echaf&far from zone to zone ; 

.Rejoice, tor labor shall have its own. 






ATTENTION INDIANA LOCALS. 



We (would most respectfully call the 
attention. of the Carpenters’ Unions of 
Indiana to the meeting of the Indiana 
>tate /Federation of Trades and Labor 
Unions which convenes at Logansport, 
•ou July 26 and 27. The session will con- 
sider matters of vital importance to or- 
ganized labor. A splendid programme 
of exercises has been arranged and the 
local uuions of Logansport will arrange for 
reduced rates on the various railways 
entering into the city and also provide 
ample hotel accommodation and will 
■arrange everything for the convenience 
and entertainment of the delegates who 
attend. All our letal unions who can 
possibly do so should send a representa- 
tive to the above mentioned meeting. 



The House Labor Committee at Wash- 
ington, D. O., has agreed to a stringent 
eight-hour bill with a penalty for its vio- 
lation. This is tiie only way to have an 
effective eight-hour law. 



August Delabar, General Secretary of 
the Journeymen Bakers’ International 
Union, after years of service in that posi 
tion has retired to accept a position in a 
business house in St. Louis. 



Buffalo, N. Y., — Union 440 held its 
first annual ball, June 2, the proceeds go 
to purchase a banner for the Fourth of 
July parade and picnic of the Building 
Trades Council of this city. 



Arthur Vi nette, formerly financial 
secretary of Union 56, Los Angeles, Cal., 
has prepared an excellent draft of a sub- 
stitute for the Sub-Treasury and Land 
1 .oan bills now in Congress and ad vooRted 
by the People’s party. 



Jackson, Mich. — Carpenters here this 
season are doing better than they did last 
season They are now all at work nine 
hours a day, thanks to Union 26 and are 
getting 25 cents per day better pay. 



Are Spring, a prominent, labor man in 
Seattle, Wash., recently published a mast- 
erly reply in the Pout-Intelligencer of 
Seattle, in answer to the circular attack 
of the Manufacturers’ Asso ciation of San 
Francisco, against the trade unions. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES. 



GLEANINGS FROM MANY FIELDS. 



The Regular quarterly meeting of the 
G. E. B. takes place on the 27th of this 
month at the General Office in Philadel- 
phia. The session will last eight or nine 
days. 



Blanks for officers and password for 
ensuing quarter have just been mailed to 
all locals in good standing. Unions not 
receiving the same should notify the 
General Secretary. 



The National Union of Retail Clerks 
meet in convention in Cleveland, O . 
July 11. 

Fort Wayne, Ind., and Lynn Mass., 
have Ladies’ Auxiliary Clubs in connec- 
tion with our Order. 



Dubuque, Iowa., has formed a good 
building trades council and the Carpen- 
ters’ Union is actively in it. 



This is your last chance ! Any amend- 
ment, change or alteration of the Consti 
tution, or any suggestions, appeals or 
complaints for action of the coming con- 
vention should be sent in at once to the 
G. S. 



T. C. Walsh, of Union 63 spoke at a 
large public meeting of carpenters recently 
in Yonkers, N. Y., and thereby helped 
Union 273 very much. 



Have you sent in the name of your 
delegate to the St. Louis Conventon ? lf- 
not you better do so at once, or the R e 
cording Secretary of your union is subject 
to a fine of $5, as provided in Section 8 
of the Constitution. 



Warren, Pa., The largest contractor 
has announced he will hire none but 
union men for one year to come. This 
encourages Union 599. 



Boston, Mass.— The Tenth Anniver- 
sary of the United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters in Boston, Mass., was celebrated 
in grand style on June 8. 



Cairo, 111. — Not a scab carpenter in 
town. Five dollars initiation fee and 50 



Galveston, Tex. — Union 526 had a 
rousing large railroad excursion April 25, 
and acquitted itself grandly. We are 
holding open meetings with grand success 
and are starting a building trades council 



Great Falls, Mont., — We have a good 
Trades Council and with its help we drove 
out the last scab job in this town. We 
also got early closing hours for the clerks 
and organized them and abolished Sunday 
work. 



Theo. S. Jones is Business Agent of 
Union 410. Pueblo, Colo., since last April. 
This union is doing splendidly. The only 
two planing mills there are now union and 
work nine hours a day. Nine-tenths of the 
work is union and all 
engaged. 



are quite steadily 



The Seventh General Convention of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters, opens 

in St. Louis, Mo., August 1, 1892, and is cents a month dues is our rule. VVe have 
likely to be in session nine days. Dele- a live trades council with six unions 
gates should come prepared for a long ses- 
sion. There are likely to be 140 to 150 
delegates present. Further particulars will 
appear in August Carpenter. 



‘ THE ADVENTURES OF A SILVER 
DOLLAR.” 



The above is the title of a book,— a 
iabor story — now being written by the 
veteran iabor reformer Geo. E McNeill 
of Boston, Mass. It is an argument in 
novel and romantic form in favor of high 
dues and benefits, and a thorough expo- 
nent of union principles. It is something 
that will interest the wives and mothers 
and ladies in the trade union work, as 
well as stir the men to greater activity. 
The whole stor-v will deal with the entire 
field of labor discussion and will contain 
arguments pro and con on the free silver 
question as well as unionism, shorter 
hours, high dues and benefits, tariff, etc., 
etc. It tiie members of our uuions will 
send 50 cents or one dollar to this office, it 
will help the publication of the book, and 
for such donation a copy of the book will 
be given each subscriber who makes a 
oonation. Mr, McNeill is a very facile 
and interesting writer, and the book will 
be of standard merit. 



New Orleans, La., — Dull times in this 
city ; carpenters average $2 per day and 
mostly small jobs. The men seem afraid 
to push ahead . Still we have lots of good 
men. The car drivers won their strike 
and organized labor is looming up. 



Gilbert Dk La Matyr died in Akron, 
O., late in May, and in his death the in- 
dustrial classes have lost an eloquent and 
devoted champion. Whether in the pul- 
pit at Denver, Indianapolis or Akron, or 
as Congressman at Washington he was 
ever our faithful friend. 



It looks as if the New England and 
Middle States will have only a very small 
number ol delegates at the St ' Louis 
Convention. The bulk of the delegates 
will come from the Western and Southern 
States, though more than half the mem- 
bership is located in the New England 
and Middle States and Canadas. 



All branches of labor in Battle Creek 
Mich., and Owosso, Mich., are now thor- 
oughly organized except the building 
trades. Both cities have good trades 
councils. 



All shoes made by Bouve & Crawford 
Brockton Mass., are lasted by scab shoe 
lästere. So that the Crawford, shoe should 
not be purchased by union meh until the 
firm hires union lasters. 



Were half the power that fills the world with 
terror, 

Were half the wealth bestowed on camps and 
courts, 

Given to redeem the human mind from error, 
There were no need for arsenals nor forts. 

— [Longfellow . 



Buckhannon, W. Va. — The Buckhan- 
non Land Trust Association of West Vir- 
ginia and the Alexander or Local Lumber 
Company of Upshur County, West Vir- 
ginia, are both advertising to flood this 
section with men when we are now over- 
crowded with workmen and there is no 
land boom such as they talk ol. 



SAYWARO’S PRAISE. 

It is a matter of common observation 
among those who are at all conversant 
with the inside of the labor movement, 
that the men who have received the edu- 
cation given by membership in a labor 
society are commonly the superiors of 
their employers in knowledge as to econo- 
mic nrincinles and industrial laws. Thus 
saith the Boston Labor Leader. A strik- 
ing bit of evidence in this direction 
cmne to my notice the other day at one of 
the legislative hearings. Secretary Say- 
ward of the Master Builders’ Association 
was before the Labor committee, and 
speaking of the educational value of organi- 
zation, said : “ I am willing to state 
publicly before tiffs committee that many 
of* the deputations from the labor societies 
are better qualified to discuss economic 
problems than the committees appointed 
to meet them by the master builders. 
This I attribute almost wholly to the train- 
ing the men receive in tueir unions.” 
l’raise from Sir Hubert.is praise indeed. 



Preparations are made for a series of 
simultaneous monster labor meetings and 
parades all over California on June 27 — 
on the one date all over the entire State. 
This is in answer to the challenge of bat- 
tle offered by the Manufacturers’ Ex- 
change of San Francisco, against all the 
unions and labor societies of the State. 



“The Fälliger specification Blanks” for 
brick and frame buildings of every kind 
are in three different forms to suit cost of 
building. They are published in very 
cheap form and are very practical; for 
sale generally by the trade throughout 
the United States and Canada. 



“ Direct Legislation, by the Citizen- 
ship, through the Initiative and Referen- 
dum,” is a very interesting book of 120 
pages and costs 25 cents in paper cover 
and 75 cents in cloth. It is written by J. 
W. Sullivan and published by the Twen- 
tieth Century Publishing Co ” New York. 



The General Secretary has arranged 
for reduced railroad farts and special 
hotel rates for the delegates to the St. 
Louis Convention. Blank credentials will 
soon be mailed to each delegate whose 
name and address is reported to the Gen- 
eral Secretary The railroad fares of dele- 
gates will be at the rate of one and one- 
third fare for the round trip on all the 
Trunk lines. 



The Masonic parquet floor layers of 
New York are on a strike for eight hours 
a day. So are the Cabinet Makers and 
Carvers. The Tile Layers also made a 
successful movement in several cities on 
May 18 for the eight-hour day. 



A SUGGESTION AS TO AN INSURANCE 
SYSTEM. 



Buffalo, N. Y. — A certain contractor 
of this city to get a house built quickly 
offered the foreman a new hat, and the 
workmen some beer; the result was the 
house was built 72 hours sooner than it 
would otherwise have been. The hat and 
beer seemed to have a magical influence. 
If all the carpenters of Buffalo were mem- 
bers of the Union, a new bat or a dozen 
kegs of beer would have little influence in 
such a case. 



A Labor Conference will be held in 
Pittsburgh, Pa., July 27th next, to establish 
an International Correspondence Bureau 
for the labor movement in the United 
States. Similar bureaus have been estab- 
lished in England, France, Belgium, Swit- 
zerland and other countries, The object is 
to secure information in case ot strikes and 
lockouts in any part of the woild and 
m ake it known 'to all branches of organ- 
ized labor every wht re. 



Olympia. Wash. — We have only one 
“ scab ” job in town, and it is run by a 
party named Rogers. Hois the laughing- 
stock of the town on account of his skin 
prices for work, Some good men are idle, 
butthey wont cut prices. We have a car 

■ i load ot carpenters here ready for ship- 
( ’ ment to any place where they can get 

work at union prices. Stay away from 
r l Puget Sound. 

if The Boilermakers' National Union 
W / held its Twelfth annual Convention in 
J '.Cleveland, O, June 20. The Paterson 
• N. J.) Labor Standard is now the official 

■ j journal of the boilermakers. The Shoe- 
makers’ and Machinists’ National Unions 

j field their Conventions in Philadelphia 
! ’(this month. 



Newtown, Long Island, N. Y , Loral 
Unions 507 of this town and Union 714, 
Flushing N. Y. have notifiea the ‘ Ameri- 
can Portable House Company,” of Cor- 
ona, Long Island, to comply with union 
rules. This American Portable House 
Company fails to do so. Hence we urge 
all our friends and members everywhere 
to boycott all coal, lumber, election booths 
and all manufactured goods coming from 
this company, until it concedes to union 
rides. 



Dkadwood, S Dak. — Here in the Black 
Hills we find it impossible to unite the 
carpenters under the United Brotherhood. 
More than three -fourths of the men are 
small bosses and jobbers and they prefer 
to join the Knights of Labor so to have 
bosses and journeymen all in one society. 
(Remark of the Editor. — We think 
they might as well not organize at all as 
to have bosses, jobbers and journeymen 
all in one organization, for they won’t 
j agree or hold together very long.) 



R. Maroske, 2814 Lemp Ave, St. Louis, 
Mo., is a live member of Union 734, St. 
l-Xiuis, Mo. He has invented a good cheap 
Regulation Mitre Box. The old style box 
when cut too deep or worn becomes 
utterly useless, whereas in Bro. Maroske’B 
new Mitre Box these disadvantages are 
overcome by means of very simple shift 
screws. 



W. H Becklky, of Union 601, Leb- 
anon Pa., declares himself in favor of 
electing workingmen representatives to 
legislative positions in Congress and to 
every State Legislature to make laws in 
behalf of the working people. He does 
not favor dragging these questions into 
our union meetings, but thinks the move- 
ment can be made by members of trade 
and labor unions outside of those bbdies. 



S. S. Baker, of Union 162, Chicago, 
111. , secretary of that union and also sec- 
retary of the District Council of Chicago, 
has invented “the Baker Repeating 
Alarm Clock.” Any number of calls can 
be rung with one clock and you must 
answer the call to stop it. It is particu- 
larly valuable to railway men, street car 
men, postmen, milkmen, liverymen, hotel 
and boarding house keepers Address 8 
S. Baker, 7015 Oglesbv ave., Chicago, 
111 . 



PAUL DESCHANEL’S IMPRESSIONS. 



The French Government lately sent a 
bright young man named Paul Deschanel 
over to this country to study the labor 
organizations and industrial conditions of 
the United States. He visited every large 
centre and town of note, and made a dili- 
gent investigation of all the varied in- 
terests ot the American toilers. Before 
leaving this country to return to France, 
he gave his impressions of his trip to a re- 
porter, and these are a few of them. He 
said : 

“ Why, the perfection of labor organi- 
zations in America is years, I may say 
dozens of years in advance of anything 
which has tieen dreamed of in France.” 

“ The point I would make is, and it is 
one which has been impressed upon me in 
every part of America, that the American 
laboring classes owe their success and their 
present power and comfort not to any leg- 
islation in their favor, but to their own in- 
dependent efforts, legislation is the last 
thing wanted or asked for. Indeed they 
look with disfgvor upon any measure 
drawn by unpractical philanthropists to 
improve their condition. 



Mr. L. G. Powers, Commissioner of the 
State Bureau of Labor Statistics of Min- 
nesota, writes General Secretary McGuire, 
that the Minnesota Labor Bureau has 
begun the study of the loss the working 
people suffer by reason of accidents while 
at their work 

Mr. Powers further says : “This leads 
to the subjects of employer’s liability 
laws and the practice of accident and 
employers’ liability insurance. That study 
and some similar ones leads me to the 
conclusion that the trade union must be 
the best means of directing the distribu- 
tion of ail relief, benefit or insurance funds 
for the protection of the working people. 

There is great need of the passage in 
thia State of an employers’ liability act 
that shall be the basis of a greater justice 
to the toiler. Then there should be an 
accident insurance that should provide 
for contingencies that no liability act can 
cover. This insurance should lie in the 
hands of labor organizations, or trade 
unions. 

With a union such as yours, let each 
man pay in a sum that on the average 
will insure him against accident for say 
$4000 or $5000 in case of death and $1 50 
or $2.00 a day in case of accident that dis- 
ables and yet is not fatal. Then as the 
risk of a carpenter is from two and one- 
half to five times that of the most 
favored risk, let the union say to the con- 
tractors: Pay three-fourths into our treas- 
ury and we will as men absolve and re- 
lease you from all genera! liability for 
accidents, while in your service, and look 
to the union tor all this is needed to make 
good my loss in case of accident or the 
I oss of my family, in case I am killed. 

In connection with a trade union man- 
aged as is the carpenters’ in addition to 
your present dues the member could in- 
sure for $4000 in case of death by accident 
and $1 50 a day in case of disability for a 
sum not tar from 75 cents a month. 

If an accident insurance fund was or- 
ganized on that basis, you could say to the 
bosses: Give us 50 cents a month for every 
union man on your pay roll and we will 
agree to release you from all loss by acci- 
dent to the men while at work in your 
employ. You could further say to them: 
If you desire we will assume the same 
risk for non-union men, but they or you 
must pay into our treasury, in addition to 
the 50 cents, a sum equal to all the dues of a 
member of the brotherhood. Possibly in 
some such way it could be made more of 
an object for the outside carpenters to join 
the union At least that is the way it 
presents itself to my mind. 

Yours truly 

L. G. Powers, Commissioner. 



Clarksburg, W. Va.— Union 236 has 
every carpenter in town except three. 
And though we have low wages we be- 
lieve in high dues. We were paving 50 
cents per month dues and have” $3 per 
week sick benefits, and this winter we 
raised our dues to $2 per month to pay 
our sick benefits and we are doing so and 
have not lost a member through the 
higher dues. 



Thirty thousand men in the granite 
trade have been locked out. This comes 
through the combination of the New 
England granite quarry owners. They 
want the men to make contracts for wages 
and hours in January — in the dead of 
winter— instead of in May, as has been 
the usual custom. Tiffs lockout involves 
granite cutters, rammers, pavers, quarrv- 
men and all engaged in the granite indus- 
tries. The men are firm and many of the 
bosses havegivenin. 



BOYCOTT GEORGE EHRET’S NEW YORK 
BEER. 



Fellow-Workmen :— Pursuant to a reso- 
lution adopted at the Birmingham Con- 
vention of the American Federation of 



l abor a boycott is declared against George 
Ebret’s brewery of New York city. 



The following are the reasons for the en- 
dorsement of tiffs boycott : 

In the early part of 1888 George Ehret, 
with others, organized the NAY. Brewers’ 
Pool, and on the. 16th of April of that 
year locked out more than four thousand 
(4000) Journeyman Brewers, the only rea- 
son assigned for their discharge being that 
they were union men. The men conten- 
ded for several months, but they were 
forced into submission. In George Ehret’s 
brewery it is not only tile rule that it is 
non-union, but even if a man is known 
to lean favorably toward the union or is 
a subscriber to a labor paper he is sum- 
marily discharged. 

A few of the men he employs' he pays 
full wages to, in order to deceive the gen- 
eral public, but a large number of men 
are employed under the guise of being 



apprentices, paying them practically ap- 

tort. 



prentices’ wages for journeymen's work 



You can judge what kind of apprentices 

sd tin 



these men are when if is stated that their 
ages vary from eighteen to fifty years 

A recent attempt was made by the re 
presentatives of the Federation to have 
George Ehret bring his brewery into line 
with rather than in antagonism to the 
.Journeymen Brewere’ National Union, 
but in vain. Mr. Ehret believes in the 
potency of his wealth and defies the 
power of organized labor. 

If the workingmen will give this boy- 
cott their undivided support we may vet 
teach Mr. Ehret a lesson. 

Whenever George Ehret’s beer is sold 
make it von* purpose to convince the 
dealer that it is to his advantage to give 
iff» patronage to a fairer employer than 
George Ehre.’s Pool, non-union brewery. 



























Published Monthly, on the Fifteenth of rah Month 
AT 

124 N. \in(h St., Phil».. Pa. 

P. .1. McGuire, Editor ami Publisher. 



Wintered at the Post-Oftice at Philadelphia, Pa., 
as second-class matter. 



Sur.s<TUPTioN Price: — F ifty cents a year, in 
advance. |>o»tpaid. 

Address all letters and moneys to 

P. J. McGuire, 

Box 884, Philadelphia, Pa. 




TO ALL OllR RfAl'ERS. 

This one issue of The Carpenter will 
cover the months of June and July. The 
Convention is close at hand and the work 
of ithe General Office is such, with the 
G- E. B. now in session, and a multitude 
of matters to be attended to, we cannot 
stop to publish a July number. We will 
have the August paper out the third week 
in July, and it will contain many matters 
of interest and all linancial reports up to 
July 1, 1892. After that the paper can 
appear each month in time to reach even 
the most remotely located cities. 



NINE NEW UNIONS. 

In the past month we have issued char 
tern to nine new unions viz • No. 695, N T . 
Indianapolis, Ind.; 724, Charleston, 111.; 
727, Northampton. Mass ; 753, Sherman, 
Tex.; 740, Pekin, III.; 754, Elizabethton, 
Tenn.; 767, Ottumwa, Iowa; 769, Chain, 
paign, 111 .; and 785, Covington, Ky., (Ger- 
man.) 

Strituk. are still pending among the 
carpenters in Baltimore, Md-, and Scran- 
ton, Pa. More than two -thirds of the men in 
each of these places gained their demands. 
But the bosses employing less than one- 
third of the men are holding out. The 
men are firm and are getting strike pay 
from this office at the rate of one dollar a 
day. Strikes are going on in Winchester, 
Ky.; Newport, R. I., Tampa, Fla., and 
among the mill men of St. Louis, Mo- 



The International Typographical Con- 
vention had its Fortieth Annual Conven- 
tion in this city. They did well to re- 
elect President Prescott and General Sec- 
retary McClevey. They have both made 
good hard-working officers, of practical 
merit, and progressive minds. 



Why Does not the Department of Labor 
at Washington, D. C , exercise its legal 
powers in the present lockout in the pav- 
ing stone and granite trades. Under the 
law that made that department, powers 
were granted it to investigate and settle 
any strike or lockout of an Interstate 
character extending over two or more 
States. Here is a chance now to deal with 
a trade trouble of a grave and serious 
character. It should lie done. And Car- 
roll D Wright as chief of the Department 
is fully competent for the task, and, no 
doubt, will undertake it. 



IRRESPONSIBLE CIRCULARS. 

The Trades Hotel Co., of Chicago, in 
connection with the Worlds’ Fair is pure- 
ly a speculative business concern. It has 
been sending out circulars to all our locals. 
We strenuously advise our local unions 
and members to take no stock in these 
circulars, as they have been sent out with- 
out any authority from this office. Any 
business circular sent the locals w T hich 
does not bear the endorsement or approval 
of the G. E. B. and G. S. should (have no 
standing in the locals. 

While on this subject we wish to notify 
the locals that the circular from Union 612 
Bridgeport, Ala., in regard to colored 
members, was sent out solely on the re- 
sponsibility of that union, and not even 
a copy of it was ever sent byUnion 612 to 
this office, nor were the general officers 
ever jonsulted about it. 



TRADE MO-VEM : N fS OF CA iPENTER*. 

Holland, Mich., and Du Quoin, 111., 
propose to move for the nine -hour day. 

Union 564, Jersey City Heights, N. J., 
postponed its strike until a more favor- 
able time. 

Sharpville, Pa., will demand an ad. 
vance of 25 cents per day, July 1, 1892, 
and will get it. 

Union 649, Jacksonville, 111 , has se- 
cured a regulation of the apprentice sys- 
tem this season. 

Lancaster, Mo., Union 353, will estab- 
lish a minimum of $2.50 per day and 
nine hours a day January 1, 1893. 

Springfield, Mass. — Two of our largest 
builders and hardest non-union employers 
came down to the nine- hour rule May 2. 

Charleston, W-Va. — Members of Union 
511 are having some trouble with contrac- 
tors violating union rules. The men are 
solid. 

Most of the planing mills in Cleveland, 
O., are now running on the nine-hour 
plan and the bosses see the advantage of 
it, as do the men. 

Evansville, Ind. — Union Carpenters 
secured an advance in wages this spring, 
and the mill men are organizing to get 
the nine-hour rule. 

AsbctryPark, N. J.— Members of Union 
750 went out and remained on a strike a 
week, finally compromising on June 15, 
for the adoption of the nine hours. 

The nine-hour day has been established 
recently in El wood, Ind. ; Saxon ville, 
Mass. ; Springfield, 111. ; Flushing, N. Y.; 
Sioux City, Iowa, and Meadville, Pa. 

The Millwrights’ and Millers’ Union No. 
786 of New York city under charter of 
our U. B., asked the eight-hour day May 
16, and after one day’s stand won its 
struggle. 

Lbwistown and Auburn, Me., are neigh- 
boring cities, and Union 407 has jurisdic- 
lion over both. The union fairly booming 
and doubled its membership the past few 
months by active agitation. 

Unions 120, Venice, III., and 792 Wash- 
ington Court House, O. ; 352, Anderson, 
Ind.; 407 of Lewiston and Auburn, Me , 
have established the card system this 
season and will not work with non-union 
men. 

Cincinnati, 0-, and its twin suburban 
cities Covington, Ky., and Newport, Ky., 
are all united in one District Council of 
Carpenters along with several Ohio towns 
adjacent to Cincinnati . The carpenters, 
mill men and stair builders' unions have 
all been successful in their demands this 
season. 

The Mill manufacturers of Ne w 0 rleau s 
in several plaining mills, thought they 
could bring the men hack to the ten-hour 
day, and tried it. But it stirred Union 732 
and the mill workmen became aroused and 
flocked into the union. The result is the 
nine-hour day is maintained. 

Baltimore, Md. — On May 2, the house 
carpenters came out for the eight-hour 
day and mill men for nine hours a day. 
At first the most of the mill men were 
conceded their demand but the mill 
bosses combined and locked out all hands. 
Tbe mill men finally gained the nine hour 
day at nine hours pay for the present. 
Seven hundred carpenters are at work 
eight hours a day and from 250 to 300 
men are still, out and are being financially 
supported by theU. B. The bricklayers’ 
union of Baltimore and all the unions in 
that city are giving great help to the 
striking carpenters. We are bound to 
win. 



LABOR AFrAIRS IN VANCOUVER. 

Vancouver. — Away np here in British 
Columbia we are struggling for our own. 
This place is a sort of a dumping ground 
for a good deal of tbe off -scouring» brought 
here by the schemers in the Canadian 
Pacific Railroad monopoly. We still hold 
on to the card system among the carpen- 
ters, and it raised our membership from 
4(1 to 140 members. On January 1 next 
we will work eight hours a day for eight 
hours’ pay until May i, and then we will 
demand $3 per day, the same as we now 
get for nine hours Some contractors 
have tried to ofiset our movement by 
pushing back to the ten hours. Ün the 
new post office building that was tried, 
and our union men quit the job. We had 
to expel William 1 -angtry from Union 617 
for going to work ten hours a day on 
tliAt jof). But now we are solid, and' will 
tight every move of the bosses against us. 



should be ““ 
with the cap** 



—>aOAii 



and worrmient m ^ i ^nklort, . . 

>. is not omy j * v ggg 



66d- 



EDITORIAL JOTTINGS. 

Unions 24, Somerville, Mass., and 138, 
Cambridge. Mass., have jointly placed a 
Walking delegate in the field and he is 
doing good service. 

Sacramento, Cal.— By agreement with 
the contractors, Union 341 has arranged 
to have the eight-hour day go into effect 
September 5th next, without a strike. 

Our Death Rate has been extremely 
large the past eighteen months. But the 
month of April this year surpassed all 
We paid out $12,554.50 for benefits on 
death and disability claims. 



BENE- ITS PAID IN APRIL. 



Denver, Colo. — The Elitch Garden 
Amusement Co., has come to terms with 
Carpenters Union 65 oi this city- A few 
months ago a boycott was put on the Elitch 
Gardens for hiring non-union carpenters 
and so efiective was the boycott that the 
company has now signed an agreement to 
hire union men exclusively, and recogniz- 
ing the union. 



Williamson & Foster, merchants, oi 
Harrisburg, Pa., have let a contract to a 
ten-hour boss to build a large storehouse 
in the central part ot the city. Union 
labor has protested, but to no avail. We 
have now placed the matter in the hands 
of the A. F. of L., and as the firm has a 
large store in Lancaster, Pa., we hope to 
soon bring it back to the nine-hour day. 



Eight Hundred plaining mill men in 
St. Louis, Mo-, went on strike June 20 to 
secure the nine-hour day. The strike is 
under jurisdiction of mill men’s unions 
395 and 734 of St. Louis, and is sanctioned 
by our <1. E. B. The union carpenters 
of that city also refuse to handle non- 
union mill stuff. The men are gain- 
ing every day and they will triumph be- 
fore July. 



Baltimore, Md- — Mill Men’s Union 
705, succeeded in establishing the nine 
hour day in every sash and blind factory 
in this city, with only one exception, after 
the men were out over three weeks. And 
where we first settled on the basis that only 
nine hours pay be given for nine hours 
work, the majority of our members are 
now getting full pay the same as they 
formerly got for ten hours so our strike 
was far from being a failure. 



No. Name. 

1507 — J. B Forrest, fial. due 



1690 — Mrs. A. Crowley 
169) — John Single . . 
1692 — Julius Klare 



1694— Clias. Wall 

1695— A. B Trussell . 



1097 — John S. Jones . . . 

1698 — A. II. Kagot . . 

1699 — Mrs. F. Fehlen . . . 

1700 — Mrs. A. C. Foster . 

1701 — Edw. Sanderson . 

1702 — H. E. Stock ett . . . 

1703 — Mrs. Julia Ryan . . 
17u4 — Mrs. Mary Kane 



1706 — Minot Grover ... 

1707 — Wm. Kenny 

1708— Mrs. M. A. O’Connor 

1709— Kail Minnich • • . . . 



Traveling carpenters, keep away from 
Tampa, Fla ; Decatur, 111 ; Baltimore, 
Md ; Scranton, Pa.; Winchester, Ky.; 
Newport; R. I.; and St. Louis, on account 
of unsettled trade troubles in those cities. 



17K- John Larson 

1712 — H. D. R. Hembrie 

1713— Wm. Bush 



Holyoke, Mass.— After a long and hard 
strike we secured a settlement in our favor 
by the presence of General Secretary 
Maguire. The men get the nine hour day, 
a minimum rate of wages and recognition 
for the union. 



1717 — Mrs. M. J. Temple . . . . 

1718 — Dallas Wilson 

1719 — David Bowers ... 

1720— E.S. Kell ye 

1721— Mrs. M. Seh weinsberg . 

1722— Mr -. E. C. Frankenberry 

1723— T. E Fairfax . . . . 

1724 — Henry GJickert 



1726- J. G. Bisehoff 

1727— Mrs. F Wine . 



La Junta, Colo. — Union 590 won our 
nine-hour strike here in four hours, and 
we are only a little over three months 
organized. This started the bricklayers 
and painters, and they likewise got tbe 
nine-hour day. 



1729- 

1730- 



-II F. Morrison . . 
-Mrs. S. A. Cheatham 



1732— W. Halldearn . 

1733 — Mrs. A Jones , 

1734— P. J. Boyne . . 
1736 — Hern Nitsche 



Marietta, O. — We have gained all our 
demauds this season, and the last planing 
mill in this city to hold out against us 
was Mr. Baker’s. He has at last sur- 
rendered. We now refuse to work with 
non union carpenters. 



1738 — Geo. E. Scott 

1739— Mr» S. Hardwick 

1740— M. D. Holfman . 

1741— Wm. Atkins . . . 



1743- 



1746— D. Gissaman 

1747— J, McNamara 

1713— Mrs. I/. Diestelkamp . 



Boycott Blumer & Kuhn Stair Com- 
pany, of St. Louis, Mo. They are opposed 
to union labor and will not concede the 
eight-hour day, and are fighting Stair 
Builders’ Union, 578, of St. Louis This 
firm refuses every offer of settlement. 



Concord, N. H. — Union 283 has gamed 
the nine-hour day for the majority of car- 
penters in this city. A few turns oppose the 
movement and will not grant thedemand | 
and early in July these shops will go on 
strike, sanctioned by the (4. 14. B., and 
everything indicates that the men will be 
victorious. 



175) — Mrs. A. MeGurgen . 

17*2 — Mrs. R. E Dakin . . 

1761— Mrs. «. Roth . . . 

1754 — J. W. Johnson . . . 

1756— E. P. Dawson .... 

1756 — K. M. Formier . • .21* 

17 57— D. J . Mercer ... 

1753— Mrs. M. «chalk 
1751 — Geo. H. Lee ...... 

I76 1 ’ — Emil stoye 

1731— 8. A. Sanford .. . 

1762 — D. J. Clifford .... 

1763— Mrs. M. C. Kelsey . . 

1764 — Edw. Borek . . . 

1765— Mrs. M. OI instead . . 

1766— Mrs. E. L. Styles 

1767— Mrs. N. M. McRobbie 



1769 — Mrs. E L. Rugh 
1770 - Mrs. Charity Jones 

1771 — Mrs. C. Ackmau . , 

1772 — Mrs. A. Ferguson . 

1773— Mrs. E. Hansen . . 

1774— J. H. Craig . . 



Carpenters are now on strike in Tam pa, 
Fla., with good chances of success All 
the men are out, Doth union and noli- 
union. The employers desire to breaK 
down the nine-hour system aud to go back 
to the ten-hour day. The union carpen- 
ters propose to not only maintain the 
nine-hour day, but also to enforce the 
card system. 



1776 — C Scoit 

1777— W. M. Risley ... 

1778— Mrs. M. L. Ward well 

1779— Mrs. A. E. Crawford 

1780— Mts. E. D. Gifford . . 

1781 — Mrs E. Bessler . . 

1782— Mrs. M. E. Mapes . . 

1783— Mrs, O. Simpkins . . 

1784 — Albert Weege. « . . 

1785 — John Pitman .... 

1786— Frank Wolf .... 



1788— L. Wesling 

1789— John Haddc 

1790— Mrs. R. Welc 



Union. 


Amt 


. . 21 


$91 75 




209 09 




50 00 




200 00 




200 00 




109 00 




200 00 


. . 33 


200 00 




200 0J 


. . 606 


200 0C 


. . 72 


200 00 


. 73 


50 00 


. . 407 


60 00 


. . 230 


200 HO 


. . 4.50 


200 00 




60 00 


10 


50 00 




50 00 


. . 382 


200 U0 


. . 109 


2ü0 00 


. • 699 


50 CK) 


. . 1 


200 00 




10 J 00 




200 00 




200 00 


. . 43 


200 00 




50 (C 




2* 0 00 




50 DO 


. . 446 


50 00 




200 OC 


. . 266 


200 00 




200 00 


. . 206 


50 00 


. . 459 


50 00 


. . 165 


200 00 


22 


200 00 




200 00 


. 310 


200 00 


. . 236 


50 0;> 




50 00 


. . 142 


200 00 


. . 226 


69 OO 




60 00 




200 00 




50 00 


. . 169 


200 OO 


. . 1 


100 00 


. . 8 


50 OC 




50 00 


. . 21 


100 00 


. . 23 


50 00 


. . 23 


100 00 


. . 28 


50 00 


... 42 


60 00 


. 43 


200 0(] 


. . 48 


59 00 


. . 72 


200 OC 


. 104 


200 OC 


. 109 


200 0C 


. . 113 


25 00 




200 00 




200 0C 


. . 167 


50 00 


. . 171 


50 00 




50 (XI 


. . 180 


50 0C 


. . 198 


87 75 


. . 21t 


200 OC 


. . 211 


200 0C 


. 228 


50 00 


. . 236 


200 0 


. 238 


200 00 


. . 261 


200 Cfl 


. . 275 


KW) 00 


. . 338 


26 0C 




200 00 


. 368 


6.) 0<] 




50 00 


. 382 


50 00 


. .«385 


200 00 




60 00 


4’6 


60 00 


. .446 


26 0C 


. . 446 


50 (jfl 


. . 447 


50 00 




200 0C 


. . 405 


59 OC 


. 482 


2ü0 00 


. 468 


2< 0 0C 


. . 473 


50 00 


. . 476 


6 ) 0C 


. 496 


6o 00 


. . «513 


50 00 


. . 538 


50 00 


. . 559 


25 00 


. 564 


200 00 


. 680 


-’00 OC 




100 00 


. . 078 


100 OO 


. . 683 


200 00 




100 00 




25 ( 0 


Total. $12.551 50 



Bet Carpenter. 



Hfjilabelpfjia, Sunt 1892. 



INDEPENDENT POLITICAL ACTION. 

I wish to call your attention to an op- 



portunity that is rapidly passing by for us 
to assert ourselves and by concerted a 
tion at the polls next November attain all 
that organized labor is striving for. 

Two political parties are to-day appeal 
ing to the labor element for support, and 
it is in the power of that element to de- 
cide who the next President will be. The 
Farmer's Alliance and the Prohibition 
party are both a unit in one respect. A 
plank in both platforms declares for the 
Goverment control of the Railroad sys- 
tem. From a labor standpoint it is of vi 
tal importance the matter should be 
brought before organized labor as it pre- 
sents a very simple and practical solution 
to most ol the labor difficulties. The 
labor element supporting the candidate of 
either party can be instrumental in elect- 
ing the next President and on that issue 
he would be the head of the greatest 
labor employing agency in the country and 
have the solution of most labor difficulties 
in his hand. 

Through the R. R system the eight- 
hour law could be enforced through all 
bran riies of mechanical industry and the 
Union rate of wages could be paid, and 
all labor would in time work to that level 
thus doing away with strikes and lock 
outs. The stand on the land question^ is 
also of great importance as they declare 
against the alien ownership of land aud 
thus the opportunity of once more set- 
tling on land that is to-day practically out 
of the market would once more be given 
to the citizens of the country and help 
take the surplus labor from the big cities 
and aU would be benefited thereby. 

Hoping you will permit this to appear 
in the next issue of The Carpenter. 



Yours, Alex, Law, 
laical 340, New York. 



(fine ffjüfip ©etoerffdjaft. 



Tie ^Bewegung jur 3 J c für jung ber 9 T rb its« 
jeit wirb uen einer Slnjaljl ©ewerfilmften 
aufred)lerbalter. Taju gehören bouptfäd)« 
heb bie Wöbelavbeiter unb bie 3'nutterleute. 
3n bent Crgan ber SSrttberfdjaft ber it (deren 
wirb a3erid)t erftntiet über bie ßtruitgen« 
fcljaften in btefein ftrübjahr. Sem £t (erwirb 
aufgefallen (ein, baft bie telcgraphifcben 9lad)« 
richten ber TageSprcffe fiber bie Shbei'e be« 
w’gung in biejent ftrüljjiftr auftenetpbfjnhd) 
iparfant geroefen (tub. Tie« liegt nid)ibaran, 
weil nic^t etwa bie getpöftnlidje SliabSlftion 
ftattgefiinben hätte, fonbern gehört einfed) 
jn ter beliebten Tobt(d)meigung«polmf ber 
faptfahftifdjen fBrcimreiitureti. 'Tie gjrbei« 
terprefie ift fafi auSfdjlieftltdj auf 'Blittfteb 
hingen ber ©dupeftereroane angewiesen n b 
ait§'©täbten, wo foErfje niefit eriftiren erfährt 
man rinfad) nid)tS, a'6 wa§ tie in längeren 
3wi(<f)enräumen erjd) inenben Trabe ■ Dr« 
ganc bringen. 

So iftpon ber Söemegvng ber gimmerlcute 
>n v iefem fttubjaftr bem groftcit ^ublifum 
faff gar nidjt§ unb ben Siefe n bee Slrbe ter« 
p-effe n'T • in U" ficif befaunt geworben. Unb 
bodi umfjftc biefetb» nteftr at« b eiftig 2ota= 
lifäten. Sent rftnrioenl) ift, baft ,bie (Sr« 
folge weit leidjter erftritten würben, als in 
beii SPorjaftren. Tie Sitnme leute haben eben 
ifjren ©aupt'djlag in ben Jaljren 1890 unb 
1891 getban unb nun fjonbclt es ftd) Iftaupt« 
frWicl) um bie ffeinrren, nod) rücEi'tänbigen 
Drtidjaften Tie Unternehmer lieftien eS 
weiften« auf Strifes nicht anfommen unb fo 
bie SluSgaben ber Union für foldje int ®!ai 
btefe« Jahres btoä 11,000 Tollar«- g‘«pcfen, 
wäbtenb fie leg es Jlaftr 35,000 unb im Iahte 
1890 76,000 ToIlarS betrugen. 

Sfiir entnehmen bem „©arpenter", bwf; bie 
atfftftünbige SlrbeitSj’it in ^remont unb 
Sacramento, (Sat , Salt Safe ©ift). jum gtö« 
fteren Ttjeil in ^Baltimore unb für eine 
fyabtifaraiuhe in (Hem ?)orf gefcd;crt würbe, 
wälpcnb ber dleunftunbentag in fol= 
getihen Stätten etablirt worben ift: 3(h n «t. 
91. D. ; $ nterop, D. ; Sllron, D ; Sairo, 
SUf. ; ©o(gori), 21'berta, ©anaba ; Tecatnv, 
3 U. ; ©liiabetf), 9t. 3- ; ®a ebbing, 3H- 
(Mvanb MapibS, SDf id). ; 3odfoni'iUe, gla 



Sa ©roffe unb 91. £« ©roffe, 2Bis. ; fia 



3unta, ©ol. ; SouiSnille, Jtp. ; Sogansport, 
3no. ; Sodlanb, D ; Clarion, 3nb. ; 
93louttb«oiUe, 9Ö. 9?a. ; Wunde, %nb . ; 9fcw= 
ton So’g 3^ianb, 91. 91. ; 9lotwalf unb S. 
Jiorroalf, ©onn. ; Th e SuHe«, Ore. ; fjjar« 
fersburg, 2B Sia. ; Smarts, TeraS; ©an« 
budfn, D. ; ©ont ruille, 91 3-i ©tr ator, 
31! ; ©otiflj 33enb 3 T 'b. ; Sprmgfiel\9Jto ; 
©p ingfielb, O. ; Tiffin, O. unb 23abafh, 
3t'b- 

3n einigen ©labten fittb Strifes für ben 
'Ji-’unftunbentag mit giinftigen 9!usfiri)ten 
nod) int ©lange. SSereinjclte SJerfudje ber 
It 1 ternehm’r. bie SPerfitrjung ber Hr be tSjeit 
wi ber rückgängig ju macben. finb jebSmal 
abaefdffogen worben 3» einer weiteren 
9lmal)l Sofalität n finb fonftioc T-orbcnm« 
gen, wie bie ©:tnbl rung »on 9Rinimal«£&f)« 
nen, »on SDgelit ber Union etc. burcftgefegt 
worben. 

Tiefe ©rrung j n'd)aften finb um fo aner= 
fe-nenswertl). al« bie iflau«©ontraft>ren faft 
allenthalben 511 9>erbänben jufammeu gehe« 
Pit finb urb roabreitb fie »on Jöannoiue unb 
9lrfeiterfreunbtidjfeit«='Gbtct r en üb rflieften, 
uielfad) offen unb »erfteef; ben Slnfpiiicben 
ber Strbei'er entgegen getreten finb. 9lud) 
b e fpftcmatifthe‘ 3ü4t«ng »on Set) bngen in 
fog. Trabejd)ulen, in welchen bie 'Bauunter« 
nehnur jegtüb rail machen, legt 3 eil g n i& i u1, < 
ihrer ©iefinnung ab. Tie39aug«me f=2lrbet« 
ter aber werbe” bacon nidjts »u fürdjten lia» 
ben, wenn fie ihre gew rffdiaftlicte Drganifa« 
tion pflegen, bie 3&g tnge bie fer ©djulenftir 
bie f c!be heraitjieljen nub fpftematifeft für bie 
Setfiirjung ber 3lrbcit«teit inirfen. — 

,,956tla. Tageblatt." 



Tie®rüberfd)aft ber gimmerleiite 
unb Saufdjrcincr »011 Slmerifa ift aud) in 
bie’cni 3aftre wieber biejenige Organifatiott, 
welche in ben pe-fdjiebeuen ©fäbten tes £an= 
bes ben Äampf für tie fBerfiirjung ber Sir* 
beitsteit in energifehev Sßeife fortgefegt, fo 
fagt ba§ ,,©t. SlouiS’cr Tageblatt." 



ffikldiea ift Slrifdimorung > 

Tie reichen Seute ocrfimmeln fief) in ber 
üan!. bem filubhauä ober S5<rlor. Söemi 
fid) bie Slrbei er bereiniget, oer'ommeln fte 
fid) in ben Straften nub alle organifirten 
DMcljte ber ®ejeUfd)aft finb oegen fie. Tati 
Kapital h«t baS Sgpr tmb bie SRarine, bie 
gefeggebenben«, bie g ( gufraf tret nlaffen« 
ben unb bie gcfegnusfiiftrenben Stbrperfdjaf» 
ten Sitenn itd) bie reichen Seute »ertam« 
mein, fo tfjun fie es nur Hwecfs S uSfiUrung 
oerfdyebmer 3been SSecfomnt’ln fid) bie 
Sinnen, '0 heiftt e« einfach „f’erjchwörimg" ; 
helfen fie fid) gegenteilig ober, fobato fie 
überhaupt etwas tl)un, Ijrift man fte ,,'Rb« 
bei" ; wenn fte fid) pertheibigen, perbaftet 
man fte wegen ,.SuKhueiratb' . 3 11 biefem 

2anb? ift bie polUifdje 9Jiad)t jwi'chen ben 
Sllänttei n gleidjmäftig »eriteUt. SÖarum foil 
ber 9Je ; d)e bie Ko; UrUe führen? Tenn 
fteberliri) gibt es mehr Slrme als 9ieid)e. Unb 
warum (oUten fid) bie SJrbciter nicht »eieini« 
gen, um ftd) bie Kontrolle über bie gef*gge« 
benben, gricginfraftrctenlaffenben« tmb bie 
gefegausführenben Jtbrperfdjaftpn w per» 
fthaffen V— -©ol. SJo&ert ®. gtißer'oll. 















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J’oa r. 



(Genna»)! 







TL’-tutü ca Ri’ J h)i n ' rjBK 



•M 






u 



General Officers. 

OF THE 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 



Office of the General Secretary, 

124 N. Ninth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



General-President — W. H. Kliver, Box 156, 
ssi 



Grand Crossing, Cook Co., 111. 

General-Secretary — P. J. McGuire, Box 884, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

General-Treasurer— James Troy, 2026 Christian 
8i., Philadelphia, Pa. 

General Vice-Presidents. 

First Vice-President — P M. Wellin, 26 Twelfth 
8t», near Market St.. San Francisco, Cal. 

Second Vice-President — P. W. Birck, 798 Nos- 
trand Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

General Executive Board. 



(All correspondence for the G. E. B. must he 
mailed to the General Secretary.) 

Hugh McKay, 302 Paris St., E. Boston. Mass. 

T. E. Deegan, 11 1 E. 89th St.. New York. 

Ä. A. Stevens, 130 Indiana Ave., JeflT’ville, Ind 
W. F. Abrams. 451 Monroe Ave., Detroit. Mich. 

8. J. Kent, 2016 S St., Lincoln, Neb. 



Financial Report. 

RECEIPTS, April, 1802. 



From the Unions (Tax, etc.). . . 

“ Rent of office 

“ Clearances, etc. . . 

Drawn from Special Assessment. 
Balance on baud April 1, 1892. . 



86,688 69 

lo no 
1 80 

10,0;)0 00 

47 07 



Total $15,647 56 



EXPENSES- April, 1892. 



For Printing 

“ Office, etc. 

“ Tax A F. of L 

“ Badges and charms. 

“ Traveling and Organizing .... 
“ Benefits Nos. 1689 to 1790 . . . 

“ Balance on claim of J. B Forrest. 
“ Quarterly meeting of G. E. B. . . 

Chicago Investigation 

Balance on hand May 1, 1892 



8575 78 
633 41 

90 00 
311 07 
331 11 

12,462 76 

91 75 
299 25 
206 00 
623 44 



Total 



, $15,647 66 



DETAILED EXPENSES, April, 1892. 

Printing 10.000 Noteheads $25 00 

“ 5,000 Members' Cards .... 12 50 

“ 5.000 Appeals ... ... 7 50 

5.000 Arrears Notices .... 12 50 

“ 6 000 Wrappers 6 O') 

“ 1,500 Postal receipts 3 00 

Electrotypes 2 75 

“ 5,000 Applications 7 50 

1 000 Note Circulars ... 4 26 

“ 850 Prot. Fund Circulars . . 5 25 

“ 1,000 Ode Cards 12 50 

1.000 Stamped Envelopes . . 1 25 

“ 500 Rituals 8 26 

1 20 Day Books (100-200 pages) 85 20 

140 Ledgers (100-300 pages) . 131 60 

100 Treas. Account Books. 36 00 

“ 45,500 Copies May Journal. . 225 73 

Wrapping and Mailing April Journal . 19 23 

Postage on April Journal J4 30 

“ Supplies, etc 32 19 

I. 000 Stamped Envelopes 22 (i0 

3,500 Postals 15 00 

Expressage on Supplies, etc .... 38 14 

Twenty-seven Telegrams (strikes etc) . 13-39 

Salary and Clerk Hire 390 66 

Office Rent for March 26 d0 

W. Slack, Organizing Westerly, R. I . 1 70 

C. J. Lakens Org. Flushing, N. Y. . . 9 25 

Massachusetts State Dist. Organizing. 50 00 

I . J. McGuire, Traveling Expenses to 

Cleveland, O.; Detroit, Lafayette, 

Decatur, St. Louis. Indianapolis, 
Cincinnati, Boston, Newport, Provi- 
dence, Middletown, etc., etc., most- 
ly on account of strikes . 147 58 

W. F. Abrams, lecturing trip, traveling 

expenses, etc., etc 122 58 

Tax to A. F. of L 90 00 

Rubber Stamps 9 00 

Quarter’s rent of P. O. Box ...... 30.) 

Insurance on office fixtures, etc 10 40 

Gas bill for three months 22 06 

1572 Badges, 2 > charms 331 07 

F. J. Lambert, attorney fee 10 00 

Stationery and Incidentals . . 4 05 

Janitor’s work . . 6 oo 

H. McKay, attending G. E. B . . 64 25 

W. F. Abrams, *• 76 60 

T. E Deegan, “ ..... 45 26 

E. A. Stevens “ 113 26 

II. McKay, Chicago investigation ... 118 25 

M . b. Abrams, ** ... 87 75 

Benefits (See page 2 of this paper) .... 12,654 50 

Tot *1 $16,024 12 



GENERAL LAWS. 



V ekrly Pay — W eekly payments are the most 
convenient lor members of this Brotherhood, 
und where practicable should be adopted. 

Convict Labor. — W e will not use any mill or 
other work manufactured in a penal institution, 
or brought from any town or city where cheap 
labor prevails. 



Labor’s Holiday. — W e favor the adoption of 
the first Monday in September as Labor s Holi- 
day, and we recommend tlmt our L. U. ’s shall 
endeavor to observe the same. 



Eight Hours.— O ur L. U.’s shall do all in their 
power to make the Eight hour rule universal, 
and to sustain those unions that have now estab- 
lished the Eight hour system. 



Amicable Understanding— T he G.E.B should 
do all in it* power to discourage strikes, and 
adopt such means as will tend to bring about an 
amicable understanding between Local Unions 
and employers. 



Lien Laws. — W e desire uniform lien laws 
throughout the United states and Canadas, mak- 
ing a mechanic’s lien the first mortgage on real 
estate to secure the wages of labor first, and 
material second. Such liens should be granted 
without long stays of execution or other un- 
necessary delays. # 



Bmlmvc; Tkadks League*.— E uch L. 0. shall 
strive to form a League composed of delegafis 
jrom the various unions of the building trades in 



V * -T «Hiviin «I luguiiuumn II. UK'S Hi 

its respective city, and by this moans an employ- 
ment bureau for these trades can be created. 



Grading Wages. — W o are opposed to anv jjvs* 
tem of grading wages in the Local U nions, a* we 
deem the same demoralizing to the trade, and n 
further incentive to reckless competition, having 
the ultimate tendency when work is scarce, to 
id low first-class men u> offer their labor at third- 
class prices. We hold that the plan of fixing a 
minimum price for a day’s work to he the safest 
and bett, and let the employers grade the wages 
above that minimum. 



Moneys Received. 



u ThK MONTH ANJJ1AC. APRIL, 30 L92 

IThrnerer *ny error« appear notify tho G. 8, without dolay. 

All mooey -eoeivM in MAY will be published In next 
month'« (JULY» paper. Thi* report include« *11 money« 
received by the G. 8. from the Local Union« for tax and «uppUca 
for th« mouth of APRIL only. 



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9- 8 

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11— 55 

12 — 10 

13— 

14— 

15— 

16— 

17— 

18- 

19— 

20— 14 

21— 48 

22— 63 

23— 27 

24— 4 

25— 28 



27— 11 

28— 68 

29 — 77 

30— 57 

31— 3 

32— . . 
83 — 53 

34— 6 

35— 



37- 

38— 



4 
21 
4 
6 

39— 9 

40— 23 

41— 3 

42— 10 

43 — 19 

44— 2 

45— 2 

46— 2 

47— 4 

48— 7 

49— 

60- 10 
51— 22 



25 166- 
40 167— 
20 168— 

169— 

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171 — 

172 — 

173 — 

174— 

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176— 

177— 

178— 

179— 
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181— 
182— 

183— 

184— 

185— 
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187 — 

188 — 

189— 

190— 

191— 

192— 

193— 

194— 
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20 196— 

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30 198— 
30 199— 
30 200— 
40 201— 
202 — 
204— 

204— 

205— 

206— 

207— 

208- 

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210 - 
211 - 
212 — 

213— 

214— 
601215— 
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$5 70 331— 
13 30 332— 



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3 30 



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16 30 
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l 40 
15 40 
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6 00 
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7 30 



334 — 

334 — 

335 — 

336— 

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338— 

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340— 

341 — 

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343 — 

344— 

345 — 

346 — 

347 — 

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354— 

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8 2 0 

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11 30 



356— 



12 75 
3 93 
8 30 



357 — 

358 — 

359 — 

360— 

361— 

362— 

363— 

364— 
365 - 

366— 

367— 

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3 20 369— 

370— 

371- 



3 30 
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44 25 
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3 40 
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6 66 
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372 — 

373 — 

374 — 

375— 

376— 

377— 

378— 

379— 

380— 



52- 




217- 


6 30 382 - 


36 00 M7— 


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1 30,548— 


54— 




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5 30; 384— 


S 20 540— 


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k on '«So- 


56— 


3 00 221- 


8 70 386- 


il 00)651- 


57— 


J 55 222— 


12 50 387— 


10 071652— 


58— 


2 36 


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4 70,388— 


2 60 563— 


59- 


3 50 


224- 


8 861389— 


2 20:654— 


60— 


14 60 


225— 


19 591390 — 


556— 


61— 




226- 


2 40 391— 


7 00 566— 


62- 


21 80 


227- 


7 00 1 392— 


3 00’567— 


63 — 


16 00 


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,393- 


3 5( 668— 


64 — 


18 40 


229— 


12 30 394— 


3 30 559— 


65— 


9 20 


230— 


16 30 395— 


12 00 560— 


66— 




231— 


5 80 396- 


9 20 661— 


67- 


6 16 


232— 


1 20 397— 


8 90 5112— 


68 — 


9 20 


233— 


1 -to 398— 


2 (.0 6(3— 


69 — 


3 90 


234— 


20 89 399— 


1 20 564— 


70 — 


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7 75,400- 


6 60 566 — 



71- 

72— 



3 40 216— 
21 36 237— 

73— 1 1 60 238— 

74— « 00 239- 

75— 3 do 240— 

4 50;24l- 



. . . 401- 
402— 
6 80 403— 
1 00 404— 
12 10 106— 
3 60,406— 



5 



$2 50 496— 
2 00 497— 

2 10 498— 

3 90 499 — 
24 30 500— 

6 00 501— 
. . . 502 — 
2 10 503— 
. . . ,504— 
54 30 505— 
6 35(506— 
10 00,507— 

4 40 508— 

8 00l509 — 
. . . 510— 

2 50,511— 
. . . 512— 
513— 

6 90,514 — 
2 85 515 — 

4 70j516 — 

9 80,517— 
10 26 518- 

619— 

5 30 520— 
17 50,521— 
. . . ,522 — 

8 80 523— 
8 00 524— 

10 80,525— 
4 40 626— 

2 60 527— 

1 oi 1 ! 62s — 

3 30 ! 529— 

7 20,530- 

2 90 531 — 

1 1 60 532— 

6 9 ) 533— 

11 601534— 

536— 
2 20 536— 
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1 00 ; 538— 
14 55 1 539 — 

12 30; 5-10— 
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8 70:512— 
5 601543— 

1 544 — 

9 00 545— 
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«8 65 
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60 
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566— 
7 10 567— 
9 35 568— 
7 60 569— 

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1 90 

10 00 



5 90 
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77- 


1 10 242— 


3 80 407— 


9 50|572— 




78- 


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4 5 J*408 — 


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79- 


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1 00)575— 




81— 


3 20 246— 


12 20 411 — 


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82— 


15 00 247— 


20 80 412— 


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414— 


6 90 «79— 


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10 00 250- 




415- 


1 4 1) ! 680— 


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254- 


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27 60|422 — 


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93— 


4 60 258— 


14 25 423— 


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2 6*1|259 — 


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425 — 


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5 95 


96— 


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S 16 265— 


3 70 


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101— 


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4 ?,0 280— 


5 90 445— 


13 60 


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27 40 281— 


4 95 446— 


39 60 611— 


30 


117— 


15 10 282— 


8 30 447— 


1 00 01 2— 




118- 


8 90 283— 


14 50*448— 


1 ‘to 613— 


' 3 40 


119— 


1« 30 284— 


9 40 449— 


12 90 614 — 


120- 


6 90 285— 




430 — 


1 50,615 — 


10 00 


121 — 


10 10 286 — 


27 70)431— 


15 40 616— 


2 60 


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287— 


7 SO 452— 


2 90 617— 


11 50 


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1 20 288- 


9 »1 453— 


13 40,618— 


1 30 


124- 


) 8« 289 — 


1 601454 — 


9 1(619— 




125— 


9 20 290— 


20 65 455 — 


620— 


8 20 


126— 


2 20 291— 




156- 


3 10)621 — 


5 00 


127- 


292— 


I 60 457— 


10 80 622— 




128- 


2 20 293— 


2 60 458— 


. • '623— 




129— 


2 60 294— 




459 — 


16 40 824— 


17 80 


130— 


4 20 295 — 


2 50 460— 


10 00 6 (.'6— 


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2 75 296- 


10 CO 461 — 


•3 70,626— 


20 75 


132— 


9 50 297— 


S 80 162— 


21 20 627— 


l 70 


133— 


1 80 298— 


7 70 463 — 


14 50 628 — 


18 20 


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2 20 299- 


28 80(464— 


7 20 «->9_ 


P» 60 


135- 


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5 00^ 4M- 


1 75|630— 


4 60 


136- 


8 90 301— 




406 — 


7 30 631- 


5 20 


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3 90 W2— 


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2 6« >532 — 


1 60 


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141— 


8 40 806— 
14 25 -W~ 


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142— 


39 70 307— 


2 50 


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144- 

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8 40 308 — 
5 90 309- 
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474— 
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11 «'* (136— 
9 00 «39 — 
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19 * 5 
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4 20 314— 


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1 80 


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3 30 480— 


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30 65 646— 


1 70 


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. . . -317— 
7 70 .318— 


2 20 482— 
483 — 


J6 9ft 647— 
16 45 6-18— 


60 


154— 


7 20 319— 


3 00 481 — 


8 25 649- 


9 10 


155— 

156- 


8 60 320- 
80.321- 


485- 
8 80 486— 


3 70 650 — 

4 40 661 — 


3 50 


157— 


10 30 322— 


10 00 187— 


6 55 652- 


5 CO 


158- 

159- 


8 39 323- 
2 40 334 — 


1 90 488— 
. . 489— 


9 65 653— 
6 20 054- 


. . . 

10 90 


160— 

J6I— 


3 6*i 325— 
10 OO 326— 


5 40 490— 
2 6) 191— 


3 40 655— 

4 1 0 050— 


162- 


30 40 :37— 


31 20 492— 


. 657— 


. . . 


168- 


8 90 328 — 


4 90:493 — 


11 00 658— 


4 20 


164— 


12 2 ',:129— 


3 70,494 — 


1 30 659— 


2 30 


165— 


•31 80 330 


2 80 H*5-- 


118 i 66ft- 


? 7ft 



3 40 I 
8 40 | 

3 60 i 
1 10 1 



?! 

hP 


Amount. 


— o 
?! 


| Amount. 


Local 
| Union. 


Amount. 


Local 

Union. 

! • 


Amount 


66!— 


S7 60,696 — 


Sll 10 


731— 


$1 50 


766 — 


83 50 


662— 


. . . 697— 


8 85 


732- 


14 90 


767— 




603 — 




698- 


16 45 


733— 




768— 


4 80 


664- 


7 00 


699 — 


15 50 


734 — 


3 20 


769— 




666— 


3 76 


700— 


2 15 






770- 


6 40 


666— 


1 0 


701— 


4 20 


736 — 


5 40 


771— 


7 66 


667— 


18 80 


702— 


1 80 


737— 




772— 


1 90 


668— 


2 20 


703 — 


9 70 


738- 


6 91 


773— 


3 70 


669— 


I 10 


701- 


8 40 


739— 


5 90 


774— 


12 00 


670- 




706— 


4 90 


740— 




776— 


3 10 


671- 




706— 


11 03 


741— 


1 60 


776- 


18 05 


672— 


4 75 707 — 


2 70 


742— 


6 90 


777— 




673— 


1 50 


708— 


5 20 


743— 


2 4ft 


778- 


90 


674— 




709— 




744— 


7 90 779— 




675— 


3 15 710— 




745— 




780- 




676— 


6 20 711— 


3 6C 


746— 


6 56 781— 


2 80 


677— 


3 20 712- 


21 20 747— 


10 00 


782— 


1 50 


678 — 


19 10 713— 


5 20 748— 


1 10 


783- 


1 60 


679- 


1 0 >714 — 


13 00 749— 


2 80 784— 




680 — 




71 5-*- 


11 09 750— 


9 85 786— 




681— 


13 20 716— 


14 «0 751— 


2 60 78«— 


5 (0 


682— 


1 13 717— 


20 08 


752- 


3 10 787— 




683— 




718- 


23 70 753— 


2 60 788— 


13 16 


684— 


3 36 719— 


3 30 754— 




789— 




685 — 


2 80 720- 


1 10: 755- 


3 GO 790— 


75 


686— 


10 50 


721— 


15 00)756— 


4 20 


791— 




687— 




722— 




757- 


7 4C 


792 — 


2 80 


688— 




7214— 


1 10 758 — 


2 s 0*793 — 


2 60 


689— 


8 70 


724— 




769— 


13 50 


794— 


* 80 


690 - 


6 50 


725- 


7 93 760— 


1 25 


795- 


691— 




726— 




761- 


1 1« 


796— 


3 40 


692 — 


6 40 


727— 




762— 


4 60 


797— 




693— 




728— 


1 80 


763— 


1 90 798— 


3 95 


694— 


3 50 


729- 


13 SC 


764— 


10 00 






695— 




730- 




765— 


7 60 







SPECIAL ASSESSMENT A' D PRO TEC- 1 
TIVE FUND. 



Below is a report of all moneys received for 
the Special Assessment levied March 17, 1892, and 
*or the Protective Fund or Reserve Fund as 
called for April 16, 1892. 

This report is complete for both funds for all 
moneys received by the General Secretary from 
March 1,1892 to June 1, 1892 (for the months of 
March, April and May, 1892). All moneys re- 
ceived since June 1st, will he published next 
month in July Carfentek. 



I (0 716 
25 286 
50 89 
» 75 298 
l 75 8 5 
: 90 9 

. 00 28 
! 75 120 
75 33 
• 50 61 
! 75 276 
’ 25 71 



Total $6,588 69 



25 
50 12 



25 4 t 
1 75 13 



! 75 31 
: 75 22 



MONEYS RECEIVED AND EX p ENf>ED FOR 
STRIKES AND LOCKOUfS. 



Below is a complete recapitulation of all 
moneys received from Reserve Fund for the 
quarter from March 1, 1892, to June 1, 1892. Also 
a report i given of all moneys expended for 
Strikes and Lockouts up to June 26. 1892. 



Balance on hand March 1, 1392. 



Reserve Fund, March 1, 1892, to June 1, 



$2,513 46 



1892 . 



22,3 5 92 



Total 



$24,829 88 



MONEYS EXPENDED. 



Baltimore, Md- 

May 13 

•' 20 . . . . 

“ 27 

June 2 

“10 

“ 17 

“24 




Total . 



$10,524 00 



Scranton Pa. 



May 13 . 


. . . $990 00 


“23 


. . . 360 OO 


“ 31 


. . . :188 00 


June 6 


. . . 373 00 


“15 


. . . 356 OO 


“31 • • 


. . . 336 00 


“ 26 




Total 




Holyoke, Mass. 


May 28 


. . . $500 O'.) 


June 6 


. . 1 ooo 00 



1$278 
2-121 
3- 41 
4 116 

5- 34 

6 - 2 

7- 15 

8- 62 
9- 17 

10- 19 

11- 103 

12- 27 

13- 3 

14- 5 
15 14 

16- 4 

17- 12 

18- 8 

19- 9 50 

20- 14 

21- 40 

22- 14.5 

23- 51 

24- 10 

25- 62 

26- 18 
27- 28 
2S-157 
29-209 
130- 25 

31- 8 

32- 

33- UO 00 310 

34- 7 50 4 

35- 10 75 27 

36- 20 40 

37- 9 50 

38- 12 

39- 20 

40- 23 

41- 7 

42- U 



90, 75 
00 81 
$0 390 
25' 132 
50 26 
50; 156 
75, 38 
75 69 
50 380 
251494 
00 100 
00 18 



43- 48 

41- 5 

45- 4 

46- 6 

47- 11 



60 3' 
75; 57 
75 53 
75 ■ . 
50 36 



$3,060 00 I 



Total . 



$1,500 00 



Newport, R. 
April 22 

May 3 

18 

“ 28 

June 18 



$400 00 
5U0 00 
164 OO 
150 OO 
100 00 



Total . . . . 

Winchester Ky. 

May 7 $132 00 

‘ 28 209 00 



$1,314 0) 



48- 19 

49- 25 

50- 29 

51- 54 

52- 15 

53- 3 001 

54- 

55- 38 

56- 7 

57- 4 

58- 3 

59- 9 

60- 32 

61- 65 
62 50 

63- 39 

64- 4f 

65- 8 

66- 5 

67- 13 

68 - 22 

69- • 

70- 6 

71- 



50 58 
00 55 



25 67 
00,131 
25 29 



60 

50 
75 
2> 

25 
75 
75 
60! 

001 49 
50 ! 102 
50 . . 
(Xi 

75' 20 
75* 60 
1 » 
75 4 



Total $332 00 

June 15, La Crosse, Wis $509 00 

May 28, Marion. Ind ...... 300 00 

“ N. I-a Crosse, Wis 96 0J 

‘‘ Jacksonville. Fla 54 00 

“ Marietta, O 35 00 

“ Downev strike (Union 567). . 12 00 

“ “ “ i* 642 . . 0 0D 

June 16. “ ‘ “ “ . . 6 00 

“ Loan from General Fund to 

pay benefit claims 3 500 0 ) 

Investigations and Visits during 

strikes . 221 46 

Express and Bank charges 36 50 

Total • .... $21,496 96 

summary. 

Total receipts • $24,829 38 

Total expenses 21,496 96 

June 1. 1892, balance on hand $3,333 42 



72- 45 

73- 28 

74- 15 

75- 18 

76- 11 

77- 3 

78- 34 

79- 4 

80- 4 

81- 4 

82- 30 

83- 55 

84- 20 

85- 

86 - 6 

87- 10 

88- 13 

89- 14 

90- 58 

91- 5 

92- 5 

93- 9 

94- 6 

95- 10 



25; 1 17 
00 67 
75| 26 
75 4 

50 1 b 
25 9 

75 45 
25 

00 13 
25 8 

21 97 
25 75 
75) 45 



20 L49-$!0 
25 150- 24 
35 151- 29 
05! 52- 
65(153- 27 
60,154- 18 
00 155- 21 
00156- 2 
15 157- 13 
30*158- 10 
96:159- 6 
05 160- 5 
L61- . . 
85 162- 42 
40 163- 19 
85,161- 
40 165- 87 
65 166- 19 
30 167- 22 
85,168- 17 
1*,169- 62 
IO I70- 8 

95,171- 31 

05 172- 12 
85*178- 3 
95 174- 
95 j 175“ 49 
»5,176- 40 
25; 177- 15 
00178- 2 
60 170- 9 
• »80- 18 
15 181- 67 
40182- 3 
45183- 8 
184- 3 
70| 185- 19 
40 186- 12 
45 187- 5 

75] 188- 18 

189- 10 

80 J90- 2 

40 191- 23 
50 192- 20 
0V193- 3 
*0194- 7 
70 195- 6 
00.196- 
55 J97- 9 
60 198- 12 
70 199- 11 

25 200- 
201- 19 

75 202" 10 
40 203- 20 
00 204- 8 

• 205- 7 
60 206- 29 
00 207- 26 
00)208- 11 
05 209- 40 
»5 210- 4 
10 211-126 
20(212- 10 

• 213- 4 
214- 6 

00 215- 28 
50 21 a- 10 
10 2! 7- 13 

26 218- 18 

219- • 

00 220“ 8 
20 J2I- 10 
00 222- 23 
65 223- 12 
65 224- 1 1 
9U 225- 48 
65 226- 4 
8 l227- 17 
20 228- 41 

40:22»- 16 

45 >30- 42 



$24 55,297- . 

39 75 298- 819 
18 66 (299- 69 
300- 8 



84 85 



00 

76 

, 25 

301- 25 25 



52 45 302- • 



55 1 



34 70 
33 50 
8 80 
15 70 



1 101 10 
> 20 05 



* 107 00 

11 60 
49 00 
33 30 

• 152 50 

5 10 



48 00 
6 25 



75)115 60 
7-51 8<),.|o 
70 n i* 
50 3 50 

0U; 9 30 

25 j 33 00 
50; 1W 15 
OO 4 85 



303- 

304- 

305- 
300- 

307- 

308- 
109- 

310- 

311- 

312- 
31S- 
114- 

315- 

316- 

317- 

318- 

319- 

320- 

321- 
122- 

323- 

324- 

325- 
126- 

127- 

128- 
329- 
:130- 



K 50 



2 50 



7 26 



4 75 



11 15 381- 
BO 8 40 i, ?3o_ 

50 j 50 60 *333- 6 

50 25 20 3i?4_ 8 

76 18 35 33ft. 30 
75 42 20)336- 13 

00 21 2ftrt37- • • 

50 1 05 33«_ 5 

26 1 53 00 1 339- 

50 52 15 340- 135 
25 ; 7 00 34i - 15 

001 17 10 342- • 
00' 17 30 343- 

34 j- 
145- 



$2 30 
45 90 
165 70 
20 65 
50 20 



58 45 
15 80 
20 00 
3 00 
9 95 
11 55 
45 05 
40 23 



27 40 
6 85 
20 00 
50 00 
1 10 



8 65 
12 80 
4 40 



II 25 



15 00 
74 75 
170 70 
29 66 
23 05 
6 00 
23 25 



25 4 80 

50 £5 75 
09 25 10 
25 1 30 75 



25 



I . . . 

OO33O 25 
9 15 



25i 



00 32 26 
00 48 60 



346- 

'*47- 

348- 

349- 
% r >C- 

351- 

352- 

353- 



21 



75 15 
75 32 
251 22 
00 36 
25 1 152 
00 12 
26 12 
00 6 
2^ II 



96- 16 

97- 12 

98- 7 

99- 4 
100 - 6 

101- 3 

102- 13 



00| 38 
00 21 
50 12 
75 1 2 
50 9 

21 6 
(X) 



1G3- 9 59 34 



THINGS TO BE REMEMBERED. 



104- 12 00 4: 



Three Months in arrears subjects a member 
to loss of benefits. 



Steady Attendance at the meetings gives life 
and iulerest to the Union. 



Members Going Off to another city should 
be provided with a clearance card. 

All Local Treasurers should be under bond* 
and the bonds tiled with the President «*f the L. U. 



Trustees Reports should be prepared semi- 
annually and forwarded to the G. Blanks are 
furnished free for that purpose. 



b 00 17 



All Changes in Secretaries should be promptly 
reported to the G. 8., and name and address of 
the new Secretary should be forwarded. 



Organize the Carpenters in the unorganized 
towns in your vicinity, or wherever you may go ! 
Hold public meetings or social festivals at stated 
occasions; they will udd to the strength of your 
union. 



Letters for the General Office should be 
written on official note paper and bear the seal 
of the Local Union. Don't write letters to the 
G. S. on monthly report blanks, us such commu- 
nications are not in proper shape. 



105- 

106- 

107- 25 

108- 52 

109- 117 

110 - 6 

111- 5 

112- 4$ 

113- 11 

114- 6 

115- 

116- 23 

117- 25 

118- 14 

119- 39 

120- 5 

121- 27 50 

122- 30 0D 

123- 3 00 

124- 5 25 

125- 21 25 

126- . . 

127- 5 

128- 3 

129- . . 

130- . 



00 58 
2 V (80 
00 281 
00 19 



5 13 
00 96 



00 29 
75 34 



29 
75 63 



25 14 

76 38 



00 139 
5 



00;23l 
40 2*2- 3 
70*233- 3 
6 > 234- 35 
36 215- 18 
80)236- 6 
10 237- 42 
21)238- 17 
0J >39- 
80 240- 24 
85 241- 8 
70 242- 9 
24S- 10 
60 244- 4 
20 215- 9 
tO 216- 29 
8* 247- 63 
25 218- 5 
50 219- 11 
75-250- 
90 251- 13 
9J|252- . 

40 1 258- 19 
254- 2 
75 255- 3 
45; 256- 16 
40 >57- 28 
45 258- 24 
301259- 9 
45 260- 3 
20i261 - 5 
00 ! 262- 
95 263- 
70 264- 
75-265- 
40,266- 
55 267“ 

8 * 268- 



75; 50 00 
30, 72 10 
27 30 
25 37 55 
0 25 95 

75 51 75 
00; 21 80 
00! 22 10 
00 29 50 pm- - 
69: 81 90 : 3%5_ 13 
00! 27 81 *56- 13 
00 92 65 %7- 3 

00 12 45 358- • • 
00 855 00 359- 19 
50 38 00 360- * " 
«5 6 35 361- 

2 362- 

00 51 35 383- 
00 364- 
00 25 40 365- 
25 47 85 366- 7 

41 30 v,7- 29 
50 f 4 80 368- 17 
00' , »8 
7«; 53 05 ^7o- 7 

«0. 31 00,371- * 

60! 7 70 372- 3 
75j 93 30 37?_ . . 
6«! 8 55 373- 14 
50' 35 00 375- :i > 
"6 376- 4 

76: 16 26377- IS 
00 21 20,378- 7 

‘ 3 35 379- J? 

1 80 386- 16 

2 10 381- 8» 
60; 85 80 382- 95 



6 75 



3 95 
86 
38 80 



8 85 
76 65 
46 96 



25 40 00 
251 31 10 
50; 31 oo 
00 



OO |6 (10 
60 10 10 
14 65 
17 10 
1 50 
19 26 
48 20 



81 30 
43 OO 
, 25 20 
60 1 |6 50 
60! 19 75 
26 7 20 



00 

00 

60 



001 0! 25,883- 
261 12 85 384- • • 
00; 116 20 385- 3< 

00 . . . 38f- 

387- '* 

50 61 20:388- :i 
00 17 90 389- 1 

60 . . 390- 

00 23 55 8M- 
25 5 25 392- 

50 18 35 393- 
<•0 77 90 394- 
00 120 35 395- 



60* :io 70 
75; -12 so 
50; 11 66 
76 69 60 
25' 8 1:5 
501 29 40 

25 8 75 

00 58 70 
75 216 (»1 
25 j i 96 

20 00 

26 15 00 



<-J 6 30 

50 8 20 

2> 23 76 



50 



16 60 396- 
2 > 7 35 397- 

398- 

50 31 10 399- 
400- 
33 35 401- 
402- 
5 90 403- 
9 85 401- 
18« 00 105- 
20 75 40«- 
16 95 407- 33 
50*408- 4 

409- 6 

1 10 410- 40 
. . Ill- 10 
5 95 412 



2 59 



4 ) 270- 
. 271- . 
. 2 2 - 



50 10 75 
75 8 90 

75 1.3 95 

00; 32 00 

50 42 50 

25 4 25 

26 15 so 

3 25 
6 26 

4 10 
20 35 
5« 10 
I» 10 
11 .35 

0 60 
3 05 
50! 82 70 
25 8 96 

25 21 35 
75 15 20 
25 4 8 00 
14 55 



00 2 I 

7 5 9 



8 


75 


27 


85 


413- 


6 


00 






'• 


50 


11 


15 


414- 


8 


75 


’ 6 


36 


8 


■ )U 


31 


65 


415- 


3 


25 


S 


70 


23 


75 


14 


05 


416- 


22 


50! 


9 


16 


18 


35 


55 


60 


417- 


5 


75 


14 


30 


7 


80 


• . 




418- 


2 


60 


7 


66 


. . 




5 


20 


419- 


10 


50 






4 


00 


11 


55 


420- 


8 


75 


20 


05 


15 


oo 


45 


78 


421- 


4 


16 


r 




23 


75 


49 


50 


422- 


6 


00 


lb 


10 


10 


75 


24 


45 


423- 


8 


50 


20 


80 


13 


75 


10 


70 


424- 


8 


50 


20 


40 


15 


25 


31 


35 425- 


3 


75 


2 


25 



50 2 10 426- 



' (.0 



Alt. Moneys received by the G. S. one month 
are published in the next month’s journal. 
Moneys received can not he published in this 
journal the same month they are received. It 
hikes some time to make up the report and put 
it into type. 



ThE ONLY safe way to send money is by Post 
Office Money Order or by Bunk Cheek or Draft 
as required *by the Constitution. The G. 8. is not 
responsible fur money sent in any other way. 
Don’t send loose cash or postage stain)« in pay- 
ment of tax or for any hill due the G. S. 



131- 


8 


75 


10 


00 


279“ 


4 


26 1 






427- 


3 


75 






132- 


23 


75 


25 


00 


2i#>~ 


17 


«1 


57 


95 


«8- 










133- 


5 


50 


12 


35 


281- 


3 


75 


2 


15 


429- 


9 


00 


5 


6) 


, 134- 


5 


50 


It 


95 


282- 


4 


25 


7 


90 


430- 


6 


7. 


29 


!H) 


135- 


4 


25 


18 


2> 


283- 


22 


0*)| 


42 


95 


4-31- 


11 


.5 


31 


10 


136- 


10 


7)0 


18 


75 


284- 


17 


00 


28 


85 


432- 






2« 


25 


! 137- 


9 


25 


21 


80 


285- 


13 


75 


7 


65 


4.33- 


25 


00 


61 


65 


138- 


24 


75 


68 


65 


28'- 


47 


50 


74 


50 


434- 






42 


20 


139- 


2 


i0 


7 


10 


287- 


18 


0ft 


11 


25 


435- 


I 


60 


11 


80 


1 140- 


10 


50 


14 


19 


288- 


23 


00 


66 


30 


436- 


6 


25 


14 


80 


141- 


23 


50 


52 


25 


28S- 










437- 










142 106 


25 : 


253 


00 


290- 


47 


25 


33 


30 


438- 


4 


00 


7 


20 


, 143- 


9 


50 


28 


25 


291- 


21 


50 


26 


3> 


4.39- 


3 


75 


«» 


10 


; 144- 


14 


75 


41 


40 


292- 


4 


03 


11 


€0 


440- 


6 


2’> 


17 


59 


145- 


8 


00 


18 


25 


•293- 


6 


50 


16 


80 


441- 






1 


8* 


i 146- 


15 


03 


27 


00 


234- 






4 


05 


442- 


4 


50 


3 


90 


! 147 - 


16 


75 


<>} 


50 


295- 


6 


25 


4 


06 


443- 


3 


00 


6 


U 


, MS- 


3 


00 


h 


83 


296- 


• • 


. ‘ 






441- 


5 


50 


7 


M 



I 



v > 



_ G .2 ■ 




C s 

dp 



G. *>- u 

w < &■ 



o = 
t- s 







V. 




Ä 0 






'S 5 


S G 


r* 


£5 


5_’g 




CL < 


Cuts, 





445- 

446- 

447- . 

448- 

449- 

450- 

451- 

452- 

453- 

454- 

455- 

456- 

457- 

458- 

459- 

460- 

461- 

462- 

463- 

464- 

465- 

466- 

467- 

468- 

469- 

470- 

471- 

472- 

473- 

474- 

475- 

476- 

477- 

478- 

479- 

480- 

481- 

482- 

483- 

484- 

485- 

486- 

487- 

488- 

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1680 - 



SPECML ASSESSMENT. 



TrauHfcrred to general fund to pay 
claims ; 



April 7 . 
April 14 
May 31 . 



. $6 000.00 
. 6,l(M).0u 
642.85 






6 46 
26 90 









T5 
63 15 









14 25 

57 25 



22 00 7.-13- 
18 60 734- 8 26 5 65 

58 ) 5 73V- .... 

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. . 737- 7 75 

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. . 740- 
. . . 741- 
. . . 74?- 
. . 743- 

11 00 74 t- 
15 60 746- 
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40 U0 747- • 

8 35 748- 

7 35 749- 

7 20 750- : 

. . 751- 

8 90 7 62- 



19 50 
29 *5 
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9 26 
6 56 
3 46 
26 (5 



14 60 
10 70 



43 15 
3 80 
2 75 
2 46 



25 vo 
11 !’5 



\\ u 



1 76 
36 26 



I 






Total Assessment received. . $10,642 85 

Total Protective Fund received . . . $22,316 92 






Below is an account of the moneys received/ 
from sjiccial aHScsssment levied March 17, 1892, 
and of all moneys expended up 4o date of June 1, 
1892. 

Total received from March 7, 1892, to June. 1, 
*892 $10,642.86 



$10,642.86 



TRADE DULL. 

This season in the building trade», aver- 
ages fairly good, and in Borne cities is ex- 
tremely good. Still there are a number 
of places where carpenter work its tia' 
and many men idle. Among them are ' 
Grand Rivers, Ky., Middleborough, Ky 
San Francisco, New Orleans, and in Wash* . 
ington the cities ol New Whatcom, Seat- 
tle, and Olympia are very dull. Work 
is stagnant in Denver, Redlands, Cal , 
Vancouver, Brit Col., Lima, O ,Sedalia, 
Mo., Austin, Tex., Knoxville Tenn., Ft. 
Wayne, Ind., Ft. Worth, Tex. and New 
Kensington, Pa. . e Jk* 



( 






F . y*~ ■ 



THE CARPENTER. 






I ' 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE GENERAL EX- 
ECUTIVE BOARD. 

(Continued from May issue.) 

FIFTH DAY'S 8K88 ION— APRIL 1. 

Appeal of Union No. 1, Chicago, 111., from de- 
cision of G. 8. and G. T., in death claim of H. 
Nitsche. Referred for further information. 

Bill« of expenses of Committee to investigate 
Chicago cose were approved, £118.25 for Brother 
H-. McKay from Boston, Mass., and $87. 76 for VV. 
F. Abrams, from Detroit, Mich. 

Communication from New York District 
Council. G. E. B . decide Sec. 67 is very plain and 
refers to house carpenters, and does not refer to 
ship joiners, so a member can join a ship joiners' 
Union and at same time remain a member of our 
U. B. 

Communication from Union 112 Butte, Mont. 
Said Union is allowed to appropriate money to 
iofend law suits of men in that city who were 
rrcsted in defense of union principles. 

Communication from D. C. of Indianapolis, 
nd., asking donation for organizing purposes. 
3. E. B. decide that the financial condition of 
he U. B. will not admit of appropriation just 
iow. The request will be given favorable con- 
id oration at next meeting. 

4 

SIXTH DAY’S SESSION— APRII. 2. 



Communication asking for Organizers to be 

>nt them, were received from these places in 

anada : Hamilton, London, St. Catherine, 

Ottawa, Calgary, Vancouver, Winnepeg and 
Victoria, also from Mill Men’s Union 690, Chicago, 
111., and the Milwaukee D. C., all wanting Or- 
ganizers at the expense of U. B. G. E B. decide, 
as they did in the Indianapolis case, that the 
condition of the finances of the U. B. would not 
permit any appropriation until next meeting of 
G. E. B. 

G. 8. was instructed towritfe Union 446, Indian- 
apolis, and insist on complying with decision of 
the D. C. of Indianapolis in the Parabold and 
Shockley eases. 

Communication from Hudson county, X. J., 
District Council, asking for loan to pay Protec. 
tive Fund and other debts. G. E. B. decide in 

the negative. 

Communications from various District Coun- 
cils asking for privilege to chib together to send 
delegates to St. Louis Convention. G .E.B. de- 
cide, under Constitution, the delegate to a Con- 
vention of the U. B. must hold credentials from 
the Local of which he is a member, but several 
locals can club together or so can unions in a D. 
C. and elect a delegate, but he must hold cre- 
dentials from the Union of which he is a member. 

Appeals to the next Convention were enter- 
tained from Union 382, New York, in the Going 
case, and from Union 62, Englewood III., in the 
M. Mueller case. 

Appeal from D. C , of Philadelphia, asking for 
decision on legality of local assessment levied 
bv said D. C. for a mass meeting. 

G. E. B. decide Union 8 can not be compelled 
to pay said assessment as said Union never voted 
to pay any expense of said meeting and the by- 
laws of the D. C. do not grant the I) C. power 
to levy assessments without a vote of the locals. 

Appeal Union 291, Brooklyn, N. Y., asking ex 
emption from tax to the D C. and from obeying 
rules of the D. C., G. R. B. decide they cannot 
grant such exemption. (See fee. 43 of Constitu- 
tion. 

Application of Union 284 Springfield, O., for 
sanction to strike. Union 284 advised to accept 
compromise offered by the employers until the 
Union is better organized. 

Application Union 701, Winchester, Kv., for 
sanction to strike, G. E. B. decide not to grant 
official sanction owing to unfavorable answers 
on official schedule of information furnished by 
Union 701. 

Application Union 327, (mill men) Cincinnati, 
O. for sanction to strike. G. E. B grant sanc- 
tion, but matter of financial aid will be con- 
sidered when Sec. 131 of Constitution is complied 

with. 

Application from D. C, of Cleveland, O for 
sanction to strike against non-union men was 
laid over for further information. 

Application Union 698, Newport, Ky.,for sanc- 
tion to strike. As said union is part of the D. 
C. of Cincinnati the decision given in Cincin- 
nati application applies to them. (.See proceed- 
ings of G. E. B., March 31.) 

G. E. B. Instruct G. 8. not to publish the pro- 
ceedings of G. E. B. in the April Carpenter, 
owing to lengthy session and prospect of many 
strikes. 



SKVRmU DAY’S SESSION.— MONDAY APRIL FIFTH. 

Ixitter read from D. C. of New York, explain- 
ing reasons for expending the money appropri- 
ated for the Downey strike in the manner it was 
spent The letter showed an apparent difference 
of opinion and the G. E. B. authorized Bro. 
Deegan and 3ecy. McGuire to visit the D C of 
Kepv York and explain the position of G. E. B. 

The demand of the D. C. of Cleveland, O., for 
sanction to strike ggaimt non-union men was, 
then taken up — further information l»cing on 
hand. The necessary two-thirds vote not being 
cast in favor of the movement the G. E. B. de- 
cided, not to grant sanction and referred the D. C. 
of Cleveland to decision of G. E. B. on Oct. 15, 
D^^i^asimilar case affecting Columbus, O. 

1 H HeprW of the Furniture Workers’ Iut. 
(Union appeared before the G. E. B. to secure an 
lag- cement or treaty as to trade rules between 
th'our U. B. and the Furniture Workers and Cabi. 
Bluet Maker*?. 

A scheduje of rules presented by B. Keonen, 
of tb«s Furniture Workers was read and 
a lengthy' discussion followed wherein the 
merits of ench article was gone into. The G. E. 
B. believe that a better understanding between 
both organizations is necessary and would ro- 
eommen 1 that the articles of agreement presen- 
ted l>e brought before our next convention for 
ratification. ’I. 

__ TheQ.-E. B- however believe that, owing to 
Ability of determing what constitutes | 



[carpenter work and what cabinet work, would 
Recommend that should the articles of agree- 
ment lie ratified by both organizations questions 
öf such a nature should be settled by the Local 
Unions of both trades in their respective locali- 
ties the G. S. is instructed to communicate with 
Mr. B. Keonen and Mr. Henryott informing 
both of abov e d u.ei*i on. 

The subject of making various changes fn the 
constitution was fully considered and discussed 
In all its phases, and laid over until later in the 
session. 

Bills of G. E. B. for attendance at this session 
were submitted and ordered paid, in all to the 
amount of $299.25, for an eight days [session. 
Brother 8. J. Kent being absent, Brother T. E. 
Deegan acted as Secretary Pro. Tern. 

The auditing of accounts of the General Office 
was completed, and shows the following sum- 
mary of receipts and expenses for the quarter 
ending March 31 1892. 

Balance on hand January 31. . . . 

Receipts for Jan., Feb., March . . 



GEORGE W. CHILDS ON “ THE BENEFITS 
OF TRADES UNIONS.” 



$3,705 62 
18,332 32 



Expenses for Jan., Feb., March . 



$22 037 94 
21.990 87 



$47 07 



Balance on hand April 1. 1892 . 

The audit of Reserve Fund and Assessments 
shows as follows: 

RECEIPTS. 



Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1892 . . . 

Reserve fund Jan. 1 to March 31. . . 

Special assessment 

Ret’ <3 by New York D. C. March 15 . 



$2,644 86 
1,031 85 
52 25 
225 09 



$3,953 96 



MONEYS EXPENDED. 

Feb. 22. New York City (Downey 
strike) 



1.000 00 



Balance on hand. 



$2,963 i6 



The G. E. B. instructs the G. S. to call for all 
Reserve Fund of the Locals up to April 1, 1892. 

A communication was read from the Amal- 
gamated Society of Carpenters with reference 
to the late investigation in Pittsburgh stating 
they had not organized a second branch there 
from ex- members of the U. B. and should not 
do so, also wishing to work in perfect harmony 
with the U. B. Referred to the G. S. for suita- 
ble replyand to continued the friendly relations 
now existing between that society and the U. B. 

A communication from Mill Hands’ Union 776 
Covington. Ky., stating they had decided to be 
governed by the advice given by the G. 8. and 
had extended the time for enforcement of their 
contemplated demands. 

A letter from the D, C. of Cincinnati, O , rela- 
tive to the idea of State organization was re- 
ferred to the next convention. 

Application Union 489, Salt Lake City, Utah, 
to have sanction for strike. G. E. ß. decided to 
grant financial aid and will consider subject of 
financial aid in case a strike takes place. 

General President Kliver is requested to visit 
Milwaukee, Wis., at the earliest date, at expense 
of U. B.. and hold a series of meetings to help 
our Milwaukee Unions. 

Various necessary amendments to the consti- 
tution were considered seriatim to be presented 
to the next convention at St. Louis, Mo. G. 8. 
instructed to compile all amendments to consti- 
tution and submit them to next meeting of G. 
E. B. ' 

Adjourned to meet Monday, June 27, 1892, at 



8 A. M. Signed, 

Hugh McKay, 

Chairman, 
T. E. Deegan, 
Secretary, Pro tern 
McGuire, General Secretary. 



Attest : 
P J. 



WARNINGS AGAINST DEAD BEATS. 

J. W. Canfield was expelled from Union 410, 
Pueblo, Colo., for sub contracting. He boarded 
with a widow lady in Pueblo, and last May left 
for parts unknown, owing $67 board bill. He 
did the same thing when living in Arkansas 
City, Kan., so he is a chronic dead beat and 
‘‘ scab.” 

J W. Brooks is now “scabbing ” in St. Louis, 
Mo., and is ^unworthy the confidence of any 

i j— : ..n I.« 



union man and is doing all he can against our 
order. He carries a clearance card (now out of J 
date) from Union 377, Springfield, Mo. 



Expulsions. 



Chas. Sh vrplesr, from Union 207, Chester, 
Pa., for misappropriating money of the Union. 



F. B. Riley, from Union 51*2, Olympia, Wash., 
for general bad habits. 



JABEZ Wheeler, from Union 746, Norwalk, 
Conn., for “scabby’' conduct. 



A E. Dixon, from 
Conn , for piece work. 



Union 116, Bridgeport, 



A A. Bearden, from Union 463, Nashville, 
Tern»., for embezzling funds as treasurer of the 
Union. 



me 

« See 



J. McLean, from Union 755, Nanaimo, B. C., 
fqr immoral conduct. 



Rejections. 



John Ponte au, front Union 26, Toledo, O., for 
ineompeteney. 




G. T. Griffin, from Union 300. Austin, Tex., 
for false statements. 



Union 299 Indianapolis, luck, reports the fol- 
lowing applicants for reinstatement have been 
rejected : 



H. W. Busches, for drunkenness. 
H. McCormack, a “scab” at heart. 



iThe appended article is taken from the 
Ban Francisco Examiner, May 22, and was 
Written by Mr. George W. Childs, editor 
and proprietor of the Philadelphia ledger, 
on the occasion of. his recent visit to 
California. Written, as it was, at the very 
moment last month when the moneyed 
interests of the Pacific coast were up in 
arms against the trades unions, and the 
pronunciamento of the Manufacturers’ 
Exchange of San Francisco had gone 
forth against Organized Labor, this article 
comes with welcome interest and re- 
doubled force, coming, as jt does, from 
the pen ot such a wealthy and philan- 
thropic employer. Mr. Oeorge W. Childs 
says in his article : 

I am a believer in trades unions. It is 
my opinion that they are of advantage 
alike to workmen who belong to them 
and to the public at large- All classes 
are benefited by them. 

Organized labor wins respect ; greater 
respect and greater consideration than it 
could possibly do were it unorganized. 

I have reached this conclusion after 
many years’ experience, both as an em- 
ploye and an employer. 

Of all the unions I believe the printers’ 
is the most intelligent, The printing 
business is one calculated to enlighten 
probably more than any other. 

It is a trade which keeps one especially 
well informed and in touch with the pub- 
lic. The oldest union in the United 
States is that of the Carpenters’ Company 
in Philadelphia. It is over 100 years old. 
Their building, Carpenters’ Hall, is one in 
which the early Congresses met, and is 
still in good preservation. 

Every year for many years the brick- 
layers there have met at the beginning 
of the season, and on consultation decided 
what they could work for each year. This 
they always do before the contractors 
take their regular contracts. 

Thus the contractors know exactly how 
to figure on their work, Of course it 
would not be right for members of those 
unions to raise wages after the contracts 
have been made. 

For this reason they act in ad vance. If 
they think they should have more than 
they have previously been paid they 
simply notify the contractors in time; and 
it can be considered and acted upon with- 
out any inconvenience to anybody. This 
arrangement prevents needless and often 
injudicious strikes. 

Were it not for the Typographical 
Union the printers of this country would 
not now be getting what they do for their 
work by at least one-third. 

I believe in equal rights for all classes, 
and cannot understand why employes 
have not as much right to organize as 
have their employers. 

There is scarcely room for more than 
one opinion about labor organizations on 
the part of intelligent and impartial men 
who have investigated their claims, and 
that is favorable to them. 

What human organization is free from 
faults ? No organization is entirely with- 
out them. 

Labor organizations are not merely eco- 
nomic organizations in a narrow sense- 

Well conducted they can, within certain 
limits, raise wages, or keep wages from 
falling. 

They enable labor to make the best of 
the existing situation, and this can be as 
I clearly proved perhaps, as anything in 
political economy. 

Labor organizations are generally active 
I temperance organizations, many of their 
members being total abstainers, if not 
prohibitionists. 

Furthermore, they are educational so- 
cieties training their members in discus- 
sion, out of which proceeds a better un- 
derstanding of the questions of the day. 

They are, finally, social and beneficial 
organizations, when the social side in 
the nature of the members is cul- 
tivated, and, in the crowded modern 
city, this is of special importance. 

All this makes it plain how a good deed 
is done by any one who helps to develop 
the best features of labor organizations. 

The following is from my friend Profes- 
sor Ely : 

“ The experience of Professor Thorold 
Rogers, of the University of Oxford, is so 
typical that it is worth while to quote it 
here- I may say in this place that it is 
quite similar to my experience, although 
I presume I do not expect so much from 
the organization of labor alone as does 
Professor Roger’s ‘These institutions,’ 
says Professor Rogers, ’ were repressed 
with passionate violence and malignant 
watchfulness as Jong as it was possible to 
do so. , 



“ 1 When it necessary to relax J the se- 
verities of the older laws they were still 
persecuted by legal chicanery, whenever 
oppression could on any pretence be 
justified. 

‘As they were slowly emancipated 
they have constantly been the object of 
alarmist calumnies and sinister predic 
tions. I do not speak of the language of 
newspapers and reviews. Far graver 
were the allegations of Senior and Thorn 
ton. Even my friend, Stuart Mill, treated 
these forces of industrial life with a strange 
indifference- 

“‘I confess to having at one time 
viewed them suspiciously, but a long 
study of the history of labor has con- 
vinced me that they are not only the best 
friends of workmen, but the best agency 
for the employer and the public, and that 
to the extension of these associations 
political economists and statesmen must 
look for the solution of some among the 
most pressing and the most difficult prob 
lems of our times. 

George W. Childs 



LET US BOOM OUR PAPER. 



Editor : The Cakpenter. — In rumbling 
through my desk this evening I came 
across an old copy of The Carpenter of 
the date of February 24,1891, and, on 
comparing it with our last issue, 1 found 
myself puzzled to realize the difierenee, 
am! in attempting to solve the question as 
fcc why such a difference in our Journal in 
the last year, I must confess I had to 
give it up" It cannot be, Brother McGuire, 
that our “ Grand Organization ” is on the 
decline. Then why let, our Journal dwin- 
dle away until we have little else but the 
dry routine matter that is of little or no 
interest at all to the majority of our mem- 
bers. What is tlie matter Brother ? Are 
we growing lukewarm ? Are we not about 
to forget that “ Eternal Vigilance is tiie 
Price of Liberty?’’ But when I think how 
long and tedious has been your work, I 
only wonder how you have stood the 
strain so well But when I look over that 
old number of The Cakpentex of February 
24, 1891, and re-read your able article 
“ Why we Organize ,” in which you so 
ably discuss the Labor situation from start 
to finish. Then on the second page i find 
a full page article entitled a Harvard stu- 
dent’s essay on our Brotherhood, in which 
is given a full and complete history of our 
Brotherhood as gathered by the student 
of political economy in Harvard College, 
and besides there are many other articles 
of interest in the old number (which is an 
eight page paper while the late number is 
only four an 1 small at that) I say when I 
look over the old and then the new, I 
cannot but note with sore regret that 
there is something wrong somewhere. 
We should build our Journal up instead 
of letting it dwindle away. There is no 
question, to my mind, but that a good, 
live paper is one of the most potent 
agencies that can be employed in the in- 
terest of any cause. Then is it not im- 
peratively neces-sary that we have a good, 
live, progressive Journal that we may, 
with pride, hand to non-union carpenters 
and other members of the bui ding trade 
with the assurance that it will demand 
their respect and attention. Now, I am 
fully aware that it requires a vast amount 
of "labor and considerable money to pub- 
lish a good paper, but if our cause is 
worlh anything it is worth pushing, and 
it would "be just about as sensible to at- 
tempt to run a steam engine without 
water as to attempt to conduct a reform 
movement of to-day without plenty of 
pi-inters’ ink (intelligently used), and I am 
sure there are plenty of our members who 
are well qualified to contribute able and 
interesting articles on all subjects per 
taining to our trade, and with our worthy 
and efficient General Secretary' as editor- 
in-chief we find that we have all the 
means at hand for the production oi a 
live, wide-awake Journal that will com- 
mend itself to the reading public. Only 
one thing more is Sacking — that is the 
irumey to pay for the white paper, ink, 
type setting, etc. Yes, the money is all 
we lack. Well, now, brethren, don't you 
think that the emergency demands that 
we take steps to build up our paper, that 
it may be on a par with any labor or 
mechanical Journal in the country. We 
can do it and never miss what it will cost. 



We cannot, or should not (if we will stop 
ai 



and consider the constant demands made 
on our General Treasury for death, disa 
bility and strike benefits), expect our 
paper to amount to much under the 
present arrangements If we ever hope 
to have a paper that will reflect the 
intelligence and magnitude of our grand 
organization we must contribute some- 
thing to that end, and I would like to 
hear from other members on the subject, 
l-ct us agitate the matter and see what 
can be done. I am in favor of each local 
union paying a sum (in proportion to their 
membership) sufficient to put such a 
paper on its feet and keep it going 
Brother we must have a live paper; 
there is nothing that will tend to build up 
our order more. Interest the members and 
keep them interested, as nothing save a 
good live paper wifi do, and they' will work 
for their organization in a manner that 
will tell on the membership roll book at 
each meeting that willlbe surpris ng. There 
is nomine (who is well informed) I presume, 
that will deny that we are now under a 



dead strain, as it were, to keep our ship 
abreast of the waves and with great effort 
we move forward very slow, but if we will 
equip her as we should (and easily can) 
with the most powerful engine known to 
modern science, the Printing /‘res* used 
with a vim) we will steer her clear of the 
breakers and will overcome every opposi- 
tion, sailing as it were upon a smooth sea. 
Let us hear from others 

C. W. Forbes. 

A member of No. 277 Fort Worth, Tex. 



FIRST-CLASS BOOKS! 



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Address 



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p. j. mcguire, 



Box 884, Philadelphia, P» 




^C/STEf^-' " 



This is a Facsimile of the LABEL of the 



UNITED HATTERS 



OF NORTH AMERICA. 



The LahcUlias received the indorsement of the 
General Executive Board of the K. of L. and of 
the American Federation of Labor. 

J&ü 'The Label is placed on every union-mad« 
hut before it leaves the workman’s hands. If a 
dealer takes a label from one hat and places it in 
another, or has any detached labels in his store* 
do not buy from him, as his labels may be coun- 
terfeit and his hats may be the product of scab or 
non-union labor. 

B iwtue ot Counterfeits. Sometimes they are 
printed on white paper and sometimes on yellow 
paper. As a general thing they are not perforated 
on the edges. A counterfeit label with perforated 
edges has lately made its appearance- It is larger 
than the genuine one. The genuine label is about 
an inch and a half square and is printed on buff 
colored paper. When purchasing a hat see to it 
that you get the genuine label with the perforated 
edges. 



This is ths On'y Correct Union Label to- 
I ur-felt Hat3. 



BUY NO FUR-FELT FAT WITHOUT IT’ 



Edward Barrett, President. 

Hat Makers’ International Association-' 



James II. Penrose, Secretary, 

523 Snyder Ave., Philadelphia. P».: 



' v'fE* Graham, President, 

Hat Finishers' International Ash u 



• t n Phillip 4 '. Secretary, 

Park Avenue. Brooklyn,«. T 



THE UNION LABEL. 

THE CIGAR MAKERS’ BLUE LABEL., 




At the Four* 
teenth Annua» 
Session of the 
Cigar Makers' 
International 
Union, held at 
Chicago, in the 
month ofSeptena- 



ber, 1 886, the ac- 
companying label 
was adopted as a 
trade mark to be 



pasted on every 



box of cigar* 
made by Unioe 
men. 



If you are opposed to the aervüe h»hor of 
ies, smoke union-made ©igars. 

If you are opposed '-o r«..traow 
labor, in deadly competition freo ***** 

smoko union-made cigars. , 

If you favor higher wage*, smoke union 

C 'ff "you are opposed to filthy tenem.ntWf 
factories, smoke none but union-made oigt*-. 
If vou favor shorter hours of labor, «.«*<** 



union-made cigars . , 

if vou favor u permanent organization eaiiMK. 

. . ^ ^ n/it mifehftif. til A iM’lr' 



ir VOU lavoru -- 

strictly union »hop», do not purchaaa the 
duct of seals», rats and blacklegs c 



that tUe Blae Lai>ei iß **»• 



IB uo* - i 
booking, etc-, J (Germai 









4 A 






' 1 

/ > 












7 i 



UI» of 

mra a 
bicli j 




bbb m 









THE CARPENTER. 



Volume XII.— No. 8. 



PHILADELPHIA, AUGUST, 1892. 



Published Monthly. 



PARAGRAPHS FROM ALL POINTS. 



Wabash, Ind. — Union 631 lias recently ae- 

t Hired a nicely furnished hall of its own, and 
lie town is becoming: thoroughly unionized. 



The Union carpenters of Edinburg and Leith, 
Scotland, in June last, got an advance of a half- 
penny per hour. This involved about 900 men. 

The Labor organizations of Arkansas held a 
State Labor Convention at Little Koek, recently. 

It was well attended. The convict labor lea.se 
system was condemned. 

Lafayette, lnd — Union 2 5 is now located in 
its new hall in “Labor Temple.” We had a 
grand excursion to Chicago June 19, of all the 
labor societies, and each union got a fair share of 
the proceeds. 

Oil City, Pa.— We lost one of our active mem- 
bers Bro. S. G. Terwillinger, by the recent tire 
and Hood in this city. Six of our members had 
their homes burned up. Our treasurer, Bro. W. 

J. Polock, lost everything. 

Chillicothb, O.— Union 386 is doing grandly 
in the short time it is organized, it now has 
nearly all the carpenters in town ami we turned 
out nearly 190 strong with handsome banners 
on July 4. 

Dallas. Tex.— Union 198 lias a member, 
Brother C. S. Lacelle, who during a member- 
ship of five and a half years has only been ab- 
sent from five meetings in that time, and has 
held every office in the union. 

There are 65 organized trades with 2,568 
bandies and 176,664 members in the Central or- 
ganization of the Trade Unions of Germany. 
Forty- four of them have their own trade journals. 
These unions are growing steadily, and had a 
wondrous growth last year. 

Denver, Colo. — Union 55 is four-fold stronger 
in membership than it was eighteen months ago, 
and “ still they come ” in scores. We will swing 
out a fine banner on Labor Day. We are rapidly 
turning job after job over to the eight-hour rule, 
and unionizing the jobs. 

Allen G. Thurman, ‘ The Old Roman,” once 
very wisely said : — ‘it is neither to a high nor a 
low tariff that the organ iz- d workingmen owe 
the high standard of wages they are receiving 
to-day, but «imply to the wise and masterly man- 
ner in which they have conducted the different 
trades unions of w'hich they are members.” 

The Average opponent of labor organizations 
is generally the man who knows the least about 
them, and, if he is an employer of labor, will 
oppose them on general principles, which means 
prejudice arising from ignorance of them and in 
his blindness will as often injure his own best 
interests. 

Auburn, N. Y.— Union 453 had a novel badge 
in its parade July 4. It was in the shape of a 
small wooden saw , of thin material six inches 
long, the handle of walnut and the saw blade 
of pine, ami on the blade was printed in black 
the title of the union. These wooden badges 
were designed by Bro H. C. Race, and can be 
furnisliei by Union 453 for the sum of 10 cents 
each. 

On Monday, Aug. 15, 1892, the fourteenth an- 
nual Labor Congress of the State of New Jersey 
will be held in the Assembly Chamber of the 
Slate House Trenton, N. J. All bona fide traue 
unions including all the carpenters’ unions in 
the State of New Jersey are invited. Address, 
J. P. McDonnell, Chair». tan Executive Board, 
Patels m, N. J. 

The Pavers strike in New York citv, after 
nine weeks lias been brought to an end by the 
unconditional surrender of the men, notwith- 
standing the trade union men and the Knights 
of Labor were united in the strike. There 
are charges of perfidy on the part of the union 
men against the Knights of Labor in the conduct 
of this strike. 

Corsicana, Tex. — There is not a ten-hour job 
in town. Mr. Minor who fought Union 731 so 
hard on the Opera House job last fall, is now 
working his men nine hours *a day. Clopton A 
Bragg, once members of Union 731, are now run- 
ning a union planing mill in this town, and will 
do any mill work or furnish plans and specifica- 
tions on short notice. 

The eight-hour bill, which passed the House 
this session in Congress, is a good measure, and 
applies to all contracts for Government work. 
The Senate will probably not take action on it 
until next session, though it should be pushed 
through without delay. When labor i- more 
strongly organized, and uses its voting power 
for labor measures, such legislation will l>c at 
abended to more promptly. 

Some labor papers say “ The carpenters of 
Birmingham, Ala., are meeting with success in 
their co-operative building association.” It that 
be true then It is the only thing they have had 
“success” in for they have no time apparent y 
for ’ success” in the line of a carpenters’ union. 
Every attempt they ever made has been a failure 
for want of having the right union spirit of soli- 
darity among the men. 

Vicksburg, Miss. — Some newspapers here are 
boasting that labor never was so cheap in this 
city; that it can now be had in abundance al 
from fifty to seventy-live cents per day. Ami 
further, that contractors will take building at the 
lowest figures to keep a-going. From this it 
seems that Vicksburg is a good place to avoid 
just now. This city is suffering the re-action due 
to the bad faith of the bosses, who two years ago 
made an agreement with the carpenters to work 
nine hours a day, and in a few months locked 
the men out, ami at the end of ten weeks forced 
them hack to ten hours. 

Akter a gallant fight for two months back, the 
Cabinet makers of New York City have been 
beaten in their struggle to gain the eight-hour 
day. The men spent -50,000 lor strike* benefits in 
this strike and in all the time they were out 
there was her lly a desertion from their ranks 
The Varnishers and Polishers were engaged in 
this strike, and also decided to return to work. 
The Cabinetmakers’ strikes ofl872 an t 1886 were 
likewise lost, but this time the Cabinetmakers 
had everv prospect of success. They complain 
that the Carpenters of New York did not give 
them every possible support, though to our 
knowledge the Carpenters helped them whenever 
called on. 



FIRST CONVENTION OF CARPENTERS OF 
NEW ENGLAND. 

Fifty-six delegates of locals under our juris- 
diction in New England, answered roll call at 
the carpenters’ convention In Boston, July 18. 
Delegates were present from union« in Maine, 
New Hamp. hire, Vermont, Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island and Connecticut. Alex. Angus of 
Union 43, Hartford, Conn., was President, D. 
Malony, Union 138, Cambridge, Mass., wai 
.Secretary. Plans for agitation and extension 
of the organization were discussed, also amend- 
ments to the Constitution and suggestions to the 
St. Louis convention were agreed upon. The 
convention was a grand success and decided to 
boycott Carnegie’s structural iron and to raise 
finances for the Homestead strikers. 



WARNINGS AGAINST FRAUDS. 

Geo. Max ley, of Richmond, Va , carries a 
a card from Union 40 Wilmington, and has de- 
frauded two members of Union 122. German- 
town, Pa. He is about 5 feet 9 inches high, 
wears a white slouch hat, has a reddish mustache 
and a red fact and is a great talker. 

Thos. V. Cogk bill, left Charleston, W. Va., 
for Pittsburgh, Pa. Union 608 informs us that 
Cockrill cheated his workmen out of their 
wages. 

John Haas, from Union 513, Town of Union, 
N. J., for “ lumping ” and piece work. 



PERSONAL. 

Grand Chief P. M. Arthur, of the Locomo- 
tive Engineers, at the recent Convention of that 
organization was voted six months’ leave of 
absence at full wages. 

Eugene V. Debs, General Secretary of the 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen, has been 
in that position sixteen years and recently has 
decided to take charge of a publishing house in 
New York city. We wish our old time friend 
Debs every success wherever lie goes. 

James Lynch, was the first Walking Delegate 
ever placed in the field by any trade union. He 
was “the Daddy of them all.” In the year 1881 
he was chosen Walking Delegate by the Carpen- 
ters of New York city, and rendered signal ser-‘ 
vice in that capacity. 



A GOOD MtVF, 

TUn Carpenters’ District Council of Cincin- 
nati, O., will establish an innovation in labor 
allairs. 1 1 lias decided to have an otliee ceil trail v 
located, where carpenters wanting work, will 
leave word as to how they ean l>e reached. 

. The headquarters will have telephone connec- 
tion and the builders will ring up the Council 
and state the number of men they require. 
This will ■ .bviute the necessity of hunting about 
buildings ;r carpenters, and will be a mutual 
lienetlt. 



TRADE UNIONS AND POLITICS. 

THE OTHER SIDE. 

2’o the Editor of Ihe Carpenter : A copy 
of your tasty journal was placed in my 
hand recently and I perused it eagerly, as 
I alwaysdo any labor or reform paper. The 
heading “ Trade Unions and Politics ” 
attracted my attention, and I read it. It 
was well written and I recognized its au- 
thor, Dyer D. Lum, as a writer of verse 
whose creditable productions I had come 
across occasionally. The treatment of the 
subject, however, was disappointing. 

While I am an active and earnest trade 
unionist, I am not one of those who think 
that all reforms are probable or possible 
through that channel ; nor can I see where- 
in the methods of the union and those of 
the ballot are at odds. If they are, then, 
also, are at odds two methods which are 
employed by reformers in every field : the 
cure of a fault in the individual and the 
removal of theoause. 

In my judgment the very best outcome 
of the trade union is the education which 
results to its members, fraternity, the 
value of united action, a just estimate of 
the dignity of labor, and a truer under- 
standing of what is the real cause of the 
cruel poverty of the working class. 

Has Mr. Dyer D. Lum a clear concep- 
tion of how, through “ an adherence to 
the lines already followed [presumably 
the methods of trade unions] the chemis- 
try of social change will inevitably draw 
nearer a final solution in Industrial Em- 
ancipation?” Unless he can tell us just 
what this means his “glorious ideal” is 
likely to be looked upon by discerning 
people with as much distrust as he affects 
with reference to the propositions of the 
various constituencies of the People’s 
party. 

The strongest and most direct weapon 
that labor has or ever will have probably, 
is the ballot». It is only the cynic who dis- 
trusts all attempt at progress through po- 
litical methods. What! shall we abandon 
thetreemen’s rightand privilege of making 
good laws and continue to put our enemies 
into office and struggle against the bad 
laws whicji they make? Your trade 
unionist is a voter, and while he throws 
the ticket put into his hands by his mas- 
ter he forges the chain which enslaves 
him. 

When the working classes have given 
sufficient thought to the industrial ques- 
tion they will grasp the ballot with a new 
pm pose. Its use as compared with the 
power of the union for “ industrial eman- 
cipation ” is as a sword in place of a 
toothpick for fighting. 

The Knights of I jabor, Greenbackers 
and Nationalists are not. perhaps, as 
“incoherent” as the gentleman thinks. 
Each one sees a portion of the social 
evil, and the propositions which they 
have placed before the country in the 
platform of the People’s party are in the 
right direction to cure all those evils. 
This party is an infant yet, and is in pro- 
cess of formation. Its growth has been 
rapid thus far, but the experience of a 
few years will undoubtedly modify its 
shape. Neither I nor Mr. Dyer D. Lum 
can say at this moment just what will be- 
come of this venture, but I look upon it 
as an evidence of deep, stirring thought 
among the masses— a powerful and blessed 
awakening of the great people — a move- 
ment of the giant of Democracy, which 
shall ere long hurl Caste and Privilege from 
their high seats. Greed has ruled — does 
rule. Justice shall have the throne ; and, 
though I am a Nationalist, I am content 
to feel assured that the future order, born 
of the ballot, will be just and good, be, it 
in accordance with my belief or not. 

C. F. Blanchard. 

Corcord, N. II. 



INDUSTRIAL GOSSIP. 

Carpenter s work and building is deplorably 
dull in Australasia, and ha« been so lor some 
time back. 

The Amalgamated Society of Carpenters from 
its latest report has 554 branches and 36,007 mem- 
bers, with 799 on sick benefit and 710 oil unem- 
ployed benefit. 

On the (Question of removing: the headquar- 
ters of the Amalgam ated Carpenters from Man- 
chester, England, the vote stood 3,911 for and 
8,666 Against removal. 

If you believe that your trade union helps 
your business, make it a business concern by 
paying dues enough into the treasury to do 
business with. Cheap dues make a cheap or- 
ganization. 

Foreign carpenters are working for $7 to $10 
per week at Botany Mills, Passaic, N J. At the 
famous Botany Bay some carpenters used to 
work with “ bracelets ” on their ankles and a 
seven-pound '‘fob” at the end of their chains. 
And it was all time work. too. 

Labor Commissioner Peck of New York is 
preparing a work on the effect organized labor 
has upon wages Mr. Peck proves by statistics 
that as a rule the trade most thoroughly organ- 
ized reaps a share of the benefit of any improve- 
ment in its own line, ami is the last to suffer from 
a depression. 

Toronto, Canada —Trade frightfully dull. 
Mechanics and workmen are leaving in carloads. 
Speculators, gamblers and botch work, backed 
bv real estate sharks, have ruined the building 
trades of this city* Many old-established firms 
have gone to the wall on account of these labor 
gamblers, who do most of their carpenter work 
with fishermen. 

England. — Settlement of carpenters’ trade 
movements have been effected at Loughborough, 
Lincoln, Hereford. Migo, Middleton, Stone, and 
Walsall : but, there is no intimation of any 
change in the position of affairs at Belfast or 
Cardiff, where all members of the Amalgamated 
Carpenters engaged in the house building trade 
are out in support of an advance of wages and 
other privileges. 

Philadelphia, Pa. — There is a new awaken- 
ingof the building trades here through the help 
of the American Federation of Labor, who with 
the (>. E. B. of the U. B. have placed W. F. 
Kberhardtof Union No. 8, in the field as District 
Organizer. A Federation of Building trades is 
now under way and our carpenters’ unions are 
commencing to grow nicely. The Plasterers 
are working eight hours a day and have union- 
ized their trade in the whole city. 



HOW TO MAKE YOUR UNION A SUCCESS. 

Attend its meetings once in three or 
four months, and only when you cannot 
find it convenient to go somewhere else. 

Always make your engagements for so- 
cial theatre and surprise parties to take 
place on the meeting night of your asso- 
ciation, and ask other members to be with 
you. 

Pay your dues only when you receive 
notice to do so, or be subject to suspen- 
sion, because the association is wealthy 
and the secretaries receive enormous 
salaries ; they do not work every day like 
yourself, so have plenty of time to write 
letters. 

If you go to the meeting do not give 
your opinion on any subject, for it might 
possibly help the association or some one 
else. 

Do not ask a member in the shop where 
you are working if he will be at the meet- 
ing because it might cause him to be 
present ; say it’s none of your business 
anyway 

Decline to accept any office in your as- 
sociation, informing the members that you 
are uneducated, incapable and ignorant, 
and don’t forget to say that you do not 
wish to have the disgrace of holding office 
attached to your honorable name. 

After the meeting at which you have 
advanced no idea and assisted only by 
your silence go to the nearest saloon, or 
stand on the curbstone, break forth ora- 
tory, denounce the action of certain mem- 
bers, and ridicule those who were maDly 
enough to express their opinion. 

Finally, don’t forget to say if the asso- 
ciation is not better managed you will 
drop out and become an honorable scab . — 
J'attem Mahn' Journal. 



ITEMS OF INTEREST. 

The lead glaziers and glass cutters of 
Chicago went out for the eight hour day 
May 2 ", and gained it. 

Even the Spaniards are trying for the 
short hour day, and the carpenters and 
masons of Havana are out on a strike for 
eight li ours. 

Last year 6,384 people, most of whom 
were railroad employees, were killed in 
this country in railroad accidents, and 
29,025 were wounded. 

I live to Rroet that season 
By gifted men foretold 
When men «hall live by reason 
And not alone by «old. 

When man to man united. 

And every wrong thing righted 
This whole world, «hall be lighted 
As Eden was of old. 

Trade unionism means fair wages and 
short hours Every workingman who 
holds himself alool from the union of his 
craft is working against his own interest. 

— Cleveland Citizen. 

Grand Rarids, Mich. — Union 55 has 
established a class of thirty -five members 
in architectural drawing. Where the men 
had nerve enough to demand an advance 
in wages this season they got it. 

Salem, Mass. — Rev. S. B. Nobbs, in re- 
sponse to the request of the Carpenters’ 
District Council, preached upon the short- 
hour question recently. His text was : 
‘‘There is nothing bette»’ for a man, than 
that he should eat and drink, and that he 
should make his soul enjoy good in his la- 
bor- This also I saw that it was from the 
hand of God.” 

President Gompers, of the American 
Federation of Labor, is making au effort 
to organize into national unions the vari- 
ous local branches of the l aborers and 
Hod Carriers, the Longshoremen and 
Vessel Unloaders’ Union and the Street 
Car Employees’ Union. Circulars have 
been issued asking that a date for assem- 
bling a convention be named by the dif 
erent unions. The street car men will 
hold their Convention in Indianapolis, 
Ind .September 12. 1892. 



THE “SWEATER” 

A sweater is a small contractor who has 
capital enough, perhaps, to buy one hun- 
dred dollars’ worth of material, it may be 
for shirts, pants, overalls, caps or jackets. 
They will understand that the sweater in- 
tends to make only the very cheapest of 
goods and that he requires very little 
skilled .help : that he is ground down by 
the manufacturing wholesaler to the very 
lowest notch ; that there are hundreds of 
other sweaters who will underbid tor the 
work if he dares to ask for a reasonable 
margin, and that consequently the notch 
is very, very low ; that the sweater, after 
making his bargain with the manu- 
facturer goes to his tenement house sweat- 
box and, in his turn, puts the screws on 
hiB own workmen. Because of this pro- 
cess of squeezing or sweating the wretches 
who do the work can make only enough 
to barely exist— not by working nine ten 
or twelve hours a day, but by toiling four 
teen, sixteen, and very often eighteen 
hours per day- — Ev. 



THE MODERN BARONS. 

James A. Garfield, whose eminent, 
statesmanship was never questioned, 
once said : ‘ 1 The analogy between the in- 
dustrial conditions of society at the pres- 
ent time and the feudalism of the middle 
age is striking and suggestive. The 
modern barons, more powerful than their 
military prototypes, levy tribute on all 
our vast industries). The corporations 
have become conscious of their strength 
and have entered upon the work of con- 
trolling the States. Already they have 
captured the oldeBt and strongest of them 
and these discrowned sovereigns follow in 
chains the triumphal chariot of their 
conquerors.” 

YOUR TRADE UNION FIRST. 

There is something radically wrong 
with the man who deserts his union and 
pleads that it takes all he can afford to 
support the other organizations to which 
he belongs. Can he forget that trade 
unionism alone has made it possible for 
him to belong to other bodies ? The first 
organization that a workingman owes al- 
legiance to is the one that represents the 
trade at which he earns his daily bread. 

VICTIMS OF OUR SOCIAL ORDER. 

Says the Rev. Dr. DeCosta (Episcopa- 
lian), New York: “The poor girls in 

these houses (brothels) are simply victims 
of the social order, and when the raid is 
made and the tower falls upon them, shall 
we argue that they are sinners above all ? 
They had no fair advantages, and are 
usually the otfsnring of poverty, ignorance 
and imbecility. Most of tfaem never had 
any means of earning an honest livelihood, 
and had no choice between tire river and 
a life of shame. This the agitators ignore 
and dare not deal with the cause ol vice 
and crime ; that is, the bad manipulation 
of capital and the false social order, which 
create and maintain alike the brothel and 
the saloon. To day the victim of the so- 
cial order is hounded and the capitalist, 
the landlord, and their fellow operators, 
go tree.” 



AN EXPLANATION FROM CARROLL D. 

WRI6HT. 

Department of Labor, 
Washington, D. C-, July 7, 1892. 
Editor of The CarpUntkr : 

You have kindly sent me a copy of The 
Carpenter for June-July, 1892, ip wkLh 
there is a marked editorial asking the 
question “Why does not the Department 
ot Labor at Washington, D. C., exercise 
its legal powers in the present lockout in 
the paving stone and granite trades?” 
and the editorial further says, “ Under 
the law that made that department pow- 
ers were granted it to investigate and 
settle any strike or lockout of an inter- 
state character extending over two or 
more States.” 

The law organizing this department, 
which was approved June 13, 1888, con- 
tains this clause : 

The Commissioner of Labor is also specially 
charged to investigate the causes of, and facts re- 
lating to all controversies and disputes between 
employers and employees as they may occur, 
and which may tend to interfere with the wel- 
fare of the people of the different Stales, and re- 
port thereon to Congress. 

This does not authorize me to take any 
action whatever, except to ascertain the 
causes ot a strike and report wbat 1 may 
find as to the causes to Congress. It does 
not seem to me that the present lockout 
in the paving stone aBd granite trades 
would come undar an interstate regula- 
tion like that quoted. If it did my only 
function would be to ascertain the cause 
and report that to Congress. The object 
of the clause in the law is to have Borne 
official body authorized to ascertain the 
exact causes of a difficulty, and thus avoid 
the public misconception of a cause, like 
the. Southwestern strike, for instance. 

I am, sincerelv yours, 

Carroll D. Wright, 

Commissioner. 



HIGH CUES ESSENTIAL TO A UNION’S 
SUCCESS. 

How little the workman who agrees to 
labor for less than the union scale reffects 
upon what he is doing or appreciates the 
injury he is doing himself as well as his 
fellow-workmen. There is something 
mean, small and unmanly about a man, 
whether he belongs to a union or not, 
who will take advantage of a strike to get 
a situation. It is the fame qualities of 
which traitors are made. There are times, 
it is true, when the hardships which men 
suffer are so great that they overpower 
the sense of duty, but this would never 
happen if every union had a treasury full 
oi money. No matter how little princi- 
ple a man may have, he is not likely to 
betray his fellows as long as he receives 
sufficient benefits to keep his head above 
water. It is significant that the unions 
which are most suoeeesful are those that 
impose high dues and can draw upon im- 
mense sums of money at a moment’s no- 
tice to carry out their demands. As a 
rule, when employers submit to the de- 
mands of unions, it is because they be- 
lieve they would lose more by opposing 
them than they would gain hv defeating 
them. The organization of non-union 
men is essential to the success oh'everv 
union. Shorter hours and inefeased 
wagee cannot be secured as long as there 
are thousands of men outot employment 
who are willing to work long hours and 
rake pmall wattes. Therefore we believe 
that labor should depend not altogether 
upon the strength of its organization, but 
also upon the reserve funds it ought al- 
ways to have on hand in case of need. 
Organization without reserve funds avail- 
ed) little. If statistics could he accumu- 
lated in regard to strikes, it would he 
found that the amount of wages lost by 
strikes could have been saved had the 
unions accumulated one-fifth of that 
amount in their treasuries. The history 
of every strike proves that labor must 
fight capital with capital.- Clenhiml Cili-‘ 

ten. 

NATIONAL TRADE CONVENTIONS. 

Many trade-union conventions have 
been held the past few months, and 
many more are to take place. Among 
them are the respective conventions of 
the eight national organizations of rail- 
road men, viz : the engine* cs, firemen, 
brakemen, switchmen, car men, car in- 
spectors, railway telegraphers and the 
conductors. There have been the Con- 
ventions of the Shoemakers, the Machin- 
ists, and the International Typographical 
Union— all three in Philadelphia, in June 
The amalgamated iron and steel workers 
| met in Pittsburgh in June, and the boiler 
makers and iron ship builders convened 
at Columbus, Ohio ; the horse shoers 
: at Boston ; and tanners and curriers at 
■ Milwaukee, whi’e the carpenters and 
; painters have their conventions both in 
j St. Louh this August. The Knights of 
! bailor trill hold its General Assembly in 
( Boston in 0 ’tober, and the American 

i Federation ot Labor will 

, Philade 1, v: a, D' 1- 



lac conned carpenters. 







The CARPEN lti-, 

OFFKIAU JOl) K5AL OF TUE 

United Brotherhood of Car’ mter: al- 
lein ers of America. 



Tt'l üi CARE EMTEB. 

— i ^ - TifE labor organizations of rtii. airo,, 

STRIKE OF PITTSBURGH BRICKLAYERS OFFICIAL TOPICS. SCIT (CUtXI in a flourishing condition. Ti.,rt^ n ” 

wioTAomnc ati act . . , » the trat let* in that city are now eni««,; 

VICTORIOUS AT LAST. Quarters for delegates ran l e had at . . .. a,. I892 the eight-hour day. y,D i 

Mr.ThomasO f)?», Genenil Secretary of tbc J^dede Hotel, $1’. 00 per day, and at fthllabelpq ta, - g . | -- — 

Unrkii.y.r^an.i M^„n- intentional i i.ion " lame« Hotel for $1.50 per dav. —Ter q r ö f; t c geinb l « SHEeno , at there only «-iui.t w..rki„ BnM . l( 

informs, u.« th««t after « hattle of •>* week* th. tile • t. .lame- ue V ^ .. .f/. tnnh«*rn Hr TräallClt the House of t.minions ..ntoi at..ui . f 1 

ßri« klarer» of PiUsb»r*b. Pa., have secure.! » Seventh General Convention of I?™*!, if, nie Pimteuinu ! * ""‘l V/^.T".fr n-‘ 



The labor organizations of Chir a«,. 
in a flourishing condition. Thirteen * 
the trades in that city art now tniovir 
the «debt-hour dav. ■ c *> 



fnt*ur.ed n:h. 



i :hr F. '/i r>::h 



144 X. Ninth S».. Phlla.. Pa. 

I*. ,T. Mc<»"il:F i.iiit. rand I’liGt-.i 

Kiiterei. at ’.he 'fli< «■ at ! hilau« i 1 ' 

a.« ‘•eetual-i la-* matter. 

Feb-< rittion Ik: t —Fifty i- .. 

Advance IMe.TJICt.il. 

Art .ire»* ;. It tier* a'af u.micy - to 

P. .'. Mi <!t u:r. 

1m \ hsi. Pi.:'.;u:e!|.h:a. !' 

PHILADELPHIA, AUGUST, 1892. 



, .(jrä 



2 L*al)rbcit ü'niiqt lienor, g.i o tit ccr stec oi] 
ot Con- lauf n endlicher (Siemescrtiridelunq, ui.b 
, unter bieiem föeiidjteinmft ftnb r> e Urheber 



— - — ■ session opens at 8 A. M. fpruiflt Ijerror. Ti a i?t ter *cr. 

PENTERS. . r ft ,> lauf n erhöh dj'cr (Sieiftcscrtipirtelunii, ui.b 

— - _ . •'“TT? I T , “T* ^ Ä MriS ecftA»»«»« fh» ►« •"*»»« 

i he carpenters in Tampa, Ha, have vention sliould be addressed to the Gen- , u , uer ^foeen, neuer jtetjerei n, tie ii}ol) : tl)as 
maintained their nine-hour day after a erai Secretary, P. J. McGuire, Laclede ter ^ (0 ^uiidiengddjlecht 6. — (Il)umaJ 
short strike- Hotel, St. Louis, Mo- Mr. McGuire will ^Jurfle. 

The strikes of carpenters in Winches- l*e there on and after . ulv 1SUJ. Hi» 1 £ fr (f-jnfluB Dfr WcDKrffdjajtfll a»i Die 
ter. Ky., and Newport, It. I., after long committee on Constitution meets there on fojialen «erijältnifff. 

tights have been closed successfully. that date. Unter biefer ll(ber)djrift bringt boo ,,^nt. 



that date. 



fopalcn ‘Bcrtjaltnifif. 

Unter biefer lleberförift bringt bao ,, g,m. 

«» » * v. .iii v i, r . . iv . . a . 



FIRST-CLASS BOOKS! 

CHEAP, USEFUL AND PRACTICAL. 

Bell’» Carpentry Made I'.a*y $• qg 

T«K HriKUER'» <»L’II>K AND KhTIMW Pi 

... __ •> . .. If . 1 . 



JiUMHiiEPIT.iouiTucuiLrK.ui.,. - UIUU UU|U 4*1 i/ft A " v ' T „ E UnMJF.R'» «OTDE A SD K»T I M A T O 

Tiif mre- hour div h i« been trained re- (O k Ontario CamuFaii Iocul« are ®'*8 ar 2MafctV iyOllt nal" btejeu IflltOplfl QlPj p R „ E Book. Hodgson. 

iiiE nuie-nour any has neen gain eu re Oik Ontario, (Canao.an totals are fn v,„ e U*o "Hainpf inufäcn Äup.tal ur.b i r the Si.kk square, am. How n, i . 

eently by the car penters’ unions m Colfax, hereby urged to send labor statistics and i*rai t»- ai. carpi ntrv. Ho.i--.,., 

" ’m-a}) Kveretr Wash . ( Iftawa 111., and Hfl nut all hiank-s eallei? fi.r hv the Hureau ClaivpIT i,tnt u ’•( • HrA’k-Bi o I ’N', M u>e I.a ^ . 



un d tuc moj unu rcTc An • ' * . . in e itt erail, bic iKajorttat aud) bier r giert, 

flkLr Tnt MtNUr HUMtSTtAD. fiit n.dl men of St. Louis, Mo., are still j i»k*.am/i:i r tin* iohm .vuior of fi> o en iefet die 'Dünen tiif dod) Die i oll’tanciq? 

Don't use any wire nails or spikes from out for the nine-hour day und euch week r^oiy'ut 'i'rm.'-t.. - ' . .V.* . f ! .* i '» i A 'la 1 . i i o' e, beit bereu fi»anbhu gen tu fntfl'iren oocr 

irnev e'« n 1L work r.n im: are inakimr inroads on the bosses- The • r,1,r »''■<»rkai'../ed i..i»oruii.iu ik-iuvc- m. im.rn cucb um-uftoBeH, iubetn ue pel) b.iinilU, cine 

irnegie f n.ixit un t work on any | '<»"• ami MihmUIii-.i. Sfajcr tiu Der iKttqliföev Mr tljre fnittöten 

.ildim: where structural iron from Car- . . — - ju gewinnen. * im qc’aii line qouMl'cija ttidje 

,, - r , - ..... , present writing are out over a uiontn. j veten beiubt ja ,udi auf tne’em mmtrqe-- 

gies mills is used This will help the i Vt . , *,,,«• ,i Q f. I ORGANIZf D SOLIDARITY. ... 






c verm ■ < iiiip ai i via ri a uium . 

negie’s mills is used This will help the l\v have given them from the Lro- 

brave men aud women of Homestead, tective Fund to help them. 

Let Cont:re s s refuse any further appro- The stair builders of Cin.innati, (»., 
priation for armor plate from Carnegie's through I'nion 4M have secured uiost o! 
mills. Write your Congress .an to tight demands without a strike to go into 



m, i gen (') unMirim c t'er c clbfimvaung 
i. Turd) bicfe Ttöjipliu cröaltcn Pie 31 n* 



f uVpl VJA 

m$h) 

Wv/ 

^C/STErtC 0 ' 

TLi« i.- a Faoiuiiie of tl..' LABEL of tLe 



it. Write your Congressman to also see '* ' ‘ ,1 a | ?t ‘ e 1 * ' 11 a { it is everywhere seen and nowhere more I in finarjieUet ¥cjieluuig, fa roirfitiq t»\-a «.idi | TLmis.* J a«du>:.e of the LABELof tLe 

that Congress enacts a law ro w ;,.e n -t ' ii: 'f '* " J 1 ttU ' { K ‘ r the nine-hour ; uliU -ketily than in trade unions. The i’t, 'onöern autö in bciu (".ioimmccrtaltcn TI\TT r ri7T^ 14 ATTCDC 

day i- recognized and none hut umon American workman is self-assertive aud fer iHitgltebcr, lrclcfie ni> ’clbftbtipufe c Ul\l 1 CD 11 A 1 1 jCKu 

the whole capitalistic private army o: men to he employed, and onlr one ap- ! eelf-respecting. He has clear-cut ideas of Wanner auftreten mb bnpyr* oft unD { OF voi’Tll \.%'ERicv 

Pinkertons prentice for everv five n eu | hie own mauhood and the hardy courage 'QueCn meljr truidica, als M:rd> hi^tfin* j ‘ ‘ * 

l ee.uAeuu. to a^ert it when needed. In his Indus- r.ige «liif.s. ! (J,tr " f ‘^ 

A ftkr a strike of ten weeks, to gam the trial relations lie carries his head high Turd) ben ’rcieit Wiiii’.inqeauftautcö n the \i'ii.rKan F-in*nili..i'. of .Mhor* ° 
QUESTIONS OF POLITICS eight hour dav, and at a cost of nearly and looks askance at those who would re ben 35ctißiiur. hmgen e: n'girei n Die ^itgheiUT ***The iaiin-i is jiiaeed on everyunii.ii-nif.ee 

The New York ••People" take- a« -o U-.lKK) from the lWlive PunJ.lhe.-ar- T 01 " ^«« »« .Ha ÄISJÄÄSiÜtf; f 

. ", ..... ,, v r , f penter« Of Baltimore Md dedired t' eir iiwl 111 i 1 '» ^lf-a^ertive wav calls Hflmcraben unb fcmircit ;u «imtu^tritarf Hm.ti.er.i.r i.^any.n-tathe.i inu-isin bis emr.-, 

task for publishing L>ver I». Lum s article 1 ' 1 re " lei lare l i.ieir them ** social tinkers. mjj ihrer 3aqe unb ber illitiel ui öer'n !öcifc= I d»* notimy from him, as his labels may be eo.ii»l 

on “Trade Cnions and Politics/’ Tim «rike off, though two-thirds ot the men n e niav not have reasoned out the ,un 9- Sie ’lernen bei: 'Jlu^cit tnö bie 'Jlctö Sonl^niön ^ ^ lhe|,rodut ‘ ofK * b « 

“People" is mistaken in the opinion ar <* working eight hours a day. Themen problem for himself, l-ut the ingrained winbigfcit einer [t.nfen jLUberftanbefaffe bewHre of Counterfeits, sometime« they *r< 

that thp ariiclp rmhliuho,! «iti.,, ui »I,*, ought to have yielded on t tie card svsteni tendency becomes visible in his trade ? in,c D«u U’tb ft n b bemüht, eine lolche au}i:= printed on white paper and sometime« ou yellow 

mar mean uiew a.- published without the - h .. union action Nor hv this is it meant ’^ntefii, jum 3rfiu$ gegen eile Hcfaf)«n As a »enerai thin K the, are not perform 

knowledge of g>ecretarv McGuire. at nrei ana me) louia nave won their , . . f ‘ v ,. ,u nrb 'JZothiatle «n the edges, a counterfeit label with perforated 

w . etrike the tirst few week« t.iat ht is indlllereilt toSdial retorms, for _ . * . _ edge« li.« lately mmie its Hp)>eurance. It is 1 we: 

> e he. ie\ e t he subject is one worthy ot such ineu seldom are ; but that his habits . wii cijichcn btc SKitqlicbcr tu efonomi* timn the genuine one. The R enuine i»b«i la About 

thorough discussion and :h'-re is an abon- «arpenters of Scranton, Pa., closed tend to lead him to see that society is not ,rf,em unö porlanut tfiri’dicm S-.rüätibnift, »»inch and a half square and is printed on bar? 

. ’ i • i _ * • » • f.dir.iM f;.* r> . • j.*! . colored imoer. When mirrhaninfi' a hat up«« tr» II 



their etrike for t lie nine-hour day in com- I f inai 



BUY NO FUR-FELT HAT WITHOUT IT 



knowledge of Secretary McGuire. ^ ^ ^ ^ 

Ue believe the subject is one worthy ot e me Drst lew weeks. such men seldom are ; but that his habits . 4 - cijichcn hie üKitqlicbcr tu efonomi* 

thorough discussion and :h r -re is an abun- The carpenters of Scranton, l’a., closed tend to leatl him to see that society is not ' ( * ,em u ! { ^ b fl rlatiUT tari’dicm S-.rflanbnift, 
dance of excellent arguments can he of- their strike for the nine- hour day in com- f machine bv which, «with a new screw ,‘ e . v'daUn g.agcu m nötigem 

c a , n .i i , , * - * r ,^ ■ .. ... „ T , ^ here or a wheel there, frict.on is to he ^ d )‘ c betrachten unb ihre An ft cf) ten thren 

.ered on both sides ot the question. As p*ete vie ton on duly b.th. Ihe strike overcome. Put he does see clearlv that ® cn offen gegeniiter erfldreit anbjuoeiF 

we published Mr. Lum’s article in the May lasted eleven weeks. At first there were if permanent reform is to he sought, it %’«btgen. 'JFo eir.c uol tifctic 3dm’e giebt 
issue, this month we give a hearing on over P " men on etrike and week by week must be by the union of hearts and bands 05 rc . c nig 9?m'inieurgen, bie inh ben GJotorrh 
the other side to our Concord corre c - “ains were made, until at the end of the a common purpose. He also sees that l$ a, " , r cn fbnrcn obmobl tev nolle 

pendent. 10th week onlv ... n,en were ou. In ,he "* ,hr V '< ,hw « «» HW.m..,eJi,i« »„,1 »“ ! 4 nieSan# je«. 

U e cannot agree with the treme view P^nod of the strike only l.j men de- lines and insists that associations to which . ^ oA) ba0 . ^ id un? bic Sfatfit ber ©. roerfr 

of either side. We cannot si 1 by those They were offered big moneyed he belongs shall be kept within the lines R&aftnt bei'chrai.ft fill nid’t aüoin auf ihre 

who believe all politics should be es- inducements. It was a grand victory of the purpose in view. 'JKifglicbcr, fonbrtn umraBt m tegebrungen, 

chewed by the labor interests, and the " 'th all the forces of the Builders' Lx- ‘ Organize. 1 solidarity ” is a phrase es- ^TipcX” ^ benn* i?r cl 

State enthely ignored Nor do we en- ‘ '“^e, coal operators, railroad com- ganrfirten ?rfci/cr mad, t fid, oiler Crtin ur.b 

dorse the position of those who hold that F a,j: ‘ s arul every corporate interest ar- natural and its forced growth. In his own 'l l aU(n ^ (i:cn niblbar. m bantm unbe 

by political action alone the working oeo- rR yed against the men. experii % ice he sees what history teaches tiotlni'cnbig, bag bic gc'aurntc 

pie can eecure their complete emam-ipa- — tha . t »*ntual needs bring mutual action ((?,!!,/ Vdinfi! n 1 

tion. We now have fort v six cities working antI thttt which .>,//, is far £ "ta v S Jn i or ^ 

T , . u n e surer grounded than that which is urn , ° 3 U CrtLtapn 1td .il, fcimoit 

There are many que.-tions affecting the eight hours a day, and 39:J cities working posed to he injected in advance. In his Crrt ' ] ? bßf? mflI l. bereit ®«rth abniuih^n, 
welfare ot the workers which can he and B-ue hours a day. Keep on pushing the own lifetime, if of middle-age. he has bficit dl'angcl fritifiren unb cut Urtlutl »allen 

will he solved without the intervention of s ! 1 “ r t hour agitation. Ten years ago the 1 8600 ^f-assertion lead from the limited fdl n litH ' r b erew Tbaten unb >>ai iDlnrgci!. 

the State, through and by the unions, ten-hour day was universal among car- te< | 1 1 V rat ^ 1 UI 'ion, and this branch COMPLETED IN OKE DAY 

are otl.ure .gain .ha. „e,,,. ynto*. ... -en veare ,„ore .he eW KÄÄÄÄ Th, 
sarilv wid require state and 1 ederal le^- “ our 'la> can he made universal. manufacture, an 1 that ju:-t so far as it re- * ate *' finished their eighth house built on 

islation and are essentially political ones- . “j gponds to mutual needs to till its place a« fi* e phui of a Sunday “raising/’ Seven 

tions. When workingmen lose eight ot , ,‘o ,n< ^ nths en,lin b- ^»ly L au important factor. " houses had been already built or. this plan, 

partv politics in the nrp^n«. ' ve l >a1 ^ oui 1 A for death and If of a thoughtful and hopeful turn of VV \ ie house was for. Mr. Chas. 

I- j . . , i . .. i se disability benelits, from our general treas- n,in 'l he will see in this fact continued a member cf I’nion ZJ. Themen, 1 

great industrial issues they can then safely ury . Ti)is js near , twU . e growth, and ’SlreanidSin^ÄJSSi » u,,, . b er “!! I'nion men started in 

deal with politics labor politics) in trade pai ,i out the re viJus vear a, t,on 111 the . ,uture b y such allied cen- th»h \ M • >u ?' a > \ • lune 3,1,1 finished 

unions, as is now the case in the unions in * 4 , . ~ tree now considered utopian. 1 e house in eight Itouiv, complete, with 

England, Germany, France and all over Complaints have come to the General M’ith the steady growth of unionism n ° COt to - I'MdoodJMr the labor, 
civilized Europe. Secretary of a violation of the alien con- f v m° Ug . " Je " ot l 1 ” 8 ( ' h . a [ act er, the ti, lie INFORMATION WANTt n 

The sre.t mistake ot many >v«rkin C . tra. t law in nonnectinn with the imporla- «WlTthi-RLÄjfd'uSS’^l! Tn.y. ». Y . .Wir.. .f,w 

men is to lay too much stress on the use tion ot some carpenters from Holland to muting those through and bv whom thev thRn ea < ‘ utS T. ,f " VKI < A ' KV - a » • '»'•« r of 

of the ballot box as the cure-all for labor's Louisiana, and of cases where the State 7™]® /' alle d into existence.’ The allied >» «»""Xi'it.ii \u ‘Ä l, V!I’rk rslv.' s, mm.. 

ills, and in the excitement of a political buildings of Pennsylvania and West Vir- *,’u 1< l 1 n;r ' t [ a,,es to “ ,a y is experiment. Trov“ x 'v Ju * 1: ' J ’- »’• i:»a Van* 

campaign-panic nlarly in presidential pinia, on the World's Fairgrounds at Chi- li' 'I ST®i,' vl, ? d .‘ th . e 7 “ " ‘ — 



on the edge*. A counterfeit Inbel with perforated 
etlges has lately made its appearanoo. It it larae? 



COMPLETED IN ONE DAY. 

The C arpentera I nion of San Francisco 



... ■ ’ »**»■* *• y,- l* u.ui.siH.iii auLi IK in ei >u Turn nt i.-i i * .... 

disability benelits, from our general treas- mind he will see in this fact continued ,l? n 8 niet,,ber c f { Themen, 

ury. This is nearly twice aa much as we h' r f«h,an.l -.Iream dreao;» ” uf ,«sihle » i 1 "l "nn ' u'™,“'™ «arted in 

paid out the Drevioim vanr action ill the future by su.-h allied cen- t, » • ' u ?’! a - ; | ,,nnt * and flmshed 

pam out tn e previo us > ear. tres now considered utopian. the house in eight hours, complete, with 

ßtuPT.i^k.« . With th» afftmiritr — *i. .... . Q° fost to Mr. Flow! for the labor. 



> 

Complaints have come to the General With t,ie steady growth of unionism 

Secretary of a violation of the alien con- US. 0 "* UieI } 01 i'“ 9 character, the ti„, e 
tract law in .... ” u »»Mtlwr «ntres will 



INFORMATION WANTI D. 



ills, and in the excitement of a political buildings of Pennsylvania and We«t Vir- , l ’ ail ' i, | ri ‘ ; ‘ t nides to-day is an experiment, 
campaign particularly in presidential L'in»a,on the World's Fair grounds ai Chi- pronto with 

years— these men chase oil after political ' a ? o , are being built on the ten-hour day such growth their own independence wi 
will-o’-the-wisps, forget all other legiti- [n violation of the eight-hour day, as ? ,Po ^ ro ' v < t,i eir minds broaden to larger 
mate labor work, neglect their unions and akr,ee<1 t<J between the organized lalior of ^‘rough the social sympathy 

even discountenance them. For such C'Cago and the Directory of the Worlds will' VetltleLTfnr‘^l?^'i JiM<l f 1 ' 0 “' 
men Mr. I.utns articles are a healthy ™r. All theee matters „re under off, cial SÄS «ff™}'"!:!, 0 
antidote. investigation, an>l the results will he made they represent and greedy employers. * 1 

known in our next issue. Cue such course is already within 



a.. 

i 2 ill 
1. 1 iff i 

1° llg I 

mm 

Si I !Kfi 



Ime plan of sendirg out representative I 
men of our l\ B. t«» confer with contract- i 



MB 



THE STATE OF TRADE. 

Tratle is exceptionally good this sum- 
mer in most of the ".'»O cities and towns 
under our jurisdiction. But on the Pa- 
cific coast and in the Southern states, as 
well as in all the overboomed towns, 
trade is very flat and idle labor abun- 
dant. Trade is quite bad in Lini 3 , <>.; 
Henieon, lex.; Dallas, Tex. ; Waxahachie, 
Tex., Sioux City, Ia.;Cnattanooga, Tenn ; 
Bristol, Tenn., and Long Island Citv 
N. Y. 



I * * * — *» . x, .inraius ot 

One such course is already within fu- ,,etr<,i E Mich.; T. E Decgan, of New 

. ture possibilities. W hen through growtli Vork ; E. A. Stephens of Louisville • I > 
position is secure am „*•_ 1 ’ H. 



isiii 

§Mli 



At the Four- 
teenth Ann > - 
Session o 1 i f 
Cigar M.tk« 

I n ter nat i( 
Union, lieh! 
Chicago, in <• 
month of St yi* ' 
ber, iSS6, t 
companying 

was ailot d« • 

« 

trademark 
j)ast*il on 
box of *. , - 

made by 
men. 



-M-'Lucftiu. Kituur I ° . ’ u y securing contracts ’ i«»i*niiapoii8 f ind., and W F Fbcr 

and m charge of Commissioner Carroll D. ai, d placing their ' own men at work with- hardt. Philadelphia p a .11 d«™' 

Wright. Thp subject is that of building employers^ 11 16 1Ur ' ^* e ^ orn,er utmost honor and credit for their ? If you are oppose«! to the sen tie ix*’-« 

and loan associations, their methods u. . . lent services in ihi- ^ ^ f«.r • >' 



ai a ääS 



mtni na9 many 
Dyer D. Lum. 



... ueuau Ol me demands ir you favor a permanent organic*« “ 

of Union 78. In both nlaceo . «trlctly union ehoi*. do not purchs** 

tpmlod V ... . I <«68 he Rag at- duct of scabs, rate and blacklegs. 

| tended by gratifying success. 



See that the Blue Label ie *w + j 





Moneys Received 

W-daieTH* *OSTH »NOiNG MAY, :i. 1.92 
W6i*»*T«» «nj mod »pr-»- ; ct)*S »•>• e. 8. wltnont 4»,. 

»* ■” 'I .r *> ■«; 

.uuls » Tfci* r '! *. Y .nc.aun ail 

O. ? frcm a>«‘ Lto*] ttuoui toi *4z ml i 
i«t th«D*osiL uf MAY oa*r. 



General Officers. 

OF TOE 

■c Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
joiners of America. 

:nce of the General Secretary, 

: N Ninth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



661— 5 7 80 696— «14 90 731— « 3 55 766— 2 1 60 

662— II SO «7— IS 05*732— its O' 767— 

49-3 — 1 10 698— 1*1 20 ?3>— . 768— . . . 

664 — 6 8V 699— 7 GO 734— 4 80 769— . 

; 665— 10 I« 700— 1 75 735— . 770— 6 20 

I 666 — X 30 701— 5 .0 736— 5 H> 771— S 90 

667 — 14 . 0 702— 160 737— 3 10 773— I Mi 

.HiS— 703 — 9 70 738— 3 H) 7?3— 190 

669— 1 70 701— 9 30 739— 6 30 774— 3 00 

610 — 1 10 716— 5 40 740— . . 775— 2 40 

671— . - 706— 9 85 74i— . . ,776— . 

672— 10 2V7U7— . 742— € 70 777— 

6,3 — 3 1.0 7* »8-- 2; <13 — 2 30 778 — 1 25 

674— . . 709— . . ,744— 4 CO 779— 

675— 2 0,' 710— 3 00 74V— . . 7H0— 2 40 

676— 9 00 711— 3 30 746— 22 85 781— . 

«77— 2 1 0 712- 16 20 747— 5 50 782— 1 70 

678— 70 111 713— 10 70 748— lilt 783— 160 

679— . . . 714— 590749— 4 10 784— . . . 

. . 71&“ 12 <5^- 1 l tO . . 

6*1— 17 50 716— 14. .0 751— 3 85 78*>— 4 10 

1 6M2— 717— . . 75'J— 10 787— 2 2« 

683 — IS 35 718— 43 20 753— I 8U 788— 27 95 

681— 2 80 719— 4 7.0 754— . 789— . - 

I 685 — 3 85 720— 1 50 755— 3 X 0 790— 85 

686— 8 70 721— 7 60 756— 5 X 0 791— . - 

I «W7 — 4 10 722— 3 60 757— . 792 - 3 60 

’ gjvS 1C Oil 72.5 — 2 50 758— 5 4» 70S— 2 80 

6-i9— . . 721— 10 00 769— 3 10 791— 

I 690 - • 725— 7 60 760— . . . 795— 1 to 

'691 — 8 10 726 — . . 761 — . 70S- . . . 

1 f,9> — 0 30 727— . . • 762— 4 30 797— . - 

693— . . 728— 1 60 763— . . 798— 3 60 

694— 729 — 11 Co 764— . . 

j 695— 10 00 730— . . . 765— 22 15 

Total 85.23C 94 



667— U 50 «99- 
« 66 — 1 <o ",00 

667— IS 65 01- 

868 — . . 702- 

689 — 1 C5 70.J- 

670— . to; 

671— . . 70V 



*8 10 733— $1! 00 766— fl 70 
1 tO 731 — . . . 767 — 10 00 



1— 5 1*«- 

2— 50 25 167— 

3— 2« 70 VJO— 

4— 4.8 60 109 — 
5 - .6 60 17w — 

6— 4 r -5 171 — 

7 — 7 rill 172— 

8— 21 9X1 178— 

9— *9 60 174— 

10— 8 20 175 — 

11— 41 50 1 To- 
xi— 11 61 177 — 

13 — . . 17a- 

14— 2 To 171 — 

15— 5 70 ISO— 

16— 36 *.5 101— 

17— 5 20 182— 

ih— 3 M 1K3— 



•12 10 33! — 

14 80 >42— 
9 .0 .334— 
31 90 334— 

3 5.1 335— 
11 »I 138— 

4 s.0 ar— 
i 20 .>58 - 

14 .5 .>59— 
21 00 340— 
16 10 341 — 

1 l«i >42— 
. . . >43— 

344— 
- . 0 345— 
27 50 316 — 

2 41 347— 

3 2<- 348- 



. . . 496— « 
. • 497— 

■ • ■ 498— 

3 «41 lyy— 
19 25 .VlO — 

9 20 5o!_ 

8 10 502 — 

• • • 50.5 — 

• • • 504 — 
50 7 0 505— 

6 10 506— 

2 50 507— 

4 80 v,8_ 

8 CO ft09_ 

• 510— 

- 511 — 

I 70 512- 
8 40 513 — 

• • 511 — 

- 70 515 — 

4 iri 516— 

1? HI 517— 

1 50 51s- 
- • 519— 

6 50 520— 

6 - 521— 

70 522 

6:3— 

7 40 524- 
15 10 525— 

526- 



r • vMV «ident — \y. H. Kliver, Box 156, 
"ii.),’. I'lmlt Co., III. 

»I I n-Ury— P. J. Mil »»lire, Box 8M. 

j 1 rt. 

rrea»urer— James Troy. 2026 Christian 
[ t'tih a.tclphia, 1*0. 

GENERAL ViCF.-pRF.SIDEXTs. 

V .1 Pr« »-.deni I* M. WfUiii. 26 Twelfth 
r Market .»t. Sail |-'i aiit i'ii , 4 al. 

1 Vice-Pte-i ie it — 1*. W. Biri-k, 798 Ncs- 
V' <• , Brooltlyn. X. Y. 

GENERAL KXEl t’TIVE RoaKD. 

• irnsimmliMHv for the 4«. 11. 13. must be 
I !<• t!ie General Secretary.) 

Mi'Kity 3o2 Paris St.. 11. Riston. Mas»*. 

1 1. gun, ill K. s'.Hh St.. New York. 

\ -»te\el>». 1 0 In liana Avi*.. Jetl' v IV. Ilid 
1 \bratn». 451 Monroe A \e Di-tro’t Mich. 
Si it. 2016 S St.. I .i I III -111 N li. 



t 90 
3 80 
5 80 
8 60 
16 M) 



67 4 — 
615— 

676— 

677 — 
678 - 
«79— 
t>80— 
681 — 
6*2 — 
681— 
8s| — 

68 5 — 



»0 786 — 
13 on 787— 
4 (lO 788— 
3 75 789— 
. . . 790- 

^ 'to 79i_ 
35» 792 — 
1 40 793— 
I III 794 — 
7 2' 7- 5— 



1 40 

2 6« 
19 35 

6 95 
5 85 
1 10 



it; uo 

2 20 

6 55 
18 00 

3 10 



9 41 525 — 
7 ‘.K 526— 

1 6« 527— 

2 |0 528— 
5 <l 52*. — 

6 .6 53 ►— 
11 7« 531— 

5 :(> 532— 
In 3 5 t— 

7 On ''il— 
4 .' 5 >35 — 

•J On 5'.«— 

2 -li >*7 — 
1 46 534— 



RESERVE FUND 



*5.36*2 19 



KECKII’TS— Jinn- 

l ii,:-: tl.i Uoioi.s (Tax, tie. 

■ I!» 01 ami < «a» 

“ < lent am e*. etc . . 

I .nan *io!ii Protei-tive Finn] 
Balm.i e on Lam] June 1. 1892 



itu-x- 



85,362 9 
28 50 
6 35 
: 000 t o 

372 10 



Financial Report 

RECEIPTS— Mhy, 1S92. 

From the Vnioo* (Tax, t-tc.J IF— 

“ Rent of oltii-e 

•* Cleaianees. etc. . . .... 

Prawn from SjK-eial A»»i»u.i nt. . . . < 

Loan froin I’roteelive Fanil .... 2' 

Balance on band May 1, ,892 *' 



42 96 ,VJ0 — 
■ • 5il— 
5.42— 
" "« 5,43 — 
7 00 534— 



EXPENSES— June, 1852. 

For Printii-jr 

'* Ollice <*i o 

‘ Tax A F of I 

1 Traveling xiSiil < iru»«izii>K - ■ 

" lit- 1 ie 111» No l*3o to No. 1**9 . 
Bitlant-e on bam! July 1. 1882 .... 



1 30 i i 6 

3 I'li 1 00.1 

2 ic 61» 

2 •20 «.23 
1 V. 6*4 
tu» 82» 

1 '.«I 62-.I 

2 Ml 637 
1 15 639 

7«642 
20 70i;4-'» 
l .* 5 1 17 
0 I 6 • 57 



Total 



S 40 548— 
1 *. 5 549— 
•550 — 
7 8" 551 — 
S -0 352— 
. 553 — 

1 56 554— 
i To 55'— 
556 - - 



V3»0 35 
1 11 £.< ‘ 
*.'0 60 



For Printir^ 

** Office, etc*. 

•* Tax A of I, 

•* Traveling anil OrgHi.ixhig 

•‘ Badgea 

** Brill-tit» No». 1791 to 1» .2 . 

•‘ Loan rrpaiil A. F. of I. . . 
Balance on hand June 1. XS92 . 



Ti tal 



■1 ('o 387 — 
18 fill 3*8 — 
I in :»'.»— 
» '.«1 :‘*iij — 
1» 30 391 — 
I '. 0 362— 
fi 90 9.1— 
;» so 391 — 
fi 50 :{*,5— 
16 8tl 35 0— 
1 711.397— 

1 _1I :;:i>— 
4 III . .*.**' — - 
i'i Hl II 0- 
7 40 ml — 
4 10 l( 12— 
in;— 



5 95 :ts4— 
; 20 4*5— 
4 10 3»f — 
387 — 
■ 5‘i .eve- 



nt! A.LMi EXPENSES— Jane, ltt*2 

l’ii»,t::.4; '■ 60 1 L.iIm la 

•* I.« oOStampid Envtli-j es . 

5ui Po»ta!s 

I , 18 0 « 1* .canoes 

J. nOO Rei-eipt Cards .... 

ti OCH Note beads .... 

5 1881 Al rears Notices . . . 

M8I (Jnurterlv Circulars . . 

5 OOtl F. s Blanks ... 

2.1» 0 Auditors’ Reports . . 

2.1 00 Ri initianic Blanks. . 

5.001 Members’ Cards 
1 ,18 0 (»cruian Constitutions 
45.000 July Journals . 

VYtappirit and Mailing July Journal 

Postage on July Journal 

Pa»sii ord. Supplies, etc- . 

I,(88i stamped Envelopes 

16. 0 Postals . . . 

F.x tire »sage 011 Supplies, etc . . . . 

oO Telegrams 

James Troy, General Tieasurer. salary 

anu M-rvie**s . • 

Salary and Clerk Hire 

Ollice Rent for June . . . 

P. J Milium-, visit Holyoke and Trey 

New I edger for (I. 8 

New I Uy Book for G . S 

Stationery and Incidentals 

Janitor’s Work 

Beiltlit» .833 to 1889 



;s 90 22x* 

90 ■-*:! 



Total 



3 -in 4- 
s 7" 6»'.- 
6 on *.»fi 
6 .»*1 », ’Ml 
:> »I .9 1 
3 »0 ii‘.*t 
.3 13 

2 n0 ii'.*» 
I 00 701 1 

1 59 7- 5 

2 55 716 



25 60 
12 50 
•4 00 
17 75 
5 00 
5 (» 

12 50 
15 (0 

223 ‘23 
19 04 
15 (85 
32 29 
22 00 
15 00 
2fi ( 0 

13 81 



DETAILED EXPENSES- May 189; 



Printing '20X0 Postal» 

* l.OllO Stamped Envelopes . . 

•• iti.0181 Applications 

” 1,M U Clearances 

“ 5.1881 Members’ X’ards .... 

5,0 OCmislitutious 

“ l.i 00 Ode Cards 

•• fi.UU Notcheads 

•* K8I Secretary's X>rder Books . 

•* inOTreasurer»' Ruci-ipt Books 

’• 45.518) Copies June Journal . 

Half Ream Wrapping Paper 
Wrapping and Mailing June Jouruul . 

Postage 011 June Journal 

•* “ Supplies, etc 

1 000 stamped Envelopes 

I, 0 JO Postal s 

Expr«-s»uge on Supplies, etc 

42 Telegrams '»trikes etc) 

Salary an.l X lerk Hire 

Oflicc" Rent for May 

M. Kiernan. Xlrganizing White Plains, 

N. Y 

H. I .a prise. Organizing Northumptcn, 

Mass 

W. ( * . Ostennayer, Organizing Union 
161. Cleveland. X) 

II. M. Fletcher, for Organizing in Roch- 
ester. X. \ 

1* J. McGuire, Traveling Expenses to 
8i-raiitoii. I’a.. twice; to Wilkes! nne 

ami Bineh.untoii 

rax t<> A. F. of I» 

5« copies of proceedings . . ... 

,o.0ii0 Lithographed Notcheads . . 

I. 536 Badge» . . 

Rubber Stumps and Paters 

Stationary and Incidentals 

Janitor's M nrk ... 

Loan repaid A. F. ot I. . . 



1 -2» 397 — 3 5» St 2— ! ’ ' 

1 59 98— 2 10 5, 3 — *n 26 

15 18. ,99— 1 20 604— 

7 SO 41 8>— 3 45 6,i— 3 10 

2 90 401— 7 20 

,6 '.8 402— 7 20 567 — 23 10 

6 49 403— 5 »0 v;*— 20 OX« 

104— 3 50 569— 

10 41 405— . . . 570 — ’ > 70 

6 5. >06 — 671_ i 20 

• ■ C7 — 13 60 672 — 3 60 

* 5i . S73 _ 

s 26 41-9— 2 fix* 574— 

3 4" 410— 32 70 575— 

11 8i’. 4M— 5 1.0 576— ' 

22 90 4 i2— . 5— _ ‘ ' * 

6 05 413— 2 90 G-i— 1 -5 

1(1 2« 434 — . . -,~i_ 4 

5 r 8l 415— 1 4" 6.M1 — - CO 

e 50 41|_ 9 91 Uhl— 540 

2 40 417— 2 90 v’— 

8 48 418— 1 10 >13— ‘ j ,vi 

I Hi 41(4— . 1 5U 

431— 4 95 5si — , so 

6 5* 123— . . .6sfi— I 40 

2* Ml 122— . . 5tC— 3 fill 

.0 «0 123- . . ass— 4 16 

4 .0 *24— 5 40 5*9— 

I 0<i 425— i 50 5914 — 4 l.O 

1 70 t .*6 . . . 591 — » 90 j 

427— . . . 592— 33 35 

• • »28— . . . 5ft4— in < 0 

»0 I.".*— 5 GO 594— <• 111 

: 5’ ;.J1— 3 15 595— 2 70 

i (• 1 — 5 70 596— ■ 30 

442 — . . 5<r— \ 50 

9 30 133 — 111 30 598 — 6 O'* 

i 4 Ml |34 — i.) 60 5<j«*_ 3 5f| 

.0 so l.i) — 2 in find — 1 411 

- • Ufi — 2 Vi 60I— 3 80 

1 GO |37— 4 8(1 602 — 4 15 1 

fi 3X- 1.» — . C03— 13 35 

13 0 139 — i 20 604— n 411 

3 7i tv— 10 20 605 — 9 45 

. . Ill— fict>— 4 70 

21 85 4 42— 7 80 607— . . . 

1 3»i 44 >— 1 20 3 55 

. . - 444 — 4 I'* G09 — 6 70 

' 10 2 ts»— 59 44.5 — 4 4> «10— . 

. . 281— . . Ri— 34 SO 61 1 — 4 3« 

H ’.‘i 282 — . 147— . «13 — 4 SO 

-> 2" 283— 9 in 44s— 2 10 613— 8 75 

I . . 0 284 — 14 35 149— 13 30 614— 3 90 

2 |0 2V — 9 8’. t'il — 1 30 filo— . . 

9 »0 2MV— ?s Id g>l— 17 00 GIG — 2 50 

22 »" >7— iO 60 152— 2 70 617— 9 40 

l *.”28*— 9» 453— 13 X10 618— 17” 

1 50 >9— 4-M — . . «10 — 10 10 

II mi 290— .8 ‘.0* ;V5— . . G20— . . . 

2 Ui 29 i — I 6*i |5G — 4 50 621— 21 95 

3 60 .92— 1 ®* 45-— iO 10 fi22 — . . 

1 5 * 29 i— 2 fiO |58— 12 50 623— 9 50 

2 9X129.— . . 1.59— 14 90 624 — 29 0 

29 s— 3 20 46.1 — . . 0.6— 

jufi— 1 (81 4fl — 3 0 02*' — 26 05 

12 20 297 — 6 7« I «2 — . . 627— . . . 

1 8 0 29* — 12 3" 463 — . . . 628 — 7 50 

'0 1” 2V4— .9 -V* 46. — 5 20 f>°9 — 25 75 

j _> ,1« — ; 50 465— 9 »0 1.30 — > 4(1 

4 2d 3”!— 50 466— 7 4.l6il— 11 Ö0 

3 7*' »«2— . . . 467— 2 4 '1.32— . 

4 ", .> — . . ,4' 8— 22 30 i>iT— 50 

304— 8 20 109 — 3 10 644— . . 

<•1 y «s— 2 90 47li— 5 0O 645— 3 £0 

11 11 ?*; — 9 m | 7| — 2J GO 6'»» — . 

3.1 j'"— . 172— 2 '.»0 6C— 7 30 

4.03118— 2 0- 173— 11 30 63*— 15 50 

! 90 174— . 6?9— 1*9 »5 

5 7< 475 — 1 70 640— 10 00 

s 41» 476— 4 70 641 — 12 15 

2 00 477— 7 90 612— . . . 

5 » 178— . 6 ’.3- . . 

4 91 -179— 3 GO 644— 1 60 

4*8— 11 20 645— 1 30 

lOi” 4*1— 9 9” 646— 1 20 

l 3- 4-2— II 60 647— li GO 

. . 648— 

G 80 619— 15 25 

5 («0 65.1 — 8 80 

6 93 651— . . 

6 6V 65-2- 6 50 

7 60 653 — 

. . . 654— 2 55 

3 £0 655— . . 

. . . 656— 2 25 

5 95 657— 7 00 

18 20 658— 4 50 

. . . 659- 2 50 

52 30 660 — 5 40 



is -.04— 

ill 10 5 u7 — 

1 4-5 412 

2 75 511- 

2 40 "15- 
•9 15 5ifi — 
5 f.(i VP.i— 

3 35 571 — 

1 I8i i25— 

2 65 5 Cl— 

; 1 0 — 



. . 105 — 
10 50 406 — 
: *90 407— 
1C» — 

4 O' I0>— 
- 0 111)— 
; 50 411— 

12 GO 112— 
2! 10 415- 
. . . ,41 *— 

5 5* IT.— 



4 70 240— 
4 2” 2*1— 
1 on 242— 
4 75 24 4 — 
. 244— 



< Hi«. 



IENE1 ;tj* paid in junk, 



Amt. 

fiOl 45 

200 no 

10X1 0(1 
2X0 U) 
700 00 
5” CIO 
>•0 1 8) 
SO (04 
50 ( 0 
50 «1 
200 1 0 
40 00 
.00 00 
50 (01 
50 («0 
fit 00 
5xi IM) 
200 On 
t(l <81 
Mi on 
60 Oil 
50 On 

tl) GO 
5n on 
so on 

200 (O 

50 ( 0 
200 (0 
200 (JO 
50 I 0 
tO OH 
2(8) (.0 
.00 00 
50 00 
.50 (8) 
90 IK) 
54) OO 
20(7 10 
25 ( I) 
50 GO 
2181 (8) 
300 1 0 
28 00 
2481 00 
:5 in 
51) (8) 
ll 0 (Ml 
5-i 10 
.5 GO 
700 18) 
60 On 
:o (.0 

2 < k 1 nn 

2* 0 181 

24 0 GO 
.5 On 



1 6 ;.;s— 
4 .9 ~ 

19 35 4,0- 
> <1 ||| — 
5 : (i 1 12— 
8 9 113— 

• • 444— 

• - 115— 

70 >0 HG — 

4 14 447 — 
44*— 
s so 449— 

7 >' |5(i — 
1 1 15 451- 
18 20 152— 
7 *. (I GV3 — 
10 n 454 
1 60 155— 

20 70 456— 

157— 

1 TO 158— 

2 20 459- 

. 1 iGO — 

’ 40 Mi — 
4 10 (62— 



SPECIAL ASSESSMENT 



BKSKFITS I*A!H IS MAY 



P^nii-n. Amt. 

20 *9) («I 

.168 200 419 

. 3 1(8) 00 

8 200 0. i 

. 17 25 xaj 

. 28 24,0 00 

. 29 50 GO 

. >9 200 4 0 

. 51 200 GO 

. 74 2G0 IM 

. IG'.l 2i 0 GO 

115 360 00 

. 1 Hi 50 00 

. 132 200 O'* 

. 161 2(8) GO 

. 162 50 0 i 

. 762 100 00 

. It5 60 00 

. 175 200 09 

. 177 2.11 (81 

. 181 400 I'd 

. lkl 50 00 

. 21 1 218) (11 

.211 210* 00 

. 211 200 On 

. 243 ‘JOG 0«) 

. Ml 50 (HI 

. 3|n 50 18) 

. 310 50 10 

. 361 2 0 GO 

. 359 50 101 

. 410 ICO GO 

. . 418 59 (8) 

. 4X8 25 0* • 

. 482 I'M* OO 

. 474 50 <Hi 

. 4°3 50 101 

.51.8 210(87 

. 530 1(8) 11O 

6 7 10* 0« 

. 621 f 0 CO 

. 681 200 DO 



Xn. Name. 

1791— Mrs. S. Wiggus. . . 
17*92 — lli-ury Hcise . . . . . 
1793— Aiex.M. Crow. . . . 

1791— .In». I 

17*95 — Mr». E. Whitmore . . 

1796 — C. E. Johnson 

1797 — Mrs. M (ihi-rle. . . . 

17*98— Anton Voller . .. 

179*9— Maurice Kelly 

IsOO — F. J» Mcrtins 

1*01 — Tims. Scully 

1802— Fred. Rk-hell .... 

1803— Mrs. F. Moshacher . 
1801 — James H. Page . . . 

1*05- Ciias. Drake 

IHXt;— Mrs. C. Wartll 

18 7— Peter Blum 

18(8— Mrs M. Kilkpatrilk . 

1809— Geo. Harper . . . 

1810— Ceu. f*teiiihell>er . . . 

1811 — N«-ls John»iin . . 

1812— Mrs. I. l.indstrom . 

I. 813— R. N. Harvey . . 

1814— 11 L. Knipling . . . . 

1815 — J. II. McDowell . . . 

1816 Aloys M'ller 

i*17 — Mrs. 1). Vezina. . . . 
lsls — Mrs. M. Cli gg . . . . 
1» 19 -Mrs. A Kiolt . . . . 
1820— W. M T.amiv t . . . 

1 8)1 — Mrs E. Randall . . . 

J. SJ2— I .. T. Walker . . . 

1»_3 — Mrs. E. E. Frost 
l».l— Mis. M. E. Cliai Icson 
1»J5 — Elisha Pnrdy .... 
182G— Mrs. M. Demiun . . 
1»27 — Mrs. E Lar*on . . . . 

1828 — Chas. Raaseli 

1H.*9 — Win. Powell 

Isa) — G. Aeschenbaeher . 
1*31— Mrs. >1. Brown . . . 
1837— E. II. Tudor .... 



Bill,« . ~ .1 i i;.i •( t of a i 1 M oiii > » for t lie Sp«-i'.al 
As.se»»'i)eut. levied March 17. I »’•- 2 . run reit-iveil 
from Jane I 1»”2 to June '• •. 1*92 imlusii. 

All 1110. «-vs rt i iuvi ii since June will l-e re- 
potted in ll: > -pteiilln-r X’AKl'KSTIJH. 

N«>. Amt. No. Amt. 

92 ?6 0 1 5*5 ; 1 *25 

164 3V 101 557 9 0.1 



Expulsions 



Pftei: BuN'Nft. from Union 47 4 Nya-.k. N. V . 
for »la* iK r1.11» talk ag-iin»i memher*. 

Tiio'i A» «* Minn, trotn Union 717. Hunting* 
,,oti W. Ya. Co violmion of olnigalio:i and for 
. efraiJili.ig « .ii penti-i» of their w age» 

A il Pa in K- ‘N. Toni Unioi. (''5. i r, ini-ii', 
• * . for ini»appio|.riation id liiiiii» as 1 ii..ii.vi.ii 
»• ri tary ol said union. 

» :t. Fil l n- from l :it«»n >7” . »)•’ .!— :• •' Mo.j 

r : .. nlii.g ti c Bstrbcr» am! T-.m-ter* 



1 168 

1 to 469 

8 20 47G 

2 ‘.0 1 17 i 

9 75 172 

1 In 473 

2 iH’ 471 
5 10 177. 

1) ..<* 4.1 

9 „I* 177 



P8— . . .,IH — 
bit*— .- 5— 

1 »C — » 01 iU6 — 

IP— j 1 ?0 ;?>7 — 

142 — 3:. io:,08- 

143— . . .>(*.*— 

1 1 4 — 6 2< 1 

1 ;5 — ll jo 31 1- 
1 Hi— . . 32- 

1 17— 13 40 31 :— 
14»— 2 10,3 4— 

I It) — 6 tHi’.Jl.V— 

15” — »0 )0 3 •>— 
151— 20 '" 3 7— 



140— 

141 — 

142 — 

143 — 
HI— 



.: F Mon 1:0 from 1 *>>"'* l"H* u *« u > J " 1 

utiii,” money under false pietei 11 »■ 

' r,:tn 1:. from Union )9». i*.d as, Tex., for 
• . . 1 -incut of loiimi funds. 

Fuwk * 1 ■ a 1 iso, fruin 1 nion 51 .. N. \ , 101 
.1 i _ me union. 

•Vviirev Bi iiis. from Union 73S, Car’aniihde. 
for mi»approprHatiou ol fund». 

J.ayman. from Union 66*9, ( lia'.latioogii. 
• i. . for defrauding the union. He is a dead 

■ at. ’ 

' lb »tu i obo. from Union 652. Llwood, lud.. 
r n. - inpropriutiou of union moneys. 

-* I.roNAtiD, Presiilont of Union 605. Jm k- 
ulli- Fla . for downright low ’’ scabby coii- 



2 1 0 42 9 
4 »" ;>tt 
*1 .04»; 
8 .01 |K'2 

1 On t<l 

i-i 

. . 485 
. . 486 



149- . • 313 — 

143 — 3 » ' 314 — 

|*v_ J] 1”31S— 
151— 13 80 316— 
153— . . . 317— 

153— 13 15 318- 

154 — 7 319— 

155— » 80 

156— . ■ • Ski— 

157— 9 6V 322— 

158— 9 tO 32o— 

1,59— . 324— 

1G0— 2 60 325— 

161— 1.3 00 326— 
;62 — 21 85 327 — 
• 63- 7 40 328 — 

164 — 329- 

l. A— 32 60 34V- 



Total 



FIXAXCJA 4 SECRETARIES. 

ALABAMA 

357. Anniston- Geo. S. Owen. 

1 12. Pkidoaport— W. A. Cat uth. 

.»9. Mobile- E Marschal. 607 8. Elmira st. 

92. ” ( Col ) W. G . Lew is. cor. Scotl & SL I »ui«. 

3o9. Shke FIELD— W ard Parker, Box 46. 

ARKANSAS 

469. Hot Seringa — M. H. Packard, 109 Tulip st. 
292. Little Rock— D. W. Cask ill. Box 371. 

541. C L. Lucas, Box 291. 

432. Pink Blcee— Jobn Mutz. 

1 CtyiiUnutd next page.] 



>T. I.ovis Stair Builder» have one Walking 
Del* gate, while the carpenters of that ci y and 
of Denver, Cole., have two delegates in the Held. 

In Denver there is a great awakening of the 
enrpenti r», and they are coming into line at the 
rate of :« and 30 new members per week. 

The State Federation of Labor of Pennsyl- 
vania wil! inec-t in Chester. Pa., Monday, August 
15. lsf-2. Gen. Sec. McGuire will address a mass 
meeting in Chester, August 16. 



2 45 1180 — 
4 50 4*5 — 
. . . 4»’'— 

4 00 487— 
50 4.8.V- 

2 9« 189 — 

5 00 490— 

23 « 0 191— 
32 60 4*92— 
. . 493— 

3 40 494- 
. . . «95- 



'•I *ov R. Wklty, was rejected .r**m X 11 ion 
• Ni w Kensington, l*a., for misrepresenting 
hiiu-i f a» a memlier of the union before he ev er 

joined it 



! 5^ — 




;J*PJ _ 


1 488 — 


7 60 654— 


2 55 


167— 


10 57 


.3 


1 *.X' 189 — 


655.“ 


115 


158- 


. . 


321 — 


1J0— 


3 20 656— 


1 80 


15*9 


1 «’ 


4.5- 


4 >0 |9,— 


. . «57— 


3 30 


1X0)— 


4 5G 


326 - 


14 3*49-2— 


3 < 5 * 58— 


8 30 


161— 


7' 


327- 


:* .« 49.3— 


13 on *>59— 


2 40 


162— 


23 3* 


3-S— 


5 1 J 494— 


2 40 * 60— 


5 50 


163— 


7 6i 


3-9 — 


3 *0 ,95— 


1 50 661 — 


10 80 


164 — 


11 9< 


33C— 


2 »0 496— 


7 20 662— 


1 70 


166- - 


31 4* 


|33l — 


. . . 497— 


21 30 06.3— 


... 


186— 


10 11 


1 332 — 


1 00 498 — 


. . 664 — 


14 7ft 



TAXES AND SUPPLIES. 

JUNE, 1892. 


- 


5 x: 


: ? = 


** 

0 




a 5 = 




ST 


2C < 


< -- 






1 — 5147 10.167- 


813 so 3 3— 


} : .0 499— 


81 90 


■ 2— 50 -0 4 ,.» — 


1*. tvi 


4 2*' 500— 


J GO 


is 5«) 169 — 


.6 70 3-35— 


18 10 501— 


... 


1 4— 52 170— 


3 50 336 — 


6 60 5Xr2— 


. . 


5— 30 30 171 — 


22 In 337— 


503- 


5 10 


6— 2 0 172— 


5 :k) 33s— 


3 60 504— 


... 


7- 5 90 173- 


1 24) Ü3C — 


. . 5**5— 


• • • 


8— ’.5 0 174- 


340— 


52 40 VOX— 


• • • 


9 — 8 u 175- 


19 I» 311— 


6 00 507— 


17 20 


10— 9 I«* 17b— 


. - 312— 


2 8*1 50.8 — 


... 


11— 40 9G 177— 


15 70 343— 


4 (HI 5**9— 


60 80 


| 12— 9:0 178— 


. 344— 


7 80 510— 


... 


; 1.1— 2 00 179- 


. . 315- 


1511— 


11 10 


14— 2 6* 1,0— 


. . 310- 


2 1 0,512— 


4 oy 


-5 — C 1^’ — 


30 00 .3)7 - 


1 7* 513- 


22 :>o 


16 — 52 75 182— 


. . 348— 


. 514— 


3 20 


17- 5 20,1 »3 — 


5 * 5 3 19 — 


515 — 


14 :0 


Is— 3 10 1>4 — 


1 

O 

O 


2 10 516— 


1 60 


ly- 3 t*i !»5 — 


7 tin Til — 


4 OO 517— 


2 70 


2C — 15 ,0 *,».;— 


4 80 5 — 


7 7« 518— 


19 50 


21— 16 51 »;- 


: 5! - 


3 45 519- 


4 00 


2*2— 52 10 !,88— 


6 2ft '354 — 


1 6 • 0 620 — 


3 15 


23— 14 *•* |s >— 


2 75 55- 


6 15 521— 


53 tO 


21— 5 90 110- 


1 tO 56— 


0 60 522— 


, , , 


:5- ’-9 .0j 191 — 


1 (N 1 • »0 1 


523- 


2 10 


26— 8 p |92— 


8 5** :;5s— 


6 :0 521— 


• • 



THE CARPENTER. 



CALIFORNIA 

47. Alameda— J a««!* Hoeck. 1512 R R gve 
217. Ei efka- M B F.>wler, b »x 335 
600. Hanford— . 1. M. Dean. 

85. II'II.I l-TER — C 1 1 irk er 

56. I os Angeles — , 1. 1) Newman Box 442. 

■36 Oakland— J F. Gallin. Uly Ninth «t 

615 Pasadena- K. H »haw . 116 Umnklin ave. 
722 Redlands— A S Backus. 

23S. Riverside— 5V. J. Embree, 2**.? E 10th st. 

341. Sacramento— E. s. Mason, 12'd ,T -t 
376 *' (Cars.) I> I» Paxton. 17o5 E st 

«6. San Bernardino— H. 5!*eg:iim. Box 797. 

San Francisco— 

22. H Meyer 260 Siegel «t . B. n. 

804 User.) Will KeinhoM. ...ii’ . Birch ave 
483. tiny Lathr*»]*, IDs Tuyi«»r st. 

616 Stair l?!<lr«. ,1. W Ni»!.ctl 1917 Steven«on. 
707. (Mill.) P. Briton 5LJ Twenty fifth at 

315. San .Iose — M Bla.se l art* - Box 1, A II. 
Hall. 

35 San Rafael— R. Scott, Bos 6'3 
226 Santa Barbara— . 1 Kraiijnan. 

13.3 Santa Cruz— G 5V. Reid 74 I-ocu«t st 

CANADA 

77 Calgary. Alberta— 5V Pittman, Ir Rot 191 
83 Halifax, N S.— a. Northun. 169 Morris at. 
1». Hamilton— D Barnard. 6 F. ore nee st. 

191. London— E. J Aust. 7H> Dundas «t. 

Montreal — S ecretary of District Council 
15 Lamontagne, 1 11 Canning st. 

134 Fr.) I. X Thivierge, 264 Drolet St 
311. Fr. | Isidore Gagnon. 1211 St. James at 
376 .!■>-. Skinner, 72 Plymouth Drove. 

666 (Fr Jos. Lamontagne. 53 Duluth are 
755 Nanaimo. B. C.— W T Kemp. Box 12 
321 Ottaw a— V. Vili.ju.ttA-, 4 1 1 st Andrew -t 
3s st. Catharines— H en rv Bald. Louisa si 
397 Sr. John. N. B — W. F «ror.k Ade'ai le -t 
27 Toronto — D. D. McNeill. 39 Hamburg ne 
Dovercourt Bratti it Ortne. 

617. Vancocveb. B. C — Geo. Lianen. Box 794. 

354 Victoria. B C.— Win. Mille-, *• View st. 

343. *5 innifeg. Man. — G. Ireland. Box 9.6 

COLORADO 

630. Aspen— M C. Haves Bos 407. 

560 Colorado City — G. F. Hamit. 

615 Colorado Spros— M. Klemmedson.Rn» 442 
663 Creede— M K Comerford.Box 44 Atnetlivst 
55. Denver— C. J. Hendershott. Box 427, High 
~ lands P.O 

50« Fremont— A. H. Pattersor, Box 2.31 
590 l.A Jt'NTA— W. A G..r-!:tn 
410. PrEBLO—W. S. Marble. 1110 Cedar st.. Be- 
w seiner 

46 Trinidad— G. Ha-sii -er. 

CONNECTICUT 

115. Brii«o«;port— VV. J Barnwell. 168 Park st. 

364 Greenwich — E. F. Clift. Box 117. 
n Hartford — R obert Wij; i \ 

49. Meriden— G eo. J. Stanley. 1 15 Grove. 

97 New Britain— A. A. Fuller. 75 Curtiss. 

137. 7-orwh h — . las Grierson. 15 Eim »t . Presto c 
746. Norw alk — K L. Griswold. 9 Kim st 
620 Stamford— F g «mill. 

DELAWARE 

40 WlLMINOTON— I) E. Bed 217 M nice st 

d;3T. of Columbia 

190 Washington— L. Burner. 1711 Seaton, N. W 
511 M. D. Bailey 6c<! Whitney av„ N. W. 

FLORIDA 

533 Cocoa— W. E Booth 

224 Jacksonville— vCo.. F Crocket Hansotr 
Tow n. 

605, “ W. P. Johnson, W.Brooklrn 

74 Pensacola— R F. Kilgore Box 71. 

127. “ (Cold A. B Pettiway. 

•TO Tamta — fCol P T. Sisstonn. Box 32. 

396 ■* E. S Cooper. Box 232. 

GEORGIA 

3>_ AMERK’I : — t ■>!. Lincoln M> Kermi- 
773. “ J 55 Colson 311 Furb»w st 

136 Augusta — (Col. T P. Lewis. 23 Msriujryst 
517 “ J S 5\ oral ward 710 Itevnolds -t 

ID Macon— E. 1: Newel cate I- p. ,v R 1. 

55 illii - ham. 

IDAHO 

til Boise City— H arry Howe:- 
610 Pol ATELl.o— -T. P Davi- 

ILLIN0IS 

79 A i ton— V P Hermn c.ire I. * : e; ( j ic: 4 
812 Anna— M.-n, F. 5V#rner 

617. Acrora — C M Senhu* 5 1 S Lake «t 
tfti. Belleville— C has. Dit man, 211 L ► tl* «t 
726 KlOOMINoTON— D aniel Sweenev. 1103 N Oak 
"0. Brighton Park— C has. Fournier. 2111 i»th 
l . Cairo — G eo H. Vunker, 1 j 46 Commercial a* 
777 Centrally— F. D.-tm !i. 

76y Champaign— W. A Brown. 

124. Charleston— 5'. S Brown. 

Chicago — S ecretary of District Council, 

S. S Baker, 701» Oglesby are 
L John 55'olter-. 796 S Kalsted «I. 

21. (French)A. Morencv, 210 Centre ave. 

33 J. Haywood, 4943 Princeton av. 

28. 55'. S. 5Vueks, 465 Thirty-first A. 

51. Boliem. i Ja.-. Sikal. 1016 Turner are. 

73 iGer.) 5Vm. Krugmann. 2133 Wab.ish ave. 

181. iSniiii ) A Hanson. i«8N. Elizabeth si 
269 L. I.. Fritz. 91 55'. M.idi»on -t 
4iu Jus. Bell i310 Van Horns; 

419 l«*er. i J Su* krau. 916 W. lsth st 
415 (Holl.' P. Tyson. Hoselanri 
623 Hohem 5 Joseph Martik. 5140 Ju«tine 
51 i I« rm Mid John No* th 3»J"9 Bloom «t 
690 (Mill Bench llanila. F. H. Quitiueyer 1125 
Ilinman st. 

296. Collinsville— J o- Vudcch. 

7 ns Decatur— G. W Trimmer, 943 N Water St. 
554 DeK-lr— A lbert Horn. 

55'> Du Quoin— E Valentine 

169 East St. I.OCIS — R. J. Tojo 814 St. Louis are 

317. Fi 1 low v l»o — T. J. Gram. 

2D Fl MHUitsT — Ang langc 
62. Englewood— C. F Nugent 6!2 36' h m 
117. Fvansti.n— H F Holmbe. k 1035 Wi sh \ av. 
872 Freeport— M. D C< Me. Oj West -t. 

36u. Galesburg — F. Cl lalstran. 629 N. Seminary 
111. Grand! kossing— A. Moline. Box 454 
29' Highland Park— J. H Zimmer. 

362 Hy de Park— S. 8 Baker. 76.6 Ogle-by ave. 
Chicago. 

649 Jai Ksonvillf— S. p «'arter. 223 s. saikIv -t. 
442. J'>i iet -- 55' in. Stit*. 306 State st. 

4 >4 Kensington (F r.>— E lapollce. Box 13Gano 
i 'ook Co. 

564. Lin* **i x — 55’. A Dodd-, 

17s Maywood— K Keun, Box 14» 

762 Moline — J. I. Swim. 242U Fifth av 

80 Moreland— A lfred Daniels Fox 281 
37» Murphysboro — 55’. D R'ni'.i« 

753. Olney — M M L*-ve r i ng. 

661. Ottayya— K. K S|„.hn 
T t'U IVk n Ja<s>b Brouwer. 

245 Peoria— J H. Bristol, 1111 7th -t 

313. “ tGer.) — J. Semiow. 616 Howitt st. 

199. Quincy — H erman J. Mareks yth and Hemp 
166. H*»ck Island — J. F Xewfleld, 240» sixth are 
199. South Chicago— J. C. Grantham, Box 149 
Cheltenham. Cook Co. 

758. S Englewood— D Bosgraaf. Jr. 

16 Springfield— J ohn Dick. 615 Eastman are 
495 Stkrator— W ilson. 30 5 55'. Mauntoii st 
797. Tay i.orvii i.e— J McCariv 
120 5 'k.MCE— 55 ni Pell. 

44 J 55* a uk eg an— 55'. J. Strickland 60S Julian 
28 . 55 'ueatos — J ames B. 55'eldon. Box 331 

INDIANA 

352. Anderson— C has. Moot e 13* First st. 

3*3. Acrora — J. J Henderson. Cochran, Ind 
439 Blufftox— J ohn N Hatfldd 
79>. Clinton -55'. 55'oodall. Box 5V. 

494 Ckawfordsvtlle— S.L ong,20i 5Vhitlook ar. 
652. Elwood — T hos. Hetl'ner. 

EY’ AXSY1LI.E — I | 

90. F 55*. Klein, 513 Edgar st 
470 M. Hallen Ire rger. l,aw av., Hartmetz add’n. 
712 (Pi Mill. Mach, and B. II.) L. Kessler, 92U E. 
Franklin st- 



153 Fort 55'ay’NE— W in. F 55'olkc. 107 Wall st 
723 Frankfort— A. F. Ravnmmi 
*46. Greenfield — Kolrert Ort'utt. 

157. Haughvili.k— I H. 55 iiit*- 
96. Hartford City— . 1 5V Cai.t«T. 

S10 Huntington — G A. Mentzei .41 High st. 
Indiana p* >i.i s — S ecret a r v of District Council. 
II. Roberta. 189 55'. l»t st. 

57 IStairsi Geo. 4Vern«ing. 74 I.ockerbie st. 

60 IGer Alb. Simonsea. 68 Buchanan st. 

299. C. 5V. Kructemeier 
M6. Oit*> Carter Peru -t. 

*«>9. (Mill. 3 .1 H Daus-liertv. 2 ~2 N. Miss. st. 

706 J. H 5V!iisn*.-r. 210 English ave. 

770. Jeffersonville— J. Page. 25 Missouri ave. 
Lafayette— 

215. H. G. Cob- 3s7 S.e.lii -t 

78.1. (Ger ) !». 5\'. I>svi'. Filth and Hi* kory st» 

656. Lawrencehurg— Ja« M< I. EAsrER. 

744. LoganspoRT — I’. rr-ou Emory. 

S13 Madison— T. •' i.o* bar*l 763 5V. Third st 
J65 Marion— I. A Ilo*igm. 2621 Harmon st 
798. Mr. Vernon— K m** !. II*>I1* m*n. Box 131. 

592 Mi ni if.— J. B Miller. 123 55'. Mich, st- 
19 New Albany'— P. G Renn. 564 5'incennesst 
North Inmanauoi.i — A u.irew Phillips. 

J79 Peru— P- B. Griffin 

756. Richmond — F. I. Burr ."7 N 17thst. 

I2i< Seymour— II Moritz Box 2 :u 

2>*. sin I.uyvii.i.S — N eliwm In in. 

629 South Bend — < > A i'altisun. 12» Mich. ave. 

48 Terre IlAUTr—J. 11 55'arner 14118. IP st 
7*. 4. Mill ( . M.Kim . 227 .N. Mill -i. 

•*As Vin* EXNE— Alien Gre*-nho«Ml. 618 Fills st. 
531. 55 'abasU— S B mister. National Hotel. 

INDIAN TERRITORY 

679. Ftili.aa ater. Okla. Ter — F. J. Myers. 

IOWA 

534. Burlington— A. Bokeueamp, 1T33 Angular. 
*47. Clinton — T. F. r’lark 313<>aK st. 

156. Crebtox — R. Strii khind. 1304 Burritt -t. 

554. Daa enport — F 5V. Boettcher, 1931 5Valnut. 
68. Des Moines — D. Reinking* 1 330 E. Grand av 
478 Dubuque — M R Hogan. 29 * 7th st. 

503 Emmftsburgh K. II Fre.ieric!:. 

81. Ft. Madison — M s .l* --up. Il l I.athrop 
70n Keokuk— H. L. Breitenstein. 1524 Bank st 
7*'*7. Ottumaa a — A.C. Minor. 71'> 5V, ä:h-t. 

721. Sioux CITY— A. E Tyl.-r 405 55'. 15th »t. 

KANSAS 

J64. ATr HISON — H. St*.rk. 4i» S. Seventli 8t. 

*6'. ChanVTE— a. M. Iravison. 

66. C<<N<ORDIA — 55'. A. Dennis. 

»9-t. I.eavenavorth— 55' H Sijo'tse, Box 2Ö. 

5s 6. PlTT'BURt.H— Gilbert -ciyder 
rf>8. Topf.ka — P F. •'*<**k Box 316 
7?j. 55 infield— B I>. Moore. S. Main st. 

KENTUCKY 

712. Coa'IN'gton — J t Cra 

776 1 5| ill , .1 I . K ■ * »I 55 . 7th et 

7*5. iternia*. t • i .N *■• ;*be:. 

841. Day i *v— .’ D**lman. 

61'.' 1 It ANKt alii N I. J|> 

31» (»rani* Rivers J. m M 1-tea 1. 

359. Hen n i it-oN— 5V. 5' P ke- lOliFir-tst 
526. Lixi'-gton— B tfrah.ui . B..x 44*. 

l.o* isytlle — » eiret.c r of Distrut Council. 
Ti *•-. Reagan 32 - K M.elit-t ,-t. 

7 J. T. B*-n* e. S3» Magno! .» av e , 

(03. J. A Stu* ink .521 'V Market -t. 

312. 11 Ruby. 721 F Mad — -• 

314. Ger. Paul N*"-h*T. 6 1 Market 

729 t ar Benj. J. D tiler. 1* 22 I 3th st. 

4f'& ! udi.oaa— A. F Hue Mix i 45. 

584 MiddlF-sbukough— J it M . a. 

77». Mt. sterling — . lit*». Th* Una». 

597. MlLI.ItALE— Fred 55' in -eher. 

598. Newport— 55 H Dauns. N F <*<r .'»th and 

York sis 

301. Paducah — Clta- B rib. 1- Huntington a\-c. 
701. 5Vixr UL'iKr. J. 4V. < rone. Box 40. 



LOUISIANA 

179 Monroe — B R. Truly. B**x .25. 

New t tRi.E.A v — 

76. J (<. BltMitner 4 >2 : » LPa-rtr. 

349. F D. R* 6, ■ < • *t i -t • * -t 

-.1 55 . > M titlet I . Si \ ui,-« - : 

7l>4. H\. Ilatlner. 133 Toie.l.i • .. -t. 

732. a Mill A nett 4V«t/e. ,2! t. v icr -t. 

739. John »ui/.er 612 4' i . 1» re -t 
45. Shreveport— IV t r (. arson. Box 339. 

MAINE 

**Vi Gardiner— f l*a-. « . !»i. .-n». 

1*7 i.EWisTON — A. M Flagg • Sprit g -t. Auburn 
444 Portland— I.. 45 . 45'htt<»ini'n. 63 A’niersrtn. 
772. 45 EsTBKooii — 4". L.Pttrtcr.i.'umberland Mills. 

MARYLAND 

29 Baltimore — A. Faulbaber. 939 Hopkin- arc. 
765. (Sash Fa*-tory PL mid. John P. Beany, 
208 D ilphllt st 

MASSACHUSETTS 
State District Council— Secretary. D. Ma- 
loney, 6 Parker »t. i’nmitridge. Mass 
VM AMEsBUKY— R. H. Outl*oii»e, ;j(j Powow -t. 
Boston — S ecu tai v «>; District t'ouncii. 

R. Martin, tYa-hlngton -t. 

33. Ii. P Si* vin-, 157« Tn tic *i»t s' 

561. Geo. <’lark. 7 Medfotd -i.. < itclsca. 

138. Cambriimjf— D. Maloney 6 Parker st. 

3*M. *' A - Mi l.i-O'i. 5» Mt. Auburn st. 

1.36. Ghfisfa — L. Joiu'.li. 1 6 -iiawmut -t. 

409. Dorchester— L. E. Tarltell, Hunt st., At- 
lantic. Mass. 

218. East 13* '"Tun —II. A Dalorey, 7 l iiion PI. oil 
Princeton -t. 

166. (Ship Joiners Fzra Huesti«. 133 Trenton st. 
103. Pali. River -.I* bn I: Pari-**anlt. .6 Ridge -i 
571. Franklin— J Htissev. Br*x3»7. 
is;. Gloucester—.!. A. M* D *na'*l. 16 Cleveland. 
82. Ha’ erhill— 1> lairoy 4\ il-.,n. 9 Sixth ave. 
124. H INGHAM — Colin t 'ampbcli. Box 113 
VÄ. Holyoke — F rench) J. Lnriiviere, l!t9 4Val- 
ntii -I. 

t>'*2 Germ Henry Fi-ln-r. 265 Park -t. 

Mt. Hudson — (* r** E. Rryan t 14ox 12-5. 

196. Hyde Park— I t. Daly. 65 luring st. 

PL Lawrence — T. Dixon. 314 Par -t. 

196. I ,ox4 ’ ell — F rank Kapplcr. 203 Lincoln st. 

108. I.y .'n — M. L. IVlurii. lit; L»‘wis -t 
321. Marblehead — J. E »t* * b*. Box 432. 

154. Marlboro — f. Latlamine. 3*>t Main st. 

192. Natick — G eo. K. Alien : 5 4Ve»iern a\*e. 

h/9. New Bei»e**rd — H. M. lUntiiioutl, <4 spruce 
37-5. Newton— Jos. Butler Box 71. 

193. North Adams— E. F. Follett. 1 Northst. 

40» North Easton— E lmer E 4Vati«. 

727. Northampton— D. JVpin, Box 400, E«-'t- 
hampton. 

135. Norwood— J as. Hadrlei*. 

417. llut^i'N* — J"hn Parsons, 21 Chestnut st. 

159. Rf.vf.re — H. P. Ilalcom.4Vi:tthrojtav., Beacb- 

RXHIt 

67. Roxbi ry— D avid Campltell, 48 Norfolk st., 
Mattapan. 

140. Salem— F. Wilkinson. 3 Parker ct. 

702 Saxon at lle — E. C Tuttle. Box 121 
24. Somerytlle — J os. Meint vre, 1 ,* Oak St. 

220 S. Framingham— E. F. Stewart 41 Gordon 
96. Springfield— I Ba -sett e. Box 766 
^41 “ E P. Mowrev. 68 Qnincx’ at 

491. Stoughton-G. 44. Fern side. Box 276. 

216. 4VALTH AM— J P. Veno.37 lax lor st 

430 . Wey mouth— E.J. Pratt. Weymouth Heights 

421. Woburn— T imothy Ring. I23 54*inn st 
92. Worcbbteh— C. D. Fisk, 720 Main a*. 

MEXICO 

293. C. P. Diaz — 1. Garnett. Box 109, Eagle Pass 
Tex. 

MICHIGAN 

77. Battle Creek— M. M. Havnes. 125 Clav st 
129. Bay City— A dam Trolwrt.' 614 Birney st. 

686. Benton Harbor— J ohn Covell. 

418. Charlotte — ti. Hickman. Box 532. 
Detroit— Secretary of District Council. 

10. Join. Crawford. 972 4th ave 
59. T. S. Jordan, 427 Beaufait ave. 



219. (Ger.) E. Eckart. 37. St. Joseph st. 

168. East Saginaw— R Welloek, 1143 S. 41 h st. 
248 •• ( will) A. A. Yeager, 510 N. 12th st. 

466. ** (Ger.) Peter Frisch, 13011 So. Warren 

Hx'e. 

Grand Rapids— Secretary of District Coun- 
cil. L. E. Kendall 265 Ottawa »t. 

65. E. L. Probert, 76 > LaBelle ave. 

583. i Holl. I A. Stanburg. 2»6 Eighth st. 

771. T F.*l wards. 670 Jett'erson ave. 

793. H Heaton, 229 Fifth st. 

441. Holland— J ohn Ileetebry, B.*x 275 

195 Iron Mountain— J erome Rayome, 2 '6 Linl- 
ingloii st. 

26. Jackson — H enry Behan, 211 Devn st 
184 Lake Linden— G eo. 44'. Guilrord. Box 678. 
213. Lan«ing — J. K. Moore, 6*H Butler «I. 

372. Marine City— A dolph B*»oske, Box 7?. 

392. MakvJUETTE— (F rench) J. Cnllin, 234 Mather, 
inn Muskegon— O. T. Brak man 10iHou-l*uiav 
123. Owosko — C harles 11. Cherry, Box 701. 

3-R. Saginaw— G. 44*et/el. 1023 S. Harrison. W. S. 
538 45 van isittk — F rancis sntliil. 

MINNESOTA 

361. Dn.UTH— John Sutlierhy, 222 54. 4th st. 

366. ** (Scainl.) P. Helgemo, 1932 W. JTicliigan. 

239. Little Falls— K. C. Mack. 

Minneapolis— 

ill. (Scainl.) A. C. Olson, 3133 18'; ave.. S 
452. A Sweii»on. 320-25 aAeniie N. 

87. St. Paul— A ug. J. Metzger. 42:? Rondo st. 

362. Winona — 4’arl Kueiierli. 107 E. Second st. 

MISSISSIPPI 

312. Greenville— J. B. Guptile. Lake 4'illage, 
Ark. 

749. Meridian— G eo. 44'lieclcr. B *\ 282. 

496. Vicksburg— 1’. Adam-. B**x 5<. 

MISSOURI 

519. Benton Station — J. C<»ok.68|' Magnolia av 
79ii Earth.age — H. F. Slatle, 45'. \\'«.o-ter st. 

160. Kansas <‘ity‘ — A. McDonald, 1717 E. Util. 
35". Lanc.asti r — M. Ashford 

577. M arshall— 45' II. Herrmann 

9» Sed.AMA — 4V B. Ilurtt, *5 >6 Vermont ax'e. 

377. Springfield — J ohn R. Talent, 21 15 Lyon st , 
Station A. 

780. Staniierry— H. 11. Davis. B*>\ 327. 

4?0. ST. Joseph— A. L. Curtiss, 1 >22 North 20th st. 
St. Louis — S ecretary of District Council, 

4V ill Rollins, 4579 Evans ave 

4. Goo. J. Swank, 1701 New'«tea*l ave. 

5. (Ger. J. Burkhard 2435 Menard st. 

12 (tier.) EiIaa . Kis«!ing. 2116 N. lltli -t. 

113. 4'. S Lamb, 4139 Papin st. 

240. (Ger 4Vm Altliails. ill 3 N. 14th st. 

257 .1 R Miller. 2624 l(.d»ert st * 

270 1 S. Hinkci. 25 JV Belle Glad* ave 
395 (Mil! Paul Gamier. 104 N 12th st 
42?. P. Boliletn, 2744 Manehest'-r fund. 

51». * Ger Henry Thiel*-. 2112 Kalb-t. 

578. (Stair Bldr».) Jos. 51* C *um, 3145 < .*/*-n- ave. 
699. J •* Narron, cl':»6 • ass ave. 

7 44. (Ger. Mill) 0-* ar Stai-ger. 2502 S 10th »t. 



10». New Brighton, S. I. — K. E Salfel ler, 4* 
York ave. 

42. New Roi helle— Jos. Gaban. Box 820. 

507. Newtoyvn — H enry Meister, I 'orona. L I. 

New York— S ecretary of l»i«tn<T Council, 
Patrick Kavanagh. 427 4V. 52*ist. 

51. Chas. A. Judge. 626 E. 146th »t. 

63 Patrick Kennedy. 19 4V. trtt th st. 

64 .’ J. 1*. Lounshury. .313 Coiumbit« ave 
2 (>; (Jewish) S Jacobson, 5 Gt. Jones st. (are 
M. Wisbiiisky. * 

340 A. 4\'att, Jr., 177 West lol st. 

382 II. Seymour, 150 i 2*1 ave., . are Sta K. 

457. (Sean.) H L. Hansen, 119 Hamillor. ave., 
Brooklyn. 

464 Ger. i L. Dinner 661 E. 163*1 »t. 

468. I b'ii nis Da vin. 5» E. Ninth st 
473. David Petrie, 347 44'. Iltb *t. 

478. <’tuu». Bickel. 611 Bergen ave. 

497. (Ger.) Frank Schneider. 716 L I2th st. 

509. James Ixumun. 1? 44 . '.'8tl< «I 

513. (Her.' 11. Knoblooh. 2** Elizal»etli st. 

715 < has. Hut' ll. 17'. •'■ L* xii.gtoi. ave 
786. Millwright- an. I Miller«' Chri». Schlenker, 
46.4 I'.i-t »2*1 «t. 

474 Nyai K -Itoht F 4V**oi, i?<».\ 496 

3n 2. Ogdenshukg — J ohn 4\’crt, Pickering «t. 

101. ONEONT a— F rank McFer*. 6 Gardner place. 
443. Osaatoo — C has 4Vard, 2IC Ea»t Bridge -t 
34 Peekskili.— T he*». Bit 'Isell. 9-?9l>iven st^ 

4 >4 . Port* -he»TER— A llen McDotiald, Rye. N 4*. 
606. 1’. RI' HMond — J. Keenan. New Brighton,.**. I . 
•it it Poughkeepsie — N. R Dalzell. H*»x 32. 

675. Roukaway Beach- T. F. I»we.Occanu»,L.I. 
Rochester — 

72. H M Fletcher. 31 Bartlett «t. 

179. (Ger.) Frank Schwind 4 May Place. 

6»S i A Schenkel, 20 Poplat *t 
479 sen t ' a Fa i i.* -Baxter Haiti» «. »? M? n*l'i«e 
146 S* llENE: TAl»Y' — J. A Maliov 114 Barrett -t. 
768 Sea Cliff— 44* nt. F Ftsiu-r Jr. 

413. SHEEPsHEAD Bay— 45'ni. Cramer. Box 71. 

667 . Stapleton— ( baric- Shay, Lock Box. 46, 
New Brighton 

Staten Island— S' * ofD < F F Salfehler 
47 York av. New Brighton. 
Syracuse- 

15. (Ger.) Al»e Frey. '217 Sail»* st. 

124. J. C French 119 Delhi -t. 

36?. (Frenchi li st. Pierre, 614 Robi :i«on st. 

565 I L. Seymour. 127 GarRr-hi ax •*. 

314. Tarry tow n—D Page, N«»rth Tarrytown. | 
78. Troy - — J ohn J. Hanlon. Box, 145 

125. Utica — H. Sclm»-tTer, 14 l,i|wnr*l «t. 

3 <8. " (Ger. I John Sjieeht 10 Faust ave 

5»0. 4\'atertoxvn — D B 45'illex. 19 5V. Muilen 
2:>?. 54 'averi.y*— I. M. Terry. Box 175 
252. 4 Vf«t Troy— C narle- Ai u - 12! 3*1 «t. 

717. White Plain« 11 54' B-ui *la_**- 
'* • :. 45'n.l I ams Briih.e — H enri Har- i«**: 

273 Yonkers — F. i Mux we ?2>ih**»*l -t 



Ha-iior. 
'«»* st. 

' • »'incli, 



MONTANA 

8». Anaconda — J. II. I.airil. 

112 Burn city - - A. M «latn-ry. B 623. 

2»*'. Great Fall«— A. .1 Kmerton. 

2»u Helen a — J. H. SehvAalen, 563 Tliir*! st. 

317. Nf.ihart— J as. Megary. 

NEBRASKA 

148 T.INuoln — J. 45' Kuitrersnn 3003 S «t 
33*1. N Et’.R AsK a < ity' — 44'. C. Willman, 4 <2 S. 17th. 
Om ah a — S ecretary District Council, C. Ketn- 
hart, '. 8 N Twenty-seventh st. 

58 J H S<'htici*ler. 2710 Cahlxvell -t. 

68». C. I’etcrson, 140? S. Nineleenth st 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

283 Concord — 1». 4V Sliulli«, I? >v * 31. 

118 . M an« he-TeR— 45'ilhurG « oil ord.334E.High. 
•*>■>5. Portsmouth — F. C. Frve, 14 Vaughn st. 

NEV; JERSEY 

70*1 V«rury Park— J F. S. ger. B**x 897. 

4*6. Bayonne — G u« Sjppel. :?i \\ . 24tl* st. 

711. " J. Anderson. 47* Ave. 1*. 

12» . r.Rtrs.ETON— J. H Reeves. 76 Vine «t. 

2" Camden— T. F. P* ters,ui. i?7 Mechanic st. 

|- 7 F. Or ange — M. K Hyerson. 4.5 Oliver «t. 

167. Klizabitih — 11. Zunmernurn. »Smith «w 
6*7. *' («er. ('ha- Me;»* ' 1<»<7 4Vi]]iam« st. 

647. Fnt.i r wood — G arret Springer 
391. Hoboken— F. St- igleitcr, 117 Bloomfield st 
265. Hackensai K-- ! liaries \\ o* ** i . ,1ant»*s st. 

Hud«on County— D. C . Secretary, N. 45'. 
B»xt* r. 14 Prescott Pia< e, Jersey City. 
I»2. Jersey City*— G eo. 45 illiamsou, 220' ;d st. 
4*». A. F. >tewart. 117 Pine st. 

56). Amos Tiiriev, 4*4 Central ave. 

370. Five Corners.) A. 44'ollle, I'or. Fraidt'inst. 

ami Pa' «ade HY'e.. Sta. I >. 

71«** 'Greenville) <*. Van Winkle. R>1 Linden av 
591. Lakewood— Chas O. Pettit. 

151. Long Branch — 4\'m. Pinson. 

2?2. Milburn— J. II 4\'hite, Short Hills. 

.305. Mil. i A'll.I.K — Luke Vaiiaman. »0* N. Second 
6i8. Morbist«*wn— V an Deats. Box 163. 

Xew ark- S ecretary of Distriet Council 
Clias. H. Clox'd, 24 S. 14tli »t 
119 J. N Dailey, 2r.Veademy «t. 

172. '<ier. A Brenner, 138 Carlton st. 

415. Ger. Vndrexv Rager, 20 44'all ,«t. 

6<2 Oi EANK— Z T. Alas. 

477. or ange— T hos. Fcrgii-on. 17 Centra! place. 
325. Paterson— O scar Zulni-kie, 34 Erie st. 

19*). Pa—aic— F rank 4Ventink. B»»x 
399. Puillipsbpri — 44 m. Hodge, 921 Ferrv at. 
Easton. Pa. 

155. Plainfield— P. A. VanFleet 43 E Third st 

•»65. Somerville— 45'. 4V. Pittenger. 

456. S' mmit— M. A Jillaon. 

31. Trenton— O. B. Gaston, 91 Jackson <«t 
54-3. Tow V OK Union— J. 4Vulfartii. 4Veehuwken 
642 4\F'T Hoboken-H. Burggraf PaKrson’ 
P ink R <1. 

NEW YORK 

274 Albany— T hos. McNeil 54 X. Knox «t 

®9. “ (Ger.) Alex. Ricken. 416 Elk st. 

6. Amsterdam —H erbert Clark, 299 F 4 Iu ; i>* «i 

4*53. Auburn— W. 45'. Gillespie. 1 pj e. Genesee 



Batavia— 0. Dew it. Box 223. 



131. Binghamton— A. F Davi«, 52 Carroll st. ™ • Miiuord-4V a F, »ton. Bi»x 177 
-1Ö. J D. Marin U», 9 Cary st 736. Nki.miamu.i F B irroi., 

Brooklyn -S ecretary of District Coune41 Nk*.v I’uktagp -Ja» 11. D.rvi« 

mo Y- V «'«hu.« 171 Ftfthave. ' 705. Norwood — A F Best. Ivanlme 

09 M. A Maher 594 Bergen st. 65u. Pomeroy — J M Fowler. Ma-on f itv 

14,. Jno. J low. IcrlylW Albany ave. 437. Pop.tsmo) th— C iui-. Tliomat; 1 lo t i 

i.V.I •' * r ‘ 1 ' 1 10 NoriuHti ave. 7(W. Salem— 55 »,. Konsul, .*'71 4V Main »i 

~ J?‘ , t ’» , * rl *?* ' Iy *‘°" ar ' 1 **t. 107. Sandusky— g. F-fel. 2 AJ I awt. :.< . i 

^58 H p , Cnlver 1 i- c bU U V" Sl ' 28». SPKIN*. FIELD- 45'. 13 Kni-elv.'J 5Lln. 

* • ' ulver, Ii < orneh» SMn *iu* n v i i i u < i.a«. i> , . , * i* w 

^9 'sl-h' e?o , ) , lI J> R B i 134 ,U " ,,M,r K 24r Tiffin— J..*' i»ar»ier. l'.9 4A AJark.’t 

M9 Sjlsii, ptc.) II. Hobin.««in. 2*23 47th ai Toifiki- v K 1 

«<: Ä'ÄÄ i" "*“»*»•»• V- to,,, 7V" r ' - M,n M,mk - ■"« 

4*1. 1* red. Brniifit, 26* Ninth st. Ti*R»)\Tu i "um** K n., rr : 

S Ä’ÄV'r» F , n "; k u "-mow ,t. **-. » »«to-j,» » ) L.: ■ 

«9. >1 h MS 1% *n*l. s. ar. ««»». C.„ „ H., v .-r.-K. Mmiuore 

to * N. North st. 



NORTH DAKOTA. 

174 (»band F«»rk--R S i \ ■ 

NORTH CAROLINA 
3«1 Asheville— J K S.. A.U» It. \ 493 
2 *> ( 'll aki.oiti— !.i i. •» B*.t;» 

;96 GREI.NsttOKO — .1. 4\ ( al«se\ 

OHIO 

84 Akron— J G’.a«« ill rh»»r»*t<»n st. 

7-4‘. Ashtabula— A. ! Howard 
17 I Ski lair k 4V A\'. aa 1 . h .-. B*»s 2~ 

44 Howling «.kef.n—J II. 1.* F.ui.-e. B*»x 95. 
17". Bridgeport- l-.lmcr Ju*t. e. B*.a i 
Sol. But'Y Rl's F -6 

14.5. Canton — D 4'ui. Kuk 12» 4Va».ung;o: .ive 
1»2. t 'ELINA —.»«»Ule« MmiiiI..a 
3'». Cl!<! I t* "I III 4Y.D T.» ' 1 • •• 

Cincinnati- "• iet.»i> ».f Di»tri. t ouncil. 
l'aviil Ki»h* r. M i iilliiu ittv, D:»tiuti4». 
2. D Fisher. 55 ( iitioii .*•. •• 

209. d»er. August \\ «•!«» -59 Freeman axe. 

327. »Mill )(»*'*' ** ursha 1. 4>7 Man* »t. 

4»!. (Staiis It. Menkhiots. 17« 4\ e-teri; «» e 
62». 11. »chut* ter. Do.Isaa ru th ave station A. 
661. (East End.' — • 4V. Shirley. ls.;7 Eastern av. 

6(57. .1 .Stevenson H* r* »'i*r<? ave. Siatioi, D 

676 4V m. I.ciu ai*. >i9('!i ton ave 
6»i. 4V m. Parker. I'2< 'he«ln «t 
68.'! J SeliAxii/. 13'.*s \\ . .*»ixt'i »t 

692. J *tni Sjh iltirink. « .leu: ic l'.*;rnn<ui * 

7 •: M , a L. * ...'.•*' l :•■• » ' s. w. Sn 

i »i»|i< • i.i.il ( in ry »I» 

I 774 T »- (iraiuim. 6s «i • u. gon »■ ,4|i. Adam« 
Ci.evei.am*— Seer dary m 1» »tr:* : t'ouueii, 

1 K B *111(1 tt. 15» Sup»o :.*:»;. Room 17 
11. J L. Adam«. «IOIVh «I 
39. (Bobeiti.' Fr. D.xoky. »5 Petrie «*. 

16'. John P» t«-r«*»i;, 5 «\ r’* : »t 
254. 1 o r.) Cli 4V it t. 4" R.mny a\ • 

241. I> F Hrw in, 12-J-3 Lmaiu «I 

2» 2. i Polish* John Peplin«Uy. 177 Fiilierton st. 

■3y3. itrer.i Theo. Weirirh. 18 Parker st. 

4-19. )!»er. Herman Seherr. 77 Seiden av. 

461. John Milner 71 B'.rt st 

632. B.di. 44' m. Mare«. 1772 Central ave. 

231. Col LEGE 11 ILL— Harry \«keiv. < .rot— la . k. 
Columbus— S eeretary of 1 »i -tri» t Com, ell. 
J. F Hepner. I.’imuii 4» < lintoii Build •». 
61. U. G. l?i'*»vles. 7' N lilcl 
5326 H. A. Goddard. 269 N 17th. 

350. I North side* G. A aa _• * r • » . 21 ITiutave 

P«t. Dayton— 1» s Zinn. •'*»« l'. 2*lst. 

346. " iG«*r 1 Frank llerfurth. 14! E 2d »I. 

3'.»’' ' ( Hldrs i 11 Slo '.js I . , 

!»7. Dufiani E— 4V.ilt* I Lam) 'eit ?!5.s»encca st 

677 Delaavakk— B. P. 4Vi,ii H ni* 2u> V Union st. 
775. Delhi— J ames s'.a’tery. Home iTty. 

782. Dki.PHO» — F rank «tr.iiiniau 

3-8. East Liver I'OO i —4V s Pittcnrer. Box 6*1 

is». Findlay— A D N.- imex * r. i;. \ i 

20.‘. Fo- roKiA— J. II K*.»*r. '72. 44’. Center st 

641. Grfi nvii.lf. F. .M Swope 

637. Hamii ton— 4V:u. Hamme V. 220 R,.»- «i. 

*267. Lima — J. 4'a>.»Averio gen. 712s Mail, »t 
8 »- > Locki and Mil* 1 M *«»tcliar, Snaron- 
ville, Hauii'toii ( '•>. 

”*53. •* ( ii.\s. F. H'-rt* !. Box 182 

369 MaDI«ONY*I 1.I F- Zoll. 

5'6. Mansufld— N. II Kline. 

256 M arieTTA-K. H. Wagner. V)» Char.e« «t 
14. Martin's Ferry* — 1. ! .«hipman. 

724. Mii>i>lktoaa N — ,i T Mould. FI. . k «t 
30.. Mn i *»p.g-4\' a F »ton. Box 177. 

7 56 N Ei. » on \ I! i.i F. B irroi. 
is: New Portage - I i- h. D.ixi». 

7(44. Norwood — A I". Best. Ia ailtioe 

65u. Pomeroy— J M Foxvler. Mason City, 4V. \*a. 

-ol' £ > " nTS>, °' T,! — »'ha-. Tbon.an 1 10 ( ämpbeli 
dw. Salem— 55 in. BonaaL .371 4V. Main si. 

10*. SANDUSKY — 15. |•■■•^•e! 2 50 LrAATv lice »t 
28». Springfield- 4V. B Kni-ely.-j SLw.denave 
J*TFUHFNY'H.t.K— l l.Hs.Blieev. I; Soutl 't 
-4>. Tiffin— J o*. Daniel. 129 4t Mark, t -» 



Buffalo— s, -ere tury of District Council 
A. E. White, 2Xi Prospect ave * 

9. It. Harry. 203 Front axe 
355. (Gcr.i C. Roc—ler 242 Strauss at. 

374. F. Kocrner, 371 l.?th st. 

440. John Holloman. 1002 ltouck ax-e. 

99. Cohoks — A. 4*an Arnam, 22 George st 
307. Corning — E. 1). Chase, Dodge a\ - e 
5»d. Cornaaalgon-Hudson— K.J. Rond Box ft 
315. Elmira— F. M Snyder, 761 E Market ’ J 
323. FisHkill-on Hudson— J as. Haves Mat- 
tea wan, X. V. ’ ’ 

714. Flushing — Fred S. Heild. CO Locust «t 
500. Glen Cove. L. I — Fred. Craft 
229. Gi.en -8 Falls-Job Mills. 32 Notre Dame «t 
272. Herkimer— C has. A. Paul. R»>x 57J. sl ' 
1*3. Hoosiik Palls — E rlxA'in Chapman 

149. Irvington— M ichael Kieruan, Box as 
603. Ithaca— J. W. Skinner, 120 W. Buffalo st. 
6 _*. Johnstown — G. H. Bowruaker 8 Glebe st 
•261. Kingston— J. DeyoChipp, ^.xltH) ^ 81 ’ 
591. Little Falls— a. A. Miller, 51 Arthur st 
465. Ixjng Island City— F. Roselius, 884 Albert st 
643. Mamaroneck -William Hopps 

150. Middletown-W. R. Rogers, 46 Johnst. 
m Mt. Vernon— S. Budd, 204 S. 4th ave 



I «« >. 1 — ■<*» V MA» II . II. Ill'll IC 

«tA ' «H'XGSTOWX— H. J. Casner. 226 44*oodiand 516 Grafton— C. F. Burk. Box 
*ib. Janesville— Fred. Kappe», O Niel »• A: ~ ly - Huntington— M eClellan R 
Ueutral ave. 322. M a RTINSBUkg— A T Parh t 



OREGON 

520. Astoria — O le Estos Box 443 

54*!: ^ 13:11 *t. 

PENNSYLVANIA 
o Allegheny City— 
dl' L MoHney. 70 4Vi!«o„ ave. 

7-7' H 'bert Gmmla-rg, 2 Biuff «t 

48~ Ä;*f’V K ,. M EV “V' st. 

om' • ToONA “ ;T. Kenner, 132s sth ave 

• K ""> »”« «". N'e» 

254. Bellefoxte — 



A9 > ' urnon — I saac Coldren Box ‘W* 

«;^ EVrK -Ni)e R. Moore, Hox!T25 

SW! Br Alum' R Lj , » ü, i» n . Bra ? ntho "ver. Hox 636. 



550. Bradford- 4* v r’ * n,am "° ,IVOT . Box 636. 
4-50. Kryn Mx w^i Iohn V> n 2 d BoVI " ,0 '> «t. 

-i .goTfe , 8 “ 1 »• 

a*?: omSH' h"'*" 21 TI,or " »'• 

K1,er s - R'Khy, 240 E. Fifth SL 



7 408. CORAOPOLIS— Joseph Miller 

530. Drijl F>XK — Chas. MLinffer. 15 
7»7 Ki.woon City.— K. a. 44'hit. 

• 16 Erie— W. II. IVat, 357 W i «t 
. 422. KRANKFORI»—J»»hn Davie«, l ij; . 

401. Franklin— C. D Nieklin u * t ' 

122. Germantown— J. F. Martin. *.i ,v ft, 

4n2. t »REKN8UUKG — Adam »Im.ig. it 

;f>«. Greenville—^ T M. ( .imp'«-li i»„, x 
; 5»7. Grove City— II. B Blaig. ii. : , * 4 
287. Harrisburg — E li II. »Iling.T. *. ,r t i. 

288 Homestead — J. A 55 . »! st )... . j- , *» 

'253. Jeannette— P. E RoMu.is. j. , a : 

, 7 *.H Ji.kmvn— .*3 5V M.... I 

2ti5 . Johnstown— C liarle« 5 **r* )?p , t 
s*7'i Kane—»?. F Hivonp 
* llo. Kittanninh — C. F. B.ii ' i 
'Soy. Lam aster— ('. lien«. L . < i N . , 

1 »'91. LaTKoHK— A. 55 . I 'lainer 
I tOl. Lebanon — C has. F«*«u*r, 102« ( t , 

3'9. LEE! HHUIMi P'. A 5' .gi*- 

4-36. Lo« k Haven— 55 . C H i..,» | m . 

177. Mi K kksPort — J > is. DilJi '..I., Wl * 

438. Man'AYUNK F|*l)':tiui P'raut, 44 .-n 1« 

431. Mansfield— R oia'ri Hhu1.ii, i 

Valley P. O.. Box 1»' " 

552 MEADVH.I.I I*. P. Kcllllig ' V - 
27». Muri kk— W in Moore 
7*1 . Mount Cakmki. Jer*- M Ji.m 
3.43 . Neaa Kensington J. < . 1:* 

2H6 . Newcastle— W 5V. M*ciea- I .i-)>o r 
38». Norristown— II. 55'. Weller ■■ < ;^»t 

Philadelphia— S i «Tetary «>• i * -» • ..jncll 

J. R. Xhcc. Gsio Pi liiiund »: , v 

8. 5V. F. Klrerharilt. 272” P'airhu. 

227. (KensingbaijChas L Spangl*-. 2 M «• -gs* n j 
3>» iGer.) P. ltuge, 1127 Ogden «I 
#x. (Southwark) Chas. Mitchell 1-. 1* * - «; oi.k 

359. (MilHGeo. 5V. Miller. 2336 N. P'l". i , «t 
Pittsburgh— H eeretarv of I>i»tr 1 1 • *u ..ctl 
5V. P. Patton. 61 Mahan av* 

1)2. II •». Seluimaker, l2fl 5Vel*ster ax V >-g 
161 Ger. Cli. Uaiil«'nslraiu-h Gciirii>c- * ■ , 

165 p) End) P'. B. Denman, *7 Inw...«l -t K. g. 
2.50 55'. P" Willock. 1 19 Bailsman «I . K : • x ' : . Ic. 

. 3s.). 55'. End) Jus. S. Connell. 19» Steu — »; 

4«)2. G*t. i J II. Heinen. Mt ('livi-r, P o 
7:37. Ja«. Reed, 11 Southern av«». 

615. Pittston — A. M. Haggerty. 32H i *n» it. 
1»5. Punxsutaaa NEA' — 4 '. (». Hennigh H \ , 
i .336. Reading — T. Kissinger, 5lu N. l ltli 
136» KrH'HEsTER— A. N. Giitermutb, Box 
563. Scranton— (J. M Hirlinger, DW Han.; **n ft 
718. •• Emm* t Puder, 4!) Plodps . 

I 751. “ Fred. Dewitt. 117 E Mark* ; «1 

).64 S. Scranton - ft»« r.'J.Brnnsehwilernzt a der 
37. ShaMOKIN— l«aa«' Smink. 46 N 8th «t 
26». Sharon— A. It Peters. 12 Elm st 
i H5 SH AKPsBCR«.— 55'. (' P:'u«* li. 

514 »H ARPSA ll.LK— 55 . Reiehard. Box !7 
27" Tarentum -T. C. Miller. 

551. Turtle Cni.EK -Jain**« Strang, Box 21$ 

320 Tyrone — W. E. McKinney. 

459. Umontown— A. E. M« Clay. 59 1 >»* . -t. 

370. 5'i;rona — . 5 J. Line. 

5'.e.i 55 'arren— 1» J. Grindluy. 

)» 1 . 5V.ashinc.ton J. 5'. MeClain, Box 227. 

<! .). 5\'EST LEIsKNRING — 5V. U. Reede. 

1U2. 5i'ii.Ki>-ItAi:RE — Thos. Tumblyn, g.J4 N -th- 
uni] don st. 

45f 55 ii.KINSBURg Janie» Todd. 

2**6. 55'ii.I.IAM-Port-S. H. Fo! liner. 634 K i «t. 
191. York — 5V. P. (»roetseh. 31» 5V. Princes» -t 

RHODE ISLAND 

51.V N > RRAGANsr-rr Pier— H I'hapman. 

17«:. Neavi'ort — A. Pulliuiy. 4 Perry st 
9». J'rovidence— W in. slack, 23 5Villuw court. 
75" WusTl.lH.V— G. C. Burlier. 7 Johns: 

694. 5\i'<>\.»iii ket — 1 >. Lainourcux, 271 s <« in »t. 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

52. Cu AKI.F8TON — (< 'ol. 1 It. 1 1 Bel linger, 5 P.*r-. s'. 
69. Columbia — C ol.) S. 1). Thompson, 17» Ewt 
Jervuis »t. 

67". Gklexvili.e— 5Vm. Burly 136 55'ashington. 
682. " (Col.) ». S. Thompson. 10» Augusta «t. 

427. Spartan burg— L. .5. Justice. 

TENNESSEE 

"73 Bristol — H.«». Bunn 

669 . ( h attanooga— E wing 5\*hite. Itidg* 

7'9 Clinton— l.L 1 l*-n«t*- r«« * • . . 

75). Elizabeth pin C. 5V. Hart. 

*.dl. Harriman— »* A. I?e!i»|.*r 

I ;.« .Iounson city— s p .»uiiih 

22 > K m > x A t Ll.E — N. I uderw i>i»«l 2i A nil» r»' »! 

3i*4. Mr »phis- N. M Bloom. 151 Mill »t 

,6? Nashville— 55'. p. Moody me I am 

766. ** (Mill) J. T. Parker, lil‘4 N. sauiu.ertt. 

TEXAS 

126. Amorili.a— K. L. Dowling. 

»•>'. Au«TiN— J. C. Miller. P. O. Box 6>6 
731. ( oRsii ana — . 1. S. Broxvi*. 71" 5V. 9th a'.** 

19». Dallas — 4). L. 55'iley, B*ix 29*9. 

371 Denison— H. B. Chase. To? D.i> «» 

344 P'.t. Paso — P' rank I.eRov 617 » 'aiupl*c -t 
'277. P't 55'orth — E J. Tu**nis"ii, * ar*- 5\ J. 

Braeewell. 17th anil Elm »t«. 

*»2''*. Galveston — 5V. J. CliM)*nutu, ! '2"av. «>'■, 
"II. *' 1 Ger. 1 H. ltal»e, axe. K mid . ! st 

111. Houston — M B. Leach. l-5|«l 55'ai ker :*• 

539 Paris— S. \V. Sutlierlld bUGrah tn »t 
3<»7. s.an Antonio — J. M. L'o»«t»< r\ , j. 1 11 1 k- 
berry st 

P* 1 1. *■ Ger.) Herrn Pfeifer, 2'.9 « M* - 1 it- 

7 ; SliERMAS— J. A Hr*'« II. 

297. Sl EPIIENVILI.E — Jan:. « IP , ». 

763. Temple — E lias Lund. Box 1' s 
v>9 55 'ax ahatxhie— 5Vm. R. Norman. 

UTAM 

635. Oi.den — J ohn Conroy, pis'. 25; «t. 

VERMONT 

512. Bellows Fali-s-M <* Bailev. 

329. Burlington— Jus. Child«. 17"’ N. 5Vi a» 1 sl 

53. Rutland — A. 55'. 5Vhlte. 52 Stale st, 

VIRGINIA 

‘218. H vmptos— 5V. B. 5\ alker. 

31». Nfavpiykt Neavs— Jas. Upshaw . 

2»5. Norfolk— II. S. Scott. 

7»1. PoRTSMoVT H — R F. Mi ggs. 6U> ( o . n 
132. Rli HMOND — H. 55'. poor« . 11« s 1 -■ 

26'2. " (Ukil.) J. B. Mason. 7HI 1 2 - 

WASHINGTON 

74? Ar.ERDEE.N-J. M Cuhbon. 13*>\ »'*:• 

69' C«it.i \x — ( lias. Baker. Box 15» 

*27. Everett— IL M Brown 
553. Kettle P.AM.S—P. H McCart'**-« 

312 OLYMPIA— W. L. Clark, 31'* Uni 
2<*U. Port Am.elfj — 5V. 55 . Maltbx 
551. ."K'lTl u -N. SAvenson, Box 1150 
4L Spokane — J ohn llearn. Box ! J| 1 
197. Tacoma— II. McLean. B.*x 10! ; 

536. 55 uati om— D. H. McArthur H >\ 1. 7 

WEST VIRGINIA 

?f>L Bui K HANNON— J 55'. Net!. B"X !7 
511. C It A K LE8TON— J. L. Jones. B. X 599 
6"» Charlestown — C harles H Grim 
2?6. Clarksburg — J H. Riiienour Box 3* 

516. Grafton— C. P*. Burk. Box 30) 

719. Huntington— M eClellan 1 »< »Heil 
322. Martinsburg— A T Parlett 
525 MOUNDVILLK— !.. S. Jackin a . 

425. 5VELL8BUKO — Sami. Patterson ! -2' 

3. 55 HEELING — E. Grossemth, «_ N cwr .1* «eyi« 

WISCONSIN 

379. Ashland— A. Beaton. 1019 Pr« - ti a r * 

128. Kau Claire — G. 5' oss. 8 1 » P * " i st »I 
588. Green Bay — J oe Soloutan 115: I «* *'< 

335. La Crosse— A l. Cullniann. lol" Fr" *' 
Milwaukee— S ecretary of DP-tm i • ,cU ' 
Otto Koliler, 198 Hadley st 
30. (Ger. ) B. Platz, 2126 Kilbourn ave 
228. (Ger.) J. Bettendorf, 7»6 7th av* 

290. (Ger.i Chas. Schulz, 1024 Holton - 

537. (Mill.) 55’. H. Schade, Jr.. 83! Gariiim • 

572. It. E. Herman, 1305 Prairie st 

598. Theo. Dembinski, 821 Eleventh a' _ 

472. North LaCrosse — E. Knudser.. 150. Aro 
532. Oshkosh— A. Nelson, 24 1 55'. P* ai ►( Q 
657. Sheboygan — (G er.) H. Krumen a r 11 
Superior 8t. 

523. Superior— P eter Tumble. ... . . .- 

451. (Wr*äT Supekior)— F red Bee»e. 703 '5 ees» 






rn 



A 



Volume XII. — No. 9. 



V 



PHILADELPHIA, SEPTEMBER, 1892. 



Published Monthly. 



0* 






IT STUCK IN HIS CROP. 



BY S. W. FOSS. 

There is too little corn an’ too much bust an’ 
cob, 

An’ it sticks in my crop. 

And folks that work hard es’ git least fer their 
job, 

An’ it sticks in my crop. 

It takes a big tree to perduce a small cherry, 

An’ it needs a large bush for a tarnal small berry, 

An’ a man must get wealthy afore he can marry — 

An’ it sticks in my crop. 

An’ the men who earn bread by sweat of their 
brow, 

(It sticks in my crop.) 

Git the wust kin er bread that there is, anyhow, 

An’ it sticks in my crop. 

But the men who dress up like a dude or a 
dandy, 

They eat nothin’ worser than puddin’ or candy, 

An’ reach out an' grab jeöt w’atevcr comes 
handy — 

An’ it sticks in my crop. 

An’ the poor man, like me, who digs in the dirt 

(It sticks in my cr&p.) 

Is ever wears a tailed coat, never wears abiled 
shirt, 

An’ it sticks in my crop. 

But the swell chaps who never do toilin’ nor 
spi linin’, 

But divide up their time betwixt sleepin* and 
sinnin’, 

Go aroun’ like men peacocks in purple an’ 
linen — 

An’ it sticks in my crop. 

It sticks in my crop, 1 can’t swaller it down 

(, It sticks in m> crop.) 

That the hard workin’ woman must wear a 
coarse gown , 

It sticks in my crop ; 

\\ lule the gals wbo’re too nice to let the ole cat 
in, 

An’ all study music an 1 paintin’ an’ Latin, 

Never wear nothin’ poorer than sealskin an’ 
satin— 

An’ it sticks in my crop. 

An’ it sticks in my crop that mean’ my wife, 

Gosh, it sticks ia my crop. 

Hev pressed sour juice from the wine press er 
life, 

An’ it sticks in my crop. 

Fate seems ter delight just to kick us an’ cull us, 

An the worl’ doesn’t care how much either one 
suffers. 

If we jaw it exclaims, “ What ungrateful ole 
duffers,” 

An’ it sticks in my crop. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

E. B. Bens'ktt, business agent and sec- 
retary of the Carpenters’ District Council 
of Cleveland, 0., has been doing a great 
deal of good work for our cause in Akron, 
0., and other cities close to Cleveland. 

Fred. T. Hodgson, author of the cele- 
brated book, “The Steel Square and Its 
Uses,” is now publishing an excellent 
monthly journal, The Operative Builder, 
price 50 een ts per year. 

A. J. Smith, Financial Secretary of 
Union 25, Toledo, O., is now superin- 
tendent of the free public employment 
office at Toledo. O. , under the State Com- 
missioner of Labor Statistics of Ohio, Mr. 
W. T. Lewis. 

Grnl J. B. Weaver’s new book, “A 
Call to Action,” retails for $1 50, and has 
twenty chapters with illustrations, and 
445 pages of reading on all phases of the 
labor problem. Send orders to J. B. 
Weayer, Dos Moines, Iowa. Brice to 
agents, $11.15 per copy. 

O. Dehli is making a tour of tl^s coun- 
try and of England as a Labor Deputy of 
the Norwegian Government. He is now 
in America to ascertain what has been 
accomplished by labor organizations, as 
the Norwegian Government has several 
ameliorative measures in hand for the 
improvement of the condition of the 
working people of that country. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES. 



The Constitution, when amended, will be 
ready to send out to the locals on October 
15 1892. Cost five cents per copy, or 85 
per 100. It will not go into elleet until 
January 1, 1803. 

The vote on the new amendments to 
the Constitution must be in the hands of 
the G. S. on or before October 1, 1892. 
Full explanations as to the return of the 
vote have been sent per circular to each 
local. 

The amendments to the Constitution, 
as adopted at the St. Louis Convention 
are printed on the third page of this 
paper, so our members can give them due 
consideration and vote intelligtAilly on 
each amendment. 

Union 437 Portsmouth, 0., has offered 
a prize to the member getting the largest 
number of initiations in a given time- It 
is an excellent plan, which might be 
adopted by other unions to their advan- 
tage. 

A brief outline of the proceedings of 
the St. Louis Convention is published in 
this journal for general information of 
our readers. Copies of the ollicial pro- 
ceedings are now in print and can he had 
for §1.25 lot 25 copies, or §5 per 100. Send 
your orders to the G. S- 

See the list of unions not sending in 
their 1 . S. reports, and the list ol unions 

whose secretaries have tailed to send in 

a list of their newly elected local officers. 
If your union is on either list see that the 
matter is attended to, and that the secre- 
tary to blame is brought to a sense of his 
duty. 

1 Each and every local union ought to 
have a post office box, then there would 
be little likelihood of the mail lor the lo- 
cal secretaries going astray. Many sec- 
retaries live in boarding houses or shift 
.around, and there are many changes 
which would be obviated by having a 
postoffice box for each local. 

Two assessments have been levied by 
the G. E. B. on August 9, 1892. Ton 
cents each, in all twenty uenta for the two 
assessments. Call for this aeseesmenthas 
been sent each local and 20 oents for each 
member fount be paid the G. S- at the 
latest by September 22, 1892. These as- 
l sessments have been caused by our in- 
creased death rate the past year. 

On page 4 of this journal you will find 
a synopsis of the General Secretary’s re- 
port to the St. Louis Convention. It is 
good instructive reading. Copies of the 
same can he had from the G. S. lor §2 per 
100. It is a good document to use for 
agitation purposes. Put a copy in the 
hands of each non-union man and it will 
do good missionary work. 



M3 LIST OF OFFICERS. 

Here is a list of the unions from which 
no report has been made as to the officers 
elected in June last. Over two months 
have passed and still the Recording Sec- 
retary has not sent into the G. S. the list 
of elected officers as required by Section 
152 of the Constitution. There can be no 
valid excuse for such carelessness. Proper 
blanks to make the returns were sent with 
the password in June. It is to be hoped 
these local unions here naimed will see 



572 

576 

586 

593 

595 

597 

598 
600 
601 
603 
613 
615 
619 
623 
628 

633 

634 
642 
64 < 
645 
656 
663 
672 



Under Section 153 of the Constitution 
it is the duty of the Financial Secretary of 
each local to send a report regularly each 
month to the G- S. on the regular official 
blanks. And in the event of failing to do 
so the F. S. is to be fined §2 as a penalty. 
We have given due warning month after 
month we would publish this list of finan- 
cial secretaries, and we do so now in order 
to have the matter of seeding in these re- 
ports attended to as it should be. The 
law must be complied with and the locals 
are called on to impose the fine required 
by Section 153. 



CHIPS AND SAWDUST. 

Working gilds of Salem, 0-, have or>- 
ganized a Federal Labor Union. 

It. Flagg, of Lewiston, Me., is our 
newly- appointed State organizer for 
Maine. 

Amsterdam, N. Y. — Union 6 is increas- 
ing in membership, and union carpenters 
are getting the cream of the work. Trade 
good. 

Waxaiiachie, Tex — Union 559 had a 
grand barbecue, and had good help from 
the painters and bricklayers to make it a 
success, with speeches and a general good 
time. 

The products of the cigar factory of S. 
Otterberg Bros. & Co , New York city, 
are non-union, and all cigars made by the 
firm are under boycott and ban of or- 
ganized labor. 

J. J. Brice has paid his shortage to L. 
U. 198, for which he was advertised in 
August journal. 

Per order of L. U. 198, of Dallas, Tex. 

M. S. Dalton, 

Bee. See. 

Jackson, Mich., Union 26, is having an 
immense growth ; 30 new members were 
initiated one meeting last month and the 
average is 20 to 25 new members per week. 
The city is thoroughly organized, with 21 
unions of as many trades. 

Wabash, Ind., has a good live Trades 
Council ; ail branches ol labor ate organi- 
zed and the Farmers’ Societies are work- 
ing hand in hand with the union men. 
They ought to do it everywhere for they 
have one common cause as producers. 

Ikon Moulders’ Union No. 198, Mans- 
field, 0-, are in a struggle with the 
Eclipse Stove Company, of that city. The 
firm locked out the union moulders Feb- 
ruary 27, and in return all good union 
men should see that the stoves of the 
Eclipse Company are let alone. 



that the list oi officers 


is sent in 


further delay. 






4 


159 


282 


390 


484 


13 


161 


292 


394 


486 


19 


166 


2>3 


399 


494 


26 


170 


296 


101 


500 


36 


17 L 


299 


403 


502 


40 


172 


SOO 


411 


503 


53 


185 


301 


413 


505 


54 


186 


3*2 


415 


605 


57 


183 


304 


426 


508 


58 


190 


307 


427 


513 


60 


193 


312 


435 


622 


66 


194 


326 


436 


526 


69 


196 


327 


441 


531 


72 


2i 1 


330 


442 


532 


75 


220 


347 


443 


534 


77 


221 


348 


4t7 


641 


86 


215 


349 


454 


552 


101 


218 


a56 


458 


551 


106 


250 


367 


467 


555 


124 


259 


359 


468 


658 


140 


261 


370 


476 


662 


113 


270 


385 


477 


566 


1*6 


279 


387 


479 


567 


FINE 


THESE FINANCIAL SECRI 



TRADE MOVEMENTS OF CARPENTERS. 

Winchester, Ky. — Union 701 has the 
nine-hour day solidly established, after a 
long strike for it. 

Nelsonville, O. — Union 736 lately had 
some trouble with Kraig & Co., con- 
tractors and mill men, but the uuion men 
showed a bold front and the firm came to 
terms. 

Logansport, Ind. —Union 744 has been 
expecti og trouble with some contractors 
who have been breaking their promises to 
live up to the niue-hour system. So stay 
away from here at present. 

Everett, Wash. — Union 527 has H. M. 
Brown in the field as walking delegate, 
and we have gained the nine hour day, 
and are now fighting sub-contract work, 
which is a curse wherever you find it- 

Pomeroy, O. — Union 650 ha« adopted a 
rule to make non-union carpenters pay 
.one dollar a month in advance to the 
“union treasury for the privilege of work- 
ing with union men. 

Muncie, Ind. — Union 592 has a diffi 
culty with a mill owner, who is endeavor- 
ing to run his mill ten hours a day, in 
violation of. his written agreement to the 
nine-hour rule. The union proposes to 
hold firmly to the nine hours. 

Middletown, N. Y. — The Lindstey 
Bros., mill men and contractors, are still 
living up to their agreement of nine hours 
as a day’s work, and they are the only 
firm in this place doing so. All honor to 
them ! The other contactors will have 
to come to it before long. 

Cairo. 111. — Union 621 has had quite a 
struggle with some contractors, who have 
been desirous of breaking down the nine 
hours and destroying our Union. But we 
have maintained our position successfully 
a 3 Union men, and propose to have the 
card system too. 




This is a 


list 


of the 


local 


unions not 


having sent in their F 
either June or July : 


. S. 


reports for 


15 


116 


271 


398 


492 


685 


697 


24 


120 


278 


399 


496 


591 


699 


36 


122 


279 


401 


500 


693 


706 


39 


133 


282 


403 


502 


694 


708 


40 


135 


291 


404 


505 


595 


710 


44 


136 


293 


408 


507 


598 


712 


46 


145 


302 


411 


508 


coo 


714 


47 


156 


316 


412 


509 


605 


715 


48 


157 


308 


413 


513 


608 


724 


49 


161 


312 


414 


516 


611 


725 


50 


162 


315 


415 


519 


613 


728 


51 


160 


321 


422 


622 


616 


731 


52 


170 


322 


424 


526 


617 


732 


53 


174 


337 


426 v 


529 


619 


733 


54 


177 


341 


428 


6 52 


621 


734 


65 


180 


312 


432 


636 


630 


737 


57 


181 


343 


436 


540 


633 


740 


66 


189 


346 


438 


641 


034 


743 


63 


190 


348 


439 


544 


635 


745 


65 


200 


354 


442 


515 


649 


757 


66 


204 


357 


443 


552 


663 


761 


67 


229 


363 


447 


553 


664 


765 


75 


242 


364 


448 


555 


666 


768 


77 


243 


366 


452 


566 


667 


789 


79 


244 


367 


454 


657 


669 


777 


81 


245 


370 


468 


662 


672 


778 


85 


250 


378 


465 


564 


673 


78 i 


88 


253 


381 


467 


566 


682 


786 


100 


262 


387 


468 


570 


683 


790 


102 , 


267 


390 


478 


576 


687 


791 


106 


269 


392 


481 


580 


694 


792 



Vancouver, B. C.— On August 11 we 
celebrated Labor Day, under auspices of 
the Trades and Labor Council. We had 
a grand procession ; every trade repre- 
sented, and a deputation from the Trades 
and Labor Council of New Westminster 
joined in our turnout. We had trade 
floats and the Mayor and City Council 
were in line in carriages. The day was a 
grand public holiday. 

San Francisco, Cal. — The labor de- 
monstrations on this coast, June 27, in 
answer to the United Employers’ mani 
festo were imposing and immensely at- 
tended. Workingmen will discover some 
day that they possess more effective 
weapons than Winchesters — their united 
ballots — if they will only use them on 
election day for labor measures and labor 
men. 

The Unions of the building trades in 
Montreal, Canada, and in New Orleans, 
La., have just recently formed very 
powerful Building Trades Leagues, or 
Federations embracing all the unions. In 
New Orleans the architect«, contractors 
and union journeymen have made an 
agreement to recognize each other, hire 
none but union carpent ers and pay an in 
crease in wages, and all without a strike. 



DEBATABLE THEORIES IN TRADE 
UNIONS. 

On last Sunday I was present at a meet 
ing of presumably as intelligent a body of 
craftsmen as this city possesses. The 
beaten path of routine business had been 
so far strayed from as to bring up for de- 
bate the questions of governmental con- 
trol of telegraphs, and the theory of the 
Single Tax. It was an excellent illustra- 
tion of the approved wisdom of trade 
union policy in keeping its machinery one 
of “specialized function.” Men who 
agreed heartily as to methods for the de- 
fence of the labor seller’s interest as 
against that of the labor buyer’s were at 
once at swords’ point when these ques- 
tions of the functions of citizenship were 
introduced. And yet this very strength 
of the trade union movement’ is in an 
other sense, its weakness. It surely seems 
a pity that the substantial machinery of 
the trade union cannot be utilized in a 
wider scope. Yet the point was made, 
and effectively, by an extreme individual- 
ist : “ What right have you to foree me, 
as a trade unionist, to give my assent to 
an economic theory that I believe to be 
unsound? If you ’Single Taxers should 
chance to obtain a majority of the votes 
at this meeting, and thereby pledge the 
union to the principle, you M ould not only 
violate my individual’ rights as a trade 
unionist, but you could not justly com- 
plain if at a subsequent meeting, another 
vote should reverse your act, and give 
your endorsement to a scheme of taxation 
directly opposed to your theory.” 

F. K. Foster. 



Vancouver, B. C —Though trade is dull 
the Union men are still holding to the 
nine-hour day, and fighting every attempt 
of the Canadian Pacific Railroad to re- 
turn us to the old ten-hour rule. The 
Post Office now being built here by 
the Dominion Government is a ten- hour 
job, and so is all the Canadian Pacific 
Railroad work, but the Union men won’t 
touch a ten-hour job. 



TO OUR CINCINNATI MEN. 

Cincinnati, 0.— On August 15 the car- 
penters of this city and vicinity com- 
menced working under their new trade 
rules, as per agreement with the contrac- 
tors last spring. The scale of wages is 38 J 
cents per hour for nine hours a day for five 
days in the week and eight hours Satur- 
days This is quite an advance over 
former prices, and was gained by methods 
of conference and conciliation without a 
strike, and is to hold good until the spring 
of 1894. Some few of the men are dis- 
satisfied because they were under the im- 
pression they should receive full nine 
hours’ pay, §3 per day, for eight hours’ 
work Saturdays. The agreement itself is 
plain, and specifies the pay shall be 33j 
cents per hour. It is unfair and unrea- 
sonable to get 50 cent« per day of an ad- 
vance in wages, and at the same day want 
full pay for the short day on Saturdays. 
A demand for an increase in pay and for 
a reduction in the hours of labor should 
never be ooupled together. They are two 
distinctand separate demands. And wher- 
ever both are insisted on at the same time, 
it has proven in most cases disastrous to 
success of the men. Once the hours of 
labor are reduced the chances for higher 
wages are improved. 



A CURSE ON THE GREAT MAJORITY. 

“To me, at least,” says Frederick Har 
rison, “ it would be enough to condemn 
modern society as hardly an advance on 
slavery and serfdom, if the permanent 
condition of society were to be that which 
we behold ; in which 90 per cent, of the 
actual producers of wealth have no home 
that they can call their own beyond the 
end of the week ; have no bit of soil, or 
so much as a room, that belongs to them ; 
have nothing of value of any kind, except 
as much old furniture as will go in a cart ; 
have the precarious chance of weekly 
wages which barely suffice to keep them 
in health ; are housed, for the most part, 
in places which no man thinks fit for a 
horse ; and are separated by so narrow a 
margin from destitution that a month of 
bad trade, sickness, or unexpected loss 
brings them face to face with hunger and 
pauperism. ... If this is to be the 
permanent arrangement of modern so- 
ciety, civilization must be held to bring a 
curse on the great majority of mankind.” 



TH £ BENEFIT OF LARGE FUNDS. 

President Prescott in hie address at the 
Convention of the International Typo- 
graphical Union, held in this city in June, 
made this very powerful argument- in 
favor of high dues and a better financial 
system : 

“If I were asked what point in our 
armor was the most vulnerable, I should 
unhesitatingly reply that lack of ample 
means for effective resistance and inabil- 
ity to concentrate our forces in aiding each 
other in maintaining our just and equita- 
ble rights and privileges were our weakest 
points. Much as we may deprecate con- 
ffiete, they cannot bp avoided unless we 
consent to acoept conditions repugnant to 
our ideas of true manhood. If we are to 
successfully cope with our adversaries and 
render assistance in the moral, mental 
and material improvement of our mem- 
bers, we must realize the truth of the 
axiom that wealth is power, and is the 
god of industrial battles, and have at our 
disposal a plethoric treasury. That the 
existence of a large fund for defensive 
purposes — demonstrating our ability to 
prolong a struggle once entered into — 
would have a most salutary effect on un- 
fair employers is amply demonstrated in 
the ease of Pittsburgh, where the most 
pugnacious of the employers freely ad- 
mit that hstd they any idea that our re- 
sources were so inexhaustible as they 
afterwards, proved to be, there would 
have been no strike. 

“Taking this case as a fair illustration, 
it is for us to consider which is the greater 
economy. — to amass a large defense fund 
which will save us from strikes , add to 
our respect for ourselves, arid consequent- 
ly gain the respect of others, or to spend 
more money in difficulties which the lack 
of a proper deiense fund ha» brought 
upon us. Of course, a large defense fund 
means higher dues— and higher dues it 
must be if we are to keep upward and on- 
ward witli the march of the age, and ul- 
timately attain those objects for which we 
are striving. In the past much has bee» 
accomplished on slim treasuries, but the 
conditions have changed. Formerly non- 
union men could not be so easily mobil- 
ized, nor were they menaced by organized 
efforts in that direction ; and it is mani- 
fest that we cannot hope to improve our 
position by ignoring the difficulties that 
surround us Let us look all such matters 
square in the face and provide the neces- 
sary remedy. 

The conclusion of progress on this line 
means the establishment of what is known 
as a stremg organization— an organization 
that can achieve results, and in whose 
welfare every member and every de- 
pendent on that member is vitally in- 
terested in a financial sense. If we will 
take the trouble to look at sister organi- 
tions, both in this country and in Europe, 
we will find that those unions which have 
the minimum of difficulties, whose wishes 
are deferred to by employers and whose 
members take the most interest in their 
organization.^ welfare, are strong unions, 
charging dues largely in excess of ours, 
and that this has iu a large measure con- 
tributed to their success is undisputed. 

Expulsions. 

A. FT. Patterson, from Union 606, Frtmonl, 
Col., for embezzling funds of Union. Hois prob- 
ably at Noblesvile, ind. 

O. Volk, from Union <01, Latrobe, Pa., for dis- 
honesty to fellow workmen. 

Geo ’ Finger and Wm. Wirth, from Union 
No. 5, St. Louis, Mo., for violating provisions of 
section 164 of Constitution. 

J. H, Beider, from Union No. 770, Jeflerson- 
ville, Ind., for non-payment of due* and fine. 

L>. O. Holman, from Union 444, El Paso, Tex., 
for taking piece work. 

Robert GrimeSby, from Union 360, Galesburg, 
Til , for scabby conduct. 

\V. H. Bavellk, from Union 89, Mobile, Ala., 
for non-payment of tine in not turning out in 
union parade and for bail actions generally. 

Tims. V. Cock rill, from Union 608, Charles- 
ton, \V. Va., for violation of rules and bad con- 
duct. 

J. H. Ellis, from Union 526, Galveston, Tex., 
for violation of section 163 in betraying a brother 
member. 

T. K. Freeman, from Union 781, Portsmouth, 
Va., for hiring non-union men, und working 
more than nine hours a day. 

Geo. Smith, from Union 401, Port Chester, N. 
Y., for defrauding a brother member. He is 
about 5 feet, 6 inches high, light hair, blue eyes 
and teeth missing in front. Give him a wide 
berth. 

F. A. Mel lick, formerly F. H., Union 10, De- 
troit, Mich , for Defrauding the union while act- 
ing as F. 8. He is now located in Canada. 



r- . u - v ■ i . 



••«“““''i l “c tenured caipenters. 



.Ve 



The GAKFLNTlR, 

OFFICIAL JOCRNAL OF TIIF. 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters an- 
Joiners of America. 

JWJ < ihfd Monthly, on thf l ifUmih r.:. M *•/ 
AT 

lit X. Ninth St., Plill».. P«. 

1* J. McMvikk. I-Mitor ami Pnli.i-l.v 

*Btere<l at the I*W«t-Ofliw» at Bhilail. I|>! in 
tt- **t*i*oiitl-cl)ivH innttrr. 

Srasi KimoN Price:— Fifty *•••« it— a y.;r. *'.• 

IMivant-c. |m»Ij>hd1. 

A.hlriv— all letter* ami money* t<> 

1*. .1. Mi tlfllSF. 
i:.,x wl. l'hilau. .|>hia. I‘a 

PHILADELPHIA, SEPTEMBER, 1892. 



TRADE FAIR. 

Carpenter work is really 
most cities, better indeed tl 
in manv euintners. But the 



•rtlÜi ( ’ * M - * N til IrC __ — — — 

J = ’ “ IT 7 Whfcritts ftehcn mir alö fin 9?oflrocrr in ffint «timmc mi? tyttsin,™ 

the locals for a general vote. These amei < »ftcn iHei^c be-r Arbeit* rorgcmfa = 211$ etn altes 'Dhtglieb lu , n 6 , r n.. 



«jliette. 



j with. The si <e of our ollicial journal, 1 






yAiC ' . ' QÜV 



Rk Sr re and have your union send in 
Assessment* Nos. '2 and .'1 as soon as possi- 
ble so to not be in arrears. 

Tub Vote ot the locals on the St. Louis 
Amendments to the Constitution must he 
in the olliceol theG.S by Oct , 1, IS'. '2, 
at the latest. 

The New Kitt a i. as adopted at the St. 



Cnion 95, Hartford City, Ind., how- 
ever. writes there is a chance tor several 
hands in that town, len hours a day, nine 
hours Saturdays, wahres S2.25 to f2.ru. 

HELP HOMESTf A r 1 



• , 1 ■ , <•__ hiul.ar uuirt*« PtDftlöitetl TO’ laruriu ,M* I" iiHVHH I)»«'..' an Ullin HUi.-uuu, ana me » 

'Ldeirams an dwellers ot greeting were tor ben 8»3tURbentag, umlireno 1HHI ber= bet bem gtoBeu Lorfout btr 
ltlcgl «U11S HDU leil • 8 .8 ii... . ... -UI SiAA».»h pinm’tllhlt limr. llllb nnaft.>ht hnft Hi’tif I'lliPin tin 



'«tlftctcutl 



report 



legislation and unite 



ora ml Rapids. Mich. ; Washington Court j the organized working people A reso ten 1 1 ,\af)re betrugen •'-C>'2,ld<> imb baoon I ertert rorben foil: Oie Ärbcita in fcr 
House, O , and manv other places pub- lotion committing the organization to the I.» un ufrgauitt'nt’n »ydc. y ant) hub nicht iolibcrticf) q»;u 

limbed in the d-iilv „men* as having I theory of single tax on land values was ite »brafniu 'ber .^‘tjUe&icbaft in« Ktt* n lenarbeitcr fatten urs tm let Rn -att t 

V ,. . ‘ • 1 ‘ * .... ^ discussed. While the sentiment of a ^abre tit aut ben leftr icbletbten ('Mdnuto* ioUen, fte ichen rilug *u ob trtt in : ,-. w 



pushed this boycott. Keep on with it 
everywhere. And semi money to help 
the Homestead penpie to William Weihe, 
514 Smith Held strict. Pittsburgh, l’a. No- 
tify T. J. Crawford, Box 11*1», Homestead, 



Louis Convention is much simpler and ^ a *’ hl nioneys - sent. Despite 1 1**- 1 . the members of the organization 

better than the one we formerly hail in n-enda. ious an 1 well-planned lies of our The following officers were 



use. The new Ritual is now in print and 1 dail - v !»»*«• there >* "° hTei ' k in the 
will be untied on the 15th of this month ! ranks at ^mertend. With all the pow- 
«ii »m. ere of the State and county, the new>- 



to all locals in good standing, along with the 
Password and blanks lor the ensuing 
quarter. 



The following officers were elected : 
Ilenrv II. Treimr, New York city, gen- 
eral president ; ,1. C. Rarwill, Cleveland, 
*)., lirst vice president ; Charles Lane, 
1 »utte Montana, second vice-president ; !’. 



Hanks lor the ensuing P a P* re ; State militia. Pinkertons and j. Mod ulre. Philadelphia, l’a., general 

capitalists combined against them, tlie ! secretary, and M. A. Clements, Cincin* 



HE LESSON OF THE HOUR. 



people of Homestead have made a brave 
stand and deserve victory. With the 



discui-sed in the locals, and voted on by Cbenio ficmanncn mir mäbrent) bfr 21(1)1» | nmb. 91U(0 mao mir r.ctlitq tab- • ct - 
the members of tin* organization. ^ tunbeit 1 ^ ctitnti oti itn yiniire ls^H miri ,vonb5, tn^tr igolifitvifät ; mit *iu.’' 

The following ofheers were elected: 2.k’itqticbcr, nuftrrnb ini »olflciipen eigenen ^iciiraientantcn mablnt, o 

Ilenrv Ii. Treuer, New \ ork ciiv, gen- ,'flbre, alo bt ,'liiititbou b(t,niibci lag, bit roenr. es rctluq roiib utifcte Hudite . im-ur. 
eral president ; .1. C. Larwill, Cleveland, n^nie nur I'hh» retrug. ... ^Jittsburn» '^' a - 

( )., lirst vice president ; Charles Lane, Silos mir nun ^cupi'odjlid) bebunen, um 

Dutte Montana, second vice-president ; P. : bie Unioro ju fiarfen, pitD bifjete SJutrage. rniumr ...nr rno\/ 

J. Mdtuire. Philadelphia, l’a., general I ^«ir mmbeii baburd) io unbe|iegbar rcerbfit, | RQOF FRAMING MADE EASY, 

secretary, and M. A. Clements. Cincin* nue mir an SJfibihcbesalil ItuH Itnb. Heme hive nren ireil . new and 

inti <»’ general treasurer Druthers < -cmerf td)u?t b^r L'tDe fann cm ’oldies, lu\ - i>a urn! ,i uu ai.t ’ ■ 

nan, .. -eiH rai irea^iirer. i.iouier. A h -. mi» !n»uimiflf> '»dir method of obtaining bevtls and ,• \.:r; 

Lane. McCiuire ami Clements vvere elected -A ac^sipu.n au lOtiier., tme o,e un itge. , ,, . . , <. 

unanimouslv. Secretary Mci.uire now f)aben als |homere ber 8 ctimbenbemegung “, h ^ ( r ;! , rrM iiltVr b r ier ' ^ • • 

.i’ .1 i I in Sior nnr^.rlwn ')f»,ho A»flnnK.it unS HIKl lilt 111* T* (litllLUlt <T ll.inlet 1 1 . 



heard on Labor L>av thi* veur ! 



It is hardly necessary to here give more 



seen live terms. 

llie new v elected <i. K. D. are: Hugh 



ivrn:d)ten 2lber, bte 21rbeitgcber f)Qben ben P* ai a,,on 01 drawings. Satislarti. n ? 
C'‘ebanftn, uns auoemanber »u treiben, rod) n,, teed or money refunded. By >* • : : 
mdn aufaegeben unb in ber näcbiten ^ufunif tu .f ,n > Ct " nts P ,,s,a * nole or ‘-fa::- s . 
merben nur langmieiigeie Strifes ur.b i?ccf» ' se '’d P ( st paid to any a*. dress 



Political parties, heedless of Labor’s in- 
terests at other tiu.es, are now catering 
for the votes of the ‘ bone and sinew.’’ 
Political heelers and ward strikers, even 
in the holy garb of I abor’s cause, are out 
for the “ boodle ” — making mercenary 
menace on political committees. 
Meanwhile the Devil’s Dance goes on ! 



The Seventh General Convention 



Allegheny Pa ; W. T. Dukehart Nash werben nur langroterifleie Strifes unb £ocf* ui" seno post pata to any aouress 
ville, Tenn.; D.’x - Howland, Cincinnati, out« tu befteljen haben, als je iimor. 2tfe. Co P' 1 s ’’ ,u or in nim-ty days. 

< » . and S. .1. Kent, Lincoln, Neb. The halb foDten mir uns oorberetten unb untere THOS. fiRl’HB. 

j delegates elected to’ attend the Conven- auf do tfenlo per 9Jlonat erbeben. Mend « r « t t ni. r. 

! tions of the American Federation ol 1-abor Sion ben H«* Strife« im porle^ten oabre Box 287. D-s Moines. I 

I for the next two vearsnre : P .1. McGuire baten mir nur io perloten unb .nt festen 



Meanwhile the Devil s Dance goes on 1 with, but the delegates were fullveuird to and * >eorge Heath, Baltimore, M*l.. were ^ blm un trer ..idgLe. di- . . t Thf. mi 1.1 . s*.ji.auf, .on ii<>« t. f t i. 

r . . . . .. ,• „ , n , , , e - . * 1,1 10 chosen a Canvassing Board to count the flid unb lolltc tmntcr better roerben. Crbe* to Practical < win ntrv n.»ig-..n 

Capital organized keeps grinding its the occasion. 1 he debates were mstruc- „ , f 1 '*- 0, i ,u u ‘ e V t hn« -oiihnrititfln.Mi.hi .a» stair Bm ms.. Mvm r.\-v. liodg-on 

_ - , s tive and masterly and nm.ln.-m.l votes on the amendments. It was re- -U oas ^ouoaritatsgi.mi)l cut auBeroru n-. H |. u , INli m, IP|; i; v . y .. 

eoeial and legislatne toll from Lalx>r. ««lmirablesniritoV'toler me* mid w-pr*. <i;.r solved that wood working machine hands, hd) gurttiges. 3 U allen nationalen ut b it-- Illi-stratei» i;t< mitk. ukai. am> Mr- 

The subsidized newspapers chant the n it; e d f ir hevoml the imn-il nm r.» r .it- 7 t whenever they desire to do so, can join ternatiomuen Unions babrn mir freunblu. e c-hasu-al i>«awixi;-b*m>k. a M’.f fn- 

•yren song of capilistic melodv. “ Down ^«;5 oL7aU ioall,iiie St I out Com l, “‘ {ht * U ‘ *'• a ’"' > *'•« m'em- »ejirtunijen untrrbalfcn. ober, fa nut ben 1m T \ U. 

with Strikes and Organized Labor.” vention marks an epoch in the l.istorv of »'f™ 'Without being compelle.l to join the tn * I PI ' T1 ’ P . M , rrr 

. , our urbanization lorn* to 1 m> rMnpn.1^.1 Machine Hands International l mon. A Ure JJutglicber lt(9 eurig buitubt naltdt, an Addies» P. J. McGLi 

A stronger government with ‘A Man o^spi ri^ Hr^delegatea’ resolutions on various sub- ^ ‘21 uibau ber »merican weberatton of Box Philadel. 

on Horseback is called tor by the mon- lt . e t . on8 -, derate thomd.t tiu. 7,1. Ti "'ere agreed to. and will be given % atot mttjuroirfen unb anberen Weroetf n 

.yed people. work and zealous endeavoT Despile the P P ace in V^oher journal. A lioycott on bei ber Drgamf.rung Pon L'ofaDUiuona bet* 

The echoes of Homestead, C*eur de intense overpowering heat of the weather ^ arn eine 8 structural iron, nails and spikes ^ t T V, 0 '.'Jk i ' *! ,'n'h ViT in 

Alene, Tennessee and Dutlalo are made fi the ddeguitesheld Hrmly to U ‘S'lTi rnn.»ni; n n „;n non uns »urücfbMflhlt niorh»ti * " ' lU 



v’ j i* \ O t ^1i;»| C471 I Hi: miU>F.R > lit lDK AM» r-sri’ 

\ ork ; teor^e A. ban born. Nileit> y Maw., - ^ . Prick Ho*»k. lloii^on. 

aniHieortje Heath, Haltiniore. M«l.. were lingerer Ikitcjhet i cb a % t ;*t The shei» and ii«»'v to 



Capital organized keeps grinding its tl'** occasion. The debates were instruc- 
social ami legislative toll from Labor. tive and masterly, and conducted 111 an 
T i „ . • j. , , . .. ailmirablespint ol tolerance ami were dig 

T1 e mi Mib/.ed newspapers chant the u itie*l far beyond the usual run ot talk at 

■yren song of eapilistie melody. “ Down conventions. All iu all, the St. Louis Con- 



CHAS1CAL r)HAWIN<;-Bo«‘K. A Self-In- 

^triieiiir. witli ::*m Illustrations 10» 

The f’ARi-LN rrn'- am» hi imiirV i. v- 

PLE*E I’llMC AXIO>* ... I 54 

Address P. J. McGUIEE 

Box Philadelpiat 



the pretext tocrush out ( »rganizetl Labor "'Z Wü ^ k B aud „ had Tl lnU - 'i er - v fert ’ ah * 
r ... . ,, , , sentees on Hie roll. The delegates were 

Legislation -in that line will be calle*! for kept busy with committee wors and the 
in many States this winter. Convention sessions weie eight hours a 

Shall it be done? That rests with the da £: 

tabor ntewte N* no n.nn of doubtlul Mavor „ »ll.ri.lge'. ol St Umis/an ol" : 
record on this labor question ever receives time carpenter ; L50 delegates and 3 gen- 
a labor vote this coming election. eral otlicers were present. Ü? unions and 

Question every candidate for public »’8 cities in 29 States and the Dominion of 

f- r. r, r;" v - . t; , ,h *~ ' ai — 1 srst rw&z 

Bt.iml by Organized Labor, and defeat eastern unions were not so largely rep- 
everv political enemy or trimmer, who resented, hut all sections had fair recog- 
cannot stand squarelv in line for labor n it* ou at fbe Convention, 
measures. * „ Mr ’ Sar “" el . U ? ul P e . ra - °L - N >"' York, 



endeavor. Despite the ! Ppace V U ‘ tober journal A hu . v ‘‘ott on bei ber Lrctamfit 

ing heat of «he weather 3 “ ,ral ir0D ’ -il. und .pikes 

lelegates held hrmly to . r , J „ «.„“.rfh? 



asor<lere*l. ratton SI 2,(100 geliehen unb bie 9lnlette tft 

The next Convention w ill be held in uo ” unG . Otriicfbeyablt trerBen. 






Indianapolis, ln*L, in 1S94. SSir fino aupcnblicflict) in einer föeftfjicfit?» 

— — — — nfrtobe, in roclditr mit nur bie Slugeti aller 

Slnterifaner, ianpern biejeni^en ter Roller 
^ aller ciniltfirten tänber ai'f bte (Sieroerf. 

lilct Qunrntnitr. idia ^«n *mcnfa’b gerietet finb, Ter .uampf, 
r m nuTcfier noncen 3Konrt an ben Ufern bis 

h i l a b e 1 p l) t a, ©eptember, 18W. Mo- angnbela Jliner fegonnen, fiat eine grb» 

— ‘ fere 3ln^af)l ton L’euttn jum 25enfen net an» 

ter ^alirc^’Bcridif be? Wenerabcefrelärö. °! Q eiu antereo Srcignifi feit 






3Der Carpen ter. 

T' li 1 1 a D e i p 1 ) i a, September, 1882 . 



!t«R^ 



1811 ). Q* tft f tn .Hampf ber Wenigen, n-eldie ! This is a Facsimile of the LABEL of tL •» 

d, 1 Sta V. » i • a . -N 



clre^. 



New Dorp,, Staten Island, N\ Y. ; 428 
Fairmount, XV. Ya .; 529, Rogers Park, 



TWENTY-THREE NEW UN ONS. a Vt ‘‘' y enouUia g ,n g ad ’ »®^ torb * it * l,fr J flmmeIs dicrcid » 1 ber'ed)! atbW^enblicf;* bte ^inkt" h.u tS'o'it'i - ’• 

Delegates Brvson of HomeBtP«d Pa m 0,e ' e ^ C/taat, urn ben 5Lrn tons tum bleuen perbammt roerbett ! IP b d «iier- takes n 1 h 1 h*i from one lmt and r * ,m 

In the naot two month« w» iccno.l ^Bar an 1 1 ’I t-ir, • t f'p ,, , . ' c a - • 3u pflanjen, aus tneldiem bie inaditiae Cr» mit ilin-n merben balb tup ^ another, or hsisnny detaeheii lainisiu i ■- ■ 

ter, uventv-thre*' n« union,, vtai ter^.in* “Ä ?o Jile taÄSta Äu'lSÄ « 

No. m Fall >n,or. Mas,. (French) STI. ^ ÄÄ ÄVÄ tÄTST« V, ta. « 

* rW ""'’'.f™ Y -i Carneeie steel Con, t , any. a,ol 0,e latter Ä" Ä ÄtÄ ',‘7 unb ^ «tWIetimian, bie a“. 

Fairmount, \\ . \a.;.i_ 8, Rogers i’ark, spoke of the trouble in the mines of Comr ^ntercfieit *u fflrb rn • aber v‘ u,e Un - b -^ nun d aufredR yu erlialPn, on the ««lues, a counterfeit label with 

111 • 735 Charlottesville Ya • — de Mene Idaho ,snterciten ju Torb«rn , aber lief« fmb bteie benn un^re Tacbe bem lit auf ©ereditiafeit ,,h * ,Ätel y made it- «ppearan*». o' 1 -«** 

in , 4ö » Lnariottesviue, ' a. , .. <t Cen- “ n ®: o 4 . ^«lutbe tu »volge ber Monfurrenj mit ur-b 2JlenfcfiIid)!eit unb hefehnibSnK«”!- than the genuine one. The genuine label !- 

tralia, 111.; .89, Clinton, Tenn.; 791, - er > t 1,)r t ot a committee appointed ben nid)toraan,futen Ifarpenter« yu Sdjan» non ber v Tnn)enbmm bnitniPrAi ^ a ?. en rc . lr an . mc h “‘d a half square and is printed 

Brandon, .Manitoba ; TiM. .lar.nyn. Fa. ^ ÄSÄÄS- 

Tnylorville. 1H. ; T»., New Haven, mill * then gl\„gLTins[.Lolte JSr" “un"“ tSTuSJS" “S SST'H 5«'nVon?b„t« ^ 

Conn. ;“800, Carlstadt, N. .T. (German ! without avail. ' ' Uniolo «“ben oerSiebS Stäbten fim,'-’ *r roc " b « n 8 etimmjettcl This is the Only Correct Union Labe! *c» 

801. Hochalaga. Canada (French); 802 ton^erable tune w^ taken up in a merten fid) ntdit uni cinanocr. äfcWbai fönnen roKbr '«ÄtJ? 2ST f 5?® f,en Fur-Felt Hats. 

Bullalo, N. Y; SOS, Oklahoma City, Uk. ünamilli *-SST with h%her momhfy 7 Kt - **!Ä »T BUY N0 «R-FEI-T HAT WITH0UT 

fer. , .,04 'Racine, \\ is. ; 8itö, Cortland, dues, and the sentiment ef the delegatee unb niebriae Q ofme nor T'ann aber nuirhe ’ 1 r 1 lLa .^: mtt . aU 1e ” ie . n .©(brfden unb fei* Edwabb Barrett, President. 

N. Y'. ; 808) Selma, Ala. , 807 Worthing- was unanimously in favor of changing our für eine nationale UniotT agitirt >4mei wir bdtreh^f 1 ** bi ?! cm ('irunbe foUten H»t Muken,’ li.ten.tition«] Ahm« . 

ton, Ind.; 80S, Dunkirk. Ind. ; 809 Uk» ^«mwdnfflttotfc» friiBere ®»rTutf,e. «ine fnlt^e 8 u bilben.'roa. irr,^ ßfc r? «2*^1 'SÄH. 

Charles, La. ;^810 Roanoke, Va., and 811 andr^nE infh»im,7 g (i y r ^ sca * e< ^- F?" »m Sahen 1854 un» 1807 it»[ n c. nurum untre"«nen 7„t1?t([S fvnaa.au, mm. 

Caines ville Tex refill ted in the adoi<ion of 24 amend- Umlagen. Ter britte »erfutb aber roar er* um bieieniaen Hat FinKhcV international a- - 

> in , which are now in the hands of tolgreid) unb nad) elf ^a^ren erftaunlit^en banbelt. Cn ^ l ^ l0ncn John Pnai .IP“ Secretary, W Y 

^ I'urk Avenue. BrooklT». «•- 



International A-* : 

RronklVT. I** ^ 






mm 



ir~ 







T’±±TJ CA RP HI N ' UEK. 



a 



General Officers. 

OF THii 

Suited Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 

Office of the General Secretary, 

124 N. Ninth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Moneys Received. 

.m ifi.nl jdU.iTfe JULY 31, i.y2 

ffheaerer coy error:» »pp*.»r notify the G> 8. without demy. 

”■ ”*} received in AUGUST, will appear in next oentfc'* 
OCTOBER’ paper. Thin report f.-r JULY uioiudee all tacney« 

*3 .-«i oy the G. S. from th* Low>i übion* for tax and suppdt* 
for *h# month of JULY onlr. 

i i i 







Union. 

Amount. 


-j 

_ a | 

II 1 


I a) cal 
Union. 

Amount. 




,1 1 

ga a 
^ < 



General President, Henry II. Trenor, 870 La- 
fayette avc . Brooklyn N. V. 

General Secretary — P. J. McGuire, Box 884, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

General Treasurer— James Troy, £026 Chris- 
tian st., Philadelphia, Pa. 

General Vice-Presidents. 

First Vice-President— J. C. Larwill, 1124 First 
ave., Cleveland O. 

Second Vi "«‘-President-- Chas. Lane, P. O. Box 
911, Butte Mot, I. 

Gr kral Executive Board. 

(All correspondence for the G. E. B. must be 
maile l to the General Secretary.) 

Hugh McKay, 283 LexingU.ii St., E. Boston, 
Mass 

D. P. Rowland, 253 W Court st. Cincinnati, O. 

W.T. Dukehart,£03 Walnutst., Nashville, Tenn. 

A M. Swartz. 1 8 James st , Allegheny, Pa. 



PROTECTIVE FUND. 




7-8 



, *9- 

101 - 



8 90*220- 
5 50 228 

1 70 281— 

2 40 232 — 
C 6 » 233— 
L ;-:5 235 — 
1 55 256— 

4 25 258— 
1 C5 -59- 

3 59 2ü0 — 
12 00 262— 

1 50i2C8 — 
11 60 270 — 
80 &7n — 
13 05 2‘ : 5 — 
20 50 287— 
7 35 290- 
1 50 291 — 
1 80 295— 

1 8 5 > 7— 

2 86 300— 

5 00 3os — 
90 310- 

3 3o nt- 
11 to 340— 

1 80 334— 

6 36 341— 
6 45 316— 

23 00 347— 
10 75 350— 

2 75 301— 

2 26 366— 

4 06.369— 
13 C5 '75 - 

5 so 378— 
j s5'38o - 

9 50 381— 

3 6%, >83 — 
2 f5 385— 
1 09 386— 

90 387— 

6 SO 3*1— 
1 25 >98 — 
6 25 




2 C5 399- 



126 60 
1 80 
CO 
70 

3 50 
2 8» 
5 4.5 

1 45 

4 t'O 
00 

5 15 
54 96 

5 35 

2 30 

4 45 
Jt 5 

5 t0 
1 45 

95 

1 70 

3 15 

2 06 



t OH- 
IO j— 
403— 
413 — 
422 — 

426 — 

427- 
429- 

434— 

435— 
439- 
452— 
45(5— 
466 — • 
469— 
471— 
4SI— 
182— 
481— 
496- 

500— 

50 1 — 
2 45 503— 

'.5 607 — 
2 25 512— 

2 70 514- 
1 40 515— 

75 510- 

11 20 519— 
70 622— 

1 20 j 525 — 

3 60.533 — 
5 30 537— 

1 65 539— 

2 30 513— 

12 30 bii- 
tö 550— 

12 20 557— 
12 85 570— 

2 85 571— 

3 25 531— 
1 10 588— 



1 30 592— 

1 66 598 — 
3 20; 601 — 

2 75: ■ 06— 
16 50 611— 

1 05 613 - 
90 616— 
10 00 '618— 
1 Tö'öM- 

3 20 626— 

1 25|f'35— 
80 1 637— 

2 90 646- 
1 60ÜI61— 

3 90ir>62— 
1 60 1 67 7 — 

20 684— 

4 98 j 685 — 

6 25|f>86— 
3 80 687— 
3 0 >|691— 
1 60 700- 

65 705— 

1 20 707— 

2 <0,711— 
2 00 728— 

1 60 731 — 

7 151731— 
75 742— 

2 10 743 — 
10 3“ 744 — 

2 40 747— 

80i751— 

9017^2— 

3 l'»|753— 
1 25 758— 
1 *90 * 

57 7 

1 95 
3 15 

60 

2 80 
1 00 



Total . 



$932 15 



SPECIAL ASSESSMENT. 

Received during the month of July. 



Amt. 


No. 


Amt. 


15 0) 


603 


$4 25 


16 50 


613 


4 00 


75 


768 


75 


2 00 


787 


60 


8 50 







10 50 




S5 S 85 



7— 



1— 8139 50 1 166- $> 

2— 48 70 167— 

3— 19 40:108 — 

4— 67 60 109— 

5 - . . . 170 — 

4 40 171 — 

6 80 172— 
26 90 173— 

13 001174— 

8 30 175— 
4L 65. i76— 
11 70' 177- 
. . . 178— 

2 60 179— 

5 4 O' 180 — 
24 90 1 181— 

5 30! 182— 

4 601183— 

3 90 ! 184— 

. . . 185— 

1 186 — 
50 70,187— 
21 90 1 188— 

9 00 189— 

28 70 190— 

11 101191— 

9 60 j 19 2— 

73 60 1 193— 
76 45jl94 — 
21 30 1 195— 

2 70 196— 
j 197 — 

84 30(198— 

3 26:199— 

3 90 200— 

. - 201— 

3 1 0 202 - 

4 40 203— 

. . 1204— 

9 50,205— 

1 90(206— 

5 10 207- 

20 25 208— 

2 00 209— 

1 601210— 

5 60 211— 

(212— 

7 . r ,0 213 — 

12 95)214— 

9 90 215— 

21 60(216- 
11 40 217- 
. . . »218— 
21 60*219— 
!0 50 220— 

3 00 , 221 - 

5 25 222— 

1 6'» 223— 
3 40 224- 

14 SO 225— 
21 20(226- 

29 70 j 227— 

1 228 — 

16 90,229— 
3 HO 1 220- 
. . . 231— 

6 80 232— 

15 40,233— 

1 50 234 — 

3 00 235— 
ißHö— 

23 80;237— 

13 60,238— 

4 20:239— 
4 60 240— 
3 60 241 — 

90 242 — 

14 60)243— 

241 

* 4 20 245- 
216— 



1U 60 331— $ . 
18 80 
13 34) 

25 20 

3 74*, 

10 60 336- 
. . . 337 — 

60,338 - 

5 On 1 339— 

21 25|340— 

3 1 70(341— 

43 60 342— 

. . . 1343- 

8 30)344— 

7 4U '34o — 

. . . (346— 

1 fH)347 — 

7 40 348 — 

1 -io :349— 

15 60 350— 

4 70 351— 

2 70(352— 

5 30 .353- 

3 00 351— 

2 0" 355-- 

6 SO' 356 — 

8 75 357— 

4 HO)a58— 

2 60 359— 

15 90 ; 560 — 

2 80 361— 

2 80(362— 

6 00 363— 

16 (i0 36 4 — ■ 

10 40(365 ~ 

9 10 366— 

3 50(367— 

•9 70)368— 

. . . !369— 

3 10, 370— 
12 50 371— 
14 50 372— 

5 00(373— 

17 70 374— 

2 80:375— 

50 60U376 — 

7 70 377— 

6 10 :178— 
60)379— 

17 20 380— 

. . . '381— 

5 30 382 - 
2 00|3S3 — 

5 10l384— 

5 30)385— 

. . . 386— 

7 50(387— 

4 3(1 388— 



496- $ 

. . (497— : 

6 00 '498— . 

4 60 1 499— 

17 50 500 — 

6 50 501— 

13 10 1 502 — . 
11 10|503— 

. . 504—4 - 
51 70)505— 

5 40,506— 

. . . 1.507- 

4 70 508— 

7 so 509— 

. - |510— 

2 80 511— 

1 60:512 — 

10 10(513— 

11 80,514— 

3 00 ,515- 

616— 

8 10 517— 

1 70 518- 

6 OH 519— 

7 70:520— 

6 40|521— 

. . 1 522 — 

. . . I&23— 

8 10 524— 

13 45)525 — 

1 40)626— 

2 60 527— 

. . 1 628 — 

2 SOI 529— 

20 20j530 — 

2 40 ! 531— 

7 10 532— 

6 60,633— 

7 30 534 — 

. - 535 — 

2 10.536— 

2 60l537— 
538— 

10 40 539— 

10 60 540— 

2 00(541— 
26 201512— 

3 30 543— 

. . . 544— 

4 60 545— 
36 90 546— 

40 65 647— 

2 80 1 518— 
549— 

3 80 560— 
551— 
652— 



18 40 
5 70 



73— 



17 50 390— 
. . 391— 

6 40* 392 — 
33 50,393— 

5 45 394— 
1« 30 395— 

1 w r.96— 
1 20 397— 

1 40)::98— 
21 10)399— 

7 GO 400— 

2 30 401— 
41 40 402— 

6 40I403— 

. . (404 — 

10 30 405— 

3 90*106— 
]4 60 j -407- 

5 101408— 

2 20:109 — 

3 50 110 — 
. . . 411— 



OBITUARY NOTICE. 

n *er turns under this head cost ten cents per line.) 

CWr,*« 1 tt . Watertown, N. Y. 

wE Union, No. 580. 
deeniPH ov er-ruling Pro\ddence has 

memhor r bnst *° Cal1 from our midst our fellow- 
Roby . it 

a faitl» Go ^ ,' n his death we feel the loss of 

further Ul of this union, and be it 

tendelviwT a c°Py °f these resolutions be 

puhlishedtn *n erei ^ ed fumil >'* a,ui the same be 
* usncd in The Carpenter. 

Jas. Parkinson, 

J. McMannus, 

G. P. Brechhk, 

Committee. 



Union No. 217. KüRKKA ' Cal - Jllnu 28. 

Te^ l 2?wm’. Th 2 <ir,ln, | Architect, of the uni- 
lov^ 1 . h V re i nov ® from our midst the bi- 
foie be it Brother , B - 1-. Tarver. There- 

hif£mnt’m. h r at h we . r X , t f Dd to thc Br ulher and 

of a*Änä mot ZT Sym,mth,<M in the k » s 

«efttÄIv 1 a , copy of thcse resolution* be 
sent the Fi otber. also published in our odicial 

S'“ d spr «' d f»'l in the minute* of our 

Almon G. Hinckley, 

M. B. Fowler, 

F. H. Gardner, 

Committee. 

FAKES AND FRAUDS. 

nu~ CK ^'* RI(:||T , a member of Union No 7nn 
1* afÄf tV'- 1,a ® union fund* and 

»even , uI,B ™‘ ! ‘er. He i* live feet 

moust„, he*M 1 . < , l , * ‘ t oomplection licavy Handy 
talker . ' u A ' y , c ” fuirl > - dresned, » rmooth 

Kcr and always lias a smiling face. 

char'ae'A'f o IcC J kao1 .‘ ik ' Previous to the Are, had 
Co 'h mill n,® door department of «icy, .lenk* & 
nine-hour C K ,d,P i’ lln d worked in it as a 
businoH« 1 ? m . ■ ' - N ,'; u U* 18 niau MeGeaohie i* in 
o«ed Tori' » «peeialty of Yen- 

send*»! r8 und 1» working ten hour* a day. lie 
Wa mT o° orH New v " rk City, De» Moines. 
»kedSS" Union Carpenters are 

4 not to handle these doors or put them up. 

AN INJUNCTION! 

s tnihi n i' U n ^ ? n liav 'i n K been issued ro- 
Cal ^ e i f A. rutc( ^ Trades of Han Francisco, 

bovoöft v 1 *- rcu \ atin !? rec iuests to all persons to 
organ an< Jttck *on Breweries’ Beer. 
F^atein£. b 5 r,r ^ 8:,,izinK the fa<<t that the 
not im^in U,1 r H ’ b V inR ‘ a >wabidin K body, can- 
Court desfi! U ? t * v, ®l ate the instructions of the 
tions existing ) t0 f n . folm i t,u ‘. ,>u . blic t,mt the r( ' ,a ' 

Breweries an^V' V n H\° * Sa *f onal and Jackson 
changed Organizations have not 

not brfmlti d i therefor«^ these breweries should 
pould any person deal in 
labor ” * Sl,Ch 1H the ft PP eal of organize«! 



11 W>,247— 


22 60,412— 


577— 


21 90 248— 




413 - 


9 30 678— 


7 30 219— 


2 00 414— 


. . . 579- 


1 70 250— 




415- 


1 40 6.80— 


251— 


7 70,416— 


11 00,581— 


4 30 1 252— 




417— 


6 00 582— 


4 70 1 253— 




418- 


2 60,583— 


6 *>0,254— 




4 1 9 — 


7 80,584— 


24 00 255— 




420— 


3 60 585— 


7 95(256 — 


7 35 


421— 


. . 586 — 


4 00 257— 
258— 


30 20 
10 90 


422— 

423- 


2 10,587— 
4 Of) 588 — 


7 TO 259- 


2 90 


>24— 


3 40 589— 


8 .80,260 — ■ 


, . „ 


425— 


2 80 590— 


7 80 261— 


1 u> 


4 , 6 — 




3 40 262— 
6 00 263— 


1 40 


427— 

428— 


. . 692 — 

24 25 593— 


1 80 2,64— 


1 10 


429— 


3 50 594 — 


8 £6 265— 




430— 


3 00 595— 


1 60 266 — 


2 £0 


131— 


6 10 596 — 




267— 


432 — 


5 15 597— 


3 80 268— 


in 30 


433— 


10 30 598— 


7 1 0 209— 


13 30 


431— 


6 40 1 599- 


6 201270— 


12 00 


435— 


2 50 1 600— 




271— 


10 no 


436— 


. . 601— 


23 1 0:272 — 


3 20 


437— 


20(602— 


26 20j273— 


6 6O1 138 — 


3 60)003— 


47 no| 274— 


14 20' 439— 


1 60)604— 


3 85 '275— 


3 0 9 440— 


6 66 605 — 


2 20 276— 


11 40 441 — 
10 95 442— 


. . . 1606— 


17 7o:277 — 


. . . 1607— 


4 SO! 27»- 




443— 


. . . 608— 


4 80 


279— 


. • . 


444- 


. . . 609- 


6 10 


280— 




445— 


. . . 610- 


14 70 


281— 


2 40 446— 


38 80 611— 


11 95 


282— 




447— 


t 101013 — 


7 90 


283 — 


8 60 418— 


2 00 613- 


10 70 


284— 


9 60 449— 


19 351614— 




285 — 


6 35J 450— 


. . ISIS — 


]0 00!286— 


18 50 451— 


23 30.616— 


11 40J187— 


8 30 452— 


8 70 617— 


1 -15288— 


10 30 453— 


1] SOU'S- 




289— 


1 00,454— 


. . I019- 


10 85 


290— 


24 30 155— 


I S 00)620 — 


4 50 


291— 


1 1 50 456— 


3 201621 — 


3 30 


292— 


1 60 


45? — 


13 361622 — 


1 50 


293— 




458 — 


. . . !6£*— 


2 50 294— 


10 00|459— 


13 70 624— 




295 — 


2 90 460 — 


3 40 626 — 



5 60 296— 
11 80,297— 

6 10 298— 
17 60 299- 
. . . 300- 



SOl— 

302— 

303— 

304— 
806— 

306— 

307— 
808- 



136— 4 30 

137— 3 70 

138— 24 50 

139— ]0 00 

140— 4 40 

141— 15 ^0 

142— 37 20 

143— 5 90 

144— 5 50 309— 

145— 4 10310— 

146— 12 60*311* — 

147 — ■ 5(0312— 

148— 2 10B13 — 

149 — 8 10*314 — 

150 — 9 70 315— 

151— 14 60*316— 

152— 

153— 

154— 

155— 

156— 

157— 

158 — 

159 — 

160 — 

161— 

162— 

163— 

164— 

165 — 



4 00 461— 

2 00 462— 
. . . 463 — 
32 60 464— 

3 40 465— 
30 60 466— 

467— 

2 .30 408— 

. . 469— 

3 70,470— 

4 60 471— 

472— 

2 30 473— 
• • • 474— 

4 10 476— 
12 60 476— 
» . 477- 

. . . 478 — 

4 90 479— 

3 60 480— 

9 00 481— 



4 00 626- 
30 00 627— 
1 50 628— 
17 30 0?9— 
32 00 630 — 
7 80,631— 
. . . (<43*3 — 
21 90,633 — 
.3 20 534— 
4 80.635— 
26 35 «36— 

3 00)637 — 
12 00 038— 
. . . '639 — 

040— 

4 20 641— 
15 no 642— 
10 00 6)3— 

] 90 644 — 
10 50 645— 
9 90 646— 



1 10 563— 

1 50 664 — 

556— 

6 50 656— 
• • . |‘567 — 

3 40 1 668— 

2 95 559— 
19 80)560— 
12 20 561— 

2 00 . 562 — 

2 70)663— 

2 60 664— 

3 10)666— 
. . ■ i566 — 

6 40,567— 

5 < 05 «> 8 — 

6 00 569— 

3 10 570— 

671— 
29 50 572 — 
. . . 073 — 

4 10 , 574 — 
34 30 575 — 

4 70 571 



1 70 
3 20 

1 2Ö 

2 90 



16 45 
6 45 



11 80 
4 CO 
52 65 
Z 95 
14 30 

1 50 

2 85 
19 60 

4 20 

4 40 

’ 3 90 
2 20 
1 80 

3 30 
8 50 

5 00 



5 00 

1 40 

’ 1 80 

2 00 

’ 1 60 
1 80 

1 40 

6 SO 

2 10 

* 4 50 

3 00 
2 80 

4 30 
3 20 



1 20 
25 
2 00 

’ 1 CO 
3 40 

2 50 

3 90 

3 45 
2 20 

4 20 
11 80 

4 70 

5 60 

13 90 
4 80 

6 60 
1 20 



661— 
662— 
6* »3 — 
664 — 
666 — 
666 — 

667— 

668 - 
669— 
610 — 



1 7 0 700- 
701— 
7 80 702— 
4 *0)703— 
4 65 ,704— 
6U 706— 
. 706— 

3 40 707— 
(708- 



1 70 738— 
3 20 739— 
1 6O740— 

10 CO 741 — 
10 00742 — 
•5 40 743 — 
17 00 744— 
. . 745— 

25 746— 



3 10 1 778— 
7 20 1 777— 

5 26I778— 
2 40 779— 

6 30(780— 



1 60 



781— 



5 75 782 — 
783 — 



5 40 
4 60 



1 40 



6 70 
5 70 



14 10 
4 30 
26 90 
1 70 
20 90 
17 00 

‘ 7 10 



8 00 



1 70 
4 30 

1 30 

2 40 



671 — 


709— . . . 


747— 


4 50 


786— 


1 00 


172— 


3 ?0|710 — . 1 


748— . 




788— 


5 20 


673 — 


2 95 711— 3 90749— 


2 30 


787— 


2 25 


«74- 


, . 712 ~ 13 30,750- 


9 90 


788— 


19 60 


675— 


2 30 713— 10 50 751— 


2 10 


789- 




676— 


6 50(7)4— . . 


752— 




790— 


4 95 


677— 


2 3»i715— 18 40 


753— 


3 £0 


791— 


2 50 


678- 


22 75 716— 16 70,754— 


5 80 


792- 


2 70 


679- 


. - 171.7- . . . 


755— 


3 80 


793— 


5 60 


680— 


. . 718— 34 50 <5t>— 


3 50 


794— 




681— 


14 90 719— 3 40 


757— 

758— 




795— 




682— 


3 51) 720— 1 SO 


4 40 


796— 




683— 


. . ,721— 11 60 1759 — 


3 60 


797— 




684— 


2 60,722— . . . 


760— 




798— 


4 55 


685— 


5 70 723 — . . 1761— 


2 20 


799— 


10 00 


686— 


6 30 724— 3 001762— 


4 20 


800— 


10 00 


687— 


3 00 725- 10 30 


763— 




801— 


10 oo 


688 — 


1 60 726— . . 


764 — 




802— 


10 00 


689— 


. . 727— 1 00 


765— 




803— 




690 - 


50 728— 1 30 


766— 


1 60 


801— 




691— 


2 00 729— 14 70 


767— 


4 70 


805— 




692 — 


13 95 730— . 


768— 


3 60 


806 — 




693— 


1 60 731— 3 9*» 


769— 




807— 




694— 


. . . ,732— 3 40 


770— 


7 10 808- 




695— 


1 20 ! 733— 3 55 


771— 


6 80 809— 




696— 

697— 

698— 


18 10,734— 6 50 

. . . 735— . . : 

14 65,736— 4 00 


772— 

773— 

774— 


2 00 


810— 


5 CO 








Total. 






. . 16,540 63 


Financial Report. 




RECEIPTS— July, 


1892. 




From the Unions (Tax, 


etc.) . . 






* 


Rent of Office. . 






JO 00 


* 


Clearances, etc . 








3 75 




^Souvenir Book for Convention . 


260 00 




Advertisements for Journal 




26 00 


* ‘ 


Lapsed Unions 








19 40 


Loan from Protective Fund . . 




. 3.200 00 


Balance on hand July 1, 1892 . 






53 23 




Total ....... 






. . 89,103 88 


*One hundred «Iollars more is due on account of 


souvenir, payable in September. 








EXPENSES — July, 


1892 






For Printing .... 








8142 26 




Ofiiee. ere .... 








657 99 


41 


Tax A F of L . . 








180 00 




Badges and Charms 






348 40 


“ 


Traveling ami Organizing . . 




64 01 


“ 


Benefit* No. 1889 to No. 1943 . 




',761 25 


4 4 


Meeting of G. lv B 








448 20 


Balance on hand August 1, 1892 






lif 78 




Tptal . . ... 






. 89, 1(B 88 



6 60 



4 20 

4 60 

2 80 
3 10 
2 00 

* 4 80 
2 00 
23 70 
3 50 

’ 2 20 
3 90 
2 00 

5 40 

’ 6 65 

6 40 

3 00 

6 80 
5 90 

2 00 
8 20 



DET A I LED EXPENSES— July, 1892 

Printing 1,500 Postuls 

*• 5,0 J0 Agitation Cards .... 

“ 300 Credentials, etc 

1,000 Note Circulars 

“ 3t0 Convention Circulars . . 

“ 3,00o Constitutions 

“ 5,0C0 Applications 

** 1,( 00 Htamped Envelopes . . 

• “ l,C0ij K«?eeipts for G H . . 

“ 1,010 Clearances . ...... 

“ Inserts lor Gen. President . 

*• 300 G. S. Biennial Kt'ports . 

Extra compositum June- July journal . 
Postuge on Journal 

“ »Supplies, etc . . 

1,000 Stamped Envelopes 
16 l 0 Postals 

Expres^age on Supplies, etc . 

44 Telegrams 

Salary Clerk Hire .... 

Office Kent for July . 

Gas bill for quarter 

J F. Jordan, Org. Sherman, Tex . 

W. A Kenyon, Genl. Org . . . 

A. M. Srni’ii, Org- Hollister Cal.,. 

II Gale, Genl. Org 

Union 15 Syracuse, N. Y. Org . . 

Tax to A. F. of L (April) 

“ “ * “ (Mayj 

1642 pins, 48 charms 

Quarterly Rent P. O. Box . . . . 

Rubber stamps and Daters . . 

Stationery and Incidentals .... 

Janitor’s Work . . .... 

T. E. Deegan attending G. E. B . 

Hugh McKay 

W. F. Abrams, “ “ 

E. A. Stevens, “ “ 

S. J. Kent, “ “ 



S4 2ö 
7 50 
6Y75 
4 ©0 
2 75 
30 00 
7 50 

1 25 
4 50 

2 50 

3 75 
54 75 
12 75 

14 76 
18 90 
22 00 

15 00 
30 10 
21 17 

394 0« 
26 00 

15 (JO 
10 00 

16 96 
9 60 

2 46 
25 00 
90 00 

90 tO 
348 40 

3 00 
11 90 

2 75 

4 00 
46 25 
63 75 

91 00 
99 50 

148 70 



3 30 

11 90 
11 40 

8 85 



1 45 



317— 


3 66 482— 


12 50 647— 




8 40 318— 


. . . 483— 


648— 




5 90 319- 


. . . 484— 


6 R0 649- 


12 as 


8 70 320— 
. . . '321— 


. . . 4*5— 


4 00 050 — 


10 80 


. . 486— 


3 90 661— 




8 60 322— 


1 90 487— 


11 80 652- 




9 9'B23— 


1 to 4-8*— 


058— 




3 SO 3 ? 4— 


. . . 489— 


6 SO 654— 


’ 2 75 ! 


1 70 325— 


4 80 490— 


3 10 655— 


4 80 i 


T 50 326— 


... 191— 


3 701660— 


1 90 | 


26 10 327— 


32 20' 192— 


2 35 657— 




7 70fc28- 


6 60 493— 


12 70 66$ — 


* 5 10 i 


1 00 329— 


3 30 494— 


1 20 680 — 


2 40 1 


29 80 33U — 


4 50 495— 


14 30 663— 


2 10 1 



Total ’ $1,762 50 

CLAIMS APPROVED IN JULY. 

No. Nurne. Union. Amt. 

1889 — M. Muller . . 62 $200 00 

1800— Mrs. S. llaverty £09 v fto 00 

1891— Harry Bowinaster 530 200 00 

1892 — E. A. Going 382 200 00 

1893— Alex. Campbell 416 200 00 

1891— Mrs. J. Palmer 1 50 00 

1305 — Mrs. A. French H 50 00 

1896 — J. H. Gerwin 25 200 00 

1897— U. B. .lames • ... 25 200 CO 

18j 8— Edw. Good burn 26 50 00 

1899— J Gengenbacli 29 200 00 

1900 — C. Schub«» t 29 200 00 

1901— Mr*. A. Sehed din SO 50 00 

1902 — Chas. Schmiedt 80 200 00 

1803— Mrs. A L. Hopple 37 50 00 

1904— J.L. Fslardeau 43 200 00 

1905— Geo. Bourne 48 200 00 

1806 — Mrs. L. A. Rose 51 50 00 

1907— Otto Smith . 51 200 00 

1908— Mrs. M. Higgason 446 50 o0 

1909 — Frank Boean 6# 200 00 

1910— Mrs. A. L. Lai>b 61 50 00 

1911 — Mis. P. W<\starviller 61 5s) 00 

1912 — Louis Stinuing 73 11125 

1913— J P. Farrell . . .... 76 200 00 

1 14— Will. C. Gray 83 :oo oo 

1915— J. O- McAndrews 90 200 00 

191 6 — Fred Toedte 90 2C0 • 0 

j 1917— Mrs. E. H. Hamer 108 50 qo 

1918— Jauie« Twaddle 109 2oo 00 

1919— Isaac Morgan JOO 200 00 

1920— C. Miller 119 200 00 

1921— Mrs L. M. Giles 150 fto 00 

1922 — Mrs. Mai y Shea 176 «91 no 

j 1923- Mrs. J. Drisch el 20«) 50 no 

1924— Mrs. M.G. Tarver 217 50 on 

1955 — Mrs. O hens«Hi 247 60 00 

1920 — Alex. M ddleton 266 2(4) 00 

1927 — Mrs. Thos Flora . . . . 302 50 00 

1928— Mrs M. J Jardine 810 50 00 

19z9 — Mrs. A. Niebol 354 90 00 

i 1930 — Wm. Marty n 367 *2(0 00 

19U — Richard Shields 3*7 200 €0 

193 John Kaiser 391 100 CO 

j 1933— C. C. Morgan 410 200 GO 

1934— Gustav Docring 419 200 00 

193"— Arcade Morine 434 50 00 

1930— Samuel Serivens 482 200 00 

1937 — Geo. Scliaftsr . . ...... 486 100 (K) 

1938— Mrs. L. H Tuthill 121 50 00 

1939 — Wm. Sorenson 509 200 00 

194'> — Karl 657 200 00 

1911-rMrs. L Mftt.bcck 681 60 00 

19*2 _ a. Schott 692 2t0 00 

1943 - Mrs. A D. Seifker 7C4 60 00 



Total f9,002 10 



AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTUUTION 
AND LOCAL RILES. 

A.s adopted at the St. Louis Convention. 

Note.— W herever any alterations or amend- 
ments are made they appear in italics. Where 
a new section or substitute is inserted it is so 
stated. 

General Contention. 

Section 4.— The U. B. shall meet in General 
Convention biennially on the third Monday in 
September, at such place as may hai-,i been desig- 
nated by the last preceding Convention. 

Sec. 8. — The election of delegates and alternates 
shall be held on the second meeting in July preced- 
ing thc Convention, and no member shall be 
eligible as a delegate unless be is a journeyman 
Carpenter six months a member in goo<l stand- 
ing of the L. U. which elects him, except when 
the L. U. has not been in existence the time 
herein required. The R. S. shall under penalty 
of $5 fine, at once report to the G.S. the name and 
Pott Office address of the delegate and alternate. 

Sec. 12. — A «luorum for the transaction of busi- 
ness shall consist of a majority of the delegates 
attending the Convention. 

General Officer**. 

Sec. 15 — The General Officers of the U. B. 
shall consist of a General President, two Gen- 
eral Vice-Presidents, a Geueral S«cretary, a 
General Treasurer, and lire members of a Gen- 
eral Executive Board, as follows: One irom 

the New England States (including New 
Brunswick and Nova Scotia), one from the Mid- 
| die States (including the Provinces of Ontario 
arfd Quebec), one from the Southern States, and 
two from the Western States, <wie of uhtch shall 
be from west, of thc Mississippi River (incht d in gMa ui- 
toha and the Territory of British Columbia). These 
officers shall be elected by the General Conven- 
tion, and shall hold office for two years or until 
^heir successor ares duly chosen and qualified. 

General Secretary. 

Sec 29.— The General Secretary shall employ 
his own clerical assistance ftt reasonable salary 
payable from the General Fund, anil ho shall 
give bond to the G. E. B. to the amount of $20,- 
000 for the faithful performance of his duties. 

(Thc only change in this section is, fixing the 
amount of the bond <>f the G S. at$iO,0OO, where 
the law now makes it only if3,0.,O. It is presumed 
there will be a larger monthly income at the 
General Ofiiee, and therefore a greater necessity 
for a «arger bond on the part of the G.S. The 
clause in regard to clerical assistance and pay- 
ment of the same is now actually the rule, and 
engrafting it in the Constitution is simply to le- 
galize (hat fact.) 

District Councils. 

Sec. 43.— Insert the words “and he «xmiposed 
exclusively of delegates from Unions of the 
U. B.“ at end^of last line. , 

Finance and Dues. 

Sec. 50.— The initiation fee of a member shall 
be not less than 32. Beneficial members shall pay 
not less than 50 cents per month dues, and Non * 
Beneficial members not less than 30 cents per month. 
No officer or member shall be exempt from pay- 
ing dues or assessments, nor shall the same be 
remitted or cancelled in any manner. 

(This amendment will not interfere with the 
dues of any of the locals where they now charge 
50 cents, or more than 50 cents per month. The 
idea Is to raise the «lues of those unions now’ 
charging only 35, 40 or 45 eernts per month, so 
that-Hueli unions will have 50 cents per month 
the lowest dues. The need for a higher minimum 
of dues has been proven conclusively by all our 
experience.) 

Sec. 63.— (Substitute.) Each L. U. shall pay to 
the G. S. a per Capita Tax of fifteen cents per 
month for each member in good standing, non- 
beneficial members included. A member three 
months in arrears is not in good standing. Four- 
teen cents of ttii$ monthly tax shall be used as a 
General Fund for the management of the U. B. 
and payment of all death and disability benefits 
prescribed by this Constitution, and one cent of 
this monthly tax shall be used exclusively for 
organizing purposes. 

(This increase in our Cnpita Tax is absolutely 
necessa ry to pay expense» and meet nil claims on 
us fordcath benefits. Either this, or we will have 
to reduce the amount of benefits we now pay. li 

has cost us eleven and a half cents per month 
the past year to meet all our death and disability 
claims. To make up the deficiency the past year 
we had to resort to several assessments, and Unit 
caused considerable contention. It is better to 
increase the tax than to have our members sub- 
ject to constant assessments. The increase in 
tax also provides for an organizing fund, which 
w ill amount to ?6,()C0 or 57.000 per year, to be 
1 used to send out speakers and organizers to all 
sections under our jurisdiction.) 

Sec. 54. — (New Section.) In order to create a 
fund for the support of such members as may be 
engaged in legally authorize«! strikes or lockouts, 
each L. U. shall set, aside five cents per month 
for each member for a Protective Fund which 
I shall be forwarde«! numthly to the G. S. until 
said fund amounts to the sum of $12.000, when 
theO. rt. shall instruct the locals to retuin said 
fund in their treasuries until again called for by 
theG.,8 in case it may be require«! at headquar- 
ters. 

(This new Section practically does away with 
Sections 69, 60 and 61 . The idea of this new Sec- 
tion 64, Is to have the Protective Fund come into 
headquarters, and prevent local unions from 
spending it. Under ou* present laws, if left 
with the local unions, there is danger of the 
Fund being spent by the lo«w.ls whenever their 
local funds run short; or, if they go on strike, 
they spend the Fund. Tlieb. when called for, 
they have not got it, and ask to be excused from 
payment, or be given time to settle. We also 
lose a good deal of the Fund when unions break 
up and lapse. This has been the case in a num- 
ber of locals, and the U B. has lost nearly £11,000 
pf Protective Fund the past four years through 
such causes. It w’ill he no gr«?ater expense or 
hardship on the locals to send the Protective 
. Fund with the t«x e.acb month, a#* they would 
eventually hav«* to do so whenever called on 
under our present laws. On the contrary, it is a 
less troublesome system t*» llu* locals and to the 
General Office t«> adopt the new law. It will 
keep all'airs in better shape. Many of the unions 
! now- send (he Fund with the tax each mouth, and 1 
J find it very convenient.*» 









Sec. 55. — The Treasurer of the L. U. shall send 
the Per Capita Tax and Protective Fund to the G. 

S. on thc first meeting night of each month for 
the month preceding. The money shall be pay- 
able by P. O. Money Order, Bank Draft or Ex- 
press to the G. S., who shall receipt for the same. 

Sec. 66. — The Per Capita Tax and Protective 
Fund shall be held as a standing appropiintion. 
An order for the same shall be signed by the 
President and Recording Secretary w ithout re- 
quiring a vote of the local. 

Sec. 57 — (Substitute.) Whenever, by virtue of 
an increased death rate, the General Fund shall 
fall below {3,000, the G. E. B. shall levy an as- 
sessment upon each L. U. not to exceed twenty- 
five cents for each member in good standing, to 
make up sai«l deficiency. 

Strik«‘4*ut Sections 69,60,61 and 63. as being 
unnecessary, and arrange in consecutive order 
thc numbers of sections retained in Constitution. 

Contractors. 

Sec. 66. — Insert the words “No member cau 
remain in the contracting business longer 
than t liree months without tendering his resig- 
nation under penalty of expulsion,” at end of 
last line. 

(This amendment of course can not be retro- 
active, and does not apply to those contractors 
who aie now members of the U. B. But it will 
apply hereafter to all journeymen who become 
contractors. This is primarily an organization of 
journeymen carpenters for the interest of the 
journeymen. It has aroused ba«l feeling to have 
our members go into business in competition 
with other contractors. In many localities it lias 
led to unpleasant complications between our 
unions and the contractors in arranging -rade 
rules. Besides that, the presence of contractors 
in many eases, it is alleged, improperly inllu- 
ences the action of journeymen in the unions 
and holds back the advance "of thc organization.)' • 

Admission ok New Member*. 

Sec. 73.— At the .‘conclusion of the initiation 
ceremony the new ly-initiated member shall bo 
conducted to the F. S.. whereupon handing in 
his name land address, and on payment of one 
month’s dues in atlvanee, and in addition such 
proportionate amount of the month's dues for the 
month in which he becomes a number, as required 
by Section 51, he shall be placed on the books of 
the L. U. as a member, and the F. S. shall 
furnish him with a card of membership and a 
copy of the Constitution and By-Laws. 

Appeals and Grievances. 

Sec. 77.— Insert at end of last line, the words 
“Where there is a D. C. the member or union 
aggrieved must first submittthc appeal to the 
I). C., which shall have power to act and infiict 
such penalty as it may deem the ease requires, 
subject to a further appeal to the G. E. B.” 

Members in Arrears. 

Sec. 84.— (Substitute.) Any member indebted 
to his L. U- for any sum equal to two months’ 
dues shall be notified by the F. S., and when 
owing a sum equal to three months’ dues shall 
be eonsideretl in arrears, and will not be eligible 
to any benefits until three months aft«*r all his 
arrearages are pai«l in full. A member owing the 
L. U. a sum equal to six months’ dues shall be 
sgspemled and his name stricken from the 
Iwoks. After that he can be readmitted only as 
a new member, subject tosuch initiation fee and 
tineas may be imposed by the By-Law s of the 
L. U. or D. C. to which he formerly belonged. 
All arrearage to be forwardetl to the L. U. from 
which he was suspended. 

Strike out Sections 85, 67, £ 8 ard'£9, as I cirg 
unnecessary in ease Section 84 is * dopt« d as 
amended. 

(See. 84 is a plainer and better law in every res- 
pect than the law under which we are now work- 
ing. Its adoption will also dispense with Sec- 
tions 85, 87, 88 and 89 of the Chicago Constitution. 
Those sections were full of conflictions and 
have been very confusing and annoying to the 
bulk of the unions. The old law’ on suspended 
and reinstated members has been a great «letri- 
ment and hardship to Uie Unions, and to offset it 
we had to grant dispensations to allow locals the 
right to amnesty suspended members. The new’ 
Section 84 gives ample ..lie to a susnended mem- 
ber to square up w ithout having to be reinstate«!. 
And if lie fails to coi • time he can then be 
readmitted subject t«> • xiew r initiation fee arid 
such fine as may be .. |$ose«I by the rules of the 
city or district to which he belonge«!. This al- 
lows of a heavy fine in a well-organ ize«l district 
where it can be collected, ami in w eak «listriete 
or weak unions a fine need not be imposed.) 

Clearance Cards. 

•Sec. 113.— (Substitute.) A member w’ho leaves 
the jurisdiction of his L. U. to work in another 
city, ortiesires to transfer liis membership, must 
apply to the F. S. and procure a Hearanec card, 
and a fine of five dollars ($5.00) shall be imposed, 
and the member bolding the car«l be suspcmled 
from all benefits for three months, unless it bo 
deposited in some L. U. or renewed by the h. U, 
granting it within thirty days from the diAe of 
issue. Said line shall be collecte«! by the L.' U. 
in which the card is deposited. If the curd he 
not <lept>sitc«l at all while the member is work- 
ing within the jurisdiction of another city or 
union, then all penalth?« shall be double«!, and 
the fine shall be collected by the original union 
issuing the chuiranee curd. On notification the 
latter union shall enforce said penalty on pain 
of expulsion. • 

.Sec. 116.— No member shall lie entitled to a 
Clearance Cai’d unless he is three monthsa mem- 
ber of the U. B. since his last initiation , and if 
granted any sooner it, shall be only upon pay- 
ment <if Five Dollars ($5.09) as a fee for Clearance. 

Sec. 119. — Kaeh clearance card shall have tw’o 
coupons attached (Nos. 1 ami 2), and on deposit 
of said card the F. S. receiving it must sign and 
affix the seal to coupon No 1, and at once for- 
ward both coupon* by mail to the F. S. issuing' 
the card as evidence of its deposit, and the F. S. 
issuing the card shall sign and affix the seal to 
coupon No. 2, and return it to the F. S. r«H?eiving 
the clearance card, as evidence that the clearance 
card was legally obtained. 

Sec. 127.— Insert the w’ords “under penalty of 
expulsion,” at end of last line. 

[£ee bist column of Page 4.] 

he 

tr- 



4 






Ye 



0 — tuv wwieu ctupenters. 






THE CABPEN TER. 



BIENNIAL REPORT 

OK TIIE 

CENERAL SECRETARY. 

(For the two years from July 1 , lHaO, to 
July I, 1892.) 

I'll II AMKI.ni I A, I*A., JlLY 25, 1892. 

To Ihf 1 is ii.nl l> ch iiilt s ii.vai nihlnl nl the Si rt nth 

(rent I til 1 ‘tntreiitiuii of Iht [ niit tl Hrotliet Il'tOtl of 

Carpi ntt i» 'inti Jiiini tx of .Interim : 

Fku.ovv Toii.-'R*: — A little over eleven years 
agn in tin- city where yon are now assemble«!. — 
herein St. Louis, Mo., in the Spring of 1»S1 
— the seeil was planted wliieh sprouted forth in 
the Convention at Chicago on August 12, 1S81, 
and led to the fornuitioii of the powerful organi- 
zation you now have the honor to represent. 
Effort after effort hail been made to raise wanes 
and advance the interests of the trade in St. 
Louis and a« often a* the union men were suc- 
cessful, they v ere again pulled hack hy the influx 
and competition of carpenter» from lower paid 
town- in ;««l «lining States and from other por- 
tions of t .e country. 

A sketch of the Past. 

The same condition of affairs likewise pre- 
vailed in all other large cities vv here unions ex- 
isted. The spirit of unionism union}; carpen- 
ter# at that date was to some extent narrow 
and contracted. The carpenters of one 
city were indifferent to the interests of the 
carpenters of other cities. I'nion earpentets 
might strike in one city and it mattered 
not to other cities whether they succeeded 
or not. There was no tie of unity no bond of 
solidarity among the carpenters of America. 
Every where the ten-hour day of drudgery was 
universal, wages low, piece work and lump work 
quite general and the fiercest underbidding and 
most reckless competition prevailed. 

Then it was that the idea of a national union 
of Carpenters was advanced and advocated by 
your humble servant. The first work was to 
Issue a small monthly Journal to p.isli the 
movement. Two previous attempts at a na- 
tional organization of American carpenters hail 
signally failed— the first in 1854: the second 
ln 1867. Under tin-' discouragement, the work 
was attempted a third time. And after eleven 
years of amazing progress the United Brother- 
hood is now a fixed institution in the front rank 
of labor organizations. It has the largest mem- 
bership and greatest roster of locid unions of 
any trade union in the entire world— outstrip- 
ping all the oldest and best labor organizations 
and unparalleled in the successes achieved and 
in the fruitful good accomplished Let us trust 
that at this convention, we may perfect its finan- 
cial system and remedy its laws, so that with the 
approval of the members, our beloved organiza- 
tion will be equal to all occasions and will la* in- 
vincible to nil attacks, no matter from what 
aource the- may come. 

The Formation and Growth of the Order. 

Eleven years ago. on Aug 12, 1881, our organi- 
zation was established at a convention called for 
that purpose in fhieago. 111 . Twelve Local Unions 
ami 2,t>42 members were the extent of the organi- 
zation at that date. Now we have 802 Locals and 
84.376 enrolled members— with 51,313 members in 
good standing and benefit* And were it not for 
the hardship of the laws enacted at our last con- 
vention, two years ago. particularly severe as to 
suspended mem be is and their reinstatement, we 
would now number over 60,(i(4) members in good 
a**uding. In fact had it not been for the exten- 
sion the past year of dispensations to w eak Local 
Unions permitting them to amnesty sn*q «ended 
members and reinstate lor the sum of two dol- 
lars, our organization would have been seriously 
reduced in membership. 

Shortening the Honrs of Lahor. 

In the pii't two years we have continued the 
agitation for shorter hours and with good effect. 
We now have 46 cities working eight hours a 
day; in 1**.#». we had only 36. We now have 393 
cities win king nine hours a day; in 1890 , we hud 
only 231. We now have 432 oilics working shorter 
hours Saturdays; in 1890 we had only 260 These 
reductions in the hours of labor bv actual calcu- 
lation estimating on an eight-hour ba-is luive 
led to the employment of 11,150 additional car- 
penters more than would he employed ware the 
iM’i-bour day universal as of old. These men, 
win would have I well idle and penniless, loot- 
ooking for work can thunk our organ izu- 
.i.»i »or the betterment ..r their condition, and 
tin sc too w in. arc now working tin- shot ter hours 
oi ia-Mir well know the gladsome advantage.- 
tli -y have obtain« d 

How Wages Have Been Advanced. 

Where wage» eleven years ago were Jl.&n to 
?2 äo jm*i day, they iiave been advanced to >2 26 
:«i ? : 5" per day. Thousands o! carpenters union 
and non-union men, now go home on a pay d-ty, 
w ith more w ages than they had prior lo the a«!- 
vcii« of our Order. In Ail cities we iiave forced 
wage« up, that on a careful computation, close 
to five ami a half million dollars mole wages 
stave bet u annually distributed in the last live 
years among the journeymen carpenters in cities 
and tow us w here w e have unions. 

These gains in w ages and advantages m shortei 
hours have not always be* n attended by costlv 
»trikes and lock-outs. Much lias been done by 
strategy, tact its und e* inference*, backed by the 
moral force of organization, and by the knowl- 
edge the employers bad of the strength and 
ability of our organization to make asturdv tight 
if need be to enf««ree its demands. Still in the 
past four year# we have spent nearly S146,0nu 
from our general fuiui in strikes ami lock-outs. 

The Benevolent Advantage*. 

V hile the l nited Brotherhood is really a trade 
uuioufor the protection of our trade interests and 
for die advancement and the welfare of the work 
ing people, at the same time, we have various be- 
nevolent features of great advantage to our mem- 



ss. ä z r ;;r \ -jä s Lrjäf? 

SÄsat s.» nr rs r- - * • • - ä; 

we Have paid out S 228.863 for these general bene- in spite of o.bis against us. Out of the few de- grea ih -htf J ^ ltH organization regularly «.«,-„ .V* 

fits from headquarters; $72,613 of this was spent feats we have sullered we can pro i . . «if nrinted Btittolies months as required by law Tl ' rt * 

the ,»ast year bee.l the lessons taught us and “In time of that the revenue fron, sales of prmted supplies months as «‘pnred »> law They 

These rleu sboubl speak in thunder tones to Peace prepare for war. ’ Let us raise our monthly | and members’ budges not only covered he passed upon all ap.a als ami 

everv man ami prove an all-convincing argu- dues all along the line to sixty cents or more per , entire cost of the same, but in addition to that referred to tl.eu, audit , -.1 my Ko,i,nN quarteriy, 
ment a* to the good the value and benelitB of month, and have a good Iteserve Fund to ana- , it was also sufficient lo pay the eost of issuing and supervised the ' interests of the Brother!,, *4 
3 «ti»l tain us in our trade struggles. our monthly journa.-T.tK Ca kpkstkb— and gtvmg to their duttes the utim.t care and 

d for M ,i 0 „ r bills for wrapping, mailing, oin attention, which require« a large am,,,« , lof 
Extent and Composition of the Orgaulza- Mrlfce» and gockokx . postage, ex pressage, telegrams, and all the run- sacrifice and devotion on their part lh.ir,^ 

,loM - The strikes of the future in our trade are likely ,, XIM .„ S es ( ,f t |„. General Office, exclusive of eisions, along with the regular ofli, i , p r «„,. #(1 . 

With 802 loeal unions, our Suited Brotherhood to be more prolonged, and there is possibility of aMt j 0 f|- ux . |„.)j, ings, are published in Thk Cakik.vi i it 

now extends to every State and Territory of the many lock-out# and bitter contests close at hand. ,,f t lie* new (1. E. 11. for six meetings As far back as Inst L» -cciuher, thi-ngi, «, ur 

United States and into Muxico, and lias a hold These struggles will teat the manhood und devo- j„ t | H . a bove report amounts to >2,362.31 1 ollieial journal I ,-ulled on our i«.< a - ni„i i„ em . 

in the leading provinces of Canada. lion of our members We will bine to pass or 53 y.-j .50 per meeting — aland $1575 i>er year, lien, to offer ary aineiidmeiits to tin- <oii*titu- 

We have unions in 724 cities ; 46 of the unions through a crucial ordeal, which will strain every ^| v or j K j tl al estimate of $1700 per year for an Kx- lion, or any suggestions, they might «b-irepr*. 

are German, 7 French, 4 Scandinavian. 4 Bulie- nerve ami fibre of our Organization 1 he em- lH . ut j vo jj OJir ,| as under the present system lias sented to this Convention for your an. | rg _ 

miau, 1 Polish, 1 Jewish and 2 Holland. ployers are preparing lor it, and so must we. j |„. el| mort . than realized. Under the old system ; pcatc-d this invitation month after n.ontli, #<, 

Eighteen of the locals are composed of planing With dull times on their side, and an array of j. : H wjt |, ,,, M 0 f annual meeting J that if there arc any who hereafter iuhv g, , ntll# 

mill men; 2 of these are exclusively of inaehiue seltlsh interests they present a formidable trout . (}e|K . rM , vicv-Presidents, the eost amounted , that they have not hud a fair eliane. ,t -, U |1 b* 



And it really appears as if the reived from me, and of the rash halan. 



.f the siek and needy members, and in that way employers- the National Association of ICmp.oy^ htw ' " f Z ZuZ 



•survival of the littest’’ would truly i in the re|s,rt up to July 1 . 1*92. hM 



unions acted in eonjmietiou with me on all < luims r 
having Uw«, Appeals and Grievuuees, a« required b^" 
*ir run- law. ’ 



trade unions. 

Extent and Composition of the Organlra- 
tiou. 



hands, or of sash, blind and doormakers ; 6 are On our side, we must lie more than ever united, | ^ ^pj^j | K . r ye ir 

exclusively stair builders’ unions, 4 of ear build- harmonious in <>ur counsels, cautious in our ac- , 

ers, 3 of millwrights and 1 of ship joiners. tions, and ever vigilant and determined in the , l’Ue System of Funeral ami Ulsahlllly 

Of these 802 unions 1 is located in Mexico, 16 protection of our fraternal interests hacked hy I Benefits, 

ill t’aniniii. 3t are on the Pacific coast, 127 in the the “ sinews of war,’’ in the shape of nn »bund- Vutler the new Constitution as adopted at the 

Southern States (10 of these are composed en- mice of funds to do manly battle whenever pm late Chicago Convention fewer claim# for benc- 
tirely of colored men). 68 are located in New voketl to conflict. At all limes our policy should Hr ,. disapproved and much more satisfaction 
England, 263 in the Middle States and 293 in the he.first to secure ism fere nee# with the employers, ■_. , ICVV j aW> j,, vi-ganl to benefits. 

Western States. and, hy negotiation or conciliation, endeavor to J i i n «ni ....tv Its ,-laiiu* .mi.. until,«- to 



their own fault if they have not mude tl« i want# 
known. The call lias brought a birg- i>uin| n . ro 
suggestions, etc., and these 1 have pine, i - .-for # 
the Committee on * ’oiistitutinn for 1 1 i r r> p.rt. 

To this Con venti«»n I present the lir-t 
or “Ollieial Hand Book” ever is-ued by -m.,- O r- 
ganization. Tlie advcrtisemi-iit# then ;u ..»v# 



Western Stati-s. 



is found with the new laws in regar«l to oeneiiis. ,,^tte«l our treasury a handsome sum ot pn.tit 
Since July I. 189«, only llh claims amonnting to : uvef aIU | jjIm.v,. a i| ( -x|HHse#. The f. k . ,r.d>!« 



New York heads the list with 93 unions, IVim- secure a settlement only resorting to a strike as *«.. ..-^i , vo ,i ; i,. ,.i. .. , , . 

• I.. riu..MU n tu « oi < ii .iisiippioi« ii. wmii .'•» ■ 1 »aims r (, w .|,u,,u tins souvenir has bad in the a<l-. iii'in» 

«ylvauia coium next with SO muons, ana Ohio a last alternative. But when we uo strike let us 



amounting to ill7.?40 have been paid. Hus i' patronage of tool mamifaelur« rs and I, 



third with 74 unions. strike to win, and give little notice of our inten- murt . ll|al , | lalf ,, f iM ,|„. and all the 

Lapsed Unions anil Organizing Fund ,i ‘*" ‘« ’“'•ike And strike only when . arpenter hl ,, ie pas, ten years. 

work is plentiful and let our strikes he short and of Ua . , HJ| ,. )aj|l|s a ,, I>r) „ t .j |s| „,. r ,. fur 

Our greatest loss in lapsed and su-peiided d. eisive , K>n ,- flll „. r .,i iM uelili.. 4#7 wife funeral hem-tit#, 

unions has been priuei|<ally in the smaller Last year the United Brotherhood of Car- , m> j v benefits. Out of tin- >117.. 31« 

town# of the Western and Southern State«. , »enters and Joiners had in all 169 stnk. # and |Ml j 1 |„ II ,i 1 iium*rsillH ii. fitsni arlvom*-«,liofit- 
tnosily in n *w towns where building “ l«sim»" lost ten. Tbi# year wre have had 128 trade I ,, r were pai.i for w ife funeral l« n. tit*, the 

have been under way and eolla|>sed. In nimm- movements ami have been successful in all hut ; U1 , yetir# 

her of ii.stam-«-«. the members of tbe-e lapsed three instances This is certainly a go«..l record ,, 1|r K ,. m . r .,| death rate lmsed on Is-nelits paid 

unions ha. e g».ue mtoo«her towns and organized to liml only 3 strikes lost out of 12s For 'trikes 0|| |nak . ,|,. a „ lSf at ,„ ir i H>t , aim.ui.ted 

new mu....' ..r om.-.i tl.ose already existing. and lock-outs we s|»e..t in all $75.497 in l#9»i. o»4 - .. , , . j | | 

* <u,,eu ,lu ‘ sc »“»oils might have 400.20 in 1891 and this year we spent only «JC.1 -4 ,., ailn> |Mil , „„ „. lll;i |,- .b ath', ami disapproved 

been k. ,.i anve ami strenglheiied had we estab- Nearly one-half of tins was s| u, the Hal- «-Ih,,,,... ,|,i ,le :l ,h about 7‘ - to il„* 

ll'licl an • ii'gam/liig Fund to semi out speakers ti.u.ir, strike this year for the elgnt-hour «lay. tUl „ 1 ^ tlll 1 Nl „„..ling oi. ..«.r nv.-n.ge me, 

aml pay t.iein. The creation of such a fundi In that strike we expended nearlv |I2J 00 from .... r .. ,■ , , ... , . , 

■ • ' sliip tor tin* year# 18 s.» ami is -o the «•«••-t oi our 

bale recommended again ami again at previous our Protective Fund. . , , 

* beliebt svstl-m Inis been 8.1 ts*nls iier 111 . mher per 

eonveiilions. ami now more Ilian ever I advocate it.-t»iii Cahmi .. „„ . • ... 



more than half of all tin- money and all tln- 
cluims paid ill the past ten years. 

Of the 994 claims approved 4SI wer«' for nirni- 
Ikts' fum-ral heiielils. 4#7 wife funeral Item-lit#, 
ami 23 ili-ahillty beiiefils. Ollt of the $ll7.3t»t 
paid out in iniieral b«-m lit# nearly onc-tith «.fit— 



<»ur general ileatli rate lia#ed on iH-nefit# paid 
on mail- death#, at our last ( \tn\ ention amounted 
to about 3 j to t lie llioll'iiml liieiul ■< i - ; i lielmlllig 
.•lain.- paid on li*mule ■li-ulbs, ami «lisapproi «-d 
.-In ui.', i lie« leaf h i ale aiii*«uul«-<l t«> about 7U to the 
t boil'. i ml. 1 .'t limiting on our .t\ ''lag«' nieinbi r- 
slnp for the year# lKs.i and Is -o the cost of our 



men generally, lead# mi* t«» Ix-licM tout ou, ottj. 
eial journal. Tnr: t .ua-e.vi i i: , can now U- en- 
larged to 12 page# ami placed on a paving -asu 
by means of a<l\erti#ing patronage. 

1 in porta nee of tile Occasion. 

This large convention of deli-gat«-# fr-.iu vl 
sections of the «-iiuiitry imlieat«-# the ext« i.--ve 
and w i ile-spread ebarai-ter of out Organi/a' i-ia, 
A ml now at tin# tim«- more than any otlo-r the 
«■yes of the Alio Mean p« <>p|e, and of all tin .Ml- 
• ze«i land- are ei-nti-ri-d on tin- tia«l<- iiiii.m -of 
America. The « «.niest whi«-li began lastn... h 
oil the bank- of the Monmigaheln i# a streggie, 
which hits aioii'i«! nu.r« -olnl tnonght and | i-s 



its adoption, or our Migauiz.it ion will have a 
larger number of lapsed unions in the next fciJ 
years. I am free to #ar many of these lapsed 
unions might to-day be in existence had their 
monthly dues been large enough to pay expenses. 

Our Annual Growth. 

For the purpose of comparison I now beg 
l«-ave to submit the following table showing our 
annual growth from 1881 up to date. 



benefit system lias been # • «•cuts per nu mber per <|ucc<! a larger public awakening than any like 
Hi suit» Gained. year, or 6 ‘ 4 .-eiits jmt inoutli. I movement since ls77 It is u struggle between 

The records on file in my olliee show the follow - l*«l l" r ti*»* y* ar closing June 30. 1891. mir the organized lew, representing the eorp.-iate 

ig uiiiiiIht of cities involved in trade disputes In-uelit system averaged a eost of S- , i«-i:ts p«-r wealth ami privileged ml« re-t- of our ItepubHi-, 
i 1889, 189Ü, lsVl and the result# ; im-iii 1 m- r each month. F or the year closing J mo* and « .rgauized labor — the ir*»n ami steel work era 

1889 1 s'.« i *891 is *2 S f, *h. 1892, our . \|.«-uses are proportionately -repr. st illing the braw n, the hraiii«and 

nr higher wage# H j4 24 29 heavier for benefits They have e.«M us $1..37 heart of tl.edisinlierit.-.l millions.. In the . rack 

»• for nine hours a iluv . .6? hI 1i* 7 P 1 ’ 1, »w tui* yi*H r , nr II <vi»t • |mt month, of tin* rith nml ainitl tin* thumh r of t uiuion *.d 



Y tars. 



s. ” ^ = * 2 Z = s 



• S'« 



18S1 . 


12 








9 1 142 




1882 


21 


n 


2 


1! 


3,780 


1,733 


1883 . 


26 


ii 


8 


3 


3,293 


‘487 


Issl . 


47 


21 


• . 


21 


4.364 


1.071 


1885 


80 


50 


17 


33 


5.789 


1.426 


ls»6 


177 


ltd 


4 


97 


21.423 


17 05» 


18»7 


306 


129 


• • . 


129 


-6,466 


4.073 


ISsS 


4 19 


178 


45 


133 


28,416 


2.950 


1 Ss'.l . 


627 


164 


75 


88 


31.494 


3.078 


1890 . 


«97 


227 


57 


170 


5.3.769 


22.276 


1891 . 


798 


215 


114 


lol 


56.937 


3.168 


1 


*02 


147 


167 


4 


61.313 


‘6.624 



ing miuilx r of ettie-s involved in 


trade* 


«Ii* 


i«ute# 


in 1839, 1890, 1891 and the- re*snlts; 

1889 


>'.■<• 


.891 


1S92 


For higher wage# 


. H 


1 « 


24 


29 


*• «-ight hours a «lay. . . . 


. 1 


42 


22 


6 


“ for nine hours u «lav 


. 61 


8 l 


li»7 


65 


“ shorter hours Saturilav. 


. 6 


4 


.3 


15 , 


Against reduced wages. . . 


o 


— 


13 


4 


I/ockoiits .......... 


. 


_ 




6 


Total 


82 


144 


169 


128 


THE KE81LT9. 
No. of strike** won 7* 


132 


148 


118 


lost. 


•} 


8 


10 


3 


“ “ “ compromised 


•* 


4 


11 


7 




— 


— 




— 


Total 


.82 


1 14 


169 


128 ! 



month. 

AMOUNT OK I.KNKItAI. ItKM.FITS PAII» 



A complete recapitulation of ull moneys re- 
ceived from Protective Fund and special strike J 
assessments ami the moneys expended for ] 



Yearn. 


No. 
Bet. eiits 


of Amount 

lAii.L Paid. 


I Bulnuee 
on Hand. 


1883 


6 


SI. 6*0 « 0 




18» t 


9 


2.260 Ul 


$ 28 34 


1885 


36 


5.7U» to 


22# tr2 


1886 


51 


9.200 Ut 


2 080 12 


1887 


139 


16.275 16 


3.333 65 


1888 


172 


18.750 (HI 


7.9*0 51 


1 »89 


224 


25,57 5 00 


6.535 t.5 


1893 


2 »4 


32.267 49 


5.986 22 


>91 


.371 


44.7.32 66 


8.232 51 


1 892 


62, t 


72. M3 36 


55 23 


Total. 


1.888 


S 228, 863 


1 



can he found in the printed ollieial pro« -ceding*. 
Counting from July 1, 1890. up to April, 1 



Practical Fraternity* 

We have also maintained the most intimate 
and friendly relations with nil National and lu- 



ll« art <d tlicdi'ii. hi nted millions. In the ■ i.tek 
of the rille ami amid the thunder of cannon, ;n 
the fiery glar«- of battle and in the fury of the 
people, the Pinkerton service lias ut la»» h«-en 
! condemned to go! And with it in time will go 
all vested privileges, moneyed rule and every 
monopolized interest detrimental to the |wop!e I 
In these trying times, the duty of maintain- 
1 ing public or<h r and pence rests w ith the men 
and women of toil for as our cause is l>as<'d on 
justice and human fraternity we have little to 
gain by any appeal to brute force. By an at#- 
peal to reason, hy public discussion by the in- 
telligent use of our ballots, ami by the legitimate 
work of Trade I'nion*, we tun accomplish more 
than by any appeal t«« the destructive powers of 
civil coiiIli«-t. with all its interne« im- horrors, and 
1 uncertainties. 

1 u tlie sight i» this great res|»oiisihility, our 
m t ions and words at this < ouventioll should !«• 
carefully guarded All our legislation here 



' - ' '* *°*°-< Protective Fund on tlie membership reported . «mi in- eareiuuv guarded All our leg. -la, ion here 

* Ix*ss. each month wouhl amount to &M.695. But up to 1 ,,,w,,s ’ a ’“‘ ,, ' ro, " rh , Ih- directed to the furtherance of tha 

The total membership above reported is only date only $49.714.30 of that amount have l«-en or ,kh1 '■« ■ gut« b«.«li. s, our a>eal unions movement w«- are engaged in and vv hieb ha# so 

of those in go«.«! standing and in benefit, and for pai«l to the General office which leaves $4,981 not | 'p'i^ * 1,,WM 11 I ,r,l ‘ >*’ “I mb r « st m the welfare of lunch at -take, not only for «>ur own mcrubm, 

which the local union« pay per capita tax to the jmiil in — most of which is lost hv unions lapsing ” r - UH " »• l uit« «I I*ah««r. Anil tlirough our bui for the millions of workers. • 

General Office. or has U-en sp.-ut hy some union# for 1.,,-al ex- . ,l “' A'"« • ■mn ; 

Tlii** t»l»U* «>f figure« printed alnive allows a net peiuwn and they m\\ not replan* it. There was Z* iax< K^enumpU <»f our faith in 

gain the pa>t t u t* > i ur*» of i(»5 new uniotift and also the mini of $5.SMof tliin fund outstanding . uri L 1 nit> of nil < h gam/cil I.»l«er, <>u you, th^ oft'uers} iui«i delegates here a>sern- 

am! a gain ol 3.1(ls members in 1891, or 7 per cent in the same way and for like reasons at the last ?" 111 *" ll * ri * "* | ,a ' 1 *"“* K‘ M »I "ill hiuI hied, rest# tin- honored «ligniiy anil exalttal work 
increase in miTulK-rship. while this past year, I Convention. This amount of $5.s5i athletl t«» J^erii« '» 1|* of a.« sisi t i trade organization# in ,.f «-mu ting si.« h lavv- ami making such provi- 

ow ing to very dull times last winter, and to eun- j $4,981 makes $10.835 as good as lost in the past !’ “ tl ‘ rn,lon - 1 hey hav e organize«! ami built sinus as will promote the best interests and 



#•' • » •• V.» COIIU Ull IIMIS MM til PI- If 1 . f . I | 

Thi* t«hh* of figures priuti-d aUive allows a net peiuwn und they can not replace it. There was . H iax< gi'enninple I'rotd of our faith in 

gain the paM t wi* \mr- of it»5 new unions and also tlie sum of |5,8M of thin fund outstanding . uri L And! nit> *»f all nigaitn/ial I.alatr. <hi you, tli^ ofluen» and delegates here a>srm- 

and a gain ol 3.16s im iuhers in 1*91, or 7 per cent in the same way and for like reasons at tlie last ?" 111 *" ll * ri * "* J"*' 1 *'"** **“ k‘ M »l " ill hii« 1 hied, rests tlie honored «ligniiy anil exalted work 

increase in membership, while this past year, Convention. This amount of $5. 85! milled t«» si#.« i trmle organizations in of i-nai ting sm )i law# ami making such provi- 

ow ing to very «lull times last winter, and to sus- ?4,9 mI makes $10.835 as good as lost in tin- past '* “ < ration. I hey !ih\ e organized and built sious as will promote the best i ate rests and 

IH-nsioii of memliers, the membership was de- four y.-ars for want of having the Protective ' i ma,,v i ,,llr |,,, al "" ,u, ' ! ‘* •‘i“ 1 a##ist*#l them guard the welfare of the entire ttgamzation. In 

« re...#, «! 5.621 members, and ,# a.-tually less hy Fund sent to headquar‘era regularly each , y " 1,1 '* ,n, ’.'* e * v Mnkes. all your .leliia rations I trust there will he a dua 

2. 166 members than it was at the time of our Con- month with the capita tax. . •cieration l.y us agitation of the eight regard f.»r each other’s ..pinions and that there 

vention two years ago. Financial AIT.Ira, nuhhe’r« » 'Z ' 'T !*" U ' be «»“ utmost haruionv and good-will, ami 

The radical changes in et lr law.** at the last Con- , , pul.lu- through the distribution of labor «I«.« u- that your pr.«iei .iings « ill meet with the entliu- 

veiition the siilijeet of su-|a-n,hyd and rein- , ' to ^>“1 exp. t.se. were | meals has h«-n one of our most valued a.ljum t* >,as|ie approval of the th..ii**ni,ls of m, ml-.-rs 

#ta:.«l tnemla rsha.l a great «leal „» ,1«. with our J'"" 1 *V .“j 0 1 , * , ‘ve» , t.o»,. am! j m the bml.hng up of , nr Organization. Ever w ho are now ,-agerlv watching the rc-ulUs of 

de«-n-as«* in n.ei.iltership It is u. I..* hoped that !' C ° C ' H ° f t,M? l^ated | «me the l nited ltr.«tl,erl,..«„l was founded in your deliberation# i*„„w de», re to thank tha 



tl« **«- Jaws will Ik- properly cluing« . 1 at lias Con- 
vention. ...C o.oii rc.xip.s OI me venerai tntiee for tlie ' «'••» a.ongwitti its si»n r trad, unions The work , n- . " ". , ’. ' 

Aiiotln r ir for this .:«•< reuse is. that ,WO y,,,,n * 1 _ WM - “ r e 5163.026 ..vj the | the 1-V.iemti,.., ba> done for us is worth more !bi ..liherl';.-,''; «nemi 

it. tin* |»ast y i ar. there was not the saute general ^M«enscs ?I62, 971.57, leaving a balance on « *•>«»» all lit«- tnni.cy tt has «.st us. Ik-snii-s that torn • .,»•"., " " •* - • " * r « . >< *t unn-r.«*, 

w i.h-pr.a i ugiliitiou c.nse.pient public '"i.vl.is'.Mof jSjJJSin theGeueral Fund with «•**“ F. «leration ha# helped u# pra.ti.ally l.y ., ,|„. v | ia> ', / ,* 1 !• i ,M ‘~ c « -»«J or «t . . • m 

awakening «- «, ti„. eigal-Sn.iir «ptestion. tiiat ”* J|*5Wdue Iront theGeneralFunil totiie j »Imiation of 812.063 in our « iglit-hour 'triki' of ~ ' my*-..Ki.« u u« 

l- r, 'u '••«! in ;#’.<" turotigit tin* work and plans * ""»• wliieh will have to ««e ro* l> -‘0. and by geueroii# loans to us at « i itica’ tun.- “•'•“"oil.. 

of «b. A ,1 F...1, rati Labor Th'-u ^ »m-nti.ers or ' In», year and again this year. Th!» . f “ * , ' an ‘' "'T 

wea.hle.1 ««v.r 22.04« new m. uii««rs to mir Mi "». v ‘»ay I« «leviswl at this Convention 1 have been all repaid. onmty with the e.tstotu and law of ..urOrgani- 

ganizat,..!« Proper legisia,i.»n will have to he enaeted at this Nation. 1 b, g leave to dose my biennial report 

In In«, when liter, was an active agitation on Vou "''""" to r in, .-ease our revenues t.. Ke porta front Local I »tons < .« r.-tary f„ r the term «»f two ye.«i# 

tic eight-hour .pn-st-on vu- galm-.I 17 wo new n ' , ‘‘ t Ulc demands on our funds to j 1,1 the lna,t,r «f sen, I ing in ih. ir niontblv • Tu,,, >92, ami 1 now submit the sums 

ineiiilKTs ilia, year, but the ut.\l v.-ar in 1887 .«ur l ,uv »»enefits. or else to decrease the amounts to reports, the Financial Seeretari.*» of a laig,- „um- y '"' a ' ll sincerely h,.pc y..u vcill find mr 
increase in im inb.-tship was only ä (title over ,,e i" 4 '' 1 The wis.lom of the lattwrj^lk-y however ] beI ;‘ ,f «*••? I.wal unions are ent;r«*ly tooi.eglig.nl ’«^Tt# \v«»rtliv ,.f y .«nr endorsement and 

4.0.1 W henever there has been any general mnv •* ‘I'u-stioned. though to abolish the wife i or »'«lilferent. This is als.» true t.» ev en a gr. i». r i4 >'l" " V;l1 - 

live’y agitation in the labor ,n«.veii»e„t it lias fu,,erul ^»vfit has been advocated bv some. extent in the matter of sending in Trustee» re -O *- 

hclpe.1 «»in Mrgaiiiziiiion. ^ ,1 ‘ e f >st ol wife funeral benefits the p ist two l ,,,rl .'* and lists of new oiln-frs. .*vcry six months ^ r j 

A Few Words of Advice. > WU * hM1 ‘ ^ « huh is an etior- This largely eoine» fro... the frcqt.M.t chang, s i»’ | / PjK/ 

... . tiu.ns sum, and is e«|ual to twice the amount of '“em officers, tetill it is very gratifying t«« liml 1 / / / 

I« -lay we «an maintain the nmud position of money raised by the special as^# IU cn. Intel, ‘»‘e great hulk of the local# are pn-mpt in remit ^ 

...v , ,.g the airgest membership ami greatest levied on March 17. Is9'2. lo replace the «lefieien- '»'b' the monthly tax and in attending t., all their X / C " 

mum* r of «mot..*, of anyone tr-.uie in the entire ey in our General Treasury. This «leiL-icm-v wa* loKi ‘ l re< t ,, >remen,s. ( ' 

world. Anil I repeat now withmorc emphasis than caused hy the increased' death rate of ,he The reports from loeal unio, is show 95 per e.*n, Mznrr,» SeceUey 

e\»r »St % ll'W Ii* Imst i-vikopiot..... »I..»« • . . . * * VA.I11. 



proceeding» 



1881. it iia- been in the front line of the Ft-.lera- 



3 lie total r«-« « ipts of the General • »(lice for the ^ tion nioi-.g with its si-t. r tr.i 



all your deliberations 1 trust there will he a «lu* 
regard fur each other's opinions, and that tliers 
will be the utmost harmony and good-w ill, an.i 
tha, your pr«-.« « «ung* v. ill meet w ith the enthu- 
siastic approval of the thousands of members 
who art* now eagerly watching the results of 
your deliberation». I now desire t*> tluttik tli* 
««Hirer» ami delegates here as*«-nthle«l, the Gen- 



of,!.« Am« ,-i.v.t F.-.l, i-a,i«.u of Labor. Then 

wea.i.l«*«; ..v«r 22.0 4« new m. ii)t««*rs to our Mt- 

gHIII.U.lIO!« 

1 li 1»»;.. w lien tin .« wa» an aetiv r agitation on 
tl « eight-hour «pn-stion vu- galn«-«l 17.1KII new 
nietiiln*rs tliii, year, but tin- lu ,\t y« ar m ls87 our 
i iii-re»»*- in im-inb.-rsiiip was .«nl\ *. tittle over 
4 -0«' Whenever there has been any general 
live y igit.itioi« in the lai«or inoveiiteut it has 
htlpeii out Mrganizalniii. 

A Few Words of A.lvtcc* 



more tin- otli. er» a-.ul metnhers of all «mr io« ul unions, 
•hat |,,r Im- «-licet i vc ant ami z.-alou# .«-operation 
l«> a tiiev havi givi-n no- in all my o.fuhil duties «*# 
' of | General !#ccr» tary. 

Ami now by virtu«- of my* utlice. ami in «-«"«- 
«■uns lortnity w ith the eustoiu ami lavv of ««nr Organi- 
zation, 1 I •< g leave to « lo-c my biennial rep*-rt iw 
* *« imral >«•« r.-tary for tile- term of tw o yea:* 
ittilv ending June :>»•. >92, ami I now submit the sum# 
j 1,1 »' «I sincerely hope y ou veill find inf 

•ft t 1 * ’ 1 1,1 * ’i*' «-hoit* worth y of y our endorsement and 
‘ approval. 



- , bu-mhersnip and greatest levied on March 17. >92. to repla.i* the «lefieien- “»« ‘he monthly tax ami in attending to -ill their 

tiuim -. r of untoi..*, of any one l mile in the entire ey in our General Treasury. Tlii# deficiency was r «*4 ,, »retuents. 

wori.l. An.t I repeat now withmoreemphasisthan caused by the increased death rate ,,'f the The repr.rts from local unions show 95 p, r 
ev.r vu-h o, l ««'t expertem-«-, vvl.at I have past two years ineident to the "Grippe, und ,,f tl, ™‘ now charge .10 cent# «»r more per month 

again aim again urgeu f,«r years in my annual w huh has likewise -everely uffeete.l the finances dues, and 75 per cent, hold weeklv 

r. i#., l.iat a.! vvt* now need as an organizatim, «.fall fraternal an.! benevolent .«rganizations. a, "‘ » >a - v »‘«->$6 per week sick benefits r„ r 1 

is a system «.« ug u-r .Im* ami larg.-r financial Tlie levying «.f that astessiuent of 25 cent», im- wvt ‘ks per year It. a number of case* the h ! 

IV'vjUri'l-«- til til.. I Mite.*! lls..ll*. .1. I . . I » . ... ‘ 



^5 






(ienerai Seoelary 



Amk.MiM I N Is to UoS'l I llTION. (CouclluUd. 
(Sit. l’liijt i.) 

I'uxiEs c«f Financial Secretary. 

Sec. 153 — Insert tlie words “and shall giv# 



rvso.treeslo make the United I equal .aratively necessary an«l small as it wa#. cause, 1 ‘"“e bankrupted their treasuries ia'Jp.L u I , , , ^ 

tom.yo, ea*m„ aadas iuvulu, ruble financially considerable dissatisfac tion in a number of the '«' ^h in ,«y, neat ot sick la-netit' hv pavi‘m* « i r Z' t ? T* ^C •"‘ ire,1 ° f him bjrhU 
as it is massive m m„nb ei >. I .,.,.1 at,,,.,. lame a sm.. *ne . L. I, at end of last line. 



astttsuassM* „ uutnbers. Lm-al Unions Many of the locals were suffer- ‘»-'ge a sum per week and for too gr'em a length ! Sp,’ 

No other trail.* organization on « arili has ever ing at the time from impoverished finances ° f li, * ,e ' Thi* ought to he cheeked i,v ». »EC. toft.-lnzert the words ’ except where ta# 

ha. such a wonderful growth and remarkable owing to heavy «Iraiu# on then, for pa vine- ut of tion of this ConvonUon. for in the imimverisi? 1 f ,U, ;‘ 8hmt ‘ nt ,b the Law#,” at cud o. 

history as ours. Young and aeeressiv^ 1 * ment of , »m,K.vern.h- last line. 



hwtz.rv ... 1 ^ -\» , " ^ M ‘ vu ‘ IWJIUCIU oi *« me lluiK>ve r imIu ’ lust H..Z« 

history as ours, \otmg and aggressive, en- ,.»e-Hl sick hem-fits. ment of the locals, the genenl organizs», r *' 

Z::ZZ:r i Z h,lVe >,,rtit ' 1 U,e KO,,, ‘ el th ^ U - «• B - refrained from levying this fers iu th ‘‘ ^ei, nation in mem W, ip and' finai ^ °* N 

° >n almost every town and assessment until no other course was left them. 1088 ‘ * these union#. New Section to be added after Scetion 161. 

front Ct ,f i liU i '.i '' D ÜÄVe bce,llu thefure ' And w lieu it was levied it caused quite a number Geueral Review AU fines levie<1 b . v »>*y L. U. or D. C. on a 

‘ l * ,l> u »“neera of the modern of unions to break up and lapse. Until we have Rro her i u ,„ t /-* " member of an outside district, for violation of 



front of battle as the Pi era of the modern | of unions to break up and 7a^. 7n«l w‘e ,«v e Bro her J 

Light-Hour movement. We have withstood the • system of higher due* this condition of affair# make a ,™Im 



make a er r,iü!!T ZZ' 6ral Trea -‘ ,ure r, will bade rules shall he charged aud collected from 
i« amount ot moneys he re- I him hy his L. U. under penalty of susj>euaioo*’ 












i 





















THE CARPENTER. 



Volume XII. — No. io 



PHILADELPHIA, OCTOBER, 1892 



Published Monthly. 



THt DAY OF WRATH. 



Swing: inward, O ! gates of the Alture. 

* Swing outward, ye doors of the past, 

For the soul or the people is moving 
And rising from slumber at last; 
l he black forms of night are retreating. 

The white sparks have signaled the day, 

And freedom her long roll is beating, 

And calling her sons to the fray. 

And woe to the robbers that gather 
In Helds where they never have sown, 

Who have stolen the jewels of labor 
And built to Mammon a throne; 

For the snow-flake asleep by the fountain« 

Shall wake in the summer’s hot breath, 

And descend in his rage from the mountains, 
Bearing terror, destruction and death 

Swing inward, 0! gates of the future, 

Swing outward, ye doors of the past, 

A giant is waking from slumber 
And rending his fetters at last— ' 

F rom the dust where his proud tyrants found him 
Unhonored and scorned and betrayed, 

He shall rise with the sunljeht around hfm 
And rule in the realm he has made. 

James G. Clahk. 



THE BUFFALO SWITCHMEN’S STRIKE. 

Of all thehvenacries of moneyed power 
against organized labor, the radroad 
switctmien’s strike at Buüalo brought out 
the most fiendish from the vast editorial 
depths of the subsidized dailies. Their news 
columns teemed with the most sensation- 
al misstatement* ol railroad cars burnt, and 
scenes of riot and outrage to prejudice the 
public against labor societies. The truth 
cannot he expected trom such interested 
sources, and workmen had better be very 
chary hi believing the general run of 
newspapers as to labor matteis. 

The Switchmen’ s Journalot Chicago, shows 
a state ot allairs which perfectly justified 
the Buffalo strike. All fair-minded people 
will agree that the demand made by the 
strikers was most reasonable, while the 
conditions against which they rebelled 
were simply outrageous ; that they de- 
manded the same pay received by other 
men doing the same work in the same 
city , that they demanded the ten hour 
day enjoyed by their comrades and legal- 
ized by the legislature of their State ; that 
they rebelled against working regularly 
eleven hours a day aDd frequently four- 
teen sixteen and eighteen ; that cases are 
on reeor I in the Erie yards of thirty-six 
hours on duty without rest or sleep ; th at 
cases of seventeen to twenty hours with- 
out time for meals were common ; that 
id the eleven and twelve-hour day but 
half an hour was given for meals, and that 
those who protested against this whit* 
slavery had been discharged. 

Never in the history of railroad labor 
have employees thrown down the gauntlet 
to corporate power with a more righteous 
cause uo contend for or a better right to 
presume that all organized labor would 
stand by them to the last ditch. 

To win this strike the Railroad Switch- 
men’s Association expected the help of 
the Association of Railroad Firemen. 
I rammen and Conductors. They had good 
reasons! to hope for such help. They had 
stood by theconductors and brakemen on 
the Canadian Pacific, last March, when 
that road discharged the union men in 
those two branches. It is not a year since 
the switchmen were called on by the brake- 
men to help them in a strike in St Louis, 
and the switchmen gave that help. Tn 
view of these facts the switchmen verv 
justly feel indignant at the policy of 

masterly inactivity ” pursued by the 
ether organizations of railroad men. Un- 
til there is more practical fraternity be- 
tween all these societies of railroad men 
there will be little hope of any successful 
railroad strike in the future. 

Still there is much significance in the 
statement of the Switchmen's Journal w hieh 
indicates ll . le possibility of an immense 
\?r st *'ke during the progress of the 
World s Fair at Chicago. It says : “ Now 
tnat the strike is declared ofl the news- 
papers are more frantically agitated than 
before because they see foreboding signs 
that the same troubles will again arise 
during the World’s Fair, when the rail 
road companies could ill afford to lose 
even one day’s use of their lines ; and the 
railroad men are first threatened and then 
appealed to, to preserve this nation trom 
anything so disastrous. ” 



W bst Superior, Wis. — Eleven contrac- 
tors Bigned for the nine- hour day June 6, 
®nd only one of them kept his word. 
Honorable Bosses ! 

IViNNi cKfi, Manitoba — Building trades 
of this city had a grand picnic August 15, 
Has is the dumping ground for much 
emigration and it hurts us. 

1 ? 3 rft nite cutters are to be congratu- 
lated upon the victory they achieved, 
hive months and more tbev fought the 
combined power of the Manufacturers’ 
Association and finally broke the lockout 
o the employers. The bosses proposed 
working rules and agreements 
witb the journeymen go into effect on 
January t— -in the dead of winter— instead 
of m the spring as formerly. The real 
purpose was to crush out the union», but 
the men have won a complete triumph. 



ENCOURAGING WORK IN SOME UNIONS. 



Union 101, Oneonta, N. Y., has nearly 
doubled its membership the past year 
through the zealous labors of a few good 
members. 

After Rhino at a standstill for years, 
Union 158 Topeka. Kan., is undergoing 
a remarkable rev val. At one meeting 72 
new members were initiated. On Labor 
Day the union took first prize a hand- 
some banner, for the best showing. They 
paraded in shirt sleeves, white aprons 
with emblem of U. B., and straw hats. 
They had a float in line with carpenters 
at work. This union has been pushed 
ahead by the intrepid, hard work of the 
members acting together. 

Union 94, Providence, R. I , has risen 
“out of the mud,” and is pushing ahead 
with wonderful activity. At one meeting 
last month 35 new members joined, and 
each week adds to the membership. No 
union in our jurisdiction has undergone 
any greater reverses or been any weaker 
than Union 94. So there is hope for the 
humblest of our unions if the members 
will only take hold in the right spirit. 

THE WALKING DELEGATE /«GAIN. 

The walking delegate has recently been 
the subject of agooddealof acrid orii.icism, 
saith the Chicago News-Record He has 
been held responsible for the industrial 
troubles of the season and indiscriminately 
condemned. It has become fashionable to 
“ jump on ” him. 

Yet the walking delegate, despite his 
short comings, is not half a bad fellow. It 
is true that he sometime« foments strife. 
It is equaJly true that he occasionally 
courts trouble in order to justify a con 
tinuanee of his salary. But as a rule he 
performs services for his union which the 
members could not very well perform for 
themselves and in various ways earns the 
money which he receives. He is not in- 
frequently the leading man of his organi- 
zation, he holds the respect of those he 
represents he speaks with their voice, and 
when they have a grievance he knows 
how to formulate it and give it force- 

Why he should be so roundly abused is 
not readily apparent. He is to h s union 
what the paid attorney is to the corpora- 
tion. The latter cannot do certain things 
for itself, and so it employs a keen, too 
often an unscrupulous lawyer, whose busi- 
ness it is to take care of the affairs of the 
employer and keep watch and ward over 
the interests involved, placating enemies, 
‘‘fixing ” legislators and courts and doing 
all things soever which may promote the 
corporate welfare. As for the public wel- 
fare, that is another matter. 

But there is no particular howl against 
this legal walking delegate. His views re- 
ceive attention and his ways, however 
sinuous, excite but the mildest criticism 
in quarters where the other sort of walk- 
ing delegate, the man who represents a 
union and the interests of men who toil, 
is held in abomination and is the subject 
of bitter reproach. 

FEBSONAL. 

D. P. Rowland late Business Agent of 
Union 2, has been chosen as the Superin- 
tendent of the State Labor Bureau at 
Cincinnati, Ohio. Labor Commissioner, 
W. T. Lewis in making this appointment 
has secured the services of a well qualified, 
painstaking official. 

W. F. Ebkrhabdt, the Financial Secre- 
tary of Union 8, Philadelphia, Pa., has 
lately been appointed one of the Emigra- 
tion Inspectors at the Port of Philadel- 
phia. His duty is to see that the laws on 
emigration and alien contract labor are 
enforced and he is performing that work 
with his most intense zeal. He has been 
a member of the U. B. from the start 
over eleven years ago 

MILL MEN’S STRIKE OF ST. LOUIS. 

The Executive Committee of the planing mill 
men’s strike of St. Louis, Mo., which embraced 
Unions No. 895 and No, 734, have published a 
report of the amount« collected and disbursed 
in their recent light for the nine-hour day. The 
list of donations and collections is very Ion«:, 
embracing over three hundred unions, etc., and 
would make a whole pa^e of this paper, and the 
disbursements, if itemized, would cover twice the 
space. The aggregate», however, are as follows: 
Total receipts from all sources $11,630 80 

Disbursements : 

Committee work . . • ... $774 70 

Relief granted by Executive 

Board . . 1,305 15 

Strike allowance 9,405 50 

Total . . , * $11,565 35 

Balance Aug. 10, when strike 

was declared off $65 45 

This balance has since been used to relieve 
cases of distress. 

The mill men’s strike of St. Louis was well 
backed, financially, by all the trade and labor 
unions of that city. The men struck before they 
were fully organized, and should not have 
coupled a demand for apparently an increase of 
wages at the same they asked for the nine-hour 
day. The men held out bravely for over seven 
weeks, and, though the men did not win. they 
have built iip a strong organization and will 
now maintain it. Next year they have prospect« 
of securing the nine-hour day very eeeily with- 
out* »trike. 



FLOATING GOSSIP. 



Since July, 1890, the Iron Molders’ 
Union of North America has expended 
$115,441 in strike pay to'itaembers. 

In Certain Eastern mills children work 
seventy hours a week, facing placards 
which read : “No laughter permitted in 
this mill. Children who sing will be dis- 
charged.” 

Studkbaker Wagon Works, at South 
Bend, Ind., the largest in the world, were 
obliged to shut down, owing to 3,000 men 
refusing to work on account of the com- 
pany using material purchased from the 
Carnegie Steel Company. 

Trade in the carpenter line is reported 
extremely dull, and that there is a surplus 
of carpenters in Harriman , Tenn . ; Marion, 
Ind. ; Elizabeth ton. Tenn. ; Rochester, 
N. Y. ; San Antonio, Tex. ; Pomeroy, 
O ; Nashville, Tenn ; Vancouver, B C. ; 
Fort Wayne, Ind., and Jacksonville, Fla. 

H. Walter Webb, the autocrat, who 
has bobbed up again in the Buffalo strike, 
was formerly a sporting man in New York 
city. .He and his brother Seward were 
prominent at every dog show held, and 
were noted for their ability to live without 
work. When Seward married Vander- 
bilt’s daughter their fortunes were made. 

It Is significant that the unions which 
are most successful are those that impose 
high dues and -can draw upon immense 
sums of money at a moment’s notice to 
carry out their demands. As a rule when 
employers submit to the demands of 
unions it is because they believe they 
would lose more by opposing them than 
they would gain by defeating them. The 
organization of non-union men is essen 
tjal to the success of every union. — Cleve- 
land Citizen. 

Expulsions. 

Union 366, Marion, Ind . has expelled A. T. 
Fra/.kk for violation of obligations and Sylves- 
ter Whitzlkr for embezzling partnership funds 
and defrauding creditors. Whitzler has left Mar- 
ion. 

Ge’'. F Pkck, late financial secretary from 
Urion 020 .Stamford, Conn., for bad conduct. 

Gko, Rosky, from Union 166, Rock Island. 111., 
for defrauding bis employer and fellow mem- 
bers. He has left Rock Island. 

Harry BKATV'from Union 621, Cairo, 111., for 
dishonesty and general rascality. 

John Fleck, from Union >26, W. Newton, 
Mass , formerly treasurer of union, for em I n zzio- 
ment and fraud, and convicted in Court of thete 
offenses. 

_Gko. Walker, from Union 301 Newburgh, N. 
Y.. formerly financial secretary of union for vio- 
lation of obligation as financial secretary, 

W. M. Gibbs, from Union 51 , Little Rock, 
Ark , for misappropriation of union funds. 

Fred II. England, from Union 162, Hyde Park, 
111., for conduct unbecoming a, union mau, and 
while r* cording secretary of the Union. 

J. B. Banker, from Union 697, Aurora. 111., for 
defrauding bis crecitors and fellow workmen, 
lie is somewhere in Dakota. Ho wears a 
moustache, is 40 years of age, five feet ten inches, 
weighs 160 pounds and of dark complexion. 

Jacob Simon, from Union 161. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
for scabbing at Homestead Roller Mill. 

Henry Arzhkimkr, from Union 167. Elizabeth, 
N. J , for defrauding the union out of its funds 

T Sharkotte from Union 105 New Brighton, 
N Y., for embezzlement 

Chas. Bickel from Union 418 New York N 
Y,, for embezzlement. 

OPENING OF THE WORLD’S FAIR ON 
SUNDAYS. 

The subjoined resolutions were adopted 
by a very large majority, at the Seventh 
General Convention of the United Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters at St. Louis, Mo., 
August 8, 1892 : 

To the Seventh General Convention of V. It. C . and 
J. of A. 

Whereas. Tlie Congress o-f this United States, in 
appropriating money to the World’s Columbian 
Exposition, has made it conditional that the Ex- 
position should be closed on Sundays. 

And whereas, the closing of Said Exposition 
would throw thousands of people on the streets 
of the city of Chicago thereby compelling them 
to seek entertaiument of a questionable char- 
acter. 

.ind whereas. In the effort to secure the Exposi- 
tion the working people of that city have sub- 
scribed their hard-earned dollars, expecting to 
be able to enjoy the benellt of Sunday opening. 
Therefore be it. 

Resolved, Thai this Convention, in regular ses- 
sion assembled, demand of Congress the repeal 
of that part- of said law which enforces the Bun- 
day dosing. 

Resolved, That we call upon the World’s Col- 
umbian Exposition Directory of Chicago to use 
all means in its power to keep said Exposition 
open, thereby keeping faith with the pooplo 
from whom they have solicited and received 
subscriptions, and we call upon all local unions 
of our craft to use every honorable means in 
their power to compel their .'epresentative* in 
the House of Congress to vote for the opening 
of said World’s Columbian Exposition ; and be 
it further 

Resolved, That in the opinion- of this Conven- 
tion of Carpenters it will be wiser, from a moral 
stand-point, that said Exposition should be open 
on Sunday than that strangers visiting the city 
of Chicago should be compelled to run the gant- 
let of the numerous saloons, confidence games, 
brothels and gambling hells which already, in 
anticipation of a large harvest, are establishing 
themselves in that city, 



GENERAL PRESIDENT TBEN0R. 

Henrv H. Trenor was born in New 
York city in the year 1839. He attended 
the public schools of the city, and at the 
age of 15 years was apprenticed to the 
trade 

At the breaking out of the Rebellion he 
joined Company O, Seventy -first Regi- 
ment, New York State militia, and went 
to Washington with the Regiment. At 
the expiration of his term of service lift 
joined the First New York Volunteer 
Engineers, under Colonel Edward W. 
Serrell, and served through the campaign 
of the Department of the South, and in 
1863 the Regiment was transferred to the 
Army of the Potomac. Mr. Trenor served 
in the campaign of that department until 
his regiment was mustered out of service 
in August, I860, Tie rose from tfie ranks 
to the command of bis company. 

He is a past officer of the I- O. 0. F., 
and has been connected with the Royal 
Arcanum, the G A R. and other organi- 
zations for a number of years. He was 
one of the charter members of ."Lodge No. 
9 of the old Ijnited Order of Carpenters, 
ami was one of the committee of the 
joint conference in April, 1887, which met 
in Newark, N. ,T.,* to consolidate the 
United Order with the United Brother- 
hood. 

On being convinced that it was for the 
itest interest ot all, lie advocated most 
strenuously and ably the amalgamation of 
the two Orders, and on its consummation, 
with a vgry large majority of Lodge No. 
9, formed Union No. 473 of the U. B., 
and was die firs presiding officer of that 
union. Ever since then he hastak-nan 
active part in its work. 

For the past fifteen years Mr, Trenor 
has been in the employ of one of the 
largest building firms in New York. He 
is affable and pleasing in address, with 
firmness and determination well stamped 
in his character ; conservative and cau- 
tious in wtioD, but decisive and resolute 
to an intense degree. He is a logical, con- 
vincing spea ker of a practical turn of mind . 
He is far from being a “putty” man. 
And in his election the St. Louis Conven- 
tion has chosen an Executive Officer of 
marked ability, and one whose adminis 
tration will be of credit to the United 
Brotherhood. 

COMPLIMENTARY TO PRESIDENT 
TRENOR. 

Whereas, The Seventh Biennial Con- 
vention of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America, held 
in the city of St. Louts, August I to 8, 
1892. 

Recognizing the services and ability of 
Brother Henry H. Trenor, delegate from 
Local Union No. 473, of Nev York city, 
by electing him General President of the 
Order not only honored oar worthy 
brother, but also honored the Local and 
the District of New Y'ork by the selection 
of the brother as the Executive Officer of 
the organization ; therefore be it 

Resolved , That we tender to Bro her 
II k«rv II. Trenor our hearty congratu- 
lation on his election to the office of Gen- 
eral President, and we can assure the 
United Brotherhood, from our experience 
with Brother Trenor. that he will bring 
to the office dignity ability and zealous 
ness of such a marked degree that the 
organizati hi will be greatly benefited by 
h •« selection to that high and honorable 
office to which he has been called. 

Resolved, That, in appreciation of the 
honor conferred upon this Local, a copy 
of these resolutions be sent to Brother 
Henry II. Trenor, duly attested; also 
that they be published in The Carpenter. 



Newport, Ark.— Trade very dull. We 
are trying to start a carpenters’ union. 
The contractors are opposing it We 
have trouble here and want carpenters to 
not foueh this town tor a month or two. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES. 



Watch charms, gold plated with em- 
blem of U. B. cost $ i 25 each. 

Send in Assessments Nos. 2 and 3 if you 
have not done so, or your union will" be 
out of benefit. 

Membership cards for 1893-1894 are 
no w ready for sale to the unions at one cent 
each or $1 per 100. 

Password for current quarter, new Ritu- 
als and new blank« were sent September 
16, to all locals in good standing. 

Fine Gold plated pins durable and good, 
with emblem of U. B. can be had of G. S. 
in any quantity for twenty-five cents 
each. 

Coptfis of the General .Secretary’s re- 
port to the St. Louis Convention can be 
had for $1 for 50 copies or 50 cents for 25. 

1 1 is good to use in converting non union 
men. 

Newly amended Constitutions as just 
adopted by general vote are now ready. 
Send in your orders at five cents per copy. 
$5 per 100. 

The Amendments to the ConBtitufion 
adopted at St. Loui» convention have ail 
been ratified by a large majority vote ot 
the members. 

Local untons should set to work and 
frame their own By-Laws now to conform 
to the Constitution as amended at St. 
Louis convention. . 

Treasurers should not write busine ss 
communic toons to the G. S- on the remit- 
tance blanks when they send money- 
Send correspondence on separate Bheet of 
note paper. 

The Use of odes and the use of the 
card, ' Remember your Obligation ” has 
been dispensed with per orders of the St. 
l-ouis Convention. The new Ritual dis- 
penses with both. 

Winter is coming: work will be scarce 
in many cases. Why not now while at 
work pay enough dues ahead, to carry you 
through until spring. This will keep you 
from danger of falling in arrears and get- 
ting out ot benefits, 

Hold public meetings, festivals or en- 
tertainments thiri tall and winter, to bring 
out non-union men and your own mem- 
bers as well. Agitation is the life of the 
movement. Stagnation means internal 
discord and eventual dissolution. 

Sick Benefi ts in most of the locals are 
more of a detriment than a benefit. They 
have become a constant weakening drain 
on the majority of unions. Thev have 
bankrupted numerous unions and caused 
considerable contention. On the whole our 
unions in most cases would be in better 
financial condition were it not for the sick 
benefits. 

Political campaign literature of vari- 
ous kinds we find is being sent by the 1 
various political machines to our laical 
Secretaries. For this we are not respon- 
sible. Our list of Local Secretaries as pub- 
lished in our journal is used by theee 
people, and we can’t stop their access to 
it as long as the list of Secretaries appear» 
in our journal. 

Union 141, Grand Crossing, 111., holds 
a “ Columbian ” entertainment and ball 
October 20. 

The Barbers’ National Union is doing 
well and has 119 Locals and an official 
monthly journal. 

The Elf.ctric Wiremen’s Union ot 
New York, is only a year old, and has 
already secured the eight-hour day. 

The Paving Block Cutters’ Union is 
National and mimbers 94 unions and 
keeps on growing at a healthy rate. 

An eight-hours Carpenters’ League 
has been formed in Los Angeles, Cal., to 
establish the eight-hour day, OctoDer 24. 

The Anticipated trouble on the Read- 
ing railroad on account of the discharge 
of union men was satiwfaetorily compro- 
mised by Chief Arthur and other Brother- 
hood railroad men’s officials. 

The Brotherhoodo! Locomotive Fire- 
men held their convention September 12,- 
at Music Hail, Cincinnati, O. We regnet 
to know Secretary Eugene V. Derm, de- 
clined re. election. He enters into the 
publishing business with the well wishes of 
ourselves and the thousands who have 
known his sterling worth in the labor 
movement for fifteen years and more. 

Lexington, Ky. — Union 626 sent 850 
to the Homestead strikers and on Labor 
Day made a grand showing. All the 
trades societies were in line and many 
floats in the parade. The bricklayers and 
masons are well organized and gained the 
nine-hour day without a strike. The« - 
peuters will oe next as the hod-earrit-rs 
made demands and gained them. We 
have organized the colored carpenters. 






-n’V" 



»y ■ 













THE CARPENTER. 



The CARPENTER, 



THE LAST ACT OF DESPERATION. 



SENO DONATIONS TO HOMESTEAD. Ä' g2Ä. h £Ä T 

n . , . .1 : .....Iamaiip iiiricMIf't Kill J . _ 1 U/.»n A .. 



* Ml» I AI. -f «••’!! N A I. < *K 



United Brotheriiood.of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 

Pil'\ ft'J J/t *«//*/ 1 . ' / " ' • r ^ - 4 ^ 

AT 

1*1 X. .Ninth St., Phila.. Pa. 

IV .1. MtMnii:. Kiliior ai.%1 l*ul»lMu-: 

Kntrr» »i it ll.»* INM-OiI'iiv nt I *h i ..*!%-* i i-t l*a 

H«. »» \ *•» h!-« lllrt 1 t«T. 



..... . _ ,. . , . . , f The carpenters’ unions under our jurisdiction ... if must be avowed, have been Audit of accounts of G. S. couth,.,, i 

“High Treason” 18 the latest form of have not been behind-hundin giving moneys to imBtaKefi, lCmuSX aizain In* session. "'Ucd in ( 

. , . . .. .. . , helnour struKcline comrades in the iron and committed Over and over amt ovei again. i> e |,. nation from Baltimon. mi 

crime charged against the Homeeteai 8toe | industry at Homestead, Pa. And just us Blit Iiow we perceive signs of a change for on strike given n hearing, ami’ i 4 t ,‘ tri * ,1, rr> 

strikers. This fairly exhaueid M entire President Weihe oi the Amalganiated wnt. s u^ ^ etter \v e notice tt craving on the tion with them and the G. K. l;. t<H,k 

j i £• • - *. e _ .i t ‘‘The contest lias changed only ir 0111 , . • ..n- „.„rbinnnion for a .... 



decalogue 
of the Car 



been made for every conceivable crime i„ this light of waiting and it seems equally a» operat j on of all member?, not on the will 
lroni ordinary assault to murder in the ImmI memiars. and the ruling of the leaders— on edura- 



Halanee on lined A |>ril 1 . < iencral Fiu„| 
Receipts — April, May, June . . 



first degree and from conspiracy to “High where they Lave not done so, will semi money 
... ,, .... .., . , . to help in this struggle The men have 

treason. What the next move of trie lK . ea out now t . enr iy four months and their 
tirni Will be in the line ol legal and judx- line* remain unbroken .In i spite 1 tllc 

e ’ w helming odds of money. Government, coni is, 

cial coercion no one knows. Supreme Judges, grand juries, police, militia 



Si l -> I;|| ! (<<v I’l 
ad\an> . ; ■ . 

Addle»- .1.1 ’.cl!« >• 



j Fi 'l v rent- a > ear. in 

a ; . i M. i iliev- ti • 

P. .1. M< < 1 cute. 

lies — 1. l'lllladeiph'a. I’ll. 



tion, not on discipline — on equality, nut 
on privilege.” 



Total . . . . 
K* (lenses for 

Iieticit. . . 



me period 



We are sat ISlW’d it will have no bettet men are still undaunted and determined. Every 

t fleet in breaking the solid ranks of the * ent given to il».- HomeMcud ' i* -,, p | ® w n 1 ' 1 '!£ 
a rigid) V aeeouuted for and will he help to nerve 

strikers than all previous attempts of the the hearts of these brave heroes. Send the money 
.• 1 - »i-ii , j - . • . j to Wm. Weihe, President of the Amalgamated 

firm in tiie line of high handed lntmnda- a.«, N ation, lit »mitlnield street. Pittsi.urgh, 
linn Pa., ami notify Thomas J Crawford, Box 196, 

i i Homestead. Pa. 

Air. Frick has played a desperate game Here is a list of all moneys received by Mr. 
II | , ... * *ii -I i • i . Weihe from carpenter's unions up to September 

all through, but it will avail him naught 2 6. 18t»2. 

as against the sturdv manhood of the Union. Amt. Union. Amt. 

it .j i . f 1 Chicago, 111 $ 50.00 355 Buffalo, N V £10.00 

Homestead people. It IS Ills last act of 3 Wheeling J 5.00 362 Winona.Minti 6.00 

desperation as an ollset to the recent de- 23 Chicago, ill 25.00 367 s«n Antonio, 2 .. t»o 

r 26 Jackson, Mich 15.00 3,7 Springfield. 25 00 

sertion of numbers ot non-uuion men 3.? Boston, Mass 100.00 379 Ashiuml Wis 7. 20 

„ 35 San Rafael, 10.00 390 Dayton, O 15.00 

iroill nis emplO) . 13 Hartford, Conn 50.( 0 405 Ludlow. Ky 10.00 

It Chiet Justice Paxson wants a good case ** Shreveport, U 5.00 «0 Buffalo n y u.\b 

_ H 50 Portland, Ore 25.00 449 Cleveland, O 25.00 

of ‘‘High Treason” in “levying war 70 Brighton Park, 5.00 41 « K Saginaw, 6.00 

against the peace and quiet of the State,” ]( ^ LouUvifie.Ky ^».co sir» Coiorado^pgs 25.00 

let him arrest Messrs, l’rick, Lovejov and ,J 5 Bridgeport, 25.00 520 Astoria. Oro io.to 

the Pinkertons for their actions in bring- hi <;r *i Crossing, 15.00 545 Boston. Mass 5.no 

ln L armed hirelings to Homestead. 170 Bridget «ort, O 10.00 026 Lexington, Ky 50 00 

“ High Treasou.” indeed ! It has come l"i tir'd Forks, 25.oo 037 Hamilton, o 25.00 

-.i, 184 Lake Linden, 2 00 639 Brooklyn. X Y 25 O0 



PHILADELPHIA. OCTOBER 1892. 



<UN!ON j LA BEL 



Union. 



Union. 




1 Chicago, III 5 50.00 355 Hutlalo, N V £10.00 0 f s 



FOUR NEW LNIUNS. 

Since our last issue charters have been 
granted to four new unions, vi/.. : No. 71, 
Lexington, Ky. (colored ; 152, Wash- 
bum, Wis.; sI2, Johnson City, Tenn ; M3, 
Chicago Heights, 111 



proceedings of the general exec- 

men are still undaunted and determined. Every UTIVF BOARD 

cent given to the Homestead |KMi|)le will be 

rigidly Recounted for and will be help to nerve fThese proceedings could not be published in 
the hearts of these brave heroes. Send the money u Scntemhcr is-ue, as the space was largely 



Further loan from Protective Fund 
Deficit paid 



S47 C 
*>,403 V, 

il "'6 « 



51 

> 5 .(2 



taken up by the G. S. report. Amendments to the A pril 2. balance on hand. . . 
Constitution and other business of the Kt Loins i* e ,. t j V ed April, Mav and Jm e 
Convention. These proceedings are in a con- 



demned form. The proceedings of the October 
session will appear in our November issue. 

FIRST DAY— Jt’SE 27, lWl2. 



Balance on hand Julv I,JM‘»2. . 

The audit of Protective Fund mid 

shows HR follows; '"»«'t 

April J, balance on hand . . 

lte« - tived April, May and June .... ” -L-' 

- . ,» 



tXPKKDITCRK.“ 



Paid to Local Unions 



Most of the duy consumed in auditing accounts I Loaned Gcmiai Fund . . 



3 Wheeling 25.00 Su'2 Winona.Minn 6.00 Claim ot'OttoWenk, Union 5i8, St. Louis, re- 

23 Chicago, 111 25.00 367 San Antonio, 2.> 00 ferred to Convention. 

26 Jackson, Mich 15.00 377 Springfield.. 25 00 Application to strike, from Union 183, Concord, 

33 Boston, Mass 100.00 379 Ashland \\ is 7.20 v. If., for nine-hour day sanctioned. Report of 

35 San Rafael, 10.00 39(1 Dayton, O 15.00 Deputy Clinkard having visited Concord received 

43 Hartford, Conn 50.10 4( 5 Ludlow, Ky 10.00 favorably. 

45 Shreveport, la» 5.00 440 Buflulo. N 5 14. (5 Demand of Union 176, X« wport, R. L, for 



lnve-tigatio;,s and \ i-its 

Express and bank charges. . . 

Total 

RK< Arm I \TION. 

Tobil rereijits 

Total ex (»ensert . . 



»6 »a 



?17.75-.m. 

15 ii i ii) 
221 f 



T22.ps, . 

4a5 ? 
22 196 >' 



50 Portland, Ore 25.00 419 Cleveland, O 25.00 balance of strike pay alleged to be due, was July’ I, balance on hand . . . . 
70 Brighton Park, 5.00 406 E Saginaw, 6.00 refused by G. E. B. ‘ Loaned General Fund 



SECOND DAY— JCSE’28, D92. 

The entire day was spent in auditing general 



Total 

Further conference held with di • 



accounts of the G. S. and Protective Fund and Baltimore and ~ 1.296.00 strike 



Assessment. 

THIRD DAY— Jt’SK.29, 1892. 

Death claim of M. Mueller, Union 62, Chicago, 



Further financial uid to cease from e.iv 
Bills uf j;. B. fur £418.20 for a ■ 
dered paid. 

Union 598 >t. Louis, Mo. -•air-lunOi. 
financial aid for trade movement. J i.- • 



eo not to be published in arreare. 



; are to t oarbine in the service of capital to Dayton, u 
. ., . 352 Anderson, 

■ exterminate strikes and strikers, labor From various 



47. hi 
( ml lo.no 



W K Ebf rhardt, bles. Referred to G. S. to setid -onu- compi tent 

Phila., Pa 110) pcr-oii. 

Carpent« r»’ District (’uni. Uniotn>‘>2, Elwooii. Iml.. for financial a>- 

C«»uncil j« r 1» -istance to prosecute violations ,,f |! lC .-tnie 

Maloney 2500 Eight-Hour Law. Referred I«. A nur it an Fed- 

era! ion of Labor. 

-1172.51) Cominunii-iitiou- were aet«d on from Unions 
uvo Mr. Weihe reports EL Prisikiyn. N. \ ,2*50 Port Angeles. Va.-li , 
i* ton mils of various 12'.* Ley * it \ M .eh., ami 5 1 ( hie.igo, us in spei all 



The American Federation of Labor organization?, and the independent apirit m 00 Mahmey 1 " r 1 * 25 oo 

has decided to appropriate the sum of of united labor. , . 

rilO.OU to make a test ca-e in the Courts before this course of oppression pre !llMitioil t „ tll „ H , M>vo Mr . U t .ihe „-purts 
of the State ot Indiana for violation of the one tiling must be remembered: th “ 1 D"' 1 ' 1 !"« »»«• Tpi.i. Councils of various 



Sum Th'jiI ' M172.50 

In addition to the above Mr. Weihe reports 



1> P. Rowland < mi iniiUti, <*., > ; , - 1 
\isit mill men on stiikc in >t. I.oui- . 
tin ir trouble, inasmuch as Brother \ 
'* ires he » annul go 
Adjust ne 1 to in- et ()< tuber 3, 1892 



ROOF FRAMING MADE EASY. 



qq .* . . .. . . Villi r IUIM » ' '(ill liltiiit M lill(;r ^tlllH III IIIOIH > , mill 

the Kight-llour law of that State, by eer- ine working men have bauots and they in each of these Councils tin rt* art* * ai pi iitnV 
tain contractors of El wood, Iml. ' Car- are learning to no longer “throw them 

penters’ I'nion No. O-'i'J has furnished the a way ” on the political tools of ivtpitalists " ot specify the urgauization. ami others again 

. I , . , send their name and occupation as a “ carpen- 

lufortuation. amt corporations. 1 lie trade union work- t. r.’’ ami n.. addr. — . \n> carpenters' unions 

„ . “ .... men and laboring tuen will make common 



cities have * outrihutcii large sums of mom v. and ;e"c— "lent No. I, and from 1 nions bit Pitts- i i_ _ i i 

ill each of these- Councils lilt re are I aip/n ter- burgh. Pa . 41 .S|a>katie Fall-. Wash.. 5.W New 1 l.a\ C , TLj tired A nm dtld ( ■ T'. el- 

unions of the U. B. representiul. There are a " Latvoni. \\ a-li.. a- lo Protective Fund. Re- j method ot obtaining bevels .11« ' ,t’-- 



The < iENEKAi. Executive Board elected 
at the -St. Louis Convention were in ses- 



men and hiborin;: -ruen will make c*orun,on 

cause with tiie farmer? and all hontst ««id the matter will i* attended to. 
workers, ami with millions of ballots, -7~LT 



eion at the Heneral Office, 1-4 North lin :, ni i »i , , . 

united together, tliev can overwhelm the 

Ninth street, Philadelphia, Pa., all week pri vileged few possessed of millions of V V ere * S reat in ^ fact of U rTli 

from October 3 to S, 1 80 - . Their chief U1U1U , V unions taking an attituue more and mere 

work was to audit the books and ae- " hostile to noii-miion men. So save the convei 

counin and jwfla on varioua appeals. The Ami then it euntinue-: 'Many unions 

proceeding? of them session will appear AND STILL NO LIST OF OFFICERS FROM are alrea»ly truete or combines «fgapeiior 
in November Cakpentek. Thf<nF iiKimioc workingmen to hold their own. not alone 

’ against the employers’ class, hut against ceived 

The Campaign Orator is abroad in the This is the second time we publish this 
land, lie is now nightly howling him- list. The publication of it last month fees, some almost prohibitory once. There read in 



HOSTILITY TO NON-INK N MEN. 



fcrreil to G. S. w tih in>!riiclioi.- a- to reply rif 1 in and \ ll.-v r ft. ru u nd r 

-I F. Day iv union 119. New ark. N. .T ° ; 1P , ^ > f ‘ ttff? , an<J | r " A ' 

con-id. red. Union 119 ordered t,. rein-tute j* IU * l *ie more difficult OT harder l!c :• 
Mr D.iv in good _ -landing on payment or two is to frame, the mi« e \alue this is ’u i 

line- whi. h lie oweil :.t time «»f Mi-ia-n- oenttrs It is ctvIv lenriitd I •» ' 

Mon. Union 119 lo pay IbeG.S. l,u iv-nt- lax 1 tr \ 11 Is <->l> 1\ ltariltO. I. a L-. 
uihI tiv«» ctMtiH i*r«>trc*iivt* Kiiini cm Hit*ountt»f Mr. a separate urnwirg cl boui hip am; v ./« 
Da . dining In. --ii-peii.-ion and Union IJ9 i- i- r.- root WOtk, acci nil aided with ' ..cX- 
-mvd f..r lueirilb gal and in-ub„rd.i,ate action nlanation of diau in»- S ilkfarl , • 
and -(M-c ial in-tiiicuon- given (i > in thi- i-i ' 1 , ‘ »• 1 M1 .- • riajl.iaciUo ^ .r... 

lawiede Hotel, st. i.oui-, seiccio.i a« luadouai- atiteed or money relundetl. B' > . 

,lo>.i... r i'..... . G I . . i . . A. . .. _ . . « . * 



work was to audit the books and he- ’ 

counLeand pass on various appeals. The 

proceeding? of their session will appear AND STILL NO LIST OF OFFICERS FROM 



in tne .act of t«-rs «luring convention ami si. .lam.- hotel twenty cents bv pi stal note or ?I 

nore and mere al-o "• recomim nd.din cinu'ar t...ic!egat. s u ill Send Di .St npid to anv -»rid . 

” SoH’.vKtliM i'»Mrt.M.-d lo rent iiMiitabi,- ball for ti.c » ^ senu pt.si paw to aii\ add o. e 

i. if i * < onvenlioii and prel'« renee bo given Druid» Copy II seilt for itl ninety days. 



in November Cakpentek. 



THESE UNIONS. 



FOCI! III DAY— .Il’SK 30, lSU’J. 

l,esoliitioii8 from Uliic^go Unicn- I. 21.23 28 2 S 7 . 



The Campaign Okatok ia abroad in the This is the second time we publish this 



62, 70, 73, >0, 111, 162. l 8 l, 199, 269. 116. 7 .,-’ 

<« i\. d calling for eorr- >p..mb uce -t.,t froin 
Chii-.igo to General Ofii,-. -. hid, eaii-«-.| 1 1,« in- 
ve>tiga(:ou «*f allair- in Chicago. Tb« (. I f } 

deeidtd it wa- Hiilli« i. nt tlnil -.,i«I U it. r - w , r .-| 
rcinl in Chicago «luring I lit- in veMigation. ami' 



THOS. GKOn. 

Member of I’ni, n 6S. 
Des Moines. I« ua. 



FIRST-CLASS BOOKS! 



... . . 4 1 1 A- r All , , , Ivithr ft.r \- 1 - 1 ,* »KiciHMf.r.. d. tHTIMun. , rBAlTKAL AltPrNTRY. IKxI^son. . . . iw 

they will onlv vote as these orators ad- election of otlirers last June, and why l >tlin > Ior Uie unions. Nery little ellort special ruiircwui rati > f..rde!eKau- to st 1 1 ,,j H Stair-Bl^ imunk madk K\^v. llod^on. 100 

V«- A«U all this political pyrotechnic* »hon'd not the Uecwding Secretariea Jf »TÄh»S‘ gSÄrÄli.' i»V Me ' * 

the trade union work goea on It i. edm these un.ona have in the list of new overcome their ignorance or'il.eir pr e I "'l v.. r... iSg 1 . 1 * 

eating and preparing the workingmen to olhcei> by tliir tune.’ some of these judices.” d.re.l pai.i when itemized bill i« r,n,ierc.l Tm. fwravmi - ,,m. Hhu.ik's i„m- 

eventually use their ballots for themselves unions will very likelv be the loudest in “ ^ hen a strike occurs, there are many ' A i Ken > on ' rin cimu.ii. o., ple*e ( «ivpamux . . . Vj 

and for “better time. ' by struggling tor comidaim .hat mail Iron, the tieneral “7 who areenn^lled l.j sheer *„,-y &Ä **'*“•*•—- •« «-« w J- McCUIBE. 

higher wages, shorter hours and better Olline does not reaeh them. How ran we rttlhimreLeTdkled' w ho'h'ave' imwe’To Ü* H<> ' '' 

treatment. The tra.le unions are prac- ?en.l them mail correctly, if we have not complain of the union and to avenge in- Sd tt aiid ! J^hlad^lone^ noV'm 't h J j !*,' " r r " u> 

tically establishing mui;h more in that the latest list of theis officers ? juries received at its iiands, tiie strike is ^‘1 exiM-nsea, momy eunm.t be paid' from tl"e 

line than can be done if workingmen wait There is no excuse tor such negligence loe V . S,jli . ,larit >' ‘'w^k. Kia-V^ardR ,, _ 



tor politicians to help them. 

WHAT IS A SCAB? 

Though printed and reprinted again 
an.l again, by special request we once 
more give this definition of “a scab ” to 
our readers : 

8?ome ten years ago a union man was 
tried in one of the courts of Eondon, 
England, for intimidating a “scab” for 
going to work on a strike job. In sum- 
ming up the case against the prisoner, 
the prosecuting counsel said : 



Ildotkated AacuiTEcrt rad and Me- 
chanical. Dkawi N ti-Bot »K. A Seif-In- 
structor. with 3t»i Illii!»! ration- 1 OC 

Till: CaKPESTKK'» AND BriLDFR's l I'M- 
PLFIF. CtlVI'ANItiN .... .2 50 

Address p. J. McGUIRE, 

Box 884, PhifadelpLiti, F» 



f the oflicers elected were 



of the courts of London, «"« »U the , mi „n 9 with the password, on 

intimidating a “scab” for ' Une aat ' " not atten.l to this their number, by restrictions put on ap- 

v on a strike job. In sum- ™‘ter without further delay ? prenüceship. etc, keep up their wages 

case against the prisoner, Uere ie the U«t of unions from which yiew L .nis^ 1 . !u, . tl,is 

□g counsel said : "e lave not received any list otthe names strictions will avail onlv for ashort"time 



I liG'en notuot ^trtke pay. not allowed, a- tit l .l tV 

SOlite classes of workingmen ; wived all tiie donations could oe^iven '' c ~ 



FIFTH DAY— Jl’LY 1, lS'.IJ. 



[Ulf /:iigsvay\ \p\ 

^GlSTERt^ ' 

This is a Fac-itnile of the LABEL of *he 

UNITED HATTERS 

OF NORTH AMERICA. 

The LnlicT^ias received the Indorsement of th# 
General Executive Board of the K. of L. a: 1 of 
the American Federation of Labor. 



peat« returns they are detested alike by 
all, so, when help is needed, a ‘scab ’ is 
the last to contribute assistance, and the 
First to grab a benelit he never labored 
to secure; he cates only for himeelf, but 
he sees not beyond the extent of a day, 
and for momentary and worthless appro- 
bation would betray his friends, his family 
and his country. In short, he is a traitor 
on a small BcaJe, who first sells his fellow- 
men, and is himself afterwards sold in his 
turn by his employer, until at last he is 
despised by both and deserted by all. 
He is an enemy to himself, to the present 
age, and to posterity. 



aiDgmen are determined in relation GiouwMer Mai -Xeui 1 Allison, 3 so 
to those of the interior claeeee. and the SSlir' 1 'i' T Ä 

kevof the (V mlp ai'Btnm in “ pai.i, lueneeanu claims ordered eaRes 



on the edges. A counterfeit labet with pe.'fi>r»te 
edge* has lately made its appearance It •* *hi tfet 
than the genuine one. The genuine label t- al't>‘* ! 
an inch and a half square and is printed on ► , - s 
colored paper. When purchatting a hat *ee to L 
that you get the genuine label with the pt rforaWG 



key Of the whole system is the situation P "A"- - — neeanu elatmaord, 

of unskiUed laborers and the number anti AwSt ''LTm'S "I t 

superior Mobile, Ala., dedalo?aVG^ 0 T„ ,, d}; ,, fr n W * 



tons of G. S. anti G. T. suel 



workingmen are therefore interested in . ^ " an ‘ ,G T — 

the promotion and elevation of the lower iiavertvc]n, 0 Ldl 0n H^; New York J"»-e 8 
ranks. They should fight their own V"; 0 .” »A«*' 

batüe on the battle-field of the lower ve r- t,on , 9 Con ‘ 

nnTfv; 0< ? lidarit T ia their best policy; York^Terred m D C 1 of'v^ v* i, ' n *-3. New 
nay, there is no otiier policy.” " ment. ' f ^ork for settie- 



“ Neglect of educational work in the Complaint, Union 758 South F 
untone, and pitUee» pereecution ol non- ^'"o 

e ' s - showed investi- 



This is the Only Correct Unioj label f c‘ 
Fur-Felt Hats. 

BUY NO FUR-FELT HAT WITHOUT < T 

Edward Barrktt, I’resident. 

Hat ^lakers’ International A--«« i** 111 

James H. Penrose, Secretary, - . , 

523 Snyder Ave., Philadelp!"«. ca. 

James Graham, President, , . 

Hat Finishers’ International Ass a. 

John Phillips. Secretary, u m 

^ 477 Park Avenue, Brooklyn, w. *• 








THE CARPENTER. 



3 



General Officers. 



Moneys Received. 



(Milted Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 



DURING THE M'lNTH ESI, INC. AUGUST 31. 1««. 
h h< um r any nr. r- a(.|. ar rmtif. it.. G. 8. without di-lav. 

All iD'.uev. pa-.',« 1 i u >EPTEMItKK «ill uj.|»ar in' ncvt 
in. ntli - Nü\ I.MHIK | :i|Kt Tl.i- rr|mrt f..r AUGUST in luilo. 
»II uioi.rt. rro-iwl l.v tin- G. S. lrorn til. L.. al Uuiuu' fur ta<i 
an l for tin- ni»nth of AUGUST «nl\ . 



Office of the General Secretary, 

N. Ninth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



General President, Henry H. Trenor, 670 La- 
fayette uv«- . Brooklyn X. 

General s. er« tar> — I*. .1. McGuire, Pox 864. 
Philadelphia, !*;i. 

General I miHiirer— James Troy, 2442 Monroe 
st., Philadelphia, Pa. 

GENERAL V ICE-PRESIDENTS. 

FirM Vi. e- President-- J. (’. Larwill, 1124 First 
.Te., i It \ eltuui 1*. 

s,.i ..nil V ire- President — ('has. Pane, 1*. (*). Box 
911 Butte, Mont. 

GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

All O' iTi 'tiotulenee for the G. E. B. must be 
miiile i to l i<- General Secretary.) 

Hugh McKay. 283 Ia-xington St., E. Boston, 



S I Kent. 204« S st., Lincoln, Xeh. 
li iv i;..w «ini, 263 \V Court st. Ciiuiimati, O. 
\V !' 1> i k l imi t. 203 Walnut st.. Nashville, Term. 
A. M. .-«art/.. 128 James st , Allegheny, Pa. 



PROTECTIVE FUND. 

>ii li id during the month of August.) 



8-2 2 si 

3=_J 

1— ?128 411 nvc- 

2- 54 20 167— 
5— 20 80 P.8— 

4 — 57 111 169 — 

5 - 18 35 170— 

5— 2 60 171 — 

7 — 7 on 172— 

8— 28 70 1 Ta- 
ft— 11 10 174— 

10— 8 10 175— 

11— 54 10 176— 

12— 10 »0 177— 

13 — 2 Co 178 — 

14— 4 20 179— 

15 — 5 4" ISO- 

16— 26 (ill 181— 

17 — 5 65 ls2 — 

18 — 3 10 1S3— 

10— 3 10 184— 

20 — 12 10 185— 

21— S3 90 186— 

22— 50 10 187— 

23— 26 00 188— 

21— 5 30 189- 

25— 23 40 l'.«t>— 

26 — 1 50 191— 

27— 9 (>• 192— 



28— 113 40 193— 





«4 






z z 


Z z 


u 

e.- 


ii !_r 


Z Ti Z 

< iJ: 


7 — $ 


* J’» _ '»» ^ 


1 05 412- 


9- 


6 : 5 231— 


90 414— 


i 


I 76 242— 


( 0 4 -’2 - 


21 — 


2 10 23’.— 


70 4 25— 


31 — 


1 30 ’3.— 


3 30 429 - 


56 — 


10 5-11 — 


2 65 434- 


37 - 


1 4 > 244— 


2 6 • 436— 


4ft— 


'. 5 249— 


'2 '.‘5 1 19 - 


48- 


.* Id 25 i - 


1181 45:.*— 


M— 


1 1 o5 


'J 25 450 — 


.V. — 


1 :.'* .57— 


ft 1 


67— 


7 V* — 


5 *.M 4ft. — 


7h — 


1 lv 5.1— 


1 51* 109— 


*6 — 


2 '5 21.2 — 


tin 4«; — 



;i^j 

2 50 i95- 
2 60 196— 
4 80 !97— 



3-1— 64 I 0 198- 



1 70 620 — 6 53 05 



>5 2t 9— 
l ¥> 273- 
1 7‘> 2-1 - 



5 25 4'2 — 
1 60 131- 

90 4*3 — 



3 35 624— 
1 05 626— 
85 637— 

1 70 611 — 

3 25 1145— 
1 25 616— 
6 10 V47— 
1 10 65:- 
I 6.0 6.57 — 

3 95 .;-6 — 
1 20 667 — 
1 75 677— 

4 0 6>4 — 
ii 45 6«5 — 
3 90 t.36— 
6 70 6V0— 



2 70 199— 

3 80 JOG- 
15 "(I 201— 

2 Sli 202 — 
1 00 203— 

w ii. aSr 

1 7" 206 — 
5 IC 2D7— 
21 90 208— 
JIS— 

1 '0 210— 



Ml I« JÖ1- « 
12 II 332— 
26 JO 33 1— 
28 20 334 — 

3 60 335— 
10 7.1 336- 
. . . 337- 

1 10 338 - 
5 65 319 — 

21 30 340— 
15 2 1 341 — 
14 60 342— 

. . . 343 — 

. . . 344- 
14 SO 345— 
31 00 346— 

2 00 347— 

3 80 348— 
2 40 349— 

. . . 350— 
.5 10 351— 

2 10 352— 

5 0 ' 353- 

3 40 351— 

. . . 355— 

6 9 • 356— 

8 60 357— 

4 80 358— 
. . . 359— 

. . . 360- 

4 15 361— 

2 SO 362— 

5 on 303— 
21 95 SCl- 

ilCS - 

1 1 35 366- 

3 50 307— 

9 90 36S— 
8 20 86ft— 

•2 so rn— 

12 30 371 — 

jr-r 

s 20 373— 

1- S' * T7i - 

2 SO 37.5— 



3 95 211— 101 5'» ,37 



11 70 212 — 
6 20 213— 
23 90 214— 
S 90 215— 
2. 50 216 - 
5 4u 217— 



3 60 377— 
2 05 378— 
2 so 379— 
13 40 3*0— 
s 20 381— 
7 to 382 - 



<*— 


1 M 28.5— 


2 15 19.» — 


6 80 si* I — 


96 


53— 


219- 


14 10 383— 


y.;— 


2 ' .5 ‘2*7— 


4 '25 .501 — 


1 49 700 - 


89 


54- 


22 10 219— 


5 10 384— 


* ’» — 


27 i" 


1 15 501- 


8- ' 7* ’5 — 


2 :t 


55— 


47 70 220— 


2 30 385— 


* — 


.«i ,:03— 


3 0512— 


2 00 7 0- 


l ;o 


.56— 


3 00 221 — 


8 20 .386— 


If)! — 


3 20 V! — 


5 O'. 513— 


95 481 71 1— 


1 • 5 


57— 


• V).» 


. . . .387— 


1 1.1— 


l mi 7- 


.! .311611- 


1 7*1711— 


2 6c 


58— 


! 22a — 


4 00 388— 


117 — 


6 !'• 3J4 — 


I Cm .515— 


7 C 727— 


2 95 


59— 


3 4f> 224- 


8 oo 38y — 


1 W — 


45 ::i 3— 


2 00 » 6— 


«0 728 — 


64 


60— 


13 7n 225— 


16 30 390 — 



6 15 sll- 

1 "(I 316- 
10 65 317 — 

1 '.*5 33 .— 

2 til 311 — 

3 10 tl — 
2 .55 5 I— 



1*5 — 125 '5 351 — 



•5 55 3'd — 

I -il 366 — 
7 30 369— 
3 65 7' — 

1 15 3s0 — 

2 5> 3'1 — 
9 1 . 33 — 

s '.SI 391 — 
1 -0 3.2— 

6 15 tun — 

7 79 1'H— 
1 15 4' 5— 



2 ID MO- 
20 TO 525— 
76 51 — 

1 75 53-— 

2 70 5 ‘.7 — 
1 46 640 - 
l I >5 5l3 — 

3 .6 55-1- 
70 562 — 

1 '20.57! — 
3 5.5 5' '— 

5 35 5*1 — 

2 5 6'S — 

6 05 59_>— 
70 599— 

3 26 6ul — 
l 25 1502 — 
1 60 006 — 
3 .6 t.i 

1 46 61s— 



2 15 732— 7 20 

190 731— 3 21) 

6 05 742— 3 .0 

60 7 13 — 1 0« 

"0 741— 2 55 

2 '.*• '47— ‘l 35 

1 <81 749 - 1 t<i 

5 » 7M — 1 111 

•5 !<0 753— 99 

55 75' — 1 tO 

7 SO 76 2 — 2 25 

5 7' i — 1 70 

1 iU 76'— 9-5 

11 Si. . ".1— 3 15 

9 62 77 1— 3 50 

1 (>i 7*1 — 2 no 

; o - l 45 

2 70 790 — 9-5 

1 mi 79 > — 1 t>u 

651 

. . . . «1,028 37 



SPECIAL ASSESSMENT. 

RrrMv m 1 during the month of A neust. 



Xo 


.(nit. 


Xu. 


Amt. 


No. 


Amt. 


10-9 


;‘.*1 fto 


473 


{‘22 6.0 


, . 


:-9 75 


15.. 


li 50 


493 . 


. '25 25 


7-S7 . . 


5 ) 


196 . . 


4 0.) 


• ki.) . 


. 9 76 


76G . . 


8 HO 


SI ' . . 


It 5i 


623 . 


5 0) 




— 


XT . 
270 


42 75 
11 70 


003 


3 50 




'254 10 



OBITUARY NOTICES. 

( Jmertvmx under this hend cost ten ccnls j>er line.) 

Mil BURN, X. J. 

WurijRAS. It has pleased Almiehty G.»d in His 
Intinitc \\ isdtiiu. in remove from this life our l>e 
h .veil hrotlier. William Pauci li s and while we 
hi.wiii humble sii’uuisuioii to His divine will, 
we mourn Him loss of a true and loA'iiijj hrotlier. 

HrsUird . That the undivided, heartfelt syiu- 
piitliy "f the im-nihers of th*> CArpenters’ a; 1 
J. mit- l'iiimi Xo. -232. of Millburn, lie tendered 
ti. hw bi it aved family in thi« their sail hour of 
«lib. turn. 

1. ' Jr. ./ That a copy of these resolutions lie 
», el at larjre oil the minute' of their Pi non and 
in- rfe.l in the Summit Record and in The Cab- 
ci M KK. 

Resulted, That a copy he en(fro'sed and pre- 
■Mited to the family of the deceased. 

Wtl.I.1 VM < '. CltAI FE, 
Thomas Clark. 

Edward IJadgley, 

.Iamis H. White, 

Nathan C. Mi.bvin, 

Isaac L»i as. 

Committe«. 



Evasistoji, 111., Auffiist 23. ! 892. 

Fnio 1 Xo. 117 join in tendering Brother M. A. 
Washburn and family their heartfelt sympathy 
In his sad bereavement by the death of his be- 
loved wife 

D.-oea'i'd hail no enemies, on the contrary her 
woman I y he irtand benevolent disposition made 
her ever ready to help the needy, had made many 
friend', and though the raberuuele be removed 
from ainom; us. the deeds and kindly 

fimlkCii words still live. Like the sivri t incense. 
thouiL:!f t!ie censor be removed the fragrance »till 
remains. 

1). ath has been here and horn away 
A si'ter from our side 
In promise of life and vigor 
A» young a» we, she died. 



G. T Scofield. 

Titos. Van Iderstine. 

J. P.rearly, 

Committee. 



80— 
Sl- 
82— 
8f— 
84 — 
85— 
36— 

87- 

88 — 

89 — 

90— 

91— 

92— 

93— 

94— 

95— 

96— 

97— 
9*— 
99— 

100 — 
101 — 
M2— 

103— 

104 — 

105 — 

106— 
M7- 
103- 

109— 

110 — 
111 — 
1172 — 
113— 
111 — 
115— 

ne- 

in— 

118- 

119- 

120 - 
121 — 
juo 

123- 

124- 

125- 

126- 
127- 
128 - 
129 — 
131' — 

131 — 

132— 

133— 
134 — 
13 V- 
1.36- 

137— 

138 — 

139 — 

140 — 

141— 

142— 

143— 

144— 

145— 

146— 

147— 

148— 

149— 
l*t- 

151— 

152— 

153— 

154— 

155— 

1 1.56- 



i? lfi jje - 

28 15 227 — 
33 »VI v'j3 - 
18 45 J.-O— 

3 3U 2 4>— 
. . . 241— 

s .V» AÖ— 
s ’u> iti — 
1 50 234— 

4 4 'i 235— 

2 <6— 
35 '0 '2-47 — 
! 4 1" 238— 

6 7o 2.49— 
4 CiO 24 ) — 
4 10 

$» 

14 21. . - 
I 70 -214— 

3 6.1 215— 

4 75 JH5 — 
1 1 10 2,7— 
23 70 JD- 

7 90 

1 70 250— 
3 40 g51— 
3 t)n 252— 
10 M rd- 
fi 20 2'*l — 
23 7U 2.55 — 



2 1 0 391 — 
•> i 0 'tt* 2 — 
1.5 s 1 31*3 — 

5 40 394 — 
18 ()• 395— 

1 s i :t96— 

I 20 397— 

1 »0 ''S— 
17 Hn S 19 — 

7 111 400 — 

2 30 401 — 

♦02— 

6 |0 41 13— 

. . t04 — 

1 1 7" 405— 

4 20 40ft— 
. . 407— 

4 60 408— 

2 30 409 — 

3 50 410— 

II 80 411 — 

2i "i P-2— 

5 55 413 - 
9 16 414— 

415— 
s 00 416 — 
1 60 4)7 — 
G >. ps_ 
. . . 4'9 — 
. . . 430— 



C f o 

a iffs 

< Ua 

. . 47*6— 8 

497— : 

3 60 47i8 — . 

5 10 4'.i9— 

18 50 500— . 

6 30 501 — 

. . . 502— 

. . . 503— 

. . 5n4— 

54 S5 505— 

5 40 506— 

. . 507— 

4 10 508— 

7 80 509— 

. . 510— 

2 90 511— 

. . 512— 

. . 513— 

6 10 514— 

5 35 515— 

6 f.O 616— 

11 80 517— 

1 SO 518— 

14 40 619— 

11 40 320— 

6 80 521— 

. . . 522— 

. . . 623 — 

8 10 524- 
19 Ot 525— 

1 40 626— 

2 30 527— 

1 50 628— 

. . . 529— 

. . 53*4- 

2 40 531 — 

14 20*532 — 

6 60 533— 

7 60 534— 

. . 535— 

1 80 536- 
. . . 537— 
538 — 

13 10 539— 
11) 70.540— 

i 90 541— 

15 00 512— 

**1T 

10 00 r>44- 
4 7" 545— 

12 10 .546— 
37 80 547— 

1 40 54*4— 
649 — 

7 1 5 560— 

. . 551 — 

. . . 652— 

14 23 563 — 

1 20 664— 

\56— 

6 50 5-Vt— 

2 602>67 — 

3 40 65S — 

. . . 559— 

16 40 560— 

13 VO 5*';l — 

7 80 19 2— 

. . . 5*i3 — 

. . 664 — 

3 20 V i— 

7 40 566— 

6 6 ' 1 567— 

. . . 568— 

V10— 

8 10570— 

671 — 

4 00 672 — 

7 00 573— 

2 50 574— 

18 20 575— 

4 ftO 576— 

2 50 577— 

. . 678— 

9 70 57.i— 

1 50 680— 

11 50 6H1— 

. . 582— 

1 00 583— 

6 JO 584— 

3 70 585— 



Local 

Union. 

Amount. 

Local 

Union. 


Amount. 

Local 

Union. 


Amount. 

Local 

Union. 


4» 

i 

3 

0 

a 

< 


66!-$ . . . «99— 


? 7 80 737— 


$8 00 77$— S 


3 00 


662— . . . 700- 


1 til. 738 — 


3 '20 1 776— 


8 30 


6i:3— . . . 701— 


3 20 739— 


13 60 777— 


3 00 


«64— . . 702— 


1 6*< 740— 


7 40 778- 




666— 4 60 703— 


11 16 711— 


779 — 


# . 


666— 5 4*) 704— 


11 -0 742— 


6 20 780— 


1 40 


667— 29 8U 706— 


5 50 743— 


2 60 781— 


4 00 


668 — 706— 


744— 


5 IU 782 — 


2 30 


669- . . . 707— 


4 20 745- 


1 83 — 


2 40 


67 0 — . . . 70^ — 


10 85 746— 


8 <0 784 — 


... 


671— . . . 709— 


717- 


5 66 78*— 


5 10 


«72— 6 60 710- 


3 40 748— 


1786— 


6 30 


673— 2 00 711— 


4 90 749— 


2 CO 1787— 


3 40 


674— . . . 712- 


13 80 750— 


9 25]788 — 


18 10 


675— 2 10 713— 


. . 751 — 


2 20 | 789 — 


1 00 


67 0 — 6 76 7H — 


6 20 753— 


. 1790— 


1 90 


677— 2 30 715— 


14 60 753— 


1 90 791— 


4 20 


678— 31 00 716— 


14 3 0 754— 


2 60 792 - 


. 


679- . . 717— 


. . . 1755- 


1 65793 — 


3 00 


680 — . . . 718— 


27 2" 756— 


3 40|791 — 


1 70 


«81— 14 90 7)9- 


3 10757 — 


795 — 


1 20 


682— . 720— 


1 30 758— 


3 70 796— 


4 30 


683 — 9 10 721— 


9 10 759— 


3 40 797— 


1 70 


684— 3 25 722— 


3 00760— 


. . . 798- 


3 10 


685— 5 1C 723— 


761- 


799— 


50 


686— 8 80 724— 


12 001762— 


4 70 800— 


... 


687— 6 00 725 - 


10 10 763- 


. . ISO!— 


• • • 


688— 1 7 0 726— 


. . . '764— 


4 80 802— 


. • . 


689- . . . 727— 


10 40 raw 


6 20; 803 — 


11 20 


690- . . 728— 


1 80 766— 


1 90 801— 


10 00 


691— 1 90 729— 


18 00 767— 


4 50 805— 


10 00 


692— 7 40 730- 


. . . 768 — 


1 90 806- 


10 CO 


j 693— 1 60 731— 


1 50 769 — 


2 CO 807— 


:o co 


1 694— . . . 732— 


16 40 770— 


6 30 808— 


10 00 


695- 1 80 733- 


3 30:771- 


6 90 8 r '9 — 


10 00 


696— 14 30:734 — 


12 40i772— 


1 60 810— 




| 697— 735— 


10 001773— 


. . 811— 


10 00 


698— 15 00 736— 


3 90 77 4— 


8 25 


Total 





*6.514 86 





NECESSITY FOR 
EFFORT. 



LEGISLATIVE 



The Committee on Organization at the 
Seventh General Convention of the U. 
B. at St. Louis, Mo-, August 5 , 1892 , sub- 



to agree to be, or to be employed, hired or en- 
gaged, contrary to all or any of the provisions 
of this Act. And be it further provided, that 
the hours of labor (hall be between the hours of 
8 A. m. and 5 r. m. Except when the contract or 
agreement is made to work two or more relays 



^ o? mitted the appended report, which, after or shifts, in which ease the hours of labor may 



a Very interesting discussion, was adopted be arranged, but not in Bitch a way as to allow 
amid tumultuous applause : more than eight hours to be worked in each 

The work of organization on trades un- relay or shift And it is further provided, and 
ion lines front the natjral progress ot shall be, and is unlawful for any person toper- 
events lias become somewhat slow and it form labor In more than one relay or shift within 
ie becoming more and more evident from each twenty-four hours, 
dav to day that the U. B. must take a new 3d. PeDuities. 

• r 1 11 * 



No. 3. Every person who violates or tries to 



else admit that the legend, Ixthur Out Hill Act shall for the first offense be punished by a 



lined is a misnomer and has no place on 
our banner. 

We would, therefore, recommend that 
this Convention create a Committee on 
Legislation, whose duty shall be to map 
out a plan for united legislative action by 
this and affiliated organizations, and in- 
asmuch as one of the fundamental objects 
of this organization is to shorten the 
I hours of labor, to the end that a great 



hour movement, the nectseity for new is- 
sues to place before the people to interest 



fine of not less than 160 nor more thanSHOor 
imprisonment in the county jail for not less than 
thirty dnvs nor more than three months. And 
every person Leii.g convicted of the second or 
any subsequent violation of any of the pro* is* 
ions of this Act, shall ha punished by a fine of 
not less than fECO nor more than Sl.OOO or im- 
prisonment iu the Slate Penitentiary for a term 
of not less than one year nor more thnn two 
year6, or both fine and imprisonment. 

4th. When Act does not apply. 

No. 4. This Act shall not affect the Inbor r 
service of any persen working at fairu labor or 
agricultural pursuits 

5th. When no action shall he maintained. 

No. 5. Na action shall he maintained by any 



V10U8. 



ltue Work OI organization la 00- person for any labor rendered in violation of tlm 
Shortening the hours ot labor ie a terms of this Act, nor shall any action he main* 



Cincinnati. O. I 149— 
Whereas, it has pleased God to remove from 1 150— 
our midst and fellowship Brother John Bradik- 151 — 
GER. and 152— 

Whereas, in his death Local Union 688 loses 153— 
a true and consistent member, his familv a de- t 164 — 
voted husband and father, and the community j 155— 
an upright and useful citizen, he it 156— 

Resolved, that this union extend to his family ' 157 — 
the resolution of sympathy and respect which 158— 
will be spread on the minutes of t his union and 159 — 
aoopv furnished to The Cabuesteb for publi- 160- 
cation . Ml- 

JOHN SCWARTZ, 166— 

M. Fitzpatbic, I 168— 

T. JVNKENS. 164 — 

Committee I 169 — 



19 7» 318- 
6 80 319- 
6 26 320— 
. . . 321— 
8 60 322— 
8 06 823- 
1 80 324 — 
3 10 825— 
326— 
1 *6 327— 
8 00 818 - 
10 60 329— 
30 60 390 — 



. . . 483— 

3 00 -184— 

. . . 485— 
... 486 — 
. . 487— 

1 40 488— 
. . . 489— 

4 80 490— 
44 on 491— 
34 40 492— 
10 00 493— 

8 10 494— 
. . . <496— 



23 00 648 — 

6 70 649— 
4 10 650 — 

7 40 661— 
6 60 652- 

14 90 853 — 
. . 654— 

3 » 656— 
. . . 656- 
. . . 657— 
14 90 658— 
1 00 659— 
13 60 660— 



Financial Report. 

RECEIPTS— August, 1892. 



1 60 From the Unions (Tax, etc.) . . 
3 35 ! “ Kent of Office 

1 40 1 “ Advertising 

“ Clearances, etc 

2 00 I “ Special Assessments . . 
6 00 1 Loan from Protective Fund . . 
t (in Balance on hand August 1, 1892 



and untiring eltorts. Eight hours, and no 
IT. I coiuproaiise except on seven or six. To 
eomprouiLce on nine hours but changes 
our tetters. It does not remove them. 
$ 5,514 so xhe galling of slavery still goes on and 
J ® the day of our emancipation is put afar 
13 fio oft. We believe the bent method of gain- 



424 so i n p an eight hour day is through the bal- 



'bo 13 ! lot box. A stringent eight hour law, Na- 

1 | tional in its application, must he the 

57,148 09 ■ means of attaining this end. Seven- 



EXPENSES— August, 1892. 

For Printing 

“ Office, etc 

“ Tax A F ofL 

“ Badges .... 

“ Traveling mid Organizing . . . 

“ Benefits Xo. 1914 to No. 1977 . . . 
“ Expenses of St. Louis Convention 
Balance on hand Sept. 1, IS9C . . . . 



eighths of the voters of this country are 



$689 98 j 
711 07 I 
90 tO I 
223 29 1 
39 40 
4.0P1 50 ; 
1114 08 ! 
267 8ft I 



arid performed would have been in violation o 
this Act. 

fth. Repeal of inconsistent laws. 

No. 6. All laws inconsistent with this Act are 
hereby repealed. 

This legislative bill is subject to such 
changes as may be required by the ditler- 
ent State Constitutions. 

Brothers, in conclusion we respectfully 
call your altenrion tu a careful study of 
the labor question as to its conclusive in- 
terest for us. as well as in its genera! forms 
of interest through affiliated organiza- 
tions. It wae our fortune yesterday to re- 
ceive an object lesson whose impressions 



Total $7,118 09 

DETAILED EXPENSES- August, 1>92. 



•250 — 


1 50 i2i — 


. . 686— 


4 80 


4 00 257— 


37 10 122— 


0 10 587— 


2 90 


4 p| 058— 


1 1 mi nr? — 


5 70 588— 


2 00 


8 5". 259 — 


3 00 124— 


589— 




1 1" 260 — 


. . . 425— 


1 78 590- 


' 3 80 


7 3" 261 — 


. • • r»6— 


. . . 691— 




5 5i 2> 2— 


1 41 427— 


. . . 592— 


25 6ft 


. . '26!— 


. . . 428- 


3 00 59.3— 


1 50 


i so I'm— 


9o 429— 


3 40 694 — 


. . 


6 00 265— 


6 40 I »— 


3 00 595— 




l ‘.81 266 — 


2 30 1x1 — 


6 60 596— 




. - . 267— 


3 70 432 — 


. . 597— 




4 0o ft*'.8— 


10 50 133 — 


10 40 598— 




6 40 2fl'* — 


■ . 131— 


6 60 .599 — 


' 6 00 ' 


3 70 270— 


12 10 135— 


2 50 6*0 — 


2 20 j 


. . 271- 


. . 4.16— 


601— 


2 00 


. *— • 


1 90 137— 


2 71 6D2— 


8 2(i 


27 7< < 273— 


6 10 wa- 


. . . 603 — 


5 CO 


-!H •«> 274 — 


ll pi .*'<>— 


6CM — 


. . . 


■'! 85 275 — 


3 30 440— 


6 SO' 605— 


. . 1 


2 ‘-0 '.>-6— 


• • 411 — 


1 40 6*6 — 


5 40 


21 ftO .77— 


S 16 4|2— 


. . . 607— 




I ftu 278— 


5 15 I«— 


608— 


2 O0 1 


3 (.0 279 — 


. . . 444- 


4 3ft 6<i9 — 


9 00 


6 10 280— 


. . »45— 


15 40 «lo- 


• 


. . 291 — 


1 *5 146— 


ss 60 611 — 


4 00 


1 1 70 28 2— 


. . . 417— 


612— 


21 60 


6 So ->3— 


9 7C »is — 


1 SO 613— 


9 75 


12 So 2 v 4 — 


9 10 no— 


13 90 614— 


6 90 


. . . 285— 


1 ;o 45H— 


39 90 615— 


2 60 


14 97 286— 


1 8 40 4M— 


16 70 616— 




23 20 287 — 


9 10 1,52— 


2 60 617— 


20 10 


I 1)288- 


10 !0 153— 


14 70 619 — 


1 30 


299- 


1 Ti' 454- 


. . 619- 


• • • 


13 60 ‘290- 


21 50 455- 


. . G20 — 


5 10 


. . . 29 i — 


. . . 1.56— 


3 90 621 — 


• • • 


. . . 292 — 


1 SO 4.57- 


10 60 622— 


• • • 


1 5" 29 1 — 


• * • 458— 


4 60 623— 


’ 4 95 ' 


294— 


. . . 1.59— 


13 20 624— 


9 .30 1 


3 on 29 V- 


2 Ml 160 — 


4 60 6:5— 


. . . ! 


1 00 296 — 


4 00 if,i — 


4 10 626— 


16 25 


11 90 297— 


2 10 462— 


. 627— 


1 40 


. . 298— 


22 30 453 — 


7 50 628— 




7 35 299 — 


. . . 464— 


6*9— 


16 50 


2 SO 300— 


3 30 165- 


23 50 630— 




4 20 3>n — 


8 70 466— 


7 90 681— 


fl 70 


3 70 302-- 


. . . 467— 


2 10 «82— 




12 65 &13— 


. . . 468 — 


. . . 633— 


9 00 


17 95 301— 


14 60 |69— 


4 50 534— 




4 *ki 4Ü6 — 


7 50 170— 


l 50 535— 


' 60 


12 20 f*' — 


15 471 — 


2« 10 516— 




37 00 {.17— 


3 00 473— 


2 90 537— 


6 30 


13 20 VI8 — 


2 10 »73- 


11 50 <38— 


13 60 


ft 20 ,309— 


2 60 174— 


9 30 539— 


6 60 


4 10 310— 


1 .50 175— 


. . . 640— 


... 


311— 


18 $0 476- 


4 90 641— 


4 60 


8 10^12— 


- • ■ 477— 


. . . 642— 


9 (4) | 


1 10 313— 


3 M) 178- 


. . . 6!3— 


1 40 


. . . 314— 


4 80 179— 


4 80 644— 




S 70 315— 


. • - 480— 


10 10 645— 


1 30 


19 20 316— 


9 70 481— 


9 60 646— 


90 


317— 


1 $0 182— 


14 16 647— 


18 50 



Printing 1 .( 00 Postals 

I, UM) Stamped Envelopes . . 
8^0 General vote circulars . . 
l.tH 1 ) Biennial Reports. . . . 

** 5.00.) Notices of Arrears . . . 

ö.U'O Xotehcads . ... 

1.750 Amend, to Constitution 
1 .500 < '.invention Proceeding' 
•* 1,** 0 Death Blanks . . . 

*• 5 0(H) Auditors' Blanks . . 

5.900 IN mittaiioe Blanks . . 
1*0 Treas. Receipt Books . . 
100 Secretary’s Order Books . 
JtO r S. Receipt Books . . . 
“ 1020 Blank Receipts . ... 

3. .'s 0 New Cloth Rituals . . . 
45. OtiO September Journal . . 
Wrapping and Mailing Sept. Journal. .* 

Poetage on Sept. Journal 

* Supplies, etc 

I.OOOStamped Envelopes 

1 ,Oi.O Postals 

Poslageon Convention Hand Book. Pro- 
ceedings, ete 

Ex pres sage on Supplies, etc 

13 Telegrams 

filial y and Clerk Hire 

Office Rent for August 

S. J. Kent, visit to < imaha 

St. Louis mill strike . . . . 
R. Hlunienhurg, org. Cnioii 786 .... 

W. T. Dukchart, new G. E. B 

A. M. Swartz. •* “ 

I). P. Rowland, “ “ 

Tax to A. F. of L. (June) 

19'.* i Clasp envelopes 

800 Special clasp envelojiea 

1116 Pins 

Incidentals mid Stationery 

Cleaning office 

Engravings for Convention Souvenir . 



j working men. What sublime power »1 of interest ’through affiliated organiza- 
i thu*? 'tat-ted hv delleetion . tione. It was our fortune yesterday to re- 

\\ hat grand and mighty refoims m gov - ( . e jve au object lestron whose impressions 
j cnnneutal and indust rit .1 courses t an ie s ), uu |,i \, e indelibly pictured on our minds 
achieved n we but will. Lv political con- the exclusion of petty foibles and arouse 
I cenlratiou the people can govern them- , ^ jq more strenuous and exalted elfort to 

* . . . . , place labor on that high plane of dignity 

I Bv the present system of misduected j an j j n )p OP taiice to which it is entitled by 
political power we arc but dupes and cats- , prt>gtie * ot ant ,q U ity and achievement. 

, paws. In all work of labor unions ibev ... t i lf . re L e h t ],i tin* aristociacv of the 



. ... . , ; place labor on that high plane of dignity 
msuuecteu an j importance to which it is entitled by 
es and cats - 1 pregtige Q f an tiquity an<! achievement. 



} 'j 5 j liave always seemed to fear to atlopt any ] 
12 6d ' methods tending toward legislation. It is 
12 60 gratifying, however, to note in the reports ' 
12 so 0 f t j ie general officers that they liave un 
*•2 26 hesitatingly approved of or recommended j 
4 69 legislative action. 

An oi gunization as powerful as the L'. 

™ B. can certainly exert a grand irlluence 
25 oo and give great force to a movement tor 
25 oo ( j ie esUihlishnjeut of an eight-lie ur day by 
9175 legislation that would be pun-tit ally a 
22323 National, or International eight-hour law. 
j'-' As a meaus to this end, we herewith 
19 os recommend and eubmit the follow ing leg- 
22 00 islative bill for the enactment of an eight- 
10 00 hour Jaw, and ask this body to take euch 
46 oq action as will bring about the desired end. 



46 00 

24 11 

6 j organizations in all of the States und 

25 oo Provinces unitedly and tiruilv advance in 
in 65 this movement for legislation and bring 
ti " 6 adl the force and intluence in their power 

5 «Q to bear on the legislators in their several 
5 5 y district;- until this matter is attaint d. 

00 " or k °f organization in the United 

20 m Brotherhood is very much retarded and 
9 60 the mcral standard ol labor unions greatly 
2 ~! lowered by the too frequent recourse of 
j 50 members to quarrels, bickerings and the 
71 69 airing of personal animosities, which can- 
■ot but do great injury to the labor move- 
ment and is absolutely barren of satisfac- 
143 90 tion to those directly engaged in these 
(6 60 useless strifes. 

«5— t V 

7 S 60 We believe a better feeling should be 
o? fostered among the members and earn- 
127 25 oetly hope the day will come when the 
55 oo word “ Brother ” will not be as meaning- 
^ less in our organization as it appears to be 

Zo (IU 

23 00 now • 

27 50 We heartily indorse the progressive 
|*7 ideas contained in the reports of our (jen- 
2^. 5 0 eral Officers, and recommend a careful 
27 60 study of them by the members of the 
® lj* United Brotherhood and sincerely believe 



We there beheld the aristocracy of the 
brute creation, We saw massive struc- 
tures erected by labor's brain and brawn. 
Great engines, that teemed to say with 
their almost human like thiobbvngf* . 
“Clive Lack ! Clive hack ' ! The laborer 
is worthy the fruits of his toil.” We saw 
the beauty labor can create but seldom 
enjoy. On every hand grand evidente of 
the sinew, intelligente and masterful ac- 
complishments of 1 *L or. and through the 
same lens do we behold the “ Master ” of 
the world led in chains to do the will of 
corporate wealth — labor's creation. How 
lontr shall these tilings be ? 

Shall we not, heie and now, resolv© 
once and again: That the spirit tf dio- 



uuu iu* mu lur ucaucu euu. ; in* ^ 4,^ , . _ 

We further recommend that the labor ! P ree9 5 ?® rt to 



EXPENSES OF ST. LOUIS CONVENTION. 

Priii tint: daily procc-ediiics and stereo- 

t vjicb of same 1 

Hall Kent 

Badges tor delegates . 

\V. H. Kllver, expenses as Gen. Pres . 

'• •* donation for servicea . . 

S J. Kent, expenses K. S. of G. E. B . . 
Hugh MeKay. ehaimian G. E. B . . . 

If. MeCorniaek, witnes* in Cliiiago case 
1*. J. Mi-tiuire, ex|ienses as G. S . . . . 

A. F. Pesehke, warden 

Koht. Young, messenger 

W. S. Weeks, Com. on Constitution . . 

Jas F. Grimes. Com. on Constitution . 

W. T. Dukehart, Com. on Constitution. 

T. J. Kyac, Committeeon Constitution. 
Tlios ltyves, “ “ 

Stationery 

Expressage on boxes 

Extra freight, expressage, etc 



organization and grander unity of pur- 
pose- Ever forward, ever upward, until 
standing on the highest point measured 
by human conception, iu i»lad unison we 
still shall shout, ‘‘Excelsior.’’ 



REDUCE THE HOURS OF T0*L. 



$143 90 
i 5 60 

32 (6 
72 60 



127 ‘25 
53 06 
59 75 
23 CO 
23 dO 
27 50 
27 50 
27 50 
27 50 
27 60 
9 43 
6 35 
16 16 



There is probably nothing in the whole 
range of economic discussion that more 
clearly shows how little influence facte 
liave in determining public policy than 
the reasoning upon the houre of labor. 
For more than fifty years says, The Social 
Economid, there has been an almost 
continuous series of reductions in the 
hours of labor iu different branches of in- 
dustry in most civilized countries, and 
particularly in England and America. 

“ A tew w eeks ago Lord Salisbuiy told a 
deputation ot English Laborers that an 
eight-hour day would ruin English capi- 
talists unless it were simultaneously 
adopted by Continental countries, and 
the proposition to roduce the working 
hours for women and children from tiO to 
58 per week has oalled forth a repetition 



CLAIMS APPROVED IN AUGUST. 



this Convention will act wisely by adopt- EvyoBÄSS 

.ng many of their reeom.nendot.ons and , h „ t ir 



Xo. Name. 

1941 — Clmo. Buecliner 
1915 — W. K. Martin . 

1946 — J. C. Siebei . . . 

1947— Mts. E. Gross. . 
i9.8 — Wm Kenny 
1949- J. P. Zoll 

1550 — J. M. Maloney . 



Union. 



209 (Bui. due) $150 00 j 



61 

5 (Bal. due) 



1951— John Myers 83 



951- David Schneider . . 90 

1953 — T. O’Oradv 109 

1954 — Mrs. A. J. Kephart . 122 

1951 — I. W Dean 137 

1956— Mr». E. S. Bailey . 146 

1957— Mrs E Anderson . . . 181 

1958— A. McGinnis .... 207 

1959— Mrs. I Barnett .... 222 

1960 — Jas. Kerr 247 

1961 — Tlios. Morgan .... 257 



1963 — John Brooks 299 

1964— Mrs. T. Randall ... 310 

1965 — O. D. Mullings .... 340 

1966 — P E. Erickson .... 351 

1967— P. G. Harris 416 

1968— Hugh Scott 426 

1969— T. F. Ward ... 468 

1970 — Mrs. M. A. Green . . 469 

1971— Mrs. F. Link 471 

1972— Mrs. A. M. A man . . 497 

1973— W. J. Murray . . .506 

1974— H. B. Wiesel .... 513 

1975— N. L. Lucas 624 

1976— J. B. Furnier 655 

1977 — J. Bradinger 683 



100 0Ü 
116 50 
60 00 
20 * 00 
200 O ' 
2' 0 DO 
200 00 
200 00 
200 O'l 
5o 00 
200 00 
50 (JO 
50 00 
50 00 
26 00 
66 00 
200 00 
200 00 
50 00 
50 00 
200 00 
200 CO 
100 00 
200 00 
200 00 
60 00 
60 00 



framing laws in conformity with the 
same. 

A Bill for the enactment of an Eight-Hour 

law in’and for the State of . 

Sections : 1. Eight hour« a legal day’s work, ete. 

2. Provisions of the Act. 

3. Penalties. 

4. When Act does not apply. 

5. When no action shall be main- 

tained. 

6 Repeal of inconsistent laws. 

Lit. Eight hours a legal day's work, 



No. 1. Be it enacted by the people ot the 

State of represented in that on :nd 

after the first day of , 189 — , eight hours of 

labor between the rising and setting of the sun, 
in all mechanical trades, arts'and employments ; 
whether under private or public contract, shall 
constitute a legal day’s work. • 

2d. Provisions of Act 



argues that if Massachusetts reduces her 
working time two hours per week she wilt 
be handicapped in competition with other 
New England States. If such reasoning 
were followed there never would be any 
progress at all. If England had waited 
for the Continent she would probab'y 
have have still been working fourteen 
hours per day, and if Massachusetts had 
waited till all New England agreed, her 
ten-hour law would never have been 
adopted . 

“And so such reasoning holds equally 
good in wages. If Eaetern employers 
waited until their Southern competitors 
were ready to increase wages it would 
never be done England did not sutler 
by leading the Continent in this respect, 
nor did the capitalists ot Massachusetts 
sutler by leading New England, nor does 
New England suffer by leading the restot 



No. 2. it shall be and is unlawful for any per- the country in the matter of wages. A 
son to employ, hire or engage, or counsel or shorter workirgday, in fact, is a necessity 



5000 p-'-suodelto employ, hire or engage any other ot progrees and cannot be stopped, and 



50 00 
100 00 
50 00 
200 00 
50 ( 0 



Total »6,880 23 



person to labor contrary to any of the provisions 
of this Act 

Further, it shall be, and is unlawful for anv 
person to agree to be employed, hired or en- 
gaged, or counsel or persuade an y^otber person 



statesmen and economists who fail to 
recognize that fact simply put themselves 
in the way of peaceful advance, and in eo 



E 



doing encourage the inflammatory feeling 
which givee rise to revolutionary schemee. ’ * 



THE CARPENTER. 



FINANCIAL SECRETARIES. 

ALABAMA 

612. Bridgeport— W. A. Carruth. 

>9. Mobii.k- K Marschal. 607 S. Elmir* st 
9*. “ (Col.) \5\ O. Lewis, 751 St. Louis St. 

hi *6. Si i.M.v- A. L. Munson. 42} Broad st. 

389. Sheffield — W in. R Ambrose. 

ARKANSAS 

469. Hot Springs— M. II. Packard, 109 Tulip et. 
292. I.irri.E Rock— D. W. Gaskill, Box 371. 

511. “ C. L. Luc*.«. Box 291. 

412. Pise Bli ff— J ohn Matz. B*>\ 125. 

CALIFORNIA 

47. Alameda— J acob Hoevk. 1512 R R. ave 
217. Ki kkka- M. B Fowler. Box 336. 

660. Hanford— J. M Dean. 

85. 1 lot i i«rER— C. Hickey. 

56. I .Oh Am.ku> - .1. I». Newman. Box 642. 

36. Oakland— J F. Guilin. 1119 Ninths!. 

615 Pa'ADEN a- II. K. Shaw. 116 Fruuklin ave. 
23‘>. Riverside — W. .1. Kinbree, 317 CridgesL 
S41. Sacramento— 17 S. Mason, 1201 .1 «t. 

174 " iCars.) i>. 1*. Paxton, I7i>5 E st. 

86 . San Bek nab nt no — II. \\ i gnori, Box 797. 

San Khan« is. o — 

22. II Meyer 260 Siegel .«t , B. II. 

801 (Ger.) M. Tropto. r7_M S:tv<*n***i st. 

48.}. Guy l.«thr**p. Ills Taylor st. 

616. (Stair Bid no .1. \\ Nisln tt. 1917 Stevenson. 
816. San .Iosk — M. Bialce, Carp.’* Box G. A. R. 

Hull. 

35 San Rafael— R. Se at, Box 673. 

126. Santa Barbara— K. A smith. 1429 Costello. 
1X3 San" « Cruz— G \V. Reid. 71 I«ocust m. 

817 sr«-* K tots— .1. II. Hohlen, 399 Grunt st. 

CANADA 

791 IlmM'iiv. Man.— J a» Lang. 

7 .» Calgary. .\ lkf.rta— 55' Pittman. Jr., Box 191 
h j. Halifax. X. S. — A. Xoittuip^ 169 Morris at 

H. Hamilton— 1>. Barnard, 6 Florence st. 
sot II<»< iialag x.Que — J I. is'ier, 2u7 Dezery. 
191. London— 15. J Aust. 706 1 'undas st. 

Montreal— S ecretary of District ('«uncil. 
,1. B. ( hampagne. 6‘" t Pungiiinet st. 

13t. (Fr.'o Cli»-\ ulier, 1375 i »iitiri** st. 

SU. (Fr.) N Norn. and. 456 Centn st . l’t.St. Clias 
376. Jo.* skinner, 72 Plymouth Grove. 

666. (Fr Jo«. I amontugue, 53 Duluth ave. 

755. NcRAtMo. B. — I. Hihliteh. 

321, Ottawa— Fr ) V. Vilitjuette. 411 St. Andrew 
34. St. Catharines— H enry Bald, Louisa st. 

89“. St. John. N. B. — W. F. Cronk Adelaide st. 
27. Toronto — D. P. McNeiii. 2ss Hamburg ave. 
Dovereourt Branch Office. 

617. Vanc U'VF.R. B. O — F. Glad a in. Box 793. 

354. Victorta, B C. — G. Malthy, Box *2. 

343. Winnipeg. Man. — G. Ireland. 80 Juno st. 

COLORADO 

630. Aspen— M 0. Haves Box 407. 

560. Colorado City— -G. F. Hamil. 

415. Coi oraiio Sprgs — M. Kiemnierison.Box 412 
53 Denver— C. J. tlendersbott, Bus 427, High- 
lands P.O 

606. Fremont— A. D. Davy. Box 231 
590 La JrsTA— W. A. Gonditn. Box 174. 

410. Pueblo — IV. S. Marble, 1 1 10 Cedar st., Bes- 
semer. 

46 Trinidad — G. Hassinger, S13 short st. 

CONNECTICUT 

115. Bridgeport— 55 T . J Barnwell, 16* Park at. 
64. Greenwich— E. F. Clift. Box 117. 

43 H artford— R obert Wight. .51 Allvn St. 

4*. Meriden — G eo. J. Stanley. 115 Grove. 

97. New Britain— A. A. Fuller, 75 Curtiss. 

799 Nf.w Haven -M J. Con uely. 963 Grand ave. 
137. Norw ich — J us Grierson. 15 Kim st.. Preston. 
7*5 Norwalk — K. L. Griswold, 9 Elm st. 

620 Stamford — F. G. Smith, W. Stamford ave. 

DELAWARE 

40 Wilmington— I>. E. Bed, 227 Monroe st. 

DIST. OF COLUMBIA 

11*0 Washington— L. Burner, 1741 Seaton, N. W. 

631. *• M. D. Bailey 62.' Whitney av.. N. W. 

FLORIDA 

433. Cocoa — W. E Booth 

224. Jacksonville— (Coi.) F. Crocket, Hansom 
Town. 

605. “ W. p. Johnson, W.Brooklyn. 

74. Pensacola— R. F. Killgore, Box 71. 

127. “ (Pol.) A. B. Petti wav. 

60 " Tampa— (C ol.) P. T. Sissionn, Box 32. 

396. “ E. S. Cooper, Box 232. 

GEORGIA 

332 Ami ricis— (C ol.) Lincoln McKennis 
136. Augusta — (C ol.) T P. Lew is, 23 Marbury st 
144 Macon— W. B. Carlton. 526 Calhoun st. 

IDAHO 

331. Boise City— H arry Bowers. 

ILLINOIS 

79. Alton— A. P. Herron, eare Letter Carrier 4. 
8i2- Anna— B en. F. Warner. 

697. Avrora — C M. Seldom 150 S. I.oke St. 

4133. Belleville— Clias. Pittman. 211 E.atli st. 

70. Brighton Park— C bas. Fournier. 2111 38th. 
6jt. Cairo— i ni Alfnd 11. House. 616 21st st 
621. - J. It. Un der. 

777. Centrally— E 1. Hodges 
769. Champaign— W. a. Drown. 

724. Charleston— V. s Brown. Box 259. 

813 Chicago Heights— C D. Nelson. 

Chicago— S ecretary of District Council, 

S. S Huker, 701* Oglesby ave. 

1. John WolU r«. 796 S Halsted st. 

21. (French) A. Morency, 210 Centre ave. 

2-1. J. Haywood. 4913 Princeton av. 

24. I >. J. Ryan. 440 Duncan Park. 

54. (Bohem.) John Ruud. 5(36 W. 20th st. 

7? (Gi-r.i Wm. Krtigiuann. 2133 Waluish ave. 
iSl. (Scand ) E Kngberg. 121 Ban-lav st. 

269. J. E. llrooks. 

416 Jus. Bell. *310 Van llornst. 

419. (Ger. ) J Sil. krau. 916 W. 14th st. 

416. (Holl.) P. Tyson, Roseland. 

623 i Bohem.) Joseph Mar-ilc. 4718 Wood st. 

690. (Mill Bench Hands) F. H. Quitiueyer, 1126 
lliniiian st. 

295. Coi.LINsvu.LE — Jos. Vnjtech, Box 471. 

78*. Decatvr — * i. W Trimmer, 943 N. Water st. 
558. DeK*lb— Albert Horn. 

566. 1>V Quoin— E Valentine. 

169. Fast St Loris— R. J. Tojo, 814 St. Louis ave 
°47. El Dorado — T. J. Gram. 

211. Elmhurst — A ug. Intrige 
'•2 . Englewood— C. F Nugent 6?2 . r 8thst 
1 7. Evanston — N. F Hollenbeck. 1039 Weslev av 
672. Freeport— M. D. Coble, 69 West st. 

3-o. Galesburg — J us. R. Rogers. 50« Mulberry st 
111. Grand Crossing — A. Moline, 13ox 4 H 
29*. Highland Park— J. H. Zimmer. 

162. Hyde i'.auk— S. S. Baker, 78; 6 Oglesby ave. 
Chicago. 

619. Jacksonville— 8. P. Carter, 223 S. Sandy st. 
431. Kensington (Fr.)— E. I-apollce, Box 18Gano 
Cook Co. 

563. Lincoln- W. A. Dodds, 32« Third st. 

91. Metropole — B. P. Schroder. Box 164. 

762 Moline— J. 1. Swim. 2420 Fifth av. 

80 Moreland — A lfred Daniels, Box 231. 

753. Olnky— J. X Massey. 

661. Ottawa — R. K. Spohn. 817 E. Joliet *t. 

740. Pekin— P hilip Reinhard. 710 Park ave. 

245. Peoria — J. H. Bristol, 1114 7th st. 

813. “ (Ger.) — J. Semlow, 616 Howitt st. 

189. Qvincy— H erman J. Mareks. 319 S. 10th St. 
i«6 . Rock Island— J. F.Newtiald, 2408 Sixth ave. 
529. Rogers Park— H. W. Cook. 

199. South Chicago— J. C. Gran than; , Box 149, 
Cheltenham. Cook Co. 

758. S. Englewood— D. Bosgraaf, Jr. 

1« Springfield — J ohn Dick. 615 Eastman ave. 
495. StrilsTOR— E. Wilson. S03 W. Staunten at 
797. Taylokville— J. Met arty. 

242. Town of Lake — Aug. Manning, 4606 Bishop 

128. Vknick— W m. Pell. 

44*. Waukhgah— W. J. Strickland. 508 Julian 
»1 . Wheaton— J ames B. Weldon, Box 831. 



INDIANA 

352. Anderson— Chas. Moore 134 First at. 

383. Aurora— J. J Henderson. Oochrau, Ind. 

439. Blcffton— J ohn N Hattield. 

795. Clinton -T. C. Martin. 

494 C'rawfordsville — S. Long, 201 Whitlock av. 
so«. Dunkirk— ' 11 "smith. 

652. Elwood—’ .. >s. Heffner. Box 2- 9. 

Kvansyi* LE— 

90. F. W Klein, 513 Edgar st 
470. M. Hallenbcrgcr, I aw av., Hartmetr ftdd’n. 
742 I PI Mill. Mach, and 13. II.) L. Kessler, 920 E. 
Franklin st. 

153. Fort Wayne— Wiii. F. Wolke. 107 Wall st. 
728 Frankfort — A. F. Raymond. 252 N. East st 
646. Greenfield — Columbus Davis. Box 1.6. 

157- Havghvillb— B. G. Hollingsworth. 

95. Hartford City— J. W. Canter. 

310. Huntington— G A. Mentzer.tl High st. 

Indianapolis — S ecretary of Di -triel Council, 
II. Roberts. 131 Fayette st. * 

57. (Stair« Geo. Wernsing, 74 l«oekerbie st. 

60 (tier R. S< hellenbi rg. 47-) X. Alabama st. 
299. C. W. Km temen r. 12'>' i panu ave. 

446. J M Pruill. 19 S. West st. 

609. (Mil . i W. B Fulwi.b r. 73 Columbia ave. 

706. J. li - Wbisner, 210 Ktiglish ave. 

77U Jeeker-sonville — L. Fogehuan, 237 Meigs av 
Lafayette— 

215. H. ti. Cole. 387 South st 

783. (tier IG. W. Davis. S Third st 
656. I.AWKKNtKBt KG — .1 As. Mcl.EASTER. 

744. Poganspokt— C utsoii Emory. 

613 Madison— T. C. Do. hard. 764 W. Third st 
J65. Marion 1. A Ilodgin. 2126 Harmon st 
798. Mt. Vernon— Wm. Guthrie, Box 43*. 

592 Muncik— . 1. B. Miller. 123 W. Mich. st. 

19 New Albany — A T. Smith, ROW. 8tli st. 
6*i5. North Inihanapoli — A ndrew Phillips. 

579 Pl.ru — J os. Bnrwell. Box 311. 

756. Rh umond— F. P Burr.2U7 N. 17lhst. 

129 neymour — II- Moritz Box 230. 

296. Sill I.RYVILLE — Nelson Goodwin. 

629. South Bend— o. A Puttison.i>14H irrisonp.v. 

,8. Teure Haute— . 1. It. Warner. 1411 S. ll’.jFt. 
76J. Mill C. M. Kinin-y. 1.333 X. 'th st. 

•As, Vincknni> — Allen ( 4 roe n hood, 618 Ellis st. 
631. Wabash— W. II. Kelch 273 W. Maple st. 

697. Worn iiiNorox— S. A. Myers. 

INDIAN TERRITORY 

8i 3 Oklahoma City.O. T.— J. Groves. 

IOWA 

534. Burlington— A. Bokencamp, 133.3 Angular. 
4t7. Clinton — J. F. Clark 313 Oak »t. 

554. Davenport— I'. Ricpe, 1524 Marquette st. 

68. Des Moines — R. Reinkiug I Ip* K. Grand av 
*>7». Dubugue— M. R. Ilogan. tft 7th st. 

503. KMMETsBURGH -Koi I. KcUhill. 

81. Ft. Madison — E Peoples. 

700. Keokuk — 11. L. Breite ustei li, 1524 Bank st 
767. OTrrMW A— A. C. Minor. 716 W. 5th st 

721. Sioux City— A. E. Tyler. 405 W. 15th st. 

KANSAS 

7«i. Chanute— A. M. Davison. 

66. Concordia— J. N. P.jrtch. Box 13. 

199. Leavenworth— J. E Cr***sley, 9th & Sher- 
man «I* 

646. Pittsburgh— O. .1 Stoker. 

1.58. Topeka — P E. Cook. Box 346 
720. Winfield — B. 1>. Moore, 12th ave. 

KENTUCKY 

712. Covington— J. J. C raig. 133 E. Robins st. 

776. i Mil! i J. I.. Ki*-«t. *4 W .7t!i st. 

7s.5. .German Ch m Nienaber, 13' Trevor st. 

641. Dayton — J. Dolman. 

; 618. Grand River. — J. M. Milstead. 

359. Hendf.K'ON— W. V I>yk(B. 1013 First st 
626. Lexington— B. Graham. B.*x 44*. 

Lou is v n.i.E— Seereiarv of District Council, 
Thus. Reagan, 33-i Fi. Market st. 

7 J. T. Bence, 638 Magnolia ave. 

103. J. A Stuehrk. 1521 \i'. Market st. 

212. H. Rubv. 724 K. Mad i«..n st . 

214 (Ger. * F.d. Haas. 43122ml st 

729. ;Car) Wm. Murphy. 1110 Kentucky st. 

106. 1 UDLow — A. K. Hue. Box 135. 

684. Ml DOLES BOROUGH -J. O'Mara. Box 1. 

778. Mt. steki ing— Jno. Thema«. 

597. Mili.dai.e— Fred Winseher. 

698. Newport — W. II. Danks. N. K. cor 5th and 

York sis. 

20'. Paducah— Cha«. Burch. 18 Huntington ave. 

701. Winchester— J. W. Crone, Box 4". 

LOUISIANA 

809. a k r Chari.E! — J. D Price. 

New i irlea's — 

76. J. G. Bloomer. 432 , 2 S. Liberty. 

349. F. I>. Ross, 6. 3 Constance st. 

624. W. S. Motte t. Ill St. Andrews st. 

7(M. Hy. Halltier. 132 Toledano st. 

732. (Mill* Al*ert Wetzel. 121 Gravier st. 

739. .'.ohn >al/i r 612 Villere st. 

4-5. Shreveport— P eter (»arson, Box 338. 

MAINE 

466 Gardiner— J. s. Moore, Box 467. 

(07. Lew iston — A. M Flagg. 94 Springst. Auburn 
344. Portland— L. W. Whitcomb, 62 Anderson. 
772. Westbrook — V. L. Porter, Cumberland Müb. 

MARYLAND 

29. Baltimore— A. Faulhaher, 929 Hopkins ave. 
765. (Sa-li Factory «V PI. mill.) John P. Ileany, 
208 Dolphin st. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

State District Council— Secretary, D. Ma- 
loney, 6 Parker st.. Cambridge, Maas. 

584. Amenbury— F. P. Bout* lie, 16 Market st. 
Boston — S ecretary of District Council, 

R. Martin. 699 Washington st. 

33. II. P Sh-vins, 1570 Treinont st.. Roxbury. 
545. >iair« F. W. Speak man, 7-5 Rutland st. 

561. Geo. Clark. 15 Everett st.. Allston. 

138. Cambridge— 1». Maloney. 6 Parker st. 

204. " A. S. McLeod. 6« Mt. Auburn st. 

135. CHEL'EA — L. Jonah. 116 Shawmut st. 

309. Dor. hf.-ter— L. E. Tarbell, Hunt 8t., At- 
lantic. Mass. 

218. East ItosrruN— H. A. Delorey, 7 Union PI. off 
Prim-eton st. 

139. Fall River— Fr. M Richard, 341 Pleasant 

403. '■ J»-. Walton. 8 Dyson, st. 

571. Franklin— J. Hussey. Box 387. 

380. Gloucester — J. A. McDonald, 16 Clex eland. 

82. Haverhill— D. I-aroy Wilson, 9 Sixth ave. 
424. H Ingham— Colin Campheil, Box 113. 

455. Holyoke — II. M Sioiit-ss. 32 Taylor st. 

508 “ F'r.’ J. La rri viere, 109 Walnut st. 

662. “ Germ. Henry Fisher. 265 Park st. 

40*1. Hudson — G eo. K. Bryant. Box 125. 

196. Hydf. Park— B. Daly. 65 Poring st. 

111. Lawrence— F. W. Heald, 72 Oxford st. 

496. Low ell— Frank Kapph-r, 2(K{ Lincoln st. 

108. Lvsn — M. L. Delano, 103 I,ewisst. 

221. Marblehead — A. T. St.-ele, Box 432. 

154. Marlboro— C alvin Clisliee. 4 Longley st. 

192. Nati* K — Geo. K. Allen. 15 Western ave. 

409. New Bf.dk« KD — H. M. llammond, 64 Spruce 
275. Newton— W m. Pom her. Rockland st. 

193. North Adams— (’. H Ram-lill. s Briggs av. 
308. North Easton— E lmer E. Watts. 

727. Northampton— D. Pepiu, Box 400, East- 
hanipton. 

435. Norwood — J as. Hadden. 

417. Qciscy — J ohn Parsons, 21 Chestnut st. 

159. Revere — H.P. Baleoia.Wiiithropav., Beach- 
, mont. 

*7. Roxbuky — IP F. 5Vliite, 58 Ottawa st 

140. Salem— F. Wilkinson. 3 Parker ct. 

702 SaxoNville— E. C. Tuttle. Box 121 

24. Somerville— J os. Melntvre, 17 0akst. 

220. S. Framingham— P. H. Dunham. 

96. Springfield— 1. Bassette. Box 766. 

854 “ E P. Mowrev, 68 Quincy st 

491. Stoughton— F. O. Fowler. Box 568. 

216. Waltham— J P. Veno,37 Taylorst. 

426 West Newton— W. A. Pang, Box 241. 

1». Weymouth— E. J. Pratt, Weymouth Helghta 

M. Worcester— C. D. risk, 720 Main at. 



MICHIGAN 

129. Bay City — A dam Trobert. 614 Birney st. 

686. Benton Harbor— J ohn Covel, Box 705. 

418. Charlotte— G. Hickman, Box 110. 

Detroit — S ecretary of District Council. 

10. John Crawford, 972 4th ave. 

59. T. S. Jordan, 427 Bcaufait ave. 

219. (Ger.) E. Uckart, 37t St. Joseph st 
163. East Saginaw— R. Wei lock. 1148 S. 4th st 
248 "• (Mill) P. Maier, 131 Barnard st., W.S 

46«; “ (Ger.) Peter Frisch, 1502 So. Warren 1 

ave. . , 

Grand Rapids— S ec of District Council, 

E. L. Probart, 765 Pa Belle ave. 

65. E. L. Probart, 765 LaBclIe ave. 

77P IV. K Sterns, 82 Woodlawn ave. 

793. W. A. Sehroder. 4Springlield ave. 

26. Jackson— H enry Behan, 211 Deyo st. 

184. Lake Linden — G eo. W. Guibord, Box 678. 

213. Lansing — J. K. Moore, 604 Butler st. 

372. Marine City— Adolph Ilooske, Box 72. 

392. M auvuette— (Fr ) J. Savard, 219 W. Bluffst. 
100. Muskegon — O. T. Brakeman 102 Houston av 
123. Owosso — Charles H. Cherry, Box 701. 

334. Saginaw— G. Wetzel, 1023 S. Harrison, W. 8. 
538. '5 YANDOTTK— Francis Sutlitl. 

MINNESOTA 

361. Duluth — J ohn Sutherbv, 222 W. 4th st. 

3t,6. " (S*aiul.) P. Helgemo, 231*9 W. Fifth st. 

Minneapolis— 

til. Carl Huger. C09 19th ave.. S. 

452. J Shall better, 1001 Dupont ave., N. 

87. St. Paul — A ug. J. Metzger, 42-3 Rondo st. 

362. Winona — C arl Kuederli, 107 E. Second ct. 

MISSISSIPPI 

749. Meridian — G eo. Wheeler, B*»v 282. 

4y0. Vicksburg— T. Adams, Bo* 53. 

582. " Cha«. Taylor, Box 128. 

MISSOURI 

519. Benton Station — J. Cook. 6841 Magnolia av 
790. Carthage — IP F. Slade, 4 ; 6 W. Wooster 
loo. Kansas City — A. McDonald, 1717 E. lltli. 

363. PancasTI R— M. Ashford. 

9'. Skdalia — G .».Taylor 919 W. Fifth st. 

377. Springfield — J oun R. Talent, 2115 Lyon st , 
Station A. 

7H*'. St.aniif.hry— II. II. Davis, B*>x 327. 

430. St. Joseph— A. L. Curtiss. 1323 North 20th it. 
St. Louis — Secretary of District Council, 

A. I. Rutledge. Wellstoll P O. 

4. Geo. J. Swank, 1701 Xewstead ave. 

5. (Ger.) J. Burkhard 2*35 Menard st. 

12. t(»er.) Edw. Ki* ««ling, 2J0« N. 22*1 st. 

113. V- S. Iamb, 4139 Papin st. 

240. (Ger.) Will. Altbau.«, 1913 N. lith st. 

257. J R. Miller, 2624 Heheit t. 

270. K. s. Hinkel, 2525 Belle < dad*- ave. 

395. (M'll) Paul Garnier, loö N. 12th -t. 

423. P. Bi'lilcin, 2747 Manchest»-r road. 

518. ((»er. ) Henry Thiele. 2112 De Ka!b«t. 

578. (Stair lihlrs.) Jos. MaOoUii, 4443 St. Ferdi- 
iiuinl ave. 

699. J. <4. Narron, 3CAL» Magazine si 

734. (Ger. Mill) Oscar Staeger, 2502 S. 10th st. 

MONTANA 

88. Anaconda— J. IP Laird. 

112. Butte City— A. M. 8 ittery, B*.x 23. 

286. Great Falls — A. J. Pinmerton. 

28*1 . Helena— J. IP Sehwalen, 56S Third st. 

3»7. Nkihart— J as. Megary. 

NEBRASKA 

148 . Lincoln — E. L. Kaincrer, 221 S. 20th «t. 

330. Nf.braska City— W. (’. Williuan, 302 8. ITth. 
Omaha — S ecretary District Council, C. Rein- 
hart, 9i8 X. Twenty-seventh st. 

58. J. II. Schneider. '.710 Caldwell st. 

68). C. Pet arson, 1403 S. Nineteenth st. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

293. Concord — D. W. Shall««, Box *530. 

118. Manchester— W ilbm G.Co!cord,834E.High. 
585. Portsmouth — E. C. Frye, 14 Vaughn st. 

NEW JERSEY 

750. Asburv Park— J. F. Seger, Box 897. 

4.86. Bayonne— G us Sippe). 33 W. 24th sL 
711. “ J. Anderson, 479 Are. E. 

121. Bru*gf.ton — J. II. Reeves. 76 Vine Ft. 

3». Camden — T. E. Peterson, 337 Mechanic si. 
HO0. Cari.-tadt — G er J. W. Doerllinger, Box fi 
467. K. Orange — M. E. Rverson, 45 Oliver at. 

167. Elizabeth— II. Zimmerman, 8 Smith #t. 

687. “(Gcr.)Chas Meiner, 1007 William et. 
647. Englewood — G arret Springer. 

391. Hoboken — F. Steigleiter, 117 Bloomtlel J at. 
265. II aukf.x.sai K — Charles Wood, Janie« st. 
Hudson- County— D. C.. Secretary, X. W. 
Baxter, 14 Prescott Place, Jersex- City. 

4*2 Jersey City— G eo. Williamson, 2.0' 2 3.1 at. 

488. R. Leonard, Station B 

564. Greenville- W. Bonner 111 Franklin st. 

570. (Five Corners,) A.Wulllev. 6*i Columbus ave 
710. (Greenville) R IT kins. 2*)l Old Bergen roa.l 
591. Lakewood— Chas. O. Pettit. 

151. Pong Branch — Wm. Pinson. 

£32. Milbubn— J. IP White, Short Hills. 

305. Millville— P uke Vanaman, 80S X. Second 

638. Morristow n— V an Deals. Box 163. 
Newark— S ecretary of District Council, 

Cha«. IP Clovd, 24 S. 14th st. 

119. J. N. Dailey, 21 Academy st. 

172. *Ger.) A. Brenner, 139 Carlton st. 

415. (Ger.) Andrew Rager, 20 Wall st. 

602. Oceanic— Z. T. Alas 

477. Orange— T hos. Ferguson. 17 Central place. 
325. Paterson — P. K Van Honten, 713 E. 27th st. 
490. Passaic— F rank Wentink, Box 122. 

399. Puii.lifsburg — W m. llodge, 921 Ferrv st, 
Easton, Pa. 

155. Plainfield— P. A. VanFIeet, 43 E. Third st 
665. Somerville— W. W. Pittenger. 

456. Summit— M. A Jilison. 

31. Trenton— O. 11. Gaston, 91 Jackson st. 

543. Tow n of Union— J. Wolfarth, 277 liergen- 
tine ave.. Union Hill. 

642. We«t Hoboken— IP Burggraf, Paterson 
Plank R’d and Paterson ave. 

NEW YORK 

274. Albany— Thos. McNeil 54 N. Knox st. 

659. *" (Ger.) Alex. Rickert. 416 Elk st. 

6. Amsterdam — Herbert Clark. 290 E Maine st 

453. AUBURN— W. W. Gillespie, 119 E. Genesee 

13. Batavia— O. Dewit. Box 223. 

131. Binghamton— A. E. Davis, Box 993. 

210. “ A. Preston, 2.35 Conklin ave. 

Brooklyn— S ecretary of District Council 
W. F. Bosiwiek. 59 Division ave. 

109. M. A. Maher, 594 Bergen st. 

IV. Jno. J. Powderlv, 190 Albany ave. 

175. Wm. A. Ward, 140 Norman ave. 

223. IiolaMt IP Young, 538 l»eonard st. 

247. G. Paynton, 1349 Fulton st. 

258. IP P. Cuh-er, 17 Cornelia st. 

291. (Ger.) John Lang, Metropolitan P. O 
Queens Co. 

349. (Sash, etc.) II. Robinson. 223 47th at 
3-81. J. IP Pudbury, 2*) Rochester a* e. 

387. Cha*. H. Richardson, Box R., Fiatbush, N. Y. 
451. E. R. Jacobus, 52 Saud« st. 

471. Fred. Brandt, 267 Xint 1 st. 

557. (Millwrights) F. G. Hale. 54° Henderson st 
Jersey City, X. J. 

639. M. E. McCabe, 188 4Uth st. 

Buffalo — Secretary of District Council, 

A. K. White. 20u Prospect ave. 

9. R. Harry, 203 F rout ave. 

355. (Ger.) C. Roess'.er 242 Strauss st. 

374. E. O. Yokom, 19 Ferguson aA'e. 

440. John Holloman. 1002 Bouck ave. 

802. Wm. Awfer, 124 Military road. 

99. Cohoes — A. Van Arnam, 22 George st. 

307. Corning — E. D. Chase, Dodge ave. 

581. Cornwall-on-Hciwon— IP Bernat, Box 287. 
805. Cortland— W m. Foster 
315. Elmira— E. M Snvder, 761 E Market 
323. Fishkill-on-TIud»on— Jas. Hayes, Mat- 
tea wan, N. Y. 

714. Flushing — F red S. Field, 50 Locust sL 
500. Glen Cove, L. 1.— Fred. Craft. 

229. Glens Falls— J os Mills. 32 Xotre Dame st 
272. Herkimer— C h as. A. Paul, Box 572. 

173. Hoosick Falls— E dwin Chapman. 

149. Ibtingto 5— Michael Kiernan, Box 38. 



Ithaca— J. W. Skinner, 120 W. Buffalo st. 
Johnstown — CP II. I3**wmaker, 8 Glebe st. 
Kingston— J. Deyo Chipp, Box 100 
Little Falls— A. A. Miller, ol Arthur st. 
Long Island City— W. Hulcheoii, 248 Han- 
cock st. 

, Mamaronkuk— W illiam Hop|»s. 

Middletown— W. R. ltogers, 46 .lohnst. 

Mt. Vernon — S. Bud*), 204 S. 4th ave. 

! New Brighton, S. I.— F. E. Salfelder, 47 
York ave. 

Newburgh— S. M. Wilcox, S. William st. 
New Dorp. S. P— C. Barringer 
Nr.w Roi-hki.le— J* >s. Gahan. Box 820. 
Nf.wtow n— IP J. Kennedy, Maspeth, L. P 
New York— S eeretarv of District Council, 
T. (' Walsh, 537 F. 81 «I st. 

Outs. A. Judge, 2325 Bath gute ave. 

’ Patrick Kennedy, 134'J Third ave. 

. J. U. Pounsbury, 813 Columbus a)-e. 

(Jewish) S. Jacobson, 5 Gt. Jones st. Care 
M. Wishinskv. 

. A. Watt, Jr., 177 West 101 st. 

II. Seymour, 130.) 2d ave.. care Sta. K. 160 K. 
SOtll Ht. 

. (Sean.) II. P. Hansen, 119 Hamilton uve., 
Brooklyn. 

. (Ger.) L. Darner 661 E. I62d *t. 

. Dennis Davin, 68 E. Ninth st 
. IP B. Rogers II Ferry *t. 

J (i. Pleager, 1167 Washington ave. 

. (Ger.) Frank Schneider. 716 E. 12th st. 

. James Pennon, 33 \V . 98th st. 

. (Ger.) II. Knobloeh, 2'» Elizabeth st. 

. Clia«. Iliiteli, 1715 Pi-xington a*, e. 

(Millwrights and Millers, Chris. Schlenker, 
4.35 East 82*1 st 

Xyauk Robt. K. Wool, lh.x 493. 

. Onkonta— F rank M.-K.-e, 6 Gardner place. 
Pekksk i i.l — T li«-o. llir*ls«-ll, 939 Dix'en st. 
Poktuhesi'KR — A llen M*-D'>ual*l, Rye, X. 5 
!*. K11 hmoND— J. Keenan, New Hi igliton.S.l. 

;. Poughkeepsie— X. R. 1'alzell, Box 32, 
i. Rock.away Beach— T.F. Lowe, Jamaica, L.P 
Rouhestk r— 

. II M Fletcher. 31 Bartlett *t. 

1. (Ger.) Frank Schwind, t May Place. 

*. Seni i'a Fail« —B axter Haines, 8;l Mynderse 
s* HKNF.iTADV — J. A. Malloy, 111 Barrett st. 

I. Ska Cliff — W m. E. Fisher, Jr. 

:. Siieepshead Bay — W ui. Cramer, Box 71. 

. Stapleton— C harles Shay, Lock B**x, 46, 
X»-w Brighton. 

Staten Island— s*-e. of I>. C , F. F7 Salfelder, 
47 York av. New Brighton. 
Syracuse— 

(Ger F. Borne. 19 New Butternut st 
(French) H.St. Pierre, 614 Robinson sk 
> C 1.. Seymour, 127 GarPehl ha*-. 

. Tabrytown — D. Page, North Tarrytowu. 

. Troy — J ohn J. Hanlon, Box, 145. 

1 . Utica — H. Schaeffer, I I Edward st. 

1 . Watertown — J. J. McManus. 

;. Wavkri.y — I. M. Terry, 13*. x 175. 

Went Troy— 1 Charles Angus, 121 3*1 st. 

. White Pl ains— A ugustus Garritt. 

!. W11 i.i.ams Bridge— Henry Harrison. 

:. Yonkers — F. K. Maxwell. 60 school e-t. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

Grand Fork — I t. S. Tyler. 

NORTH CAROLINA 

i. Greensboro— J. W. Causey. 

OHIO 

1. Akron— J. Glass, 111 E. Thornton st. 

’. Bella irk — W W. >\ hitmore. Box 27. 

1. Bowling Green — J. II. la* Farree, Box 95. 

I. BuiiMiKPOKT— Elmer Justice, Box 133. 

. Ill uyrus — J. A Fink. 

!. Canton — !>. Van Kirk. 128 Washington ave. 

. Chilli* oi he— W. D. Taylor, 196 Hirn st. 
Cincinnati — S ecretary of l)istri<-t Council, 
David Fistier. 56 Clifton ave., District 148. 

!. I). Klshi-r, 55 Clifton u\-e. 

I. (G*-r.) August Weiss, -559 Freeman ave. 

(Mill ) Geo. Marshall, 4»7 Main st. 

. (Stairs) B. Melik ha us, 17« Western are. 

I. A Berger 227 Fergu« s(.. Station A. 

I. (East End.) — C. W. Shirley, 1792 Eastern u\-. 

’. J. Stevenson Ib-rt s ford ave., Station D. 

*. J II 11 tier, 1 Winkler st . Corrvville. 

. Wm Parker. ISChestnut st. 

!. J. Schwarz. 1398 W. Sixtli st. 

John Spellhrink, -.deni av., Fairmount. 
i. (Mill A Klevabir Bliii's. 1 Cha«. W. Smith, cor. 

Cooper ami 1 berry «t« . < 'uuiuiiusvilie 
i. (C-irs Tlioa. Graliam, «8 st Gicgorv st., Mt. 
Adams. 

Cl. k\ eland — S ecretary ot District Council, 
K. B. Bennett. I.'vi Sii|ieri»ir st., Room 11. 

. J L. Adams, 616 Pearl st. 

1. (Bohem.) Jos Va\-ra, «9 Jewett st. 

. John lYlersou. 5 ■>> rh-ii st 
t. ((ter.) Ch. Witt. 4" Rai ny ave. 

. 1*. F. Erwin, 1213 Lorain st. 

(Ger.! Theo. Weirieh. 16 Parker st. 

'. (Ger.) 11* nnan S< herr, 77 Seiden av. 

. John Milner. 71 Burl st. 

’. Boh.) Wm. Mares. 1372 Central ave. 

Mill II. .1 • Peters, *.»'• l.n«-em!en ave. 

. College. Hill— H arry A«k* w. Gr«a*sbeek. 
Columbus— S ecretary of District Council, j 

J. F. Hepner. Room 4s. Clinton Build’g. I 
. U. G. Broyles, 136 E Guy «t. 

. IP A. (rodilaril, 269 X. 17th. 

. (North side) G. A. \\ar*l,2t Hunt ave. 

. Dayton— D. s. Zinn. 25 s st. Clair st. 

(Gpr.) Jos. Wirih. 318 Clover st. 

“ (Car Blilrs ) .1. IP Slurp. 1526 E 2*1 st. 

. Defiance — W alter Izunbert, 315 Seneca st 
. Delaware— B P. Williams. 205 X. Union st. 

. Delhi— J ames Slattery, Home City. 

. Delphos— F rank strothman. 

. East Liverpool— W. S Pittenger Box 634 1 

. Findlay— G e«. B. P. ach. 240 Midland ave 
. Fostoria— J. li. Faler, 722 W. Center at. 

. Greenville— (». W. Hamilton. 

. H amilton — W m. Hamuierle, 213 Ross st. 

. Lima— J. Vansweringen, 712S. Main st. 

. Louki.and — (M ill.) F. s. Mosstellar, Sharon- 
ville, Hamilton Co. 

('has. F'. Hertel, Box 182. 

. Madisonvili.e— A. Zoll. 

. Mansfield— X. H Kime. 

Marietta— K. IP Wagner. 504 Charlea st. 

. Martin s Ferry — P I. Shipman. 

. Middletown— J. F Mount, Flick st. 

. Milford- W. A. Elston, Box 177. 

. Nelson vi LI.K — John Sidwel!. 

New Portage— W m. Farner, Barberton. 

. Norwood — A. E. Best, Ivnnlioe. 

. Pomeroy— J M Fowler. Mason City, W. Va. 

. Poktsmoi T! — Clia«. 'I'li*. man. no Campbell 
. Salem— W m. Bonsai, 371 W. Main *»t 
Sandusky— G. Felle). 2.30 Pawn-m-e «t 
Springfield— W. B. Kinsley, 2i5Pinden ave 
Steubenville f has. Bucev, 100 K. South at' 

. CIFKIN — Jos. Daniel. 129 W. Market st 
Toledo — A. Smith. Rooms 20 nod 21 Worth- 
ington Block. 

Munk, 1014 Bucking- 
ham st * . 

M arren Jos. 5\ . Mease, 136 Belniom st 

esi's“ North m“ t Hoc “-"- 

5 oungstown — H. J. Casner, 226 V'oo«l]and 
LK N 1 oth Ward FrCd ‘ Kappew ’ Ce,llr al ave., 
OREGON 

Astoria— M. Saland. Box 443 

• Portland— I). E. Miller. Box 548. 

. 1 he Dalles — IP Hansen, Box 68. 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allegheny City— 

• k- Mohney, 70 Wilson ave. 

: EÄKS ÄS 

' n^; TOONA ~ H A - Dod®on, 1524 3*1 ave 

' BriÄtom “~ A ‘ BUr0 ’’ ®° X 6l1 ' 

. Bellefonte — 

. Belle Vernon— I saac Coldren, Box 207 
BKLLEVUE-Nile R Moore Box, 12.*5 
BRADDOC-Kr-John V. Branthoover, Box 636 



. Duval st. 
< '*ne*.r«i 



). Bradford-C. F. Cummings. 23 Bovlaton .. 

I. Butler— B enj. Foster, Box 777. n **• 

i. Carbon dale -F red Sluman. 21 Thorn u 
. Chfster— EIkt S. Rigby. 24') K Fifth s t 
. Coraopolis — J oseph Miller. 

1. DuyUKSNE — Cha.«. Stauffer. Box 6. 

. Elwood City. — U. A. White. 

Erie — W. H. Peat, 357 W. 23*1 st. 

. Era skford — J. R. Xaee, 6« 10 i-Mrnund st 
Tae*ony. ' •» 

. Franklin— C. I* Xicklin. 

. Germantown— J. E. Martin, .53 W. Duval 
. Greensmi kg— Adam Slonetker, 226 ( '• •tic.r.i 
. (»reenvillk— T. M. Campbell. Km 
. Grove City— IP B Black, Box 21 1 
. Harrisburg — E li Hollinger, 6!9 N.jrtk »t. 

. Homi-8TK.au — J. A. Wolff, Box 173. 

. J kann kite— ( '. J. Miller. 

Jl-RMYN— J. (» Wcsi-ott. 

. Johnstown — diaries N'ore. 43 Plum *1. 

Kittanning — C. F. Honey. 

. I.an*'Astkk — C.H.- ns, New li* auo iv 

. I.ATKOliE A. W. ('miner. 

Lebanon Clius. F'*i«t*-r. JH2.8 ( Inn ■), -t. 

1 . Lei < h nun*» -C. E. Shatter, sin-ar* , r r ,, lg 
Rom'Is 

1. 1.0* K llAVFN— W. C. Hub hard, E eg'. Hotel 
. McKeesport— J as. I)illen*l;-.l 
. Manavunk K K. Frantz, 449 Gr*-eo ); 2 j, 

. Mansfield — R obert ilaubrieh, 7*1 n.sU«ia 
Valley P. ()., Box 18«. 

. Meaovili.e — P. P. Keliing, I;*>x 616. 

1 . Mekukk — W in Moore. 

!. Xkw Kensington- J. c. 1:* * >1. I • x *2 
New- Castle— W. W. M«4‘!ei*ry 2i Harbor. 

1. On. Cl iv— IP P. MeVengb <*il* 
Philadelphia— S e*-**-tary >it D*-t. * moil, 
J. R. Xa*«-, (is It) E-Iiiiuii* 1 st.. l ueoiiy. 

). W. F. Ebei lmr*l(. 2727 I- u.ihil. * ; 

'. ( Kensington, Clms. P.Sp»ingler,2l6t .-v-rgea«! 

i. (Ger.) P. Rug*', 1"27 Ogiien st 

1. I. Soil tin* ara 1 Clias. Mitelieil. 18.,*, P.i-«juhk. 

1. (Mill) Geo. W. Miller, 23:36 X. Fill* , tu st. 
Pittsburgh — S ecretary of District ( ouneu 
W. P. Patton, 61 Mh!i>i*i ave. 

I. 11. G. SchoHiaker, 326 Wel*«t«r st., A deg. 

. iGer.) John Pii|*|*, b.*klin>ii >t*i. 

i. (E. End) F. B. Denman, «7 Inwoo*! st.. K K. 

I. W. F. WiPoek. 1 19 Bailsman st.. Knoivi,;*. 

1. ( W. End) Jas. S. Coiiih U, I9J Steuben st. 

I. (Ger. 1 J. IP ID men, Mt. Oliver, P. O. 

'. Jus. Reed, II Southern ave. 

1 . Pittstos — A. M. Haggerty. 32U Franklin at, 

i. Pun xsutawnf.y— W in. Hurl. 

i. Heading — T. Ki««inger, llu7 Green w i* h st. 

I. Rociiebter — A. X. (iiitermuth. B**x 152. 

1. Scranton— G. M. Hirlinger, 1408 Hampton it 
I. •• C. Hull' 612 Wa «hingt on uve. 

“ Fr*-d. Dewitt, 1"7 17. Market «t. 

1. S. ScRANTON-tGer.lJ.Hrunachwiler 624 Aldar 
’. Shamokin — IP A. P. Smink. 510 17. Cameron 
I. SHARON — A. It. Peters. 12 Elm st. 

1 . Shakusruhg — W. Pfusch. 

I. Sharp-sville— W. Heiehard, Box 170. 
i. Takeni cm— T. C Miller. 

1 I'niontoWX — A. K MeClay, 59 Lincoln«!. 

1 . Warren— I). J. (irin«!l»iy. 

1 . Washington — J. 5'. McClain, Box 227. 

!. Wilke»-Bakke— A. II. Avers, 5i IVnn st. 

I. Wii.kinsburg— J unes Todd, 
i. Williamsport- L. F. Irwin. 1(1 Ilephum -t. 
;. YORK — W. P. (»roe lech. 318 W. Prince-M at. 

RHODE ISLAND 
I. Xarraoansett Pier— H. Chapman, 
i. Xexvpokt — P. 1! l>n w J* y, Jr . 6‘.*3 Th ini«-« at. 
I. Provides* e — W in. slack, 23 Willow court. 

». Westerly— G. C. Barber. 7 John st. 

1 . Wuonsouket— A. Fontaine. 4« Cumberland 

SOUTH CAROLINA 
:. Charleston — *C ol.)R.ll Bel linger,« Park at 
1 . Columbia — <C« 1.) S. B. Thompson, 178 Kaat 
J»-rvuis st. 

. Greenville — (Col.) s. s. Thompson, 108 

Aug**«!«* si. 

. Spartanburg — L. A. Justice. 

TENNESSEE 
. Bristol— F. J. He Wald 
. Chattanooga— E wing White, Ridgedala. 

. Clinton— 1. L. Hendeisoii. 

. Ei.izabetut«>n — W iu Francis. Box 11. 

. Hakkimis— G. A. Bender 
. Johnson City— S. F. Smith. 

. Knoxville — X. Underwood, 21 Anderson at 
. Memphis— X. M. B oom. 151 Mill «t. 

. Xa«H vii LE— W. 1*. Moody. 1 KC l aurel st. 

. ** (Mill) J. T. Parker, 1 101 X. Summer -t. 

TEXAS 

Amorilla— R. I.. Dowling. 

. Austin— J. C. Mi.ler, P. •). Box 63«. 

. Corsi* an a— J. S. Brown. 710 W. 9th ave. 

. Dallas — o L. Wiley, Box 299. 

. Denison — IP 13. Chase. 703 Day st. 

. El Paso— J M.CauiplK-ll.619X Camphellst 
. Ft. Worth — 17. .1. Thomson, care W. J. 
Bran-well, 171 h ami Elm sis. 

G MM «M1.I.K— J M Peach. 

. Gai.vE'Ton — J. H. Kissinger, 714 l8ilist. 

(Ger. * Jos. Ku k*- nve. X and 37th. 

. Houston — M B. Peach. 1510 Walker ave. 

. Paris — S. W. Sutherlin 61 3 Graham st. 

. San Antonio — W m. l->keiir«*th, 119 Plum «; 

Ger.) H«-rm Pfi iller. Vl9 S. Mesijuite »I 
. Sherman— J. A Brown. I’.. Hnm4oust. 

. Stepiienvi 1.1.K— James Hollis. 

Waxauati hie— W in. R. Xorman. 

UTAH 

, Ogden — J ohn Conroy, B*»x 121. 

VERMONT 

Bellows Fai.i.s— M C. Bailey. Box '61. 
Burlington— J as. Childs, 176 X. Wiilard tl. 

VIRGINIA 

, Cu VRi.OTTESVtLLE— W. P M* Knight, 705 17. 
Water st. 

Hampton— W. B. Walker. 

Newport Xews— J as. Upshaw, Box so. 
Norfolk — IP S. Scott. 1 Fenehuich st. 
Portsmouth— P. W. i;. Seorey. ■>(*'.' it h st 
Ru HMoNT» — II. W. Poore. 1 It .s Cliad'ni st. 

(Col.) J. B. Mason, 701 Clatk st 
Roanoke — W. J. Bacon, 116 4th ave., X. W. 

WASHINGTON 
Aberdekn — R. 17 Turner. Box 617. 

Colf ax— Cha*. Baker, Box 158. 

Kverf.tt— IP M Brown. 

Olympia— W. I.. Clark, 315 Union. 

«k'tti.i? -X. Swenson, Box 147>0. 

Spokane — J ohn Hearn. Box 1340. 

Tacoma— IP MePean. Box loll. 

Whatcom— D. IP McArthur Box 12'7. 

WEST VIRGINIA 
Ruckhannon— J. W. Neff, Bos 17. 
Charleston— J. P. Jones. Box .‘99. 
Charlestown— C harles II. Grim. 
Clarksburg — J. H. Ridenour. Box 38. 
Fairmont- R. W. Shaw. Box 172. 

Grafton — C. F. Burk. 13ox 304. 
Huvtington— M cClellan Roach. 
Martinsruro— A. T Parlett. 

Moundvili.e — L S. Juekiiiaii. 

Wellsbubg — S unil. Patterson. Box 243. 

55 hf:eling — E. Grosseurth. 82 New Jersey *t 

WISCONSIN 

Ashland — A. Beaton, 1019 Prentice ave. 

Eau Claire — F. Werner, 529 Germania st. 
Gkf.en Bay — J oeSoloman 1152 Pine st. 

La Crosse — A l. Cullmann, 1015 Ferry et. 
Milwaukee — S ecretary of District Council. 

Otto Kohler, 198 Hadley st. 

(Ger.) B. Platz. 2126 Kilbourn ave. 

(Ger.) J. Bettendorf. "66 7th ave. 

(Ger.i Clias. S«-hulz. 1024 Holton st. 

(Mill.) 55 T . H. Schade, Jr., 831 Gt-rden st 
W. C. Henrich, 5>4 5Vulker st. 

Theo. Dembinski, 821 Eleventli ave. 

North Lacrosse— E. Knudsen, 1597 Avon. 
Oshkosh— A. Nelson, 241 5V. Pearl et 
Raitnr — F. A. Botsford, 1112 N. 55 is. st 
Sheboygan — (G er.) H. Krumenauer, 111® 
Superior «t. 

8upkbior— P eter Tumble. 



T H E 



CARPENTER. 




AN ODE TO FREEDOM. 

Oh Freedom ! thou art not as a poet’» dr* am, 

A fallr young girl with light and delicate limbs, 
* I* * * * * * * A bearded man 

Armjed to the teeth art thou 1,1 * * 

> I* * * * * Tyranny himself 

Thyjenemy, although of reverend look. 

Hoary with many years and far obeyed, 

Is later born than thou. * * * 

Tbou.shalt wax strong with lapse of years. 

Bat he shall fade into a feebler age ; 

Feebler yet Bubtler. He shall weave his snares 
And spring them on thy careless steps, and clap 
His withered hands, and from their ambush call 
His hordes to fall upon thee. He shall send 
Quandt maskers, fair of form and gallant mien 
To catch thy gaze and uttering graceful words 
To cl) arm thy ear ; while his sly imps by stealth 
Twine around tliee threads of steel, light thread 
Ion thread, 

That grow to letters; or bind down thine arms 
With chains concealed in chaplets. Oh ! not yet 
May’st thou unbrace thy corselet, nor lay by 
Thy sword ; nor yet, O Freedom! close thy lids 
In slumber; for thine enemy never sleeps, 

And t.)iou must watch and combat till the day 
"Of the new earth and heaven. 

—Wat. Cullen Bryant. 



HOMESTEAD DAY! 

Though the daily press reports the 
men at Homestead have returned to 
work, still there are scores of men need- 
ing help. These men are awaiting trial on 
various charges from the smallest crime 
to the higher ones of Murder and Treason. 

They must be helped to make a good 
defense in the Court«, and if necessary, 
jn the highest tribunal in the land. 
Against them is a vast array of corpora- 
tion lawyers and all the hellish fury of 
corporate greed and Pinkerton revenge- 
The best legal talent must be secured in 
behaif of the men, so that they may be 
saved from conviction and imprisonment 
and persecution. 

A Defense Fund is now being raised, 
and the Chicago trade unions have done 
nobly. October 29th was the day fixed 
for Chicago workmen as their “ Home- 
stead Day” and thousands of dollars 
were raised that day. 

Now the American Federation of Labor 
has fixed on Tuesday December 13th, 1892, 
as 11 Homestead Day ” for general observ- 
ance all over the land. Wageworkers, 
business men and citizens are all appealed 
to give some portion of their savings that 
day or a donation to help get justice in 
the Courts for the men of Homestead 
at present under arrest. Theatres and 
placeB of amusement are also appealed 
to give part of their receipts on that day. 
The Opera House, at Fort Wayne Ind., 
has been first to respond. Let there be 
more to follow in line. 

Send contributions to Secretary Chris. 
Lvans, 14 Clinton Place, New York; and 
notify Thos. G. Crawford, Box 190, 
Homestead, Pa. 

DONATIONS TO HOMESTEAD. 

In addition to the list published in our 
October journal, we print this list of 
moneys received by President Weihe of 
the Amalgamated Society, from Septem- 
ber 20, 1892, to November 5, 1892. This 
is the list of moneys donated by Carpen- 
ters’ Unions to help the men at Home- 
stead It shows, in all, donations to the 
amount of $2,100.70. 

_ In addition to this it is reported Union 
-’8, of Chicago, donated $500 mone in re- 
sponse to the visit of the Special Com- 
mtttee from Homestead which has been 
going the rounds of the Chicago Unions. 
Others of our Carpenters’ Unions in 
Chicago have albo made liberal dona- 
tions. 

Auv Carpenters’ Unions which have 
sent money to help Homestead and are 
not reported in the list we printed last 
mouth or in the above list, can notify this 
office and inquiry will be made. 

I Chii-iigo, III 300 
11 Cleveland, O . SO 
28 Chicago, 111 201 

f* }• Haute. Ind 10 
49 Mei-iden, Cuu | ID 
“LN. York, N. Y 10 
... „ H'ds, Midi 10 
“°KiUan’ni>, Pa 10 

! l "Cmit°n, O 8 

isS'Steubeii’le, o to 
230jPiu-d)urK, Pu 25 
on. ™ Orleans, Lai 15 
-no IV m'spor. l'a 3 
**? Helena, Mont 5 
305 .Marion, Ind | 5 

Previously reported 
Sum Total . . 



FLOATING ITEMS. 

The Cornice Workers of Chicago, have 
lately secured the eight-hour day. 

The International Brotherhood of 
Blacksmiths convened in Indianapolis, 
last month. 

The Cabinetmakers of Cincinnati have 
recently secured the nine-hour day quite 
generally after a bitter fight. 

Indianapolis, Ind. , stonemasons struck 
on a big building because non-union 
carpenters tvere employed. Job was 
promptly unionized. 

The Brewers’ National Union aBk union 
men to boycott Geo. Ehret’s New York 
beer, John Haucks Cincinnati, and Troy, 
N. Y., beer, as alTof these breweries are 
opposed to organized labor. 

Boston. Mass. — The bricklayers of this 
city established the eight-hour day the 
first of this month. The men conceded to 
lose one hour’s pay to secure their 
demands. This ought to be an encour- 
aging example to the carpenters of the 
“Hub.” 

Scranton, Pa. — The Common Council 
of this city refused to grant an extension 
of time for completion of the municipal 
building. This is practically a blow at 
Contractor Benore who has stubbornly 
held out as ringleader of the builders 
against the nine hour day. ' 

San Francisco, Cal. — The Building 
Trades Council of this city and the Fed- 
erated Trades Council and central bodies 
of organized labor of San Francisco, Sac- 
ramento and adjacent cities are now ar- 
ranging for a general consolidation of all 
these bodies into one Central Council. 

William Jones, ex-treaeurer of the St. 
Paul. Minn., Union, was arrested last 
month charged with embezzling $000 of 
the Union funds. He was held under 
$1500 bail for the grand jury. .This course 
should be taken in every instance by car- 
penters’ unions where they have dishonest 
officers. 

The Kailway Switchmen met at Dallas, 
Tex. Frank K. Sweeney was made edi- 
tor and manager of the Switchman's Jour- 
nal, despite attacks on him by the daily 
press on account of the Buffalo strike. 
Eighty- two lodges ot switchmen were or- 
ganized the past year and $104,000 paid 
out in death and disability claims. 

At the Convention of the Brotherhood of 
Painters and Decorators. held in St. Louis, 
the secretary-treasurer reported 264 
unions in good standing, with an active 
membership of 12,126, a gain in member- 
ship of 1.958, and 63 new unions. Wages 
have been raised and hours of labor re- 
duced for painters, in over 200 cities. 

Cigarmakers’ International Union is 
arranging to establish and erect a suitable 
home for superannuated and indigent 
union cigarmakers, such as the printers 
have at Colorado Springs. Favorable 
offers of land sites free have been offered 
by a number of cities in Colorado. The 
question is to be voted on by the member- 
ship at large. 

There is to be a series of scientific tests 
of the relative superiority of wire nails 
and of cut nails. It is to take place 
November 30, 1892, at the United States 
Arsenal, Watertown, Mass. The tests 
come from a challenge of the cut nail 
manufacturers, and are to be made on the 
Government testing machine undersuper- 
vision of the Arsenal Commandant 

Philadelphia, Pa. — Union No. 8, has 
arranged for a grand fair and bazaar to 
take place at Carpenters’ Hall, N. E. cor- 
ner Eighth and Oallowhill streets from 
November 26 to December 3, 1892, inclu- 
sive Season tickets 25 cents. Seven 
valuable prizes are oflered, including 1 set 
of saws, a lady’s gold watch and a bicycle. 
The Amalgamated Building Trades Coun- 
cil of Philadelphia is growfing very rapidly 
and is about to issue a working card. 



00 367 
00, 374 
00 -167 
00, 460 
00, 485 
00 437 
00] 493 
00 539 
00. 554 
00 692 
00 617 
75 «29 
00 676 
00 754 
00 



S. Ant' ia, Tex 
Buffalo, N Y 
N. York, N.Y 
S. Ant’ia, Tex 
Bockland, O i 
Altoona, Pa 
Mt. V’r’n, N.Y 
Par is, Tex . . 
O’nport, Iowa 
Muneie, Ind 
iV’couver, B.C 
'S. Bend, Ind j 
Cincinnati, O, 
Rliza’ton.Teir 



3 20 
8 00 
10 00 

fl 00 

15 00 

6 25 
50 ( 0 
JO 00 
25 00 
20 00 
10 00 
25 00 
15 00 

7 00 



PERSONAL GOSSIP. 

John McCullough, the famous trage- 
dian, in his day, was a journeyman car- 
penter long before he was an actor. 

James O’Connell, of Union No. 1, of 
Chicago, has just been elected County 
Commissioner on the Democratic ticket. 

David Fisher of Union No. 2, is now 
the business agent of the Carpenters’ Dis- 
trict Council of Cincinnati and vicinity. 
That body now represents over 3,000 car- 
denters. 

M. A. Clements, of Cincinnati, O., 
General Treasurer elected at St. Louis 
Convention, decline s to serve Meanwhile 
General Treasurer James Troy holds over 
until the va ancy is filled by General 
President Trenor. 

Henry Weissman, editor of Ihr. Sukers’ 
Journal, of. New York, is doing yeoman’s 
service for the Journeymen Bakers’ Na- 
tional Union. That body now has 101 
Local Unions and had its Convention re- 
cently in Buffalo, N. A’. Mr. Weissman 
is a talented speaker and writer on econ- 
omic subjects and wrote an excellent arti- 
cle for our Carpenter Convention Sou 
venir. 

Among the delegates attending the St 
Louis Convention we find the following 
ex delegates, who were in attendance at 
some previous Convention of ourU.B. 
viz: Thos. R Kyves Toronto, Can.; L. R. 
Carl, Auburn, N. Y.; P. W. Birck and 
Thos. P. Rvan, Brooklyn, N. Y.; W. F. 
Plumb and John T. Goodwin, New York 
city ; A. M. Swartz, Allegheny, Pa ; H. 
Blackmore, Martin Wölpert and Chas. 
Diecke, St. Louis, Mo.; A. Woodring, 
Akron O ; M Clements, D. P. Rowland 
and Henry Frank, of Cincinnati ; August 
Smith, ToDdo, ().; Chas. Witt, Jas 
O’Connell, W. S. Weeks, S 8 Baker and 
W. H Kliver, Chicago, 111 ; J- F. Grimes, 
Portland, Oregon. 



» 928 20 
1 172 50 



*2,100 70 



The October report of the Amalga- 
mated Society of Carpenters shows 570 
Branches, aiid a total membership of 
37,133 with 35.583 in benefit. 

“ Simple Lessons in Drawing for the 
Shop,” by Orville H- Reynolds, is well 
worth the price of $1.00. It is a splendid 
book on mechanical drawing and sketch- 
ing. The charm of the book is in its sim- 
plicity. Mr. Reynolds was chief draughts- 
man, Northern' Pacific Railway. Send to 
the Debs Publishing Company, Terre 
Haute; Ind. 

A FRAUD EXPOSED. 

Albert Hague, a contractor of Scranton, Pa., 
is complained of by Union 71S of that city. 
1 1 agile .has left Scranton with a large sum of 
money belonging to his employees, He lias pro- 
hahly'gone to Jersey City to become a member 
of our order in that olty. Look out for him. lie 
is a short 'stout man, 135 pounds weight, light 
hair, blue eyes, fair complexion, and an exceed- 
ingly heavy moustache. 



AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

The Twelfth Annual Convention of the 
A. F. of L will be held in the Common 
Council Chamber, in old Independence 
Hall Philadelphia, Pa., December 12. 
1892. The Convention will be in session 
a full week and will deal with many im- 
portant questions of social, industrial and 
legislative importance to the working peo- 
ple of our common country. Right un- 
der shadow of the Old Liberty Bell, and 
at a momentous period of political change, 
the Federation meets at an auspicious 
time to the welfare of American labor. 
At this forthcoming Convention our 
United Brotherhood will be represented 
General Secretary P. J. McGuire, L. R. 
Carl, Auburn, N.Y.; J. J. Linehan, of Chi- 
cago, and R. C. Longsdon, St. Louis, Mo. 

KILLING ASA FINE ART. 

It is stated that there have been over 
seven hundred workmen killed on the 
World’s Fair Grounds, 342 having met 
death in the construction of the Fine Art 
Budding A number of them were mem- 
bers of our Order. 

AN IMPORTANT DECISION AS TO EM- 
PLOYERS' LIABILITIES. 

August Werner, a carpenter, has re -ov 
ered $20,000 against the contracting firm 
ot William Goldie A Son, ot Chicago In 
November, 1890, Werner fell from a scaf- 
fold, a distance ot twenty feet, and as a 
result both legs were partially paralyzed 
and he sustained other serious injuries. 
He sought $25,000 damages 8n a claim 
that defendants were responsible for a 
poorly and defectively constructed plat- 
form As a defense the contractors al- 
leged that Werner was one of the men 
who helped build the scaffold and he 
ought to have known that it wasuDsafe- 

TO UNION MECHANICS. 

Jacksonville, Fla., Nov. 7, 1802. 

Brothers do not come South this 
winter 

Every winter brings suffering and want 
both to the home mechanic and the 
stranger . 

Take Jacksonville with 17,000 popula 
tion and four hundred home carpenters 
and in the dull season 1,000 strangers 
rushing in from every State in the Union 
and Hooding the whole State the same 
way. This causes wages to go down, 
causes much suffering and want and fills 
cur chain gangs with white men whose 
only crime was in not having enough 
money to pay the fine for vagrancy. 

Before you decide to come South inves- 
tigate weil and see if it will pay you. The 
papers told you Jacksonville had a $500, 
000 fire one year ago., but they did not 
say anything' about six hundred carpen- 
ters walking the streets unable to get 
work at any price. Tampa and every 
town and city in the State has the same 
experience. Carpenter. 



REMEMBER THIS SCABBY CONCERN. 

The New York Lumber and Wood 
Working Company, of Batavia, N. Y., is 
an enemy of organized labor. It has 
broken up Carpenters’ Union No 13 of 
Batavia, N. Y. This company furnishes 
material very largely lor buildings in 
New \ r ork and Brooklyn. The Carpen- 
ters’ Unions in those cities should remem- 
berthis firm in its enmity to our organiza- 
tion. 



MOVING TO REDUCE THE HOURS. 



Fostoria, O.— Union 202 will ask the 
nine-hour rule April 1 next. 

Aurora 111. — Union 697 proposes to 
move for the nine hour day next spring.' 

Chattanooga - , Tenn. — Union 669 is 
growing at a rapid gait, and now is 
arranging to get the nine-hour day. 

New Orleans, La —The Carpenters’ 
Unions secured a general enforcement of 
the nine hour day November 1st on all 
house building operations. 

Orange, N. J. — Union 477 has the 
eight- hour rule on Saturdays well estab- 
lished, with nine hours a day the other 
five days of the week, making fifty-three 
hours per week. 

THE EIGHT-HOUR WORK DAY. 

[From the Freemason’s Jownal. ] 

While we do not propose to discuss in 
these columns the labor troubles of the day, 
nor to go outside masonry for editorial 
subjects, there seems to be a connection 
between the speculative masonry of past 
ages and the operative masonry of to-day 
which has been overlooked. 

There are various points of difference 
to-day in labor’s field between the em- 
ployers and the employed, points which 
have been the bone of contention in all 
the great labor battles of this century. 
Not the least important is the eight-hour 
work day. In many cases this concession 
has been made to the men willingly and 
without evasion ; in other cases the em- 
ployers while granting the request, have, 
by stipulations and reservations, practi- 
cally nullified their concession. It is this 
latter fact that has brought about the 
most hitter labor troubles in history. 
There is, however, a very old precedent 
for eight hours as a working day. 

Two thousand years ago, when King 
Solomon’s Temple was being erected, eight 
hours constituted a day’s work among the 
then operative maeons It is a notable fact 
that this structure, one of the grandest 
pieces of architectural art the world has 
ever known, one of the most intricate 
structures in its form and diverse as to 
material that the ingenuity of man has 
ever created, was erected with the least 
friction. Not even the sound of an axe, 
hammer, or other metal tool waB heard, 
and yet this was accomplished under a 
rigid eight hour law. 

To hew many entered apprentices does 
this fact present itself as they are invested 
with the working tools of the degree, the 
gauge and gavel? The gauge, divided 
into twenty-four equal parts, emblematic 
of the twenty -four hours of the day, 
“ which we are taught to sub divide into 
three equal partB, wherein we find eight 
hours fur our devotions, eight for refresh- 
ment and sleep and eight hours for our 
usual vocations. 

It operative Masons of to day would 
divide their time according to the rule of 
speculative Masonry and follow its tenets 
in this respect both they and the world 
would be much happier. 

TRUTHS TERSELY TOLD. 

A Scab, as a rule, is a narrow-minded, 
short-sighted, mule-headed creature, who 
lacks comprehension of the moetordinary 
questions of daily life. He has no idea of 
the bond of fraternity, he knows not the 
meaning of the word. , 

Snakes hies and geese cackle, and when 
you find a man in the labor movement 
who is always peddling scandal or con- 
demning some one put him down for one 
or the other.— Frank K. Foster, in the 
Boston Labor Leader. 

The Real Anarchists ara the asso- 
ciated capitalists. The unions, if de- 
stroyed, will be succeeded by aecret 
societies and the deeds of darkness which 
| have ever been associated therewith. 

I This is not a threat- it is but a warning 
i from the pages of history, ancient and 
modern. 

'fins Country is practically owned and 
! dominated by the railroads, and their 
power is tightening every day, and we 
cannot help ourselves. O ye«, they will 
keep on in their grasping for domain and 
power until there will be an uprising and 
a revolution, and it will be the people 
against the railroads, and when the peo- 
ple rise up something else has to go down. 
These ate the words of Cassius M. Clay. 



THE FUTURE OF MACHINERY. 

Advanced ideas in any Bphera of human 
endeavor are seldom received with favor, 
and the artisan or thinker, or whatever 
he may he, says the Mechanical News, who 
presumes to enlighten humanity upon 
truths which it is unprepared to receive is 
very apt to he treated with ostracism or 
contumely for his pains But as all pro- 
gress is made through sacrifice of soms 
kind or other, we may rest assured that 
the truth, be it social, economical, me- 
chanical or otherwise, will force its way 
despite all obstacles to a triumphant vic- 
tory. 

The truth of the foregoing, adds the 
Age of Steel, finds a splendid exemplifica- 
tion in tiie history ot mechanical pro- 
gression. The toiling thousands found it 
difficult to believe that the new innova- 
tions of machinery in their various oc- 
cupations would not leave them eventu- 
tually without anything to do, and in 
some cases there were those who strove to 
throw legislative stumbling blocks and 
other obstacles in the way of the unwel- 
comed competitor ofmanuai labor. With 
the lapse of years, however, the mists of 
ignorance and prejudice have been cleared 
away, and with the increase of wisdom 
garnered from observation and practical 
experience, the grimy- laced toilers in 
forge and mine and factory have learned 
to look upon machinery as the friendly 
ally rather than as the enemy of labor 
They have begun to see that the forces of 
production, however multiplied or im- 
proved, can never do any harm to man- 
kind, unless, by the maladministration 
of economic law s, they be turned from 
the service of the many to the exclusive 
benefit of the few-. 

With this truth fully grasped and com- 
prehended. the tendency of economists at 
the present time is to so shape the forces 
of production and distribution that this 
humane vi< w ot machinery in its rotation 
to humanity may find a full and complete 
realization. No man will ever starve be- 
cause there is too much to eat, and if all 
do not get what belongs to them it will 
not be because there is not enough , but for 
the reason that the product of hlieir labor 
has been unfairly administered in the pro- 
cess of distribution. So that whatever 
men stiller to-day in an economic wav, 
they have ceased to place the blame upon 
machinery, aDd have transferred it to the 
men who manipulate it to the advantage 
of themselves at the expense of their fel- 
lows. Instead of retarding mechanical 
progress, we are predicting for it an im- 
measurably wider field of activity, and 
are speculating upon its application to 
uses which a Bhort time ago we would 
have declared a man insane for daring to 
attempt. We are beginning to look upon 
machinery, in short, as a means by which 
man can realize his highest dignity, in 
mustering it into ourservicein those fields 
of industry where the labor we are called 
upon to do is brutalizing or otherwise in- 
jurious to the physical or moral constitu- 
tion of man. Hence it is that in silent 
rooms and in lonely garrets busy minds 
are to day painfully struggling to contrive 
mechanical appliances that will do away 
with all manual labor that overtaxes or 
devitalizes human energy in its perform- 
ance. The mechanical ideal has been 
lilted to a loftier plane, so that it is now 
intended that eventually aH unintellectual 
labor, all monotonous dull labor, all labor 
that deals with dreadlul things and in- 
volves unpleasant conditions, must he 
done by machinery. Machinery must 
work tor us in coal mines, do all sanitary 
services, he the stoker of steamers, clean 
the stree‘8 arid do all work that is tedious, 
filthy or extremely distressing, i here is 
no doubt, but that this is the future of 
machinery, and its realization, however 
far removed, will mark an epoch the most 
brilliant by far in the history of civiliza- 
tion. 



LABOR IS ON THE FREE LIST. 

There is no tarifl upon it). It can come 
daily in ship loads, swarming over the 
land and clutching the bread from the 
mouth» of the men who are here. In 
droves men troop to our shores until labor 
is the most plentiful commodity oflered 
for mouey. And the more abundant it 
becomes the cheaper it will be, just as 
sure as death and taxes. This is a fact 
that otdy a fool will blind his eyes to. 
Aud in this vein the Painters' Journal con- 
tinues : And what is the remedy ? Simply 
make labor scarcer by stopping this foreign 
drain here. How is that to be done? Give 
the laboring classes the benefit of the 
tarifl' as well as the nabobs. I’ut a duty 
upon imported labor, which will dam the 
tide and insure the pick of foreign immi- 
grants. let each man ami woman who 
comes to this Republic— an Ajcadiaalready 
discovered, settled, developed and refined 
for them— pay for the splendid privileges 
that our fathers fought lor, and this, gene- 
ration bled and paid for. 

■ f. ' 'i&J 







THE CARPENTER. 



The CARPENTER, 

OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of Am „rica. 

Published Monthly, on the Fifteenth of ch Month, 

AT 

144 N. Mnlh St., Phil»., Pa. 

P. J. McGuire, Editor and Publisher. 



Untere«! at the Post-Office at P' 'ladclphiu. Pa., 
a« se«.i>n«l-c!ass mi r. 

Subscription Pric e Fifty cent»« a year, iu 
advance. |Mistpuiil. 

Address all letter»« and moneys to 

P. .1. McGuire, 

Box H84, Philadelphia, Pa. 

PHILADELPHIA, NOVEMBER, 1892. 



_ ir nrucoAi cyFP. Correspondence relative to affairs in Chicago (etl fte bie ffielt mit ©etdllf* über fjfty u ,,4 

Sk::d in your vote as a Local Union on PROCEEDINGS Or Tilt btNLKAL tAtu- ^ liefore the Board for actio q. Decision of gtorbneie Tinge. 2Bie lange roerben f,* 1 ?' 
Sec. 53, as per circular sent out by G. UTIVE BOARD. ^ j,; b. ns Riven in letters to the o.s. was con- in ibren feiligfteTtunbnäcf) f 'en 2cb*nfintfr.l* 

S. on November 1. IMt The vote II.-M.» «TTV“ SSLF”’" *"» «W 

closes December 12, 1S92. 



UTIVE BOARD. o"k b aspiven in letters to the o. 8. was con- in ihren fceiliqften unb norfi^'cn 

B _. a F> R consisting of firmed, to tl.e effect. viz.-Chicago Iaaals shall fen ©C r d)ä»iflten no* be:f)0Ten Unb P* 

ÄÄ äl Mw ™ _ 

Dukehart, fore And this is in accordance with resolution iR fill „Sfflb“ «* 

Z' a„ B u.. « •> * £ ...he '■ *"- tfJUVÄK Snur r 

Laclede Hotel, St Louis, Mo. 11 a ‘ Suits of Paul Tliurmer of Turner Hall, St beiterO beontragte, ber I inf n Sir b»T It 

M/.k'nv «■«« fWtpri f hairniHii and S. J. Kent, nuns oi ram «»«niici ... ,, , . A n ‘rv ^ - CfM" 



Hugh McKay, E. Boston. Mass ; S. J 
coin. Neb ; D. P. Rowland, Cincinnati 



Havk you any spare change in your 

pockets? Then invest it in advance dues "T ’ ~ a nTi'iiä « 7 >»2 organizations, except Locals of tue i . snan Tiuu) utn iuuticn etreo i:onroner Staotia«. 

to your Union SO to not get into arrears The Bonnl met August* 1892 , at 8 P. M , at the be represented in any D. C. under our ^odjcn'Vä”^ bie SeruU fte’lV' 3 *‘ 

this winter and be out ot benefit. Laclede Hotel, st Louis, Mo. On ballot Hugh tion.^ ^ ^ Thurmer of x.irncr Hail, st beiters beantragte, ber t inen Hr bnn ,n ?f!5* 

Ixmis, for rent and damages, and of Mrs. Anna flefcbitrp f t ()atte. ^nbem ber 2‘Qa^(Tnroa!t 

Just the moment subsidized news- ;. ention ^ erer J lan dap P rovi. Bro. Kent was Kggli for death benefit bothcases pending in the etn »«fume \exnet inflate oob, faoteer: 

papers had lvinglv announced the Home- «„thorized to remain in St. Louis and secure 9t. Louis Courts were given due consideration. »nflwt blder It rt^eS Hni;.rp t n ji 

stead strike was over, the New Orleans settlement of mill men’s strike, and in case a O. S. was given full power to act according to ° fer 00ft 

the 



Convention, Augusts, 1892. 



20a$ ifl rin ,,2rab" * 

91ad) ben Shorten eire* i'onboner Staat*»» 

»ff« ht a bovialhn «rt» e- <% I/» 



Just the moment subsidized news- 



strike began. So, notwithstanding the settlement cannot be effected the sum of »100) best judgment. 

i .. , , ., additional be appropriated to aid the men on (t 

mendacity of such papers, it seems the K ^ _____ 

strike Ban<{UO will liOt 80 easily Ordered that two assessments often cents each 

4 4 down. ” be levied under Section »6 to cover deficiency on 

• • account of deatli benefits. >4»» ^ A 

Manv labor men favor workingmen August 9.— Bro. Kent ordered to visit flic D. C. - ■ » 

withdrawing from the militia, because of of st - Lo,,,s ,l,,d «quest ,h *' m ,,ot 10 a,,ow union 

1 . , j - carpenters to handle non-union mill work. 



(Continued on pa ge J.) 



JJcr Carpenter. 






[LABEC 



ELEVEN CHARTERS GRANTED. 

Since publication ol lait month’s paper 
charters have been granted the past 
month to eeven new unions and four re- 
organized, viz.: 250, Lake Forest, III.; 
255, Tipton, Ind.; 26.J, Salt Lake City, 
Utah (reorganized) ; 332, Los Angeles, Cal , 
(reorganized); 339, Dockland, Me.; 345, 
Battle (’reek, Mich, (reorganized); 3.58, 
N. Galveston, Tex.; 373, Lincoln, Neb. 



• . i t * . «. . uniLicmcin iu immiic uuirumuii 

late it has been used too often to coerce Q 8 instructe(1 to eecure 31i0 oo to be held in 
men on Strike. To our mind the best readiness for the mill men in case of need, 
course is for organized labor to Bwell the Bro. Kent wns given full power to settle the 
rankB of the militia, and when called out n,il * >ne n ' s strike of st. Louis, 
fraternize with the strikers. Then, in case ,°-, s : ln ' ,r ' K '‘ < '' 1 “T7T? ’"ll ?. e J' 

1 elect, in regard to bond of G. T., aH the G. h. JB , 

of necessity , snob officers like Snowden wiltpaM on the name at the October meeting, 
and Streator could get a dose of the lams Bro. M. A. Clemente, General Treasurer elect, 
treatment. failed to be present ot the conference of General 

— Officers ami G E. B. U»is date, eo the Board was 

unable to deal with matters concerning the office 

POST ELtCTICN THOUGHTS» Of G. T. ami adjourned until October 3, 1892. 

. Now the Trade Union Agitation can be October 3 — G. E. B. met at General Office, 
„„ 0 L„r *. . .« ■ i . 8 A. M. Bros. Swartz, Rowland and Dukehart 

pushed, that the political campaign is . „ , ’ .. . . „ . , 

^ ‘ present ; Kent and McKay aliscnt. The day 

• was s|>ent in auditing accounts of G. 8. for 
A campaign of social and economic Protective Fund, S|a*iial Assessment and Gen- 

education in behalf of labor's true inter- e,al 



finb Seibe — ber iianbeonertatlier, mieber 
Scab-Mii ücriporrercn 3eiten (rintr ’$ atf 
♦ei nfi&ltd) : aber fobalö >-er ^n e bc roifbxT- 
f)?r <ieft« lit iff, juerben fie oon beiben L'orteien 
gleidiwifria oerab^(6 f ut. 

fiilfe oonrötben, bann ift ber 2<- C b 
ber i'eftte. tcefdier fid) bereit ftntet, f tt ' w 
(elften; gilt t s aber etren Sort^etl u nefietr’. 
fo ift ber Scab ber (*rfte, ber harraeft q rei f t ' 



ests and real advancement is of more 



or st. Louis and revest them not u, ai.ow umo» ^ iUb e { a# 9lot)«mber, 1892. beM^MeffierAr fid) here in r CC& 

carpenters to handle non-union mill work. y y Oer ^epie. me 0) T |la) P ere It Tint-.t, )te 

g. s. instructed to secure » 1,000 to be held in « ..s erf f rfia f f I i rb r A ftifbift [eilten, gut fy aber e»_rcn ^nt tljeii undiern, 

readiness for the mill men in case of need. »«DerrfUttrHldlf« WfDlCf. ,o tft ber Scab bet^rfte, ber harraeft g rt jf,; 

Bro. Kent wns given fan power to settle the fjhj c Möbelarbeiter in Cincinnati baben ?^f ebon er nicht mttg'brl.en Iia 4 , uci iu h»« 
mill men’s strike of st. Louis. intfirem Strife für ßrringung bes 9ieun* °rgt n^ mr fit, füm« 

G. 8. inntriicted to oorref»]>ond with the G. T. ftunbcnsXciQä firt) Htir tttlt VCI), |tCQt Jua)t9 tib^T 

elect, in regard to bond of G. t. as the g. e. b , ^ 8a(f ^ inUfler Unionen in Softon haben etnen^ Vorüber J'heTben“"^^ h ” Jt 

W,n paason the same at the Gctobv-r mcetmg Qm ! . 9 f OOCm ber ben a<$tftiinbiflen 2lrbeitotag S, 5 "2S V4unbe S V - -fs u n ; 

Bro. M. A. Clemente, General 1 reasurer elect, • »-t ^ q-:« hnh.iflnOnn nut DOniJrU leine fV T eunoe / vine tlluie unb 

failed to be prvwnt at lit. ronfvrvnce of General »e”«'lKn. H it ein« 

Ofli.a'r. an.) <! E. B. thin date, ao the Boar.) u-aa "eunlt Siunhe foB ( nlim Ih«tl ll|te8 his. ® ort . _ b „ € cab ift fin » mäthr u-,.™ 

unable to deal with matters concerning the office * PlenrC^ ; erft P’rflUlft ft ^t’ine 5W itTlbCTtcr 

of G. T. and adjourned until Octobers, 1892. T)if Ätneticon (ffbetflt'.On 0) wflDOt Q0t ben bann Wifb ft felber t)0n feilten 

October 3.— o. K. B. met at General Offi«*, Setrag oon •f'JoO betuilligt, uni in ben^(^erich s oerfauft, b'ö ev fcbltefilid) non betb^tt 3 e ■ ten 
8 a. ,m. Bros. Swartz, Rowland and Dukehart ten beo Staates 3»nbiana gegen germffe ^aus »erachtet unb oon 2lUen oerlaffen n’ b. j* r 
present; Kent and McKay absent. The day Unternehmer in (^ItDoob, njelc^e bas 'Jlc^t* 0cab ift tuncidift fein eigener ,'eir. f 
was s|K«nt in auditing actouiiLs of G. 8. for ftunben (5Jefe$ »erleben, einen leftfall jut Kyeinb feiner Mittoel! unb ^einb b r 
Protective Fund, Special Assessment and Gen- Gntfctyeibung ju bringen. --ncdi 2lnficht ber T’a^eo Unionificu." 

crai Fund. £ag ^aupguartier ber Stgar Mafers’ Jn-- ■ ■ - ■ ■ 

October i.-Aii present, except Bro. McKay, temationalllnion roirb mit Stnfang nächten 
Rules of order for government of new G. E. B. 



N. Galveston, Tex.; 373, Lincoln, Neb. . , Rules of order for government of new G. e. B. Don Buffalo nach (Shicago uerlegt ROOF FRAMIMfi MAflF FAQV 

(reorganized) ; 390, Fitchburg Ma6e (re- ' alue tlian tIle eucce6s ol an 7 political adopted. The day was taken up with auditing roerben. 2luch hüt bie genannte Crgani'ation ' nlVIlliO IVInL/LLno.i 

i i i 4. rii. . n i Am wi a iuri t o x. k I iiJJVP nrPnn ff-f 1 a nf*\r an/i rnnv.ikto 



organized); 38S, Dover, N. J., and 40b 
Rahway, N. J. 

OFFICIAL NOTICES. 

Membership cards for 1893— 18’.»4 are 
now ready. 



party. the books an«i accounts of the General otiire. bie liTridjtuna eines illten^ein!^, nac§ bem ^ have prepared a new and complete 

For on the spread and dissemination ot Oitober » —Audit of books and accounts of Seiipiel ber Jutemational Tnpographical ofobiaining bevels and lyn^ths 

correct knowledge amomr the working General otii.-c couiinued. Union, befchloffen unb ftnb ihr troei hierfür ol hip and vallev rafters and root work, 

, ^ ® Communication from National Builders’ Asso- lehr geeignete gro§e f^runbflürfe, baä eine in ar, o the nior«' difficult or harder the root 

ni.is.-es depends their own emancipation, ciation. report of their Committee mi Arbitration (Solorobo (5ift), bc«j oubere in Monte 2Ufta. is to frame, t he nuv e value this is to < ar- 

I hat knowledge should consist of a and text of agreement in negotiations between Colo , ppn Bürgern ber betreffenben 3tdote It is easily learned. I furc-h 

proper unilerstanding as to labor s rights employing bunders and journeymen was sub- gratiö offerirt roorber. 3 separate drawing of both hip and v Ley 

and duties, -the right to share in man’s •“«««* to B. and endomed » tending to ' u e b e r hunbert 3aftre beflanb bie fchroarje nirLt^'f 2 rco, ? ipan ^ ied with fui; « x- 

* Sflouerei hier im 2 an be, aber fein 6Haoen« P'^ation of drawings. Sa isfacticn ge.r- 

°f finfier mor im i 3 .tnnh» mi» c»ir(a «iia.- f-:. ar.teed or money reliiTided. B\ sei ? 



...... promote the best interests of employer and em- 

bn th right to the soil, free from monopoly ,, lovee in ,, u . blindi ng trades. The response of 



New Constitutions will he ready De- or pnvilege-the right to a currency free ourG.s. in mknowi. dging communication of 5« 0f (aJ e n Tinf ^fflioiT^oUarä anjuhäu^ 
imoer lö, 1ÖJ2. from debasement by the arts of the National Builders was heartily approved and f en Stber in ben 28 Aahten nach ber Sfla= 



cember 15, 1892. ironi debasement by the arts of the ««i'“» 1 “ «"Uders was heartily approved and f en ^ 5 er in ben og fahren na$ ber "Sfla* 

F.»» gold-plated pins cost S3 cents usurer money monger or Shyloek-ths ^t M,d .„d 

each; watch charms $1.25. Both have nght to en,0 - v t0 the fulleBt de g r ^ the over for further consideration. ... 1 1 n A ' * l) n'n ^ n ^ ^ 

the emblem ot the U. B. and are durable fruits ol honest t01 ’ w *thout the competi- October 6 -in ap,»eal of Union 3«. Brooklyn, ncn ^ 2 oo Millionen Xollars beiben 
and good. tlon or debasement ol labor, or its en- n • v.. against d c.of New ^York, o.s. instructed beroeift, bnfe bie aeaenroär iae »orm ber 

slavement to the private interests of stock to " et j“ re f '"»i , cr miormation. «Sffauerei oiel fc^limmer ift, als bie alte je 

tJ 1 ‘JerZ FtZ^oandL»;!, 11 ' “ 1 "»-Po'««. P™«t grabbsrs an,! t 

n, trench, Scandinavian and privileged classes. «lisabiiity claim for uoo, wiyok he allege* he ia t ? er Äongrefe ber Sauar« 

KrthAmian anonanma tnll Ln ,1 n ... .t' AS4 » hot tar non ai w 



F.s. gold-plated pins cost S3 cents “30™, «noney monger or Shylock-the 
«ach ; watch charms $1.25« Both have r1 ^ 1 0 fullest degree the laid over for further consideration. 



. Butvtsintriii tu nie privaie lnierests oi block 

New Constitutions and New Rituals in jobbers, monopolists, profit grabbers and 
the German, I rench, Scandinavian and privileged claves. 



p l , * — — »••cwFiiiwj uniiu mi » hju m ue illlfgfS lie 18 

an anguageß will be ready soon These three cardinal rights in\oive en ^^e<i to, the Board decide they have no juris- 



— — — — .«J • 4» » VSI » V • # — 

alter January 1, 1893. other r j g hts, the enjoyment of which will ,H,,,ion - a, " , <a,,no * compromise a claim after 

Assessments Nos. 4 and 5, of 10 cents K 1 ™ *> the working people the fullest inR 0 . E . as w „ done in this pa p ticular 
each, or 20 cents tor both, have been freedom ami the greatest measure of case. 

levied November 1, 1892. Locals should happiness. Letter from Bro. McKay received explaining 

send in these assessments without delay. To establish these rights requiies the “*"*■»«* account ofaevere iiine«« of his wife. 

you are opposed to further assessments performance of certain duties. There e. b. in thi«* instance, 
then vote for Sec. 53 and adopt it. should be “ no rights without duties.” Preparation of bond for Bro. Clements, <;. t. 

Agitate this coming winter hv nublic Lab ° r ’ 8 ^ d,U - V is to regard- consi.icred. G. E. B. decide that g t. 

” J * ^ 1al-o i • •. eleci Mini 1 nr» vi* u n i ndemnit v hnnd in wnm .j 



, -'«7 „‘"trucifii 3J 00 betoeift, ba6 bie «egemtiir ige Rorra ber 

“TT f " H ' ,,r t 7T?' - ,„. . en«ewi »w («tHmmrr ifl, als bie alte je 

On tile proposition of A. Loftus, of Union 8, qeroelert ' 1 

Philadelphia, to accept »200 in full payment for ‘ m a • 

disability claim for »400, wbjoh he alleges he is , : ® * Jt 0 1 1 0 n a I e HOftjireB ber 39auat< 

entitle«! to. the Board decide they have no juris- - ^ in 99orbtaur 

•lii-tioii, ami cannot compromise a claim after 1^®.* Ütlb, ()üt ftC^ füt folactlbc SWabnctlfficn 

disapproval by both a Convention and a prece«l- ®B 9 8 e 'P ro ^ e B • L bligatoriitbc Unfalloer* 
ing G. E. B., as was done in this particular Bw®rU11g auf .Hoffen ber Unttme f)iner mit 



.... .iw., w.iimn vuiupiuuiipu ia vmuii aitri ^ f ■ w -. r ~ 

disapproval by both a Convention and a prece«l- ®B ö 8 e 'P ro ^cn . L bllgatonfcbc Unfallocrs 
ing G. E. B., as was done in this particular I, ^ Ä Often ber Unfemufltner mit 

ca**. ffoatlt^er 8eraniroortlic$ffit gegenüber b«n 

Letter from Bro. McKay received explaining ^frbettenLlInterbtÜCfung bet ofürfatbeit. 9lc* 
absence on account of severe illness of bis wife. J®rtn be r OURebsgeticflte, Regelung ber Vof)n : 



twenty cents by postal note or stam; s I 
will send post paid to any address, ore 
copy if sent for in ninety days. 

THOS. GRl'RR, 

Member of Union 68 
Box 287. Des Moines, Iowa 

Phii.adei.chia. P\. 

Bro. Orcbb: 

I I tave examined your method of roof fram- 
ing an«i tin«l it «piite practical and worthy of 
patronage. 

P. J. McGl'ICE. 

(wrntral S*CTftn*y. 

FIRST-CLASS BOOKS! 



meetings or festivals! Prepare at once 
to do so. Stir up non union men and 
your own members, too. Let there be a 
campaign of trade union education now 
that the political “campaign of educa- 
tion ” is over ! 



tudee of life, until men and women are 
Correspondence relating to the affairs free from the haunting spectre of poverty 
of a Local Union and intended for and all its privations, 
answer by the G. S. should come Furtlmr its 1. 



answer by the G. S. should come 
through the Recording Secretary of the 
Local. Otherwise do nob expect the G. 
S. to answer, as the mail to the General 
Office is large enough. 



Ho 1 race, creed, or politics, and insist ^«11-givc a,, indemnity bond in the »um of Joau9erocm ®uöbre#enben 

on fairer chances m life. Its duty is to Hamilton Co., Ohio, or state of Ohio, said in- Die Gonoention ber 9tationaDDr. 
discuss all the slavish con«iitions allecting «ienmity bond t*> be given to secure bond by some (f®nifiUion ber MulesSpinners cinq am 5. 
its social status. Its duty is to combine reliable trust company in county of pbiia.ici- Oftober 3U fnbe. 2)ie Üeiträaefür bie lien« 

for self-protection in trade unions and pllilV Kx i u ‘" ! ‘ e ofsai ‘ 1 ,,on ‘f *« h e i*Hid out of fr® Haffe rourben von 10 auf 20 6ent«j per 
assiRt PRch nthor in fbo •• • General Kund, as per orders of General Convet- -9« »tbit erhöbt, ferner limtben $100 )Ur 21 \- 

assist each other in the countless vicissi- tion . and tllP «a, ary of General Treasurer to b e »®«on für ben se&nftiinbigen »rbfiiStaq in 

tudee o- life, until men and women arc as provided in Section 33 of Constitution. Sfljobe ^slanb aitqerotefen. (fer 3 ftetär 

free from the haunting spectre of poverty Communioation from Union »\s, itochestcr, ferner beauftragt, für ?of)ner^öbun« 

and all its privations. * i*»- on constitutional points, g. e. B. decide! P cn <n MafTatfiufetfö unb Mebuftion ber roö* 

Further its dutv i« ir, «tond ;« ^ i under 8ecl,on 13 of Constitution, that it $cnUw$en 9lrbeit6ftunben in Ülero .'öampibire 

i- urtiier, its duty is to stand in the work- ia imperative for i,ocais of one Ci. V to belong to ” on 60 «if 58 per 2Bo$e ;u aqitiren 

shop. mine, factory and everywhere as a one D.C. There is nothing to prevent the said 



tare, 2ld)iftünbiger Slrbei ötaq, »bfcbaffunq ! 

bet Stfforbarleit, SSerbot, in ben »erfen metr CHEAP - USEFUL AND PRACTICAL. 

at# ein 3?bnte| auölänbUcbe Arbeiter tu be* 

Wbaftigeit, Örünbung finer Aaffe §ur Unter* bell’a Carpentry Made Easy f* oo 

ttu^unq ber tnt 33augeroerbe aipjbrecbenben The bcu.der’s gcide and estimator’s 

Streifs. " Price Book. Hodgson 2 0# 

_ . The Steel Sqcare. and How to Use It. I 'JO 



Further, its duty is to stand in the work- 
shop, mine, factory and everywhere as a 



unit for shorter hours of toil, for better 1)1 C * fro,n embracing more territory than one 
pay. better treatment and proper recogni- city if ^ w>«wh«ere.i expedient by the Locals inter- 
tion of its true moral and material worth. 



Jie L'age in «uflralicn. 

ie L'aqc ber 3immerer in 2(uffralien roiib 



Uffice tfi large enough. . . , , . . b ested, and the local conditions warrant «n,.i. — . „ . 

. , ‘ " K° ral EDd Ulatenahvorth - action. When a member leaves the jurisdiction in ^"ffralien iPltb 

There is a misprint in the recent cir- U should also be a unit at the polls on of his own Local be should provide liimself with 0 if f, ! ,! < 1 ^ ~ Urt ^ bie 1* tat fr 
cular of November 1, from the General e * ei t ion day to elect men in the councils a clearance, as provided iu Sections 113 and r>o ftorf h A*h C * ^ r 9 an,,at,on berfelben 
Office. The reference in it to “assess- of Nation and State, who will he obedient while a member’s due card is evidence that L T iroieilnr/ffit **1 5 «f ftC 33e,DO ° 

r- N ° 8 : , ! r 4 r -r“ hav? — ‘ir r" au,! n : ,s i ~- 

‘assessments Nos. 2 and 3.” The latest The leeeon of Solidarity of Labor inter- h e works, it is deemed best by the g k b " od > l^Mter qebnt. e!)e f;e jur »cHnnung 
assessments Noe. 4 and 5 are numbered ^ts must be taught and practietd. New th.t Locals in the vicinity of a large city should .°™ men un ^J« Siotljipenbigfcitbeo «nuöluf» 

4 - _ “..WM..* nil ncn '),orh rt»t N 44. rv P r » 'v 



f a 1 1 ^ r <~iH u, muuun oeruuoen 

ftarf bur^broeben. 3)aö iff ber beffe Seroe o 
bariu^ rote Unrest Tiejeniqen baben, roeldje 
ber ,^iV mn9ftnb - com »ff e öen Arbeitern erft 



Practical Carpentry. Ho«igson. ... 1 OP 

Stair-Biti.dinu Made Easy. Hodgson. 1 0 0 
Hand Railing Made Easy .... 1 00 

Illustrated Architectural and Me- 
chanical Drawing-Book. A Self-In- 

struiXor. with 300 Illm-irittions 100 

The Carpenter’s and Builder's Com- 
plete Companion 2 50 

Address p. J. McCUIRE, 

Box 884, Philadelphia Pa 






correctly. 



| Orleans points the way. When white ^ represented in the D. ^ C. of that city, so mem- 



^G/STER^ 

This is a Facsimile of the LABEL of the 



mpn of tlio <r>nfh »» ill bers will be given sufficient latitude in working 

All Signs— both Entering and Retiring thetic strik r r ti • i ° n Hympa ' outside of the jurisdiction of their own Locals 

igns- dispensed with in our U.u , f ^ rth « r colored uo workers, without the necessity of taking out clearances or 



Signs—" dispensed with in our U. II. 
The mo» 4 4 Remember your Obligation ’ ’ 
and the use of Odes are dispe nsed with. 
The current password is all that ie neces- 
sary to enter the meetings. The office of 
Preceptor is likewise abolished. The 
New Ritual ie our only Ritual and the 
Locals must cease using the Old Ritual. 



the “ Bloody Shirt ” has indeed given wav transferring their membership. Hence Ur 

. . » . * ns ta _ i . vx • 



- - «« ‘Mwugivcuwiiy v.umv. ou . f . Jience union Kmhau« ««w u r • • JJ iuiu 

to the greater issue of the Kagged Shirt 368 » Rochester, Pa., is recommended to retain iu fV«?a>L r0 ^^ tn ^ e \ nen ^ ür öie* 

HnniAictn .1 1 i m * membership in the D. C. of Pittsburgh 1C10C 3U tlttDCn. SlC 9t?beit0?eit ift 48 Stun* 

Huiiiestea.l, Coal Creek, Teanewee, the E.il,n.t. or . ?« Wr »Ode. Set tarifmäki., «„LTSK 



ltd an ben Qicibaub rinfebett $e i^ letter Facsimile of the label of the 

gSSaass: UNITED HATTERS 

aejnm.ijen, ™le «rtSiaftat“ «‘bw'sHertt 0F K0ET " AMEKICA - 

KftnAAM «imW r • -=4. .. _ u 1 4 i rru _ t .1 . ... _ « 



„ ’ uie I Estimate of Union 54, Cli.cago 111. for n,'. t 

»Ul alo switchmen, C" Ur D’Alene, and j ing Bohemian Constitutions, referred to G S 



and all the movements of the past six to procure further estimates and let the job to the 



only Ritual a„,,Z ^ 

• .» n1 , . . wijJ only wdru lrom them. rh6Rf pvpntR .»•. . . » 

IDS the Old Ritual . . .. a Litre events Hitual adopte»! 



fnh b «ir?°? C ’ ? Cr tarifm äÜ>ae 2cbn rotrb 
l^roanft jrot|cben fi unb 9 o^iUmq 



wi,l only learn from them. Theseevents v <"T T I,,d ’ ob > c »» to new 
are arousing the public to deep and preg- g. e. b. decide that they have no jurisdicihm 



OF NORTH AMERICA. » 

The Ijüienins receive«! the indorsement of the 
General Executive Board of the K. of L. a i of 
the American Federation of I nl««r. 

W’The Labt'l is. placed or t very uni« • '-inad* 
hat before it leaves the work man's bait« 1 -. 1 • 
dealer takes a laliel from one Im ami j»Im* « ^ ,D 
another, or lias any dctaelicd lalwlsiu hi- “ter®» 
do not buy from him, as his labels may re < a* 
terfeit and his hats may be the product of s ah i>: 
non-union labor. 

Beware of Counterfeits. Sometlm«'“ th. ' Are 



4 /..IU 1 , ..V, I .win-, nit-, 1 11U ODICCtS to non. . nn • . . - —— Ul. uav UIUI U® IUC UlUUUlOMr .. 

Ritual adopted at St. Louis Convention. The ^«3 SSl^flgflc bon 0«Cn Srogfll. non-umon l a ^ Imr 

G. E. B. decide that they have no jurisdiction ffieltfje 3freiffraqe in ber SBelf nb n ( printed on white paper and sometimes oi: ' 

and have no power to set aside the will of the VOlttijcfiem, rechtlichem relifliofem bttr 4 , QU o“ P »T r ' a general thing they are n.»t i- —sted 

( onvention. and see no other recourse for Union imffepidiaitlirii mu °»' the edges. A eoui terfeit label wltn !■« ^ 

90 than to acouicsee in tl„. „ui r .. lü 9ieniCI)aTtIlCtj.>in,fe^!HÖCf)ein Ober tnerfuntiL e ^ Ke(> hM ,atel >’ it* appearanc«. It - rger 

, ... .. ° ma .i°rity. Cnt (Gebiet Ober